Yale, Osborn, others

Osborn MS a 5

Copy, in a neat italic hand, with (ff. 1r-6v) an ‘Introduction’ beginning ‘From worldly cares and wanton loues conceipt’, with a patterned title-page partly in gold, ‘The Pathe to Paradise’, iv + 27 quarto leaves, in 19th-century paper boards. c.1600.

SoR 267.92: Robert Southwell, S.J., Catholic Saint, A Foure-fold Meditation: of the foure last things (‘O wretched man, which louest earthlie thinges’)

Inscribed on the title-page ‘Mary Yeate’. A pasted-in slip ‘The Rev. Charles Churchill [fl.1845, Wesleyan missionary], Halifax, Nov Scotia, requests your acceptance of this manuscript found on board a vessel wrecked off the coast of Bermuda’.

First published, as ‘By R: S. The author of S. Peters complaint’, in London, 1606. The poem is more commonly ascribed to Philip Howard (1557-95), first Earl of Arundel, Catholic Saint, with whom Southwell was acquainted (see McDonald, pp. 6-7, 121-2). EV17760.

Osborn MS a 6

A quarto miscellany of Catholic verse and prose, in the hand of Peter Mowle (b.1554), entitled ‘Sartain Most Holsome Meditations Verey Meete to Bee Dulie Considered’, iv + 38 pages; once bound with a commonplace book of Nicolas Hanslopp, of Attleborough, dated 1 January ‘1595’ but with dates between 1618 and 1622, now disbound. c.1595.

Inscribed names ‘Robert Worral’, ‘John Radford’, and ‘William Sutton, His Booke’.

Discussed, with facsimile examples, in Earle Havens, ‘Notes from a Literary Underground: Recusant Catholics, Jesuit Priests, and Scribal Publication in Elizabethan England’, PBSA, 99 (December 2005), 505-38 (p. 525 et seq.).

pp. 1-22

SoR 267.93: Robert Southwell, S.J., Catholic Saint, A Foure-fold Meditation: of the foure last things (‘O wretched man, which louest earthlie thinges’)

Copy, untitled, subscribed ‘Finis P M’, preceded by an epistle ‘To ye right honorable, ye Ladie vicount Hereford...this first of ianuarie, Anno 1595’.

First published, as ‘By R: S. The author of S. Peters complaint’, in London, 1606. The poem is more commonly ascribed to Philip Howard (1557-95), first Earl of Arundel, Catholic Saint, with whom Southwell was acquainted (see McDonald, pp. 6-7, 121-2). EV17760.

Osborn MS a 25

Copy, in a professional secretary hand, untitled, on 133 quarto pages, in contemporary vellum gilt. Late 16th-early 17th century.

MrT 106: Sir Thomas More, William Roper's Life of Sir Thomas More

Once owned by William Say (d.1529), a family friend of the Mores. Christie's, June 1972.

First published in London, 1626. Edited, as The Lyfe of Sir Thomas Moore, knighte, written by William Roper Esquire, by Elsie Vaughan Hitchcock (EETS, London, 1935).

Osborn MS a 41

A quarto copy of (?) Richard Verstegan's Declaration of the true causes of the great troubles presupposed to be intended against the realm of England (1592), in several secretary hands, untitled, 40 leaves (plus blanks), in contemporary calf (rebacked). c.1590s.

Inscribed on f. iv‘Lib. Edwi. Mangin. This volume was inspected by the Revd. and learned Joseph Hunter [(1783-1861), scholar and antiquary], who said it did not contain anything of moment - sufficient to make amends for the trouble of reading it’.

f. 37v

RaW 378.5: Sir Walter Ralegh, Epitaph on the Earl of Salisbury (‘Here lies Hobinall, our Pastor while ere’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Here lyes ye worthy warrier / thar neuer blouded sword’.

First published in Francis Osborne, Traditionall Memoyres on the raigne of King Iames (London, 1658). Works (1829), VIII, 735-6. Latham, p. 53.

Of doubtful authorship according to Latham, p. 146, and Lefranc (1968), p. 84.

Osborn MS c 102

Commonplace book of Lady Christian Kerr (b.1679), 205 folio pages. c.1716-30.

p. 26

HoJ 38: John Hoskyns, Absence (‘Absence heare my protestation’)

Copy of the last stanza, beginning ‘By absence this good mean I gain’.

First published in Francis Davison, A Poetical Rapsody (London, 1602). The Poems of John Donne, ed. Herbert J.C. Grierson, 2 vols (Oxford, 1912), pp. 428-9. Osborn, No. XXIV (pp. 192-3).

Osborn MS c 111

A verse miscellany, in a single hand, in calf. c.1700s.

p. 60

DoC 326.999: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On the Death of the Duke of Gloucester (‘For Gloucester's death, which sadly we deplore’)

Copy.

Recorded in Harris.

First published in Tom Browne, Remains (London, 1720), p. 143. Edited and discussed in Harris, pp. 184-5. Possibly by another Lord Dorset.

Osborn MS c 125/4

A composite volume of MSS. Late 17th century.

Inscribed and possibly once owned by the Scottish advocate John Spotiswood (1666-1728). Pickering & Chatto, sale catalogue No. 353 (1953), item 655.

[unspecified page numbers]

HaG 19: George Savile, First Marquess of Halifax, The Character of a Trimmer

Copy, in a professional hand, on 133 quarto pages.

This MS collated in Brown, I, 345-96.

First published, ascribed to ‘the Honourable Sir W[illiam] C[oventry]’, in London, 1688. Foxcroft, II, 273-342. Brown, I, 178-243.

Osborn MS c 139

A verse miscellany, comprising Volume I of ‘A Collection of Poems’ by Thomas Binns of Liverpool, paginated 4 to 625, including an index. 1789.

pp. 124-5

HrG 220.5: George Herbert, The Quip (‘The merrie world did on a day’)

Copy, subscribed ‘From Herberts Poems 5th. Edition printed in the year 1638’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 110-11.

pp. 126-7

HrG 82.5: George Herbert, Dialogue (‘Sweetest Saviour, if my soul’)

Copy, subscribed ‘From the same’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 114-15.

pp. 128-9

HrG 18.5: George Herbert, Antiphon (II) (‘Praised be the God of love’)

Copy, subscribed ‘From the same’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 92-3.

pp. 130-2

HrG 32.6: George Herbert, Businesse (‘Canst be idle? canst thou play’)

Copy, subscribed ‘From the same’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 113-14.

pp. 133-4

HrG 181.8: George Herbert, The Method (‘Poore heart, lament’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 133-4.

pp. 135-6

HrG 58.5: George Herbert, Clasping of hands (‘Lord, thou art mine, and I am thine’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 157.

p. 137

HrG 34.5: George Herbert, The Call (‘Come, my Way, my Truth, my Life’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 156.

pp. 138-9

HrG 85.5: George Herbert, Discipline (‘Throw away thy rod’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 178-9.

pp. 140-1

HrG 95.5: George Herbert, The Elixir (‘Teach me, my God and King’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 184-5.

p. 142

HrG 102.8: George Herbert, L'Envoy (‘King of Glorie, King of Peace’)

Copy.

pp. 143-83 passim

WiG 21.9: George Wither, Haleluiah, or, Britains Second Remembrancer (‘Come, oh come in pious Laies’)

Extracts, comprising six hymns and religious meditations.

First published in London, 1641. Spenser Society, Nos 26-27 (1879; reprinted in New York, 1967).

See also WiG 47.

Osborn MS c 142

A miscellany compiled by Thomas Binns. 1799.

p. 401

DrW 227.5: William Drummond of Hawthornden, Sonnet (‘I Know that all beneath the Moone decayes’)

Copy.

First published in Poems (Edinburgh, 1616). Kastner, I, 4.

Osborn MS c 144

A quarto commonplace book of verse extracts, 340 pages (including blanks), in a small neat hand. Mid-18th century.

p. 110

CgW 1: William Congreve, Doris (‘Doris, a Nymph of ripe Age’)

Copy of lines 49-64, headed ‘Character of a Jilt’ and beginning ‘Peculiar therefore is her Way’.

First published in Works (London, 1710). Summers, IV, 142-3. Dobrée, pp. 285-7. McKenzie, II, 370-1.

passim

DrJ 398: John Dryden, Extracts

Extracts.

passim

MnJ 145: John Milton, Extracts

Osborn MS c 152

A quarto verse miscellany, in a neat probably female hand, 76 pages (including blanks) plus twelve tipped-in letters etc., in contemporary calf gilt. c.1732-47.

Inscribed on f. [iv] ‘This Book was given me by Dear Mrs Ogle January ye 15 1747’, to which is added in another hand ‘Widow of the late George Ogle Esqr. and Daughter of Sir Thomas Twisden’. Inscribed on the same page inverted ‘My Brother Wilm & Family came to My Mother April ye 26 1808. Richd From May ye 26 1808 left July ye 10th’, and on the front paste-down ‘Mary Dyott 10 Febry 1782’ . Dated on page 1 1732.

p. 43

DkT 36.5: Thomas Dekker, Vpon her bringing by water to White Hall (‘The Queene was brought by water to White Hall’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon the Removal of Queen Elizabeth's Body from Richmond where She died to White-Hall, by Water where she lay in State’.

First published in The Wonderfull yeare (London, 1603). Reprinted in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1614), and in Thomas Heywood, The Life and Death of Queene Elizabeth (London, 1639). Grosart, I, 93-4. Tentatively (but probably wrongly) attributed to Camden in George Burke Johnston, ‘Poems by William Camden’, SP, 72 (December 1975), 112.

Osborn MS c 158

A quarto miscellany of verse and prose, ix + 484 pages, in contemporary vellum. Entitled (p. iv) ‘A Miscellany of various things Being A Collection of rarities / In two Books / the First Book is cheifly Composed of Ænigma's Dialogue Epigrams Epitaphs Fragments of Dr. Latimers Sermons Poems Satyra, songs, Love verces & other accations &c...Collected from ye year 1697 to ye year 1728 per: Jer: Cliff Apoth; at Tenterden In Kent’. c.1728.

Inscribed (p. 484) ‘Sarah Cliff Her Book July ye 18 1741 Given her By her father’.

p. ix

RoJ 238: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, On Rome's pardons (‘If Rome can pardon sins, as Romans hold’)

Copy.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 161-2. Walker, pp. 127-8, among ‘Poems Possibly by Rochester’. Love, p. 247, among Disputed Works.

p. 105

DaJ 152.3: Sir John Davies, An Epitaph (‘Here lieth Kitt Craker, the kinge of good fellowes’)

Copy of a version, headed ‘Epitaph ye 20th upon a Bellows Maker of Oxford’ and beginning ‘Here lies John Crucker a maker of Bellows’.

A version, ascribed to John Hoskyns, first published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1605). Krueger, p. 303. Edited in The Life, Letters, and Writings of John Hoskyns 1566-1638, ed. Louise Brown Osborn (New Haven & London, 1937), p. 170.

Osborn MS c 160

Verse miscellany. Early 18th century.

Previously owned by John Wilson (1719-83) of Broomhead Hall. Later Phillipps MS 17695. Later owned by C.K. Ogden (1887-1957) and sold at Sotheby's, 31 July 1962, lot 619, to Dobell.

ff. 1r-8r

MaA 358: Andrew Marvell, The Second Advice to a Painter (‘Nay, Painter, if thou dar'st design that fight’)

Copy.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 34-53. Lord, pp. 117-30. Smith, pp. 332-43. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 28-32, as anonymous.

The case for Marvell's authorship supported in George deF. Lord, ‘Two New Poems by Marvell?’, BNYPL, 62 (1958), 551-70, but see also discussion by Lord and Ephim Fogel in Vol. 63 (1959), 223-36, 292-308, 355-66. Marvell's authorship supported in Annabel Patterson, ‘The Second and Third Advices-to-the-Painter’, PBSA, 71 (1977), 473-86. Discussed also in Margoliouth, I, 348-50, and in Chernaik, p. 211, where Marvell's authorship is considered doubtful. A case for Sir John Denham's authorship is made in Brendan O Hehir, Harmony from Discords: A Life of Sir John Denham (Berkeley & Los Angeles, 1968), pp. 212-28.

ff. 8r-9v, 16r-v

MaA 387: Andrew Marvell, The Third Advice to a Painter (‘Sandwich in Spain now, and the Duke in love’)

Copy, the envoy here ascribed to Denham.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 67-87. Lord, pp. 130-44. Smith, pp. 346-56. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 32-3, as anonymous.

See discussions of the disputed authorship of this poem, as well as of the ‘Second Advice’, cited before MaA 314.

ff. 16v-19r

MaA 420: Andrew Marvell, The Fourth Advice to a Painter (‘Draw England ruin'd by what was giv'n before’)

Copy, here ascribed to Denham.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 140-6, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 33-5, as anonymous. Regarded as anonymous in Margoliouth, I, 348-50.

ff. 19v-22r

MaA 433: Andrew Marvell, The Fifth Advice to a Painter (‘Painter, where was't thy former work did cease?’)

Copy, here ascribed to Denham.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 146-52, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 35-6, as anonymous. Regarded as anonymous in Margoliouth, I, 348-50.

ff. 95r-94v rev.

RoJ 602: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Upon Nothing (‘Nothing! thou elder brother even to Shade’)

Copy.

Collated in Walker and in Love, ‘The Text of Rochester's “Upon Nothing”’.

First published, as a broadside, [in London, 1679]. Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 118-20. Walker, pp. 62-4. Harold Love, ‘The Text of Rochester's “Upon Nothing”’, Centre for Bibliographical and Textual Studies, Monash University, Occasional Papers 1 (1985). Love, pp. 46-8.

Osborn MS c 166

A miscellany of anecdotes and verse, in a single hand. c.1730.

p. 293

RnT 473: Thomas Randolph, The Combat of the Cocks (‘Go, you tame gallants, you that have the name’)

Copy.

(Sometimes called A terible true Tragicall relacon of a duell fought at Wisbich June the 17th: 1637.) Published, and attributed to Randolph, in Hazlitt, I, xviii. II, 667-70. By Robert Wild.

Osborn MS c 176

An octavo verse miscellany, 186 pages, in contemporary calf. c.1728.

p. 38

CgW 32.9: William Congreve, A Pindarique Ode Humbly Offer'd to the Queen On the Victorious Progress of Her Majesty's Arms, under the Conduct of the Duke of Marlborough (‘Daughter of Memory, Immortal Muse’)

Copy, headed ‘Song’.

First published in London, 1706. Summers, IV, 82-91. Dobrée, pp. 335-41. McKenzie, II, 419-23.

p. 124

WaE 132.5: Edmund Waller, Of a Lady who writ in Praise of Mira (‘While she pretends to make the graces known’)

Copy.

First published in Workes (1645). Thorn-Drury, II, 2.

p. 180

RoJ 121: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Impromptu on Charles II (‘God bless our good and gracious King’)

Copy of a version headed ‘King Charles's Epitaph. By the E: of Roch:’ and beginning ‘Here Lyes our Sovereign the King’.

First published, in a version headed ‘Posted on White-Hall-Gate’ and beginning ‘Here lives a Great and Mighty Monarch’, in The Miscellaneous Works of the Right Honourable the Late Earls of Rochester and Roscommon (London, 1707). Vieth, p. 134. Walker, p. 122, as ‘[On King Charles]’.

Osborn MS c 186

A quarto verse miscellany, in a single hand, 154 pages. c.1760.

pp. 49-50

SeC 14: Sir Charles Sedley, The Doctor and his Patients (‘There was a prudent grave Physician’)

Copy.

First published in Miscellaneous Works (London, 1702). Sola Pinto, I, 45-6.

Osborn MS c 188

A folio verse miscellany, 91 pages, in vellum. c.1760.

Formerly ‘Osborn MS. Box III, Number 27’.

p. 68

RoJ 239: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, On Rome's pardons (‘If Rome can pardon sins, as Romans hold’)

Copy, headed ‘On ye E of Ro—r’ and endorsed ‘On ye Church of Rome by ye E of Ro:’.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 161-2. Walker, pp. 127-8, among ‘Poems Possibly by Rochester’. Love, p. 247, among Disputed Works.

Osborn MS c 189

A duodecimo verse miscellany, in a largely secretary hand, 222 pages, in calf. c.1705.

p. 1

DoC 184: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On the Countess of Dorchester (II) (‘Dorinda's sparkling wit and eyes’)

Copy, headed ‘On a Lady who fancy'd her self a beauty by Tho: Brown’.

First published in A Collection of Miscellany Poems, by Mr. Brown (London, 1699). POAS, V (1971), 384. Harris, pp. 43-4.

p. 1

RoJ 122: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Impromptu on Charles II (‘God bless our good and gracious King’)

Copy of a version headed ‘Posted on Whitehall gate pr: my Ld. Rochester’ and here beginning ‘Here lives a great & mighty Monarch’.

First published, in a version headed ‘Posted on White-Hall-Gate’ and beginning ‘Here lives a Great and Mighty Monarch’, in The Miscellaneous Works of the Right Honourable the Late Earls of Rochester and Roscommon (London, 1707). Vieth, p. 134. Walker, p. 122, as ‘[On King Charles]’.

p. 2

CgW 42: William Congreve, Song (‘Pious Selinda goes to Pray'rs’)

Copy.

First published in Poetical Miscellanies: The Fifth Part [by John Dryden et al.] (London, 1704). Summers, IV, 78. Dobrée, p. 245. McKenzie, II, 326.

p. 3

DrM 39.6: Michael Drayton, King John to Matilda (‘When these my Letters come into thy view’)

Copy of the later version of lines 149-52.

First published inEnglands Heroicall Epistles (London, 1599). Hebel, II, 147-52.

Lines 149-52 (beginning ‘Th' Arabian Bird, that never is but one’) later published in a version beginning ‘'Tis the Arabian bird alone’, attributed to John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester, in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1703), p. 191.

pp. 9-10

DrJ 178: John Dryden, A Song (‘Fair sweet and young, receive a Prize’)

Copy.

First published in Poeticall Miscellanies: The Fifth Part (London, 1704). Kinsley, IV, 1775. Hammond, V, 622.

pp. 10-11

RoJ 524: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, A Translation from Seneca's ‘Troades’, Act II, Chorus (‘After death nothing is, and nothing, death’)

Copy, headed ‘On Death by my Lord Rochester’.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution; collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 150-1. Walker, p. 51. Love, pp. 45-5, as ‘Senec. Troas. Act. 2. Chor. Thus English'd by a Person of Honour’.

pp. 18-19, 24-5

PsK 577.2: Katherine Philips, Pompey. A Tragedy

Extracts.

Translated from Pierre Corneille's La Mort de Pompée. Tragédie (Paris, 1644). First published in Dublin, 1663. London, 1663. Poems (1667). Thomas, III, 1-91.

See also Introduction.

p. 27

PsK 48: Katherine Philips, A Countrey life (‘How sacred and how innocent’)

Copy of lines 1-4, 29-32, headed ‘In Praise of ye: Country’.

First published in Poems (1664), pp. 177-82. Poems (1667), pp. 88-91. Saintsbury, pp. 588. Thomas, I, 159-62, poem 61. Anonymous musical setting published in The Banquet of Musick (London, 1691).

p. 27

PsK 84: Katherine Philips, A Farwell to Rosania (‘My Dear Rosania, sometimes be so kind’)

Copy, here beginning ‘My dear Rosania sometimes to be kind’.

First published in Poems (1667), pp. 130. Saintsbury, p. 559. Thomas, I, 201, poem 84.

p. 29

PsK 354: Katherine Philips, Tendres desers out of a French prose (‘Go soft desires, Love's gentle Progeny’)

Copy, headed ‘A Lover’.

First published in Poems (1667), p. 184. Saintsbury, p. 604. Thomas, III, 92.

p. 29

PsK 543: Katherine Philips, Upon the engraving. K:P: on a Tree in the short walke at Barn=Elms (‘Alass! how barbarous are we’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon graving a Name on a Tree’.

First published, as ‘Upon the graving of her Name upon a Tree in Barnelmes Walks’, in Poems (1667), p. 137. Saintsbury, p. 583. Thomas, I, 208, poem 91. Musical setting by Henry Purcell published in The Works of Henry Purcell, XXII, ed. W. Barclay Squire and J.A. Fuller-Maitland (London, 1922), pp. 153-4.

p. 63

SdT 23.6: Thomas Shadwell, Bury-Fair. Song: I sent a fish

Copy of Oldwit's jocular verses, in a version beginning ‘In a dish came fish’.

First published in London, 1689. Jocular lines by Oldwit. Versions published in Ben Jonson, ed. Herford and Simpson, VIII (Oxford, 1947), pp. 424-5.

p. 112

DoC 253: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, A Song to Chloris, from the blind Archer (‘Ah! Chloris, 'tis time to disarm your bright eyes’)

Copy, headed ‘A Song to Cloris from ye: blind Archer, by my Ld: Buckhurst’.

First published in Poetical Miscellanies: The Fifth Part (London, 1704). Harris, p. 76.

p. 126

CgW 25.5: William Congreve, Lesbia (‘When Lesbia first I saw so heavn'ly Fair’)

Copy, headed ‘Song by Mr. Congreve’.

First published in Poetical Miscellanies: The Fifth Part [by John Dryden et al.] (London, 1704). Summers, IV, 79. Dobrée, pp. 284-5. McKenzie, II, 369.

p. 158

OtT 13: Thomas Otway, ‘Would you know how we meet’

Copy of the song.

A song attributed to Otway in early printed sources and possibly by him. First published, in a musical setting by Henry Purcell, in The Theater of Music, The Second Book (London, 1685).

Osborn MS c 193

A small quarto verse miscellany, 149 pages (plus many blanks), in contemporary calf gilt. c.1791.

p. 36

DrM 65.5: Michael Drayton, To His Coy Love, A Conzonet (‘I pray thee leave, love me no more’)

Copy, headed ‘From Drayton's Works. To His Coy Love, a Canzonet’, followed (p. 37) by a Latin version ‘Puellæ fastidiosæ; ode’ (“Parce, precor, parce; inque alium jam transfer”).

First published, among Odes with Other Lyrick Poesies, in Poems (London, 1619). Hebel, II, 372.

Osborn MS c 229/1

The first of a set of two folio verse miscellanies, in several hands, compiled in part by Maurice Johnson (1668-1755), in contemporary calf. Early 18th century.

f. 40r

DrM 39.8: Michael Drayton, King John to Matilda (‘When these my Letters come into thy view’)

Copy of the later version of lines 149-52.

First published inEnglands Heroicall Epistles (London, 1599). Hebel, II, 147-52.

Lines 149-52 (beginning ‘Th' Arabian Bird, that never is but one’) later published in a version beginning ‘'Tis the Arabian bird alone’, attributed to John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester, in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1703), p. 191.

Osborn MS c 244

A folio verse miscellany, in a single hand, compiled by Nathaniel Hamby, of Wymondham, Norfolk, 648 pages, in morocco gilt. c.1729.

p. 107

BrW 229.4: William Browne of Tavistock, On the Countess Dowager of Pembroke (‘Underneath this sable herse’)

Copy of lines 1-6.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1623), p. 340. Brydges (1815), p. 5. Goodwin, II, 294. Browne's authorship supported in C.F. Main, ‘Two Items in the Jonson Apocrypha’, N&Q, 199 (June 1954), 243-5.

p. 108

MkM 18: Mary Monck, Verses Wrote on her Death-Bed at Bath, to her Husband, in London (‘Thou, who dost all my worldly thoughts employ’)

Copy.

Twenty-two lines, first published, introduced ‘The following verses were wrote by her (as I am inform'd) on her death-bed at Bath, to her husband in London’, in George Ballard, Memoirs of Several Ladies of Great Britain (Oxford, 1752), pp. 418-22.

p. 230

CoA 100.8: Abraham Cowley, Life and Fame (‘Oh Life, thou Nothings younger Brother!’)

Copy.

First published, among Pindarique Odes, in Poems (London, 1656).

pp. 290-1

RoJ 11.94: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, An Allusion (‘The freeborn English Generous and wise’)

Copy, headed ‘The Charrecter of the English by Mr Wolseley’.

This MS recorded in Nicholas Fisher, ‘Rochester's An Allusion to Tacitus’, N&Q, 255, No. 4 (December 2010), 503-6.

First published in The Genius of True English-men (London, 1680). Love, p. 55 (21-line version) and pp. 257-8 (30-line version). Also attributed to Robert Wolseley.

Osborn MS c 358

An octavo volume of Psalms of David by Isaac Watts (1674-1748), 115 pages, in calf. 1729.

p. 2

EtG 82.3: Sir George Etherege, Sylvia (‘The nymph that undoes me is fair and unkind’)

Copy.

First published in A Collection of Poems, Written upon several Occasions (London, 1672). Thorpe, p. 26.

Osborn MS c 360

Three quarto volumes of verse, 164, 155 and 145 leaves respectively, in later vellum. Compiled by Colonel Gabriel Lepipre. c.1753.

Vol. I, p. 33, No. XXXIII

WoH 197.6: Sir Henry Wotton, Upon the Death of Sir Albert Morton's Wife (‘He first deceased. she for a little tried’)

Copy, headed ‘on a Gentleman who died ye next Day after his Lady’ and here beginning ‘She first Departed: He for one Day try'd’.

First published as an independent couplet in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1636). Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 529. Hannah (1845), p. 44. The authorship is uncertain.

This couplet, which was subject to different versions over the years, is in fact lines 5-6 of a twelve-line poem beginning ‘Here lye two Bodyes happy in their kinds’, which has also been attributed to George Herbert: see HrG 290.5-290.8.

Vol. I, p. 185, No. CLXIV

JnB 136.4: Ben Jonson, Epitaph on Elizabeth, L.H. (‘Would'st thou heare, what man can say’)

Copy, headed ‘Epitaph on a Lady - written by Ben Johnson’ and here beginning ‘Underneath this Stone doth Lye’.

First published in Epigrammes (cxxiiii) in Workes (London, 1616). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 79.

Vol. I, p. 319

CgW 46.9: William Congreve, To Sleep Elegy (‘O Sleep! thou Flatterer of happy Minds’)

Copy.

First published in Works (1710). Summers, IV, 144-5. McKenzie, II, 372-3.

Vol. I, [unspecified page numbers]

MnJ 146: John Milton, Extracts

Vol. II, f. [18r], No. 53

ShJ 21.5: James Shirley, Epitaph On the Duke of Bvckingham (‘Here lies the best and worst of Fate’)

Copy, headed ‘Epitaph on George Villiers Duke of Buckingham -- by Shirley’.

First published in Poems (London, 1646). Armstrong, p. 15.

Vol. II, f. [19r], No. 54

BrW 229.5: William Browne of Tavistock, On the Countess Dowager of Pembroke (‘Underneath this sable herse’)

Copy of lines 1-6, headed ‘an Epitaph by an uncertain hand on Mary Countess Dowager of Pembroke’ and here beginning ‘Underneath this Marble Hearse’.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1623), p. 340. Brydges (1815), p. 5. Goodwin, II, 294. Browne's authorship supported in C.F. Main, ‘Two Items in the Jonson Apocrypha’, N&Q, 199 (June 1954), 243-5.

Osborn MS c 362

A duodecimo commonplace book, compiled by Ralph Tinley (1739-89), 92 pages. Late 18th century.

p. 6

MrC 19.8: Christopher Marlowe, The Passionate Shepherd to his Love (‘Come live with mee, and be my love’)

Copy.

First published in a four-stanza version in The Passionate Pilgrime (London, 1599). Printed in a six-stanza version in Englands Helicon (London, 1600). Bowers, II, 536-7. Tucker Brooke, pp. 550-1. Gill et al., I, 215. For Ralegh's ‘Answer’ see RaW 189-99.

Osborn MS c 481

A quarto verse miscellany, compiled by John Freeman Milward Dovaston (1782-1854), 309 pages. Early 19th century.

p. 53

BrW 229.7: William Browne of Tavistock, On the Countess Dowager of Pembroke (‘Underneath this sable herse’)

Copy of lines 1-6.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1623), p. 340. Brydges (1815), p. 5. Goodwin, II, 294. Browne's authorship supported in C.F. Main, ‘Two Items in the Jonson Apocrypha’, N&Q, 199 (June 1954), 243-5.

p. 271

MkM 19: Mary Monck, Verses Wrote on her Death-Bed at Bath, to her Husband, in London (‘Thou, who dost all my worldly thoughts employ’)

Copy, incomplete.

Twenty-two lines, first published, introduced ‘The following verses were wrote by her (as I am inform'd) on her death-bed at Bath, to her husband in London’, in George Ballard, Memoirs of Several Ladies of Great Britain (Oxford, 1752), pp. 418-22.

Osborn MS c 547

A quarto commonplace book of extracts, compiled by Elizabeth Elliotson, 330 pages. 1729.

p. 230

BrW 229.8: William Browne of Tavistock, On the Countess Dowager of Pembroke (‘Underneath this sable herse’)

Copy of lines 1-6.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1623), p. 340. Brydges (1815), p. 5. Goodwin, II, 294. Browne's authorship supported in C.F. Main, ‘Two Items in the Jonson Apocrypha’, N&Q, 199 (June 1954), 243-5.

p. 332

RaW 98.5: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Euen such is tyme which takes in trust’

Copy, as an epitaph used for a monument to Wilfred Lawson.

First published in Richard Brathwayte, Remains after Death (London, 1618). Latham, p. 72 (as ‘These verses following were made by Sir Walter Rauleigh the night before he dyed and left att the Gate howse’). Rudick, Nos 35A, 35B, and part of 55 (three versions, pp. 80, 133).

This poem is ascribed to Ralegh in most MS copies and is often appended to copies of his speech on the scaffold (see RaW 739-822).

See also RaW 302 and RaW 304.

Osborn MS c 549

A duodecimo verse miscellany, 150 pages. 1720.

p. 94

EtG 82.8: Sir George Etherege, Sylvia (‘The nymph that undoes me is fair and unkind’)

Copy.

First published in A Collection of Poems, Written upon several Occasions (London, 1672). Thorpe, p. 26.

p. 114

SeC 17.8: Sir Charles Sedley, The Indifference (‘Thanks, fair Vrania. to your Scorn’)

Copy.

First published in A Collection of Poems (London, 1672). Miscellaneous Works (London, 1702). The Works of the Honourable Sir Charles Sedley, Bat (2 vols, London, 1722), I, 69-70. Sola Pinto, I, 29-30.

Osborn MS fa 3

Copy, in a single secretary hand, densely written on 53 folio pages, imperfect, lacking the beginning and ending, disbound. Late 16th century.

LeC 87: Anon, Leicester's Commonwealth

Sold at Sotheby's to Dobell.

This MS recorded in Peck. p. 226.

First published as The Copie of a Leter, Wryten by a Master of Arte of Cambrige, to his Friend in London, Concerning some talke past of late betwen two worshipful and graue men, about the present state, and some procedinges of the Erle of Leycester and his friendes in England ([? Rouen], 1584). Soon banned. Reprinted as Leycesters common-wealth (London, 1641). Edited, as Leicester's Commonwealth, by D.C. Peck (Athens, OH, & London, 1985). Although various attributions have been suggested by Peck and others, the most likely author remains Robert Persons (1546-1610), Jesuit conspirator.

Osborn MS fa 12

Copy in six or seven cursive secretary hands, on 76 folio pages (pp. 23-6, 59-68 of slightly smaller size), possibly a rapidly produced piecemeal production, disbound. 1597-early 17th century.

SpE 63: Edmund Spenser, A View of the Present State of Ireland

Once owned by Sir Henry St George (1581-1644), Garter King of Arms. Bought in 1852 by Sir Thomas Phillipps (part of Phillipps MS 13761). Hofmann & Freeman, sale catalogue 21, item 80. A set of photocopies is in the British Library, RP 207.

First published in Sir James Ware, The Historie of Ireland (Dublin, 1633). Variorum, Prose Works (ed. Rudolf Gottfried), pp. 39-231.

Spenser's authorship of this ‘View’ is generally accepted, especially in light of the comparable views about Ireland in The Faerie Queene. A cautionary note about authorship is sounded, however, in Jean R. Brink, ‘Constructing the View of the Present State of Ireland’, Spenser Studies, 11 (1994), 203-28; in her ‘Appropriating the Author of The Faerie Queene: The Attribution of the View of the Present State of Ireland and A Brief Note of Ireland to Edmund Spenser’, in Soundings of Things Done: Essays in Early Modern Literature in Honor of S.K. Heninger, Jr., ed. Peter E. Medine and Joseph Wittreich (Newark, Delaware, 1997), 93-136. See also, inter alia, Andrew Hadfield, ‘Certainties and Uncertainties: By Way of Response to Jean Brink’, Spenser Studies, 12 (1998), 197-202, and Jean R. Brink, ‘Spenser and the Irish Question: Reply to Andrew Hadfield’, Spenser Studies, 13 (1999), 265-6.

Osborn MS fa 27

Copy. Copy, in a professional anglicana and secretary hand, some majuscules engrossed, with corrections and interlinear additions possibly in another hand, 118 folio leaves, in modern limp vellum with green ties. Mid-16th century.

MrT 30.8: Sir Thomas More, A Dialogue of Comfort

Once owned bt Sir Geoffrey Pole (d.1558). Later owned by N.H. Tattersfield. Sotheby's, 10 July 1986, lot 9, with a facsimile example in the sale catalogue.

Facsimile in the British Library, RP 3529.

First published in London, 1553. Yale, Vol. 12.

Osborn MS fb 7

Copy, 81 folio leaves, bound with eight leaves of later poems at the beginning and a score of lute music at the end (ff. 81-9). Headed ‘The appearance of the ghost of Kinge Edward the Second, Kinge of England’, incomplete at the end.

HuF 21: Sir Francis Hubert, Edward II (‘It is thy sad disaster which I sing’)

First published, in an unauthorised edition as The Deplorable Life and Death of Edward the Second. Together with the Downefall of the two Unfortunate Favorits, Gavestone and Spencer. Storied in an Excellent Pöem, London, 1628. First authorised edition, as The Historie of Edward the Second, Surnamed Carnarvan, one of our English Kings. Together with the Fatall down-fall of his two vnfortunate Favorites Gaveston and Spencer, London, 1629. An edition of a 576-stanza version in three cantos, entitled The Life of Edward II, was printed in London 1721 from an unidentified MS.

Mellor, pp. 4-169 (664-stanza version, headed ‘The Life and Death of Edward the Second’, including ‘The Authors Preface’ beginning ‘Rebellious thoughts why doe you tumult so’?).

Osborn MS fb 9

A folio volume of transcripts of state papers, in a secretary hand, i + 41 leaves, in contemporary vellum with remains of ties. c.1610.

Names inscribed on f. [ir]: ‘John Humphreys’ and ‘D [?] Wynn’.

f. 30r

TiC 46: Chidiock Tichborne, Tichborne's Lament (‘My prime of youth is but a frost of cares’)

Copy, here beginning ‘My prince of youth...’

First published in the single sheet Verses of Prayse and Joy Written Upon her Maiesties Preseruation Whereunto is annexed Tychbornes lamentation, written in the Towre with his owne hand, and an answer to the same (London, 1586). Hirsch, pp. 309-10. Also ‘The Text of “Tichborne's Lament” Reconsidered’, ELR, 17, No. 3 (Autumn 1987), between pp. 276 and 277. May EV 15464 (recording 37 MS texts). For the ‘answer’ to this poem, see KyT 1-2.

f. 30v

KyT 2: Thomas Kyd, Hendecasyllabon T.K. in Cygneam Cantionam Chidiochi Tychborne (‘Thy prime of youth is frozen with thy faults’)

Copy, headed ‘The Aunsweare to the same’ [i.e. Tichborne's poem] and here beginning ‘Thy theyme of youthe, is frozen with the faults’.

First published in Verses of Prayse and Ioye (London, 1586). Boas, pp. 340-1. Probably not by Kyd.

f. 33r

ElQ 101: Queen Elizabeth I, On the Sailing of the Cadiz Expedition, May 1596

Copy, headed ‘Queene Eliz: lre: or prayer for the prosperous successe of Thear[le] of Essex at Cales’.

The text is subscribed ‘This lre being written by her matie: & lieing in her closett vnsent one of her maides of honor priuately tooke the same lre and showed to Sr. Robert Cicill who tooke a Copie therof & laide yt where it was found and then wrott that ler: to gather wth his owne here vnder written to The Earles at Oates’. This is subscribed (f. 33r) with the text of Cecil's letter.

This MS cited in Selected Works.

Beginning ‘Most omnipotent Maker and Guider of all our world's mass, that only searchest and fathomest...’. Collected Works, Prayer 38, pp. 425-6. Selected Works, Prayer 4, pp. 254-6 (as ‘For the success of the expedition against Spain, June 1596’).

ff. 34r-5r

ElQ 243: Queen Elizabeth I, Queen Elizabeth's Speech at the Closing of Parliament, April 10, 1593

Copy of the English version, headed ‘The Queenes speech in pliment’ and introduced by the original scribe's explanation ‘The ffirst words I heard not all tell yt came to this sayeinge’.

First published (Version II) in John Stow, Annales; or a General Chronicle of England (London, 1601), pp. 1272-3.

Version I. Beginning ‘This kingdom hath had many noble and victorious princes...’. Hartley, III, 173-5. Collected Works, Speech 21, pp. 328-30 (Version 1)

Version II. Beginning ‘My Lords and you, my Commons of the Lower House, were it not that I know no speeches presented by any other...’. Hartley, III, 28-9. Collected Works, Speech 21, pp. 330-2.

f. 38v

RaW 496.5: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘The state of Fraunce as nowe it standes’

Copy.

First published in A Catalogue of the Harleian Manuscripts in the British Museum (London, 1808), III, 78. Listed but not printed in Latham, p. 172. Rudick, No. 30, p. 71. EV 24294.

ff. 40r-1v

DaJ 295: Sir John Davies, An Entertainment at Harefield

Copy of the dialogue between Place and Time.

The fullest text of what are taken to be the extant portions of the Entertainment at Harefield, 31 July-2 August 1602, is edited in The Complete Works of John Lyly, ed. R. Warwick Bond (Oxford, 1902), I, 491-504, where it is suggested that probably the prose and the Mariner's song were written by Lyly and the rest chiefly by Davies (see I, 534-5). Krueger, following Grosart, accepts the prose too as Davies's (see Krueger, pp. 409-11). It is argued that ‘Davies probably wrote all of the Harefield entertainment’ in Gabriel Heaton, Writing and Reading Royal Entertainments (Oxford, 2010), pp. 100-16.

Osborn MS fb 12

Copy, in a professional secretary hand, on seven large folio leaves, disbound. c.1620.

OvT 57: Sir Thomas Overbury, Observations in his travailes

A tract beginning ‘All things concurred for the rising and maintenance of this State...’. First published as Sir Thomas Overbvry his Observations in his Travailes vpon the State of The Xvii. Provinces as they stood Anno Dom. 1609 (London, 1626). Rimbault, pp. 223-30. Authorship uncertain.

Osborn MS fb 13

A folio commonplace book of miscellaneous entries under headings, in Latin, 694 pages (including blanks), in contemporary calf (rebacked).

Inscribed on the first page ‘F Welles’.

p. 407

ElQ 238: Queen Elizabeth I, Queen Elizabeth's Latin Speech to the Heads of Oxford University, September 28, 1592

Copy of the speech in Latin, in a secretary hand.

Beginning ‘Merita et gratitudo sic meam rationem captiuam duxerunt...’, in Autograph Compositions, pp. 163-5. An English translation, beginning ‘Merits and gratitude have so captured my reason...’, in Collected Works, Speech 20, pp. 327-8.

Osborn MS fb 23

A folio volume of state tracts and speeches, 380 leaves, in contemporary calf gilt, now disbound. Early-mid-17th century.

Includes arms and genealogy of ‘Helsby Cherleton & Acton Co. Lestr’ and of ‘The Lords of Hatton Co. Lestr’. Inscribed ‘Thomas Helsby Lincoln's Inn London 1855’.

ff. 1r-48r

NaR 38: Sir Robert Naunton, Fragmenta Regalia

Copy.

Fragmenta Regalia (or, Observations on the late Q. Elizabeth, her Times and Favorites), first published in London, 1641. Edited by John S. Cerovski (Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington, D.C., etc., 1985).

ff. 49r-137v

LeC 88: Anon, Leicester's Commonwealth

Copy.

First published as The Copie of a Leter, Wryten by a Master of Arte of Cambrige, to his Friend in London, Concerning some talke past of late betwen two worshipful and graue men, about the present state, and some procedinges of the Erle of Leycester and his friendes in England ([? Rouen], 1584). Soon banned. Reprinted as Leycesters common-wealth (London, 1641). Edited, as Leicester's Commonwealth, by D.C. Peck (Athens, OH, & London, 1985). Although various attributions have been suggested by Peck and others, the most likely author remains Robert Persons (1546-1610), Jesuit conspirator.

ff. 196-9v

RaW 700: Sir Walter Ralegh, Opinion upon the Articles propounded by the Earl of Essex upon the Alarum given by the Spaniards in 1596

Copy.

The articles propounded by Essex beginning ‘Besides many advertisements of the great preparation of Spain, of their forwardness or rather full readiness to set sail...’ and Ralegh's opinion beginning ‘First, if we consider without further circumstance that the fleet which was at Lisbon is already gone...’. First published in Opinions delivered by the Earl of Essex, [&c.]...on the Alarm of an Invasion from Spain in the Year 1596 (London, n.d.) [the exemplum in the National Archives, Kew, SP 9/52/25, bears the MS date ‘1803’]. Works (1829), VIII, 675-81.

ff. 203r-4r

ElQ 305: Queen Elizabeth I, Elizabeth's Golden Speech, November 30, 1601

Copy of Version 3, headed ‘Her Maiesties most Princely answere deliuered by herselfe at the Court att Whitehall on the last day of November 1601 when the Speaker of the lower house of Parliamt assisted wth the greatest part of knights and Burgesses had presented their humble thankes for her free and gracious fauour in preventing and reforming of sundry greiuances by abuse of many graunts called monopolies’, in a professional hand.

First published (Version III), as Her maiesties most princelie answere, deliuered by her selfe at White-hall, on the last day of November 1601 (London, 1601: STC 7578).

Version I. Beginning ‘Mr. Speaker, we have heard your declaration and perceive your care of our estate...’. Hartley, III, 412-14. Hartley, III, 495-6. Collected Works, Speech 23, pp. 337-40 (Version 1). Selected Works, Speech 11, pp. 84-92.

Version II. Beginning ‘Mr. Speaker, we perceive your coming is to present thanks unto me...’. Hartley, III, 294-7 (third version). Collected Works, Speech 23, pp. 340-2 (Version 2).

Version III. Beginning ‘Mr. Speaker, we perceive by you, whom we did constitute the mouth of our Lower House, how with even consent...’. Hartley, III, 292-3 (second version). Collected Works, Speech 23, pp. 342-4 (Version 3). STC 7578.

Version IV. Beginning ‘Mr Speaker, I well understand by that you have delivered, that you with these gentlemen of the Lower House come to give us thankes for benefitts receyved...’. Hartley, III, 289-91 (first version).

ff. 267r-8r

BcF 530: Francis Bacon, Bacon's Humble Submissions and Supplications

Copy.

The Humble Submissions and Supplications Bacon sent to the House of Lords, on 19 March 1620/1 (beginning ‘I humbly pray your Lordships all to make a favourable and true construction of my absence...’); 22 April 1621 (beginning ‘It may please your Lordships, I shall humbly crave at your Lordships' hands a benign interpretation...’); and 30 April 1621 (beginning ‘Upon advised consideration of the charge, descending into mine own conscience...’), written at the time of his indictment for corruption. Spedding, XIV, 215-16, 242-5, 252-62.

ff. 287-98

RaW 647: Sir Walter Ralegh, A Discourse touching a Marriage between Prince Henry and a Daughter of Savoy

Copy, headed ‘A politicke dispute about the happiest Match for the noble Prince Charles’.

A tract beginning ‘There is nobody that persuades our prince to match with Savoy, for any love to the person of the duke...’. First published in The Interest of England with regard to Foreign Alliances, explained in two discourses:...2) Touching a Marriage between Prince Henry of England and a Daughter of Savoy (London, 1750). Works (1829), VIII, 237-52. Ralegh's authorship is not certain.

Osborn MS fb 27

Copy, on 124 folio pages. Complete with fourteen-page ‘The Epistle To the Queen’, but without a title, in a single professional scribal hand. c.1630.

HoH 51: Henry Howard, Earl of Northampton, A Copy of the last instructions which the Emperor Charles the Fifth gave to his son Philip before his death translated out of Spanish

Phillipps MS 13128.

An unpublished translation of a suppositious work, supposed (but unlikely) to be Charles V's instructions to his son Philip II, which was circulated in MS in 16th-century Europe and published in Spanish in Sandoval's Life of Charles V (1634). An Italian translation in MS was presented to James VI by Giacomo Castelvetro between 1591 and 1595 and is now in the National Library of Scotland (MS Adv. 23. I. 6): see The Works of William Fowler, ed. H.W. Meckle, James Craigie and John Purves, III, STS 3rd Ser. 23 (Edinburgh, 1940), pp. cxxvii-cxxx, and references cited in The Basilicon Doron of King James VI, ed. James Craigie, II, STS, 3rd Ser. 18 (Edinburgh, 1950), pp. 63-9. A quite different translation was published as The Advice of Charles the Fifth...to his Son Philip the Second (London, 1670).

Howard's translation, dedicated to Queen Elizabeth, was allegedly written when he had been more than twelve years out of the Queen's favour [? in the early 1590s]. The Dedication begins ‘If the faithful Cananite of whom we read in the holy writ...’; the main text begins ‘I have resolved (most dear son) to come now to the point...’, and ends ‘...to proceed in such a course as prayers may second your purposes. Sanctae Trinitati, &c.’

Osborn MS fb 37

A folio volume of transcripts of Bacon's correspondence, in a single professional hand, vi + 62 leaves, disbound. c.1630.

A microfilm of this MS is in the British Library, (M/488(2)).

passim

BcF 652: Francis Bacon, Letter(s)

Copies of numerous letters by Bacon, to various recipients.

[unspecified page numbers]

BcF 75.11: Francis Bacon, Advice to the King touching Sutton's Estate

Copy.

Written c.January 1611/12. First published in Resuscitatio (London, 1657), pp. 265-70. Spedding, XI, 249-54.

ff. 20v-7v

BcF 194: Francis Bacon, Considerations touching the Queen's Service in Ireland

Copy.

First published in Remaines (London, 1648). Spedding, X, 46-51.

Osborn MS fb 38

A folio volume of texts relating to Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, in two or more professional hands, 150 leaves, in modern boards.

ff. [7r-19v]

EsR 150: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Apology

Copy, the work dated 1598.

First published, addressed to Anthony Bacon, as An Apologie of the Earle of Essex, against those which jealously and maliciously tax him to be the hinderer of the peace and quiet (London, [1600]), but immediately suppressed. Reprinted in 1603.

Osborn MS fb 39

A folio volume of state tracts, in two or more professional hands, 150 leaves, in modern boards. c.1630.

ff. 27r-[63r]

RaW 1077: Sir Walter Ralegh, A Military Discourse

Copy.

A treatise beginning ‘Forasmuch as in every doubtfull and questionable matter, it is familiar and common amongst men to be diverse...’. First published in London, 1734. It was probably written by Sir Thomas Wilford (1541-1601?), or possibly by Sir Francis De Vere or Nathaniel Boothe. See Lefranc (1968), pp. 64-5.

Osborn MS fb 40

A folio composite volume of state tracts, in professional hands, including that of the ‘Feathery Scribe’, 605 pages (including blanks), in 17th-century calf. c.late 1620s-30s.

Once owned by Sir Richard Grosvenor (1585-1645). Later owned by the Duke of Westminster, Eaton Hall, Cheshire (bookplate, ‘XXI no. 20’). MS 25. Sotheby's, 20 February 1967, lot 265, sold to Dobell.

Recorded in HMC, 3rd Report (1872), Appendix, p. 215. A microfilm of the MS is in the British Library (RP 83).

pp. 21-114

NaR 39: Sir Robert Naunton, Fragmenta Regalia

Copy, the title-page (p. 21), pp. 23 to the top of p. 51, most of p. 65 to p. 66 in the hand of the ‘Feathery Scribe’; the rest of p. 51 to the top of p. 65 in a second professional hand, and pp. 67-114 in a third scribal hand.

Fragmenta Regalia (or, Observations on the late Q. Elizabeth, her Times and Favorites), first published in London, 1641. Edited by John S. Cerovski (Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington, D.C., etc., 1985).

p. 224

RaW 389.6: Sir Walter Ralegh, An epitaph on the Earl of Leicester (‘Here lyes the noble warryor that never bludyed sword’)

Copy, in a professional copy (on pp. 185-246) of Richard Verstegan's A Declaration of the True Causes of the Great Troubles...1592, which is here entitled ‘Cicell's Common Wealth’.

First published as introduced ‘...yet immediately after his [Leicester's] death, a friend of his bestowed vpon him this Epitaphe’ and beginning ‘Heere lies the woorthy warrier’, in Richard Verstegan, A Declaration of the True Causes of the Great Troubles (London, ‘1592’), p. 54, which is sometimes entitled Cecil's Commonwealth: see E.A. Strathmann in MLN, 60 (1945), 111-14. Listed but not printed in Latham, p. 172, who notes that the epitaph was quoted, from a text among William Drummond's papers, in Sir Walter Scott's Kenilworth (1821). Rudick, No. 46, p. 120.

pp. 513-444

RaW 568: Sir Walter Ralegh, Apology for his Voyage to Guiana

Copy, headed ‘Sr Walter Rawleighes Apologie’.

A tract beginning ‘If the ill success of this enterprise of mine had been without example...’. First published in Judicious and Select Essays and Observations (London, 1650). Works (1829), VIII, 477-507. Edited by V. T. Harlow in Ralegh's Last Voyage (London, 1932), pp. 316-34.

Osborn MS fb 41

A folio volume of state tracts, sermons and other texts, in at least four hands, 89 leaves (including some blanks), in contemporary calf gilt. c.1640.

Probably associated with Oxford. Armorial stamp on the cover of a Duke (?of Devonshire). Sotheby's, 5 July 1955 (André De Coppet sale), lot 952.

ff. 63r-80r

NaR 40: Sir Robert Naunton, Fragmenta Regalia

Copy in a secretary hand.

Fragmenta Regalia (or, Observations on the late Q. Elizabeth, her Times and Favorites), first published in London, 1641. Edited by John S. Cerovski (Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington, D.C., etc., 1985).

ff. 84r-9r

WoH 290: Sir Henry Wotton, A Parallel between Robert Earl of Essex and George Duke of Buckingham

Copy, in a non-professional secretary hand.

First published in London, 1641. Edited by Sir Robert Egerton Brydges (Lee Priory Press, Ickham, 1814).

Osborn MS fb 43

A folio volume of two works, each in a different professional hand, bound with two printed tracts, in modern red half-morocco.

A flyleaf inscribed ‘John Rose Christmas 1895’.

ff. 1r-60v

NaR 41: Sir Robert Naunton, Fragmenta Regalia

Copy, with a title-page added (f. i) in a non-professional hand and other late-17th-century minor additions. c.1630s.

Fragmenta Regalia (or, Observations on the late Q. Elizabeth, her Times and Favorites), first published in London, 1641. Edited by John S. Cerovski (Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington, D.C., etc., 1985).

Osborn MS fb 53

A folio volume of parliamentary tracts, debates and proceedings in Parliament, in two professional hands, 439 pages, in contemporary calf. c.1690.

Bookplate of James Brydges (1642-1714), eighth Baron Chandos, of Wilton Castle, Herefordshire.

second pagination, pp. 1-38

ClE 70: Edward Hyde, First Earl of Clarendon, Articles of High Treason and other hainous misdemeanours agst Edward, Earle of Clarendon, Lord Chancellor, exhibited by Earl of Bristol, 10 July 1663

Copy.

pp. 160-359

ClE 123: Edward Hyde, First Earl of Clarendon, Impeachment Proceedings against Clarendon in 1667

Copy, headed ‘Collection of proceedings in the House of Commons about impeaching the Earle of Clarendon late Lord Chancellour, with the debates and speeches concerning that matter’.

Articles of Treason exhibited in Parliament against Clarendon, 14 November 1667 published in London, 1667. The Proceedings in the House of Commons touching the Impeachment of Clarendon 1667 published in London, 1700.

Osborn MS fb 57

A folio composite volume of state tracts, speeches, etc., in various professional hands, 375 pages, in 17th-century calf (rebacked). c.1620s-30s.

Scribbling on several pages including the names ‘Mrs Anne WM Quinney’, ‘Oner Ormen’, ‘Ormeson’, and ‘Rumney’.

pp. 219-24

CtR 201: Sir Robert Cotton, The Danger wherein this Kingdome now Standeth, and the Remedy

Tract beginning ‘As soon as the house of Austria had incorporated it self into the house of Spaine...’. First published London, 1628. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. 308-20.

Osborn MS fb 60

A folio composite volume of 23 state tracts and papers, 476 leaves, in contemporary calf gilt. In several professional hands, including that of the ‘Feathery Scribe’.

Once owned by Sir Richard Grosvenor (1585-1645), and Liber 4 (=MS 20) in his list of MS volumes, 18 February 1634/5. Later owned by the Duke of Westminster, Eaton Hall, Cheshire. Eaton Hall booklabel ‘Case XXI no 12’. Hofmann and Freeman sale catalogue No. 21 (January 1968), item 1 (vols i and ii)i.

Recorded in HMC, 3rd Report (1872), Appendix, pp. 212-14. Briefly described in Peter Beal, In Praise of Scribes: Manuscripts and their Makers in Seventeenth-Century England (Oxford, 1998), pp. 252-3 (No. 82). A microfilm of the MS is in the British Library, RP 217.

ff. 206r-32v

BcF 96: Francis Bacon, Arguments of Law. The Arguments on the Jurisdiction of the Council of the Marches

Copy.

Spedding, VII, 567-611.

ff. 344v-51v

BcF 195: Francis Bacon, Considerations touching the Queen's Service in Ireland

Copy.

First published in Remaines (London, 1648). Spedding, X, 46-51.

ff. 448r-56r

BcF 428: Francis Bacon, Speech(es)

Copy of Bacon's inaugural speech as Lord Chancellor, 7 May 1617, in the professional secretary hand of the ‘Feathery Scribe’.

Beal, In Praise of Scribes, No. 82.7 (p. 253).

Osborn MS fb 64

A largely autograph copy, on five pages of three unbound folio leaves. The title and first stanza in Cotton's hand, the remainder in the hand of Amanuensis C (i.e. William Fitzherbert), with a revision in stanza 29. This MS once formied part of the Derby MS (Derby Central Library, fmss 8470). c.1660s.

*CnC 8: Charles Cotton, Contentation. Directed to my Dear Father, and most Worthy Friend, Mr. Isaac Walton (‘Heav'n, what an Age is this! what Race’)

Later owned by Mrs D.C. Scratchley. Sotheby's, 31 October 1961, lot 218 (when the hands were misidentified). Formerly in Yale Files/Cotton.

Discussed, and the hands correctly identified, in Parks, with facsimiles (on pp. 7 and 9) of the first page and stanza 27. Facsimile of stanza 27 and Cotton's signature also in Nicolas (1836), I, after p. clxiv, reproduced in Parks, p. 9. The MS edited in full, with a facsimile of the first page (but with hands then still misidentified) in Stephen Parks, ‘A Contentation of Anglers’, Yale University Library Gazette, 43 (1969), 157-64, and further discussed (confusedly) in Alvin I. Dust, ‘The Manuscript of Cotton's “Contentation”’, The Library, 5th Ser. 30 (1975), 315-22.

First published in Poems (1689), pp. 252-60. Beresford, pp. 89-95. Buxton, pp. 251-7.

Osborn MS fb 66

A composite collection of separate copies of English verse, 64 folio and quarto pages. Assembled by the traveller Lorenzo Magalotti (1637-1712). Late 17th century.

Sotheby's, 19 July 1966, lot 518.

No. 11

ShJ 171: James Shirley, The Contention of Ajax and Ulysses for the Armour of Achilles, Act III, Song (‘The glories of our blood and state’)

Copy of the dirge in the hand of one Thomas Style, subscribed ‘Sr This is the Song I Promised you if you Please To turne over Leafe...’ and headed ‘A Song composed by the Earle of Orrery’, on two conjugate folio leaves.

Gifford & Dyce, VI, 396-7. Armstrong, p. 54. Musical setting by Edward Coleman published in John Playford, The Musical Companion (London, 1667).

No. 26

DeJ 7.8: Sir John Denham, Cooper's Hill (‘Sure there are Poets which did never dream’)

Extracts.

First published in London, 1642. Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 62-89. O Hehir, Hieroglyphicks.

No. 27

WaE 511: Edmund Waller, To a Lady Singing a Song of his Composing (‘Chloris! yourself you so excel’)

Copy, untitled, on a single quarto leaf.

First published in Workes (1645). Thorn-Drury, I, 105. A musical setting by Henry Lawes published, as ‘To the same Lady singing the former Song’, in Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1653).

No. 27

WaE 747: Edmund Waller, ‘While I listen to thy voice’

Copy, untitled, on a single quarto leaf.

First published in Workes (1645). Thorn-Drury, I, 127. A musical setting by Henry Lawes published in Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1653).

No. 32

BuS 35: Samuel Butler, Dildoides (‘Such a sad Tale prepare to hear’)

Extracts.

Dated in some sources 1672 but not published until 1706.

Nos 35v and 36r-v

DaW 33: Sir William Davenant, A New-years-Gift to the Queen, in the Year 1643 (‘Madam, 'tis fit I now make even’)

Copy, preceded by a deleted copy of lines 6-14, on two of three folio leaves containing extracts from Davenant.

First published in Works (London, 1673). Gibbs, pp. 134-6.

No. 38

DnJ 1381: John Donne, The Flea (‘Marke but this flea, and marke in this’)

Copy on a single leaf.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 40-1. Gardner, Elegies, p. 53. Shawcross, No. 60.

No. 39

CoA 299: Abraham Cowley, Extracts

Extract(s) from work(s) by Cowley.

No. 40

DrJ 267.9: John Dryden, The Indian Emperour, or, The Conquest of Mexico by the Spaniards

Extracts.

First published in London, 1667. California, IX (1966), pp. 1-112.

No. 42

RoJ 333: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, A Satyr against Reason and Mankind (‘Were I (who to my cost already am)’)

Copy of lines 1-173, untitled, inscribed ‘Satira del Conte di Rochester’, on five pages of four folio leaves.

This MS collated in Walker.

First published (lines 1-173) as a broadside, A Satyr against Mankind [London, 1679]. Complete, with supplementary lines 174-221 (beginning ‘All this with indignation have I hurled’) in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 94-101. Walker, pp. 91-7, as ‘Satyr’. Love, pp. 57-63.

The text also briefly discussed in Kristoffer F. Paulson, ‘A Question of Copy-Text: Rochester's “A Satyr against Reason and Mankind”’, N&Q, 217 (May 1972), 177-8. Some texts followed by one or other of three different ‘Answer’ poems (two sometimes ascribed to Edward Pococke or Mr Griffith and Thomas Lessey: see Vieth, Attribution, pp. 178-9).

Osborn MS fb 68

A composite volume of separate verse MSS, in various hands and paper sizes, 142 pages, disbound.

Later owned by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bt (1792-1872), manuscript and book collector: Phillipps MS 8302. Sotheby's, 25 June 1935, lot 342, to Maggs. Formerly ‘Chest II, 2’.

p. 45

SeC 15: Sir Charles Sedley, The Doctor and his Patients (‘There was a prudent grave Physician’)

Copy on a single folio leaf. The text is followed on p. 47 by a poem headed ‘The doctor and the Cooke’ (‘Going down staires he met a scullion’).

First published in Miscellaneous Works (London, 1702). Sola Pinto, I, 45-6.

p. 49

SeC 113: Sir Charles Sedley, Essay on Entertainments

Abridgement, here untitled, amounting to some 43 lines, beginning ‘Marcus Varro in a treatise Written of the Number of Guests...’, on a single folio leaf, endorsed ‘Symposiack of SC. Sidley’.

c.1700s.

First published in Miscellaneous Works (London, 1702). The Works of the Honourable Sir Charles Sedley, Bat (2 vols, London, 1722), I.

p. 71

MaA 163.99: Andrew Marvell, The Dream of the Cabal: A Prophetical Satire Anno 1672 (‘As t'other night in bed I thinking lay’)

Copy.

A lampoon sometimes called The Gamball or a dreame of ye Grand Caball. First published in A Second Collection of the Newest and Most Ingenious Poems, Satyrs, Songs, &c. (London, 1689). Edited in POAS, I (1963), pp. 191-203, as possibly by John Ayloffe. Ascribed to Marvell in two MS copies (MaA 163.4 and MaA 163.92).

p. 75

SeC 93.5: Sir Charles Sedley, Character of Ld Leicester (‘Learned thy selfe, and having such for frinds’)

Copy, ascribed to ‘Sidley’.

pp. 99-101

EtG 56: Sir George Etherege, Second Letter to Lord Middleton (‘Since love and verse, as well as wine’)

Copy, addressed on the back (p. 102) ‘For Mrs. Weatherly att the Countesse of mnchesters house in Downing Street in Westminster’, dated 10 May 1686, on two conjugate folio leaves, once folded as a letter.

This MS collated in Thorpe.

First published in The History of Adolphus (London, 1691). Thorpe, pp. 48-50.

p. 123

DoC 89: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Epitaph on Mrs. Lundy (‘Here lies little Lundy a yard deep or more’)

Copy, untitled, on the first of two conjugate folio leaves.

This MS collated in Harris.

First published in Poetical Miscellanies: The Fifth Part (London, 1704). The Literary Works of Matthew Prior, ed. H. Bunker Wright and Monroe K. Spears, 2nd edition (Oxford, 1971), II, 777-8 (among ‘Works of Doubtful Authenticity’). Harris pp. 93-4.

Osborn MS fb 69

A folio commonplace book cum letterbook, predominantly in one hand, compiled by Sir Francis Castillion (1561-1638), 241 pages (plus many blanks). c.1620s-30s.

The front pastedown inscribed ‘Thomas Hugh Markham From his Mother. Sepr 11th. 1846’ and, in pencil, ‘Darker Esqr. Gayton’.

pp. 57-73

SiP 244: Sir Philip Sidney, Extracts

Extracts, headed ‘Deuine & morall sentences taken out of Sr. Phillip Sedneys Arcadia’, dated at the end ‘16. finis. 2i. / Aug. 24’.

Facsimile of f. p. 57 in Fred Schurink, ‘Lives and Letters: Three Early Seventeenth-Century Manuscripts with Extracts from Sidney's Arcadia’, EMS, 16 (2011), 170-96 (p. 187).

p. 200

HoJ 178: John Hoskyns, ‘Martin is fled, Farewell my friend’

Copy, headed Mr. Hoskins a lawyer in the Middle Temple made these two verses of four gentlemem of the Temple (Mr. Martin Mr. Farwell Mr. Musket Mr. Warre).

A single couplet.

p. 208

RaW 98: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Euen such is tyme which takes in trust’

Copy, headed ‘1616. [sic] Sr Walter Rawley, nox ante obitum’ and subscribed ‘These verses were made the night before he lost his hed’.

First published in Richard Brathwayte, Remains after Death (London, 1618). Latham, p. 72 (as ‘These verses following were made by Sir Walter Rauleigh the night before he dyed and left att the Gate howse’). Rudick, Nos 35A, 35B, and part of 55 (three versions, pp. 80, 133).

This poem is ascribed to Ralegh in most MS copies and is often appended to copies of his speech on the scaffold (see RaW 739-822).

See also RaW 302 and RaW 304.

p. 211

SiP 245: Sir Philip Sidney, Extracts

Further extracts, headed respectively ‘A description of an excellent woman, for mind & body. Out of Arcadia’ and ‘The excellency of marriage taken out of Arcadia; which I cannot now so well aproue of, when as I do look on my [wife deleted]’.

Facsimile of f. p. 211 in Fred Schurink, ‘Lives and Letters: Three Early Seventeenth-Century Manuscripts with Extracts from Sidney's Arcadia’, EMS, 16 (2011), 170-96 (p. 190).

p. 236

RaW 186.8: Sir Walter Ralegh, Like to a Hermite poore (‘Like to a Hermite poore in place obscure’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Brittons Bowre of Delights (London, 1591). Latham, pp. 11-12. Rudick, Nos 57A and 57B (two versions, pp. 135-6).

[unspecified page numbers]

ElQ 229: Queen Elizabeth I, Queen Elizabeths Armada speech to the Troops at Tilbury, August 9, 1588

Castillion's account of Elizabeth's visit to the army at Tilbury, ‘I myselfe beinge there a Captayne and an eye Witnesse. F. C.’

Beginning ‘My loving people, I have been persuaded by some that are careful of my safety to take heed. how I committed myself to armed multitudes...’. Collected Works, Speech 19, pp. 325-6. Selected Works, Speech 10, pp. 77-83. The Queen's authorship supported in J.E. Neale, Essays in Elizabethan History (London, 1958), pp. 103-6.

Osborn MS fb 70

A folio composite volume of poems on affairs of state, 319 pages, disbound. Late 17th century.

This MS owned in 1682 by Narcissus Luttrell (1657-1732). Later Phillipps MS 8301 and ‘Osborn MS. Chest II, Number 52’.

p. 28

RoJ 358: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, A Satyr on Charles II (‘I' th' isle of Britain long since famous grown’)

Copy, untitled, on the second page of two conjugate folio leaves.

Edited from this MS in David M. Vieth, ‘Rochester's “Scepter” Lampoon on Charles II’, PQ, 37 (1958), 424-32 (p. 424); recorded in Vieth (1968) and in Walker.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1704). Vieth, pp. 60-1. Walker, pp. 74-5. Love (five versions), pp. 85-6, 86-7, 88, 89-90, 90. The manuscript texts discussed, with detailed collations, in Harold Love, ‘Rochester's “I' th' isle of Britain”: Decoding a Textual Tradition’, EMS, 6 (1997), 175-223.

pp. 31-3

DoC 62: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Colon (‘As Colon drove his sheep along’)

Copy, headed ‘A Bathe Lampoon’ and dated ‘1698’, on two conjugate folio leaves.

This MS collated in POAS and in Harris.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1697). POAS, II (1965), 167-75. Harris, pp. 124-35.

ff. 49r-50v

BuS 36: Samuel Butler, Dildoides (‘Such a sad Tale prepare to hear’)

Copy.

Dated in some sources 1672 but not published until 1706.

pp. 53-5

EtG 57: Sir George Etherege, Second Letter to Lord Middleton (‘Since love and verse, as well as wine’)

Copy on two conjugate folio leaves.

This MS collated in Thorpe.

First published in The History of Adolphus (London, 1691). Thorpe, pp. 48-50.

pp. 67-8

EtG 121: Sir George Etherege, The Comical Revenge. or Love in a Tub, Act II, scene ii, lines 153-69. Song (‘When Phillis watch'd her harmless Sheep’)

Copy of the song sung by Aurelia and Letitia, headed ‘Song 134. The Carefull Shepherdesse’.

This MS collated in Thorpe.

First published in London, 1664. Brett-Smith, I, 1-88 (pp. 21-2). The song in Thorpe, p. 20.

pp. 89-90

EtG 117: Sir George Etherege, Song (‘Since Death on all lays his impartial hand’)

Copy, headed ‘Song’, on the first of two conjugate folio leaves.

Edited from this MS in Thorpe.

First published in Examen Miscellaneum (London, 1702). Thorpe, pp. 59-60.

pp. 105-7

DoC 304: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, A True Account of the Birth and Conception of a Late Famous Poem call'd ‘The Female Nine’ (‘When Monmouth the chaste read those impudent lines’)

Copy, on two conjugate folio leaves.

This MS collated in POAS and in Harris.

First published in POAS, V (1971), 211-13. Harris, pp. 25-7.

pp. 143-4

MaA 470: Andrew Marvell, Advice to a Painter to draw the Duke by (‘Spread a large canvass, Painter, to containe’)

Copy, on the first of two conjugate folio leaves.

This MS collated in POAS, I.

First published [in London], 1679. A Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689), as by ‘A-M-l, Esq’. Thompson III, 399-403. Margoliouth, I, 214-18, as by Henry Savile. POAS, I, 213-19, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 40-2, as by Henry Savile.

pp. 147-9 (bis)

DoC 326: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, The Deist: A Satyr on the Parsons (‘Religion's a politic law’)

Copy, headed ‘The Deist’, on five pages of two conjugate pairs of folio leaves.

This MS recorded in Harris.

Unpublished. Discussed in Harris, pp. 189-90.

p. 155

MaA 498: Andrew Marvell, Further Advice to a Painter (‘Painter once more thy Pencell reassume’)

Copy, untitled, on a single folio leaf.

This volume formerly Phillipps MS 8301.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1697). Margoliouth, I, 176-7. POAS, I, 163-7. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 38-9. Rejected from the canon by Lord and the authorship considered doubtful by Chernaik, pp. 211-12.

pp. 173-6

DoC 102: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, A Faithful Catalogue of our Most Eminent Ninnies (‘Curs'd be those dull, unpointed, doggerel rhymes’)

Copy, including corrections and notes in a second hand supplying calculations and markings for copyists and evidently used as a scriptorium master copy or exemplar from which further transcripts were made, on two folio leaves.

Edited from this MS in POAS and in Harris. Facsimile of first page in POAS, IV, after p. 190, and discussed pp. 351-2.

First published in The Works of the Earls of Rochester, Roscommon, and Dorset (London, 1707). POAS, IV (1968), 189-214. Harris, pp. 136-67.

pp. 203-5

MaA 421: Andrew Marvell, The Fourth Advice to a Painter (‘Draw England ruin'd by what was giv'n before’)

Copy on two conjugate folio leaves.

This MS collated in POAS, I.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 140-6, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 33-5, as anonymous. Regarded as anonymous in Margoliouth, I, 348-50.

ff. 271-3

DrJ 150: John Dryden, Prologue To The Prophetess. Spoken by Mr. Betterton (‘What Nostradame, with all his Art can guess’)

Copy on two conjugate folio leaves.

This MS recorded in Kinsley, IV, 1997.

First published in Thomas Betterton, The Prophetess: or, The History of Dioclesian (London, 1690). Poems on Affairs of State, Part III (London, 1698). Kinsley, II, 556-7. California, III, 255-6. Hammond, III, 231-4.

Osborn MS fb 88

A folio letterbook of Sir Richard Bulstrode (1610-1711) chiefly when he was British envoy at Brussels, in several hands, 226 pages, in contemporary vellum. c.1678-82 [and later additions].

p. 119v

DoC 209: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On the Countess of Dorchester (IV) (‘Tell me, Dorinda, why so gay’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in A Collection of Miscellany Poems, by Mr. Brown (London, 1699). POAS, V (1971), 385. Harris, pp. 45-6.

f. 120r

DnJ 470: John Donne, Breake of day (‘'Tis true, 'tis day. what though it be?’)

Copy, immediately following on from ‘Stay sweet and do not rise’ (see DnJ 2983).

First published in William Corkine, Second Book of Ayres (London, 1612), sig. B1v. Grierson, I, 23. Gardner, Elegies, pp. 35-6. Shawcross, No. 46.

f. 120r

DnJ 1382: John Donne, The Flea (‘Marke but this flea, and marke in this’)

Copy.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 40-1. Gardner, Elegies, p. 53. Shawcross, No. 60.

f. 120r

DnJ 2983: John Donne, Song (‘Stay, O sweet, and do not rise’)

Copy.

See also DnJ 470.

First published (in a two-stanza version) in John Dowland, A Pilgrim's Solace (London, 1612) and in Orlando Gibbons, The First Set of Madrigals and Mottets (London, 1612). Printed as the first stanza of Breake of day in Poems (London, 1669). Grierson, I, 432 (attributing it to Dowland). Gardner, Elegies, p. 108 (in her ‘Dubia’). Doughtie, Lyrics from English Airs, pp. 402-3. Not in Shawcross.

See also DnJ 428.

Osborn MS fb 95

Copy, in a professional secretary hand, on 112 folio leaves, lacking title, disbound. c.1620s-30s.

DaJ 280: Sir John Davies, The Question concerning Impositions

Sotheby's, 24 March 1970, lot 438.

A treatise, with dedicatory epistle to James I, comprising 33 chapters, beginning ‘The Question it self is no more than this, Whether the Impositions which the King of England hath laid and levied upon Merchandize, by vertue of his Prerogative onely...’. First published in London, 1656. Grosart, III, 1-116.

Osborn MS fb 100

Copy, in two or three hands, including revisions, untitled, beginning ‘Genesis Chap. 1st Canto 1s’, 318 folio pages, in 17th-century calf gilt. c.1664-79.

HuL 3: Lucy Hutchinson, Order and Disorder (‘My Ravisht soule, A pious Ardour fires’)

Endpapers inscribed ‘Anne Rochester her book’ and ‘Rochester 1664’ [i.e. by Anne (1614-96), Countess of Rochester, mother of the poet].

This MS discussed, with facsimile examples, and the first five cantos collated against the 1679 edition, in Norbrook, EMS, 9 (2000). Cantos 6-20 edited from this MS in Norbrook's edition (2001), with facsimile examples on pp. 10, 88 and 145.

A microfilm of the MS is in the British Library, RP 547.

An unfinished epic poem in twenty cantos. The first five cantos first published anonymously as Order and Disorder: or, the World Made and Undone. Being Meditations upon the Creation and the Fall (London, 1679). Attributed to Lucy Hutchinson in David Norbrook, ‘Lucy Hutchinson and Order and Disorder: The Manuscript Evidence’, EMS, 9 (2000), 257-91. The full twenty cantos first published in the edition by David Norbrook (Oxford, 2001). The attribution supported in John Burrows and Hugh Craig, ‘Lucy Hutchinson and the Authorship of Two Seventeenth-Century Poems: A Computational Approach’, The Seventeenth Century, 16/2 (Autumn 2001), 259-82.

Osborn MS fb 106

A guard book of separate copies of poems, 72 pages, various sizes. Chiefly late 17th century.

Assembled by Col. Cyril Hackett Wilkinson (1888-1960), Vice Provost of Worcester College, Oxford, literary scholar. Sotheby's, 26 June 1961, lot 212. At Yale formerly ‘Osborn Box 89. No. 7’.

a microfilm of this MS is in the British Library, M/625.

No. 1, pp. [1-2]

CoA 152: Abraham Cowley, Prologue to the Guardian (‘Who says the Times do Learning disallow?’)

Copy, headed ‘The Prologue and Epilogue to ye Game at Chesse by Pooley’, on both pages of a single quarto leaf.

First published, under the pseudonym ‘Francis Cole’, in The Prologue and Epilogue to a Comedie, presented, at the Entertainment of the Prince His Highnesse, by the Schollers of Trinity Colledge in Cambridge, in March last, 1641 (London, 1642). Waller, I, 31-2 (and II, 161). Autrey Nell Wiley, ‘The Prologue and Epilogue to the Guardian’, RES, 10 (1934), 443-7 (pp. 444-5).

See also CoA 68-81.

No. 1, p. [2]

CoA 81: Abraham Cowley, The Epilogue [to the Guardian] (‘The Play, great Sir, is done. yet needs must fear’)

Copy on the second page of a single quarto leaf.

First published, under the pseudonym ‘Francis Cole’, in The Prologue and Epilogue to a Comedie, presented, at the Entertainment of the Prince His Highnesse, by the Schollers of Trinity Colledge in Cambridge, in March last, 1641 (London, 1642).Printed (with the first line: ‘The Play is done, great Prince, which needs must fear’) in The Guardian (London, 1650). Waller, I, 32 (and II, 242). Autrey Nell Wiley, ‘The Prologue and Epilogue to the Guardian’, RES, 10 (1934), 443-7 (pp. 444-5).

See also CoA 137-52.

No. 8

DeJ 94: Sir John Denham, A Speech against Peace at the Close Committee (‘But will you now to Peace incline’)

Copy, headed ‘Mr Hamdens speech occasioned upo ye Londoners petition for peace’, on a single broadsheet.

First published as a broadside entitled Mr. Hampdens speech occasioned upon the Londoners Petition for Peace [Lonon, 1643]. Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 122-7.

No. 9, f. 2

DeJ 76: Sir John Denham, On the Earl of Strafford's Tryal and Death (‘Great Strafford! worthy of that Name, though all’)

Copy, headed ‘Wentworth Triumphe over all’, on two folio leaves. The text accompanied by a parody.

First published in Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 153-4.

No. 15

WaE 266: Edmund Waller, Of the Lady Mary, &c. (‘As once the lion honey gave’)

Copy, here beginning ‘As Sampsons Lyon honey gave’, on a single folio leaf.

First published in Poems, ‘Fourth’ edition (London, 1682). Thorn-Drury, II, 80-1.

No. 16

DeJ 36: Sir John Denham, Elegy on the Death of Judge Crooke (‘This was the Man! the Glory of the Gown’)

Copy on a single folio leaf.

First published in The Topographer for the year 1790 (London, 1790), II, 177. Banks, pp. 156-8.

No. 17

MaA 197: Andrew Marvell, The Loyal Scot (‘Of the old Heroes when the Warlike shades’)

Copy on eight folio pages.

First published in one version [c.1669?] (exemplum without title-page owned by the Library Company of Philadelphia, 935Q). An incomplete version in Charles Gildon, Chorus Poetarum (London, 1694). Margoliouth, I, 180-7. Lord, pp. 188-92. Smith, pp. 403-12.

Lines 15-62 also appear as lines 649-96 in The last Instructions to a Painter (MaA 500-4), and lines 178-85 appear as a separate poem in Upon Blood's Attempt to Steal the Crown (MaA 253-280).

No. 18

MaA 231: Andrew Marvell, The Statue at Charing Cross (‘What can be the Mistery why Charing Cross’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon the Statue of brass of King Charles ye first on horsback to be sett up at Chairing cross’, on the first of two unbound conjugate folio leaves.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1698). Margoliouth, I, 199-201. POAS, I, 270-3. Lord, pp. 201-4. Smith, pp. 418-19.

No. 19

MaA 160: Andrew Marvell, A Dialogue between the Two Horses (‘Wee read in profane and Sacred records’)

Copy on two folio leaves.

First published in The Second Part of the Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689). Margoliouth, I, 208-13, as ‘probably Marvell's’. POAS, I, 274-83, as anonymous. Rejected from the canon by Lord.

No. 21

DoC 139: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, My Opinion (‘After thinking this fortnight of Whig and of Tory’)

Copy, headed ‘My Opinion on ye nine pinn's’, on a sikngle quarto leaf.

This MS collated in Harris.

First published in Miscellaneous Works, Written by…George, late Duke of Buckingham (London, 1704-5). POAS, II (1965), 391-2. Harris, pp. 55-6.

No. 24

MaA 84.91: Andrew Marvell, A Ballad called The Haymarket Hectors (‘I sing a woeful ditty’)

Copy.

Sometimes called Upon the cutting of Sr John Coventry's nose. First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1704). Thompson, I, xxxix-xli (from ‘Marvell's writing’). Grosart, I, 456-8. Edited in POAS, I (1963), 168-71, as doubtfully by Marvell.

No. 27

DoC 63: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Colon (‘As Colon drove his sheep along’)

Copy, headed ‘A Satyr’.

This MS collated in Harris.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1697). POAS, II (1965), 167-75. Harris, pp. 124-35.

No. 31

DoC 360: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Rochester's Farewell (‘Tir'd with the noisome follies of the age’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Filld with the noysome folly of the age’, on three of four folio leaves.

See DoC 358.

First published in A Third Collection of the Newest and Most Ingenious Poems, Satyrs, Songs &c (London, 1689). POAS, II (1965), 217-27. Discussed and Dorset's authorship rejected in Harris, pp. 190-2. The poem is noted by Alexander Pope as being ‘probably by the Ld Dorset’ in Pope's exemplum of A New Collection of Poems Relating to State Affairs (London, 1705), British Library, C.28.e.15, p. 121.

Osborn MS fb 107

A folio verse miscellany, with a title-page: The Theatre of Complements erected Collectection of Songs composed and compiled by A Schollar of Oxford. Printed for S.S. 167, 80 pages. c.1670s.

The title-page inscribed ‘Nar. Lutterell: His Book 1682’, i.e. owned by Narcissus Luttrell (1657-1732), annalist and book collector. At Yale formerly Chest II, No. 39.

p. 12

DrJ 250.6: John Dryden, The Conquest of Granada by the Spaniards: In Two Parts, Part I, Act IV, scene ii, lines 122-49. Song (‘Wherever I am, and whatever I doe’)

Copy of the song.

California, XI, 69-70. Kinsley, I, 132-3. Hammond, I, 239-40.

p. 15

EtG 83: Sir George Etherege, Sylvia (‘The nymph that undoes me is fair and unkind’)

Copy of lines 1-8, headed ‘The pleasant Death’.

This MS collated in Thorpe.

First published in A Collection of Poems, Written upon several Occasions (London, 1672). Thorpe, p. 26.

p. 18

DrJ 267.4: John Dryden, An Evening's Love: or The Mock Astrologer, Act V, scene i, lines 504-33. Song (‘Celimena, of my heart’)

Copy.

California, X, 310-11. Kinsley, I, 126-7. Hammond, I, 223-4.

p. 29

EtG 16: Sir George Etherege, The Forsaken Mistress: A Dialogue between Phillis and Strephon (‘Tell me, gentle Strephon, why’)

Copy, headed ‘Song 56. Loue Trick's’.

This MS collated in Thorpe.

First published in The New Academy of Complements (London, 1669). Thorpe, pp. 3-4.

p. 27

DrJ 261.8: John Dryden, An Evening's Love: or The Mock Astrologer, Act II, scene i, lines 499-514. Song (‘After the pangs of a desperate Lover’)

Copy.

First published in London, 1671. California, X (1970), pp. 195-314 (p. 245). Kinsley, I, 125. Hammond, I, 221-2. This song first published in Merry Drollery, Complete (London, 1670).

pp. 30-1

EtG 126: Sir George Etherege, She wou'd if she cou'd, Act V, scene i, lines 312-23. Song (‘To little or no purpose I spent many days’)

Copy, headed ‘Song 60. The Rambling Lady’.

This MS collated in Thorpe.

First published in London, 1668. Brett-Smith, II, 1-179 (p. 169). Thorpe, p. 23.

p. 31

EtG 84: Sir George Etherege, Sylvia (‘The nymph that undoes me is fair and unkind’)

Second copy of lines 1-8, headed ‘The Beauty’.

This MS collated in Thorpe.

First published in A Collection of Poems, Written upon several Occasions (London, 1672). Thorpe, p. 26.

p. 41

DrJ 265: John Dryden, An Evening's Love: or The Mock Astrologer, Act IV, scene i, lines 47-70. Song (‘Calm was the Even, and cleer was the Skie’)

Copy.

California, X, 270-1. Kinsley, I, 126. Hammond, I, 222-3.

p. 42

MsP 21.5: Philip Massinger, The Fatal Dowry, IV, ii, 51-8. Song (‘Courtier, if thou needs wilt wiue’)

Copy.

First published, as by ‘P. M. and N[athan] F[ield]’, in London, 1632. Edwards & Gibson, I, 13-95 (p. 71).

pp. 42-3

MsP 26: Philip Massinger, The Fatal Dowry, IV, ii 71-86. Song (‘Poore Citizen, if thou wilt be’)

Copy.

Edwards & Gibson, I, 72.

p. 44

ShJ 178: James Shirley, Cupid and Death, lines 265-80. Song (‘Victorious Men of Earth, no more’)

Copy of the second song, headed ‘Song. 91. Death, and his Emissaries’.

Gifford & Dyce, VI, 355. Harris, pp. 388-9. Armstrong, p. 53.

pp. 58-9

HeR 41: Robert Herrick, Charon and Phylomel, A Dialogue sung (‘Charon! O gentle Charon! let me wooe thee’)

Copy, headed ‘Song. 117. Philomel, and charon’.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, p. 248. Patrick, p. 327. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in John Playford, Select Musicall Ayres, and Dialogues (London, 1652).

pp. 79-80

ShJ 172: James Shirley, The Contention of Ajax and Ulysses for the Armour of Achilles, Act III, Song (‘The glories of our blood and state’)

Copy of the dirge, headed ‘The Glittering Shade’.

Gifford & Dyce, VI, 396-7. Armstrong, p. 54. Musical setting by Edward Coleman published in John Playford, The Musical Companion (London, 1667).

Osborn MS fb 108

A folio composite volume of separate copies of poems, in various hands and paper sizes, c.257 pages, now disbound. Late 17th century.

Sotheby's, 14 March 1961, lot 573. Formerly at Yale ‘Box 89, No. 3’.

Microfilm in the British Library, M/608.

pp. 5-9

CoA 160: Abraham Cowley, A Satyre against Seperatists (‘I have beene where so many Round-heads dwell’)

Copy, headed ‘A Puritan Lecture discribed by Mr. Abraham Cowley’ and here beginning ‘Ive ben where So many Puritans dwell’, on three folio leaves.

First published, as by ‘A. C. Generosus’, in London, 1642. Collected Works, I, pp. 94-101, as The Puritans Lecture. Cowley's authorship uncertain but probable: see Perkin, pp. 25-9.

pp. 13-19

MaA 161: Andrew Marvell, A Dialogue between the Two Horses (‘Wee read in profane and Sacred records’)

Copy, on four folio leaves.

First published in The Second Part of the Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689). Margoliouth, I, 208-13, as ‘probably Marvell's’. POAS, I, 274-83, as anonymous. Rejected from the canon by Lord.

p. 83

DoC 363: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Under the King's Picture (‘First Heaven resolv'd William should reign, and then’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Harris.

First published in J. J. Alexander, ‘An Otterton Notebook’, Report and Transactions of the Devonshire Association for the Advancement of Science, Literature, and Art, 50 (1918), 493-502 (p. 495). Edited in Harris (1940), p. 118. Discussed in Harris (1979), pp. 183-4.

pp. 207-36

DoC 103: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, A Faithful Catalogue of our Most Eminent Ninnies (‘Curs'd be those dull, unpointed, doggerel rhymes’)

Copy, headed ‘A Satyr on The Most Eminent Court Ninnys’, on fifteen folio leaves.

This MS collated in POAS and in Harris.

First published in The Works of the Earls of Rochester, Roscommon, and Dorset (London, 1707). POAS, IV (1968), 189-214. Harris, pp. 136-67.

pp. 327-34

DrJ 43.999: John Dryden, An Essay upon Satire (‘How dull and how insensible a beast’)

Copy.

A satire written in 1675 by John Sheffield, Earl of Mulgrave, but it was widely believed by contemporaries (including later Alexander Pope, who had access to Mulgrave's papers) that Dryden had a hand in it, a belief which led to the notorious assault on him in Rose Alley on 18 December 1679, at the reputed instigation of the Earl of Rochester and/or the Duchess of Portsmouth.

First published in London, 1689. POAS, I (1963), pp. 396-413.

The authorship discussed in Macdonald, pp. 217-19, and see John Burrows, ‘Mulgrave, Dryden, and An Essay upon Satire’, in Superior in His Profession: Essays in Memory of Harold Love, ed. Meredith Sherlock, Brian McMullin and Wallace Kirsop, Script & Print, 33 (2009), pp. 76-91, where is it concluded, from stylistic analysis, that ‘Mulgrave had by far the major hand’. Recorded in Hammond, V, 684, in an ‘Index of Poems Excluded from this Edition’.

p. 367

RoJ 11.95: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, An Allusion (‘The freeborn English Generous and wise’)

Copy.

First published in The Genius of True English-men (London, 1680). Love, p. 55 (21-line version) and pp. 257-8 (30-line version). Also attributed to Robert Wolseley.

Osborn MS fb 117

A portion of a folio volume of state letters, in a secretary hand, 22 pages, disbound. Early-mid-17th century.

Bought in the ‘Fenn sale 1866 (243)’. Formerly part of Phillipps MS 29759. Sotheby's, 14 June 1971, lot 1492, to Dobell.

pp. 4-8

SiP 180.98: Sir Philip Sidney, A Letter of Advice to Robert Sidney

Copy of the letter ‘to his brother beinge beyond the Seas’.

A letter beginning ‘My most deere Brother. You have thought unkindness in me, I have not written oftner unto you...’. First published in Profitable Instructions. Describing what speciall Obseruations are to be taken by Trauellers in all Nations, States and Countries (London, 1633), pp. 74-103. Feuillerat (as Correspondence No. XXXVIII), III, 124-7.

pp. 16-18

GrF 23.5: Fulke Greville, Letter to Grevill Varney on his Travels

Copy, headed ‘A letter written by Sr ffulke Grevill to a Cosen of his residinge in ffrance wherein he setts downe what observacons he thinks fitt for him to make vse of his travells’.

An epistolary essay beginning ‘My good Cousin, according to the request of your letter, dated the 19. of October, at Orleance...’, dated from Hackney, 20 November 1609. First published in Certaine Learned and Elegant Workes (London, 1633). Grosart, IV, 301-6. This essay perhaps originally written by Thomas Bodley and possibly also used by Francis Bacon and/or the Earl of Essex. Also perhaps sent by Greville to John Harris rather than Greville Varney: see Norman K. Farmer, Jr., ‘Fulke Greville's Letter to a Cousin in France and the Problem of Authorship in Cases of Formula Writing’, RQ, 22 (1969), 140-7.

Osborn MS fb 140

A folio miscellany of poems on affairs of state entitled A Collection of Poems Sayters and Lampoones, 4178 pages (but a number excised). Late 17th century.

Front endpaper inscribed ‘Latchington 2 March 1787’. Later owned by Sir Thomas Phillipps (Phillipps MS 8303). At Yale formerly Chest II, Number 3.

p. 9

ClJ 223: John Cleveland, The Definition of a Protector (‘What's a Protector? Tis a stately Thing’)

Copy.

Published in J. Cleaveland Revived (London, 1660), pp. 78-9. The Works of Mr. John Cleveland (London, 1687), p. 343. Berdan, p. 185, as ‘probably not genuine’. Rejected ‘as probably not Cleveland's’ by Withington, pp. 321-2.

pp. 18-19

MaA 190: Andrew Marvell, The Kings Vowes (‘When the Plate was at pawne, and the fobb att low Ebb’)

Copy, headed ‘King Charles the Second's vow’.

This MS collated in POAS, I.

First published as A Prophetick Lampoon, Made Anno 1659. By his Grace George Duke of Buckingham: Relating to what would happen to the Government under King Charles II [London, 1688/9]. Margoliouth, I, 173-5. POAS, I, 159-62. Lord, pp. 186-8, as ‘The Vows’. Discussed in Chernaik, pp. 212-14, where it is argued that it is of ‘unknown’ authorship, ‘possibly Marvell's’, and that the poem grew by accretions by different authors.

pp. 42-52

WaE 111: Edmund Waller, Instructions to a Painter (‘First draw the sea, that portion which between’)

Copy.

First published as a broadside (London, 1665). Poems, ‘Third’ edition (London, 1668). Thorn-Drury, II, 48-59. See also Mary Tom Osborne, Advice-to-a-Painter Poems (Austin, Texas, 1949), pp. 26-7.

pp. 53-64

MaA 359: Andrew Marvell, The Second Advice to a Painter (‘Nay, Painter, if thou dar'st design that fight’)

Copy.

This MS collated in POAS, I.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 34-53. Lord, pp. 117-30. Smith, pp. 332-43. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 28-32, as anonymous.

The case for Marvell's authorship supported in George deF. Lord, ‘Two New Poems by Marvell?’, BNYPL, 62 (1958), 551-70, but see also discussion by Lord and Ephim Fogel in Vol. 63 (1959), 223-36, 292-308, 355-66. Marvell's authorship supported in Annabel Patterson, ‘The Second and Third Advices-to-the-Painter’, PBSA, 71 (1977), 473-86. Discussed also in Margoliouth, I, 348-50, and in Chernaik, p. 211, where Marvell's authorship is considered doubtful. A case for Sir John Denham's authorship is made in Brendan O Hehir, Harmony from Discords: A Life of Sir John Denham (Berkeley & Los Angeles, 1968), pp. 212-28.

pp. 65-79

MaA 388: Andrew Marvell, The Third Advice to a Painter (‘Sandwich in Spain now, and the Duke in love’)

This MS collated in POAS, I.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 67-87. Lord, pp. 130-44. Smith, pp. 346-56. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 32-3, as anonymous.

See discussions of the disputed authorship of this poem, as well as of the ‘Second Advice’, cited before MaA 314.

pp. 79-84

MaA 422: Andrew Marvell, The Fourth Advice to a Painter (‘Draw England ruin'd by what was giv'n before’)

Copy.

This MS collated in POAS, I.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 140-6, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 33-5, as anonymous. Regarded as anonymous in Margoliouth, I, 348-50.

pp. 89-92

MaA 250: Andrew Marvell, The Statue in Stocks-Market (‘As cities that to the fierce conquerors yield’)

Copy, headed ‘On the statute erected by Sr. Robert Viner’.

Edited from this MS in POAS, I.

First published in A Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689). Margoliouth, I, 188-90. POAS, I, 266-9. Lord, pp. 193-6. Smith, pp. 416-17.

p. 110 (pinned to 108)

RoJ 434: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Song (‘Quoth the Duchess of Cleveland to counselor Knight’)

Copy of lines 1-3 only, headed ‘A Dialogue between Mall: Knight and the Dutchess of Cleaveland’, imperfect, lacking the remainder.

This MS recorded in Vieth; collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, p. 48. Walker, p. 61. Love, p. 90.

p. 123

RoJ 543: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Tunbridge Wells (‘At five this morn, when Phoebus raised his head’)

Copy of lines 146-75, here beginning ‘And on her halfe dead wom bestow new Life’, imperfect, lacking the previous portion.

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published in Richard Head, Proteus Redivivus: or the Art of Wheedling (London, 1675). Vieth, pp. 73-80. Walker, pp. 69-74. Love, pp. 49-54.

pp. 124-9

RoJ 334: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, A Satyr against Reason and Mankind (‘Were I (who to my cost already am)’)

Copy of lines 1-173, headed ‘A Satyr against Mankind by the Ld R:’.

This MS recorded in Vieth; collated in Walker.

First published (lines 1-173) as a broadside, A Satyr against Mankind [London, 1679]. Complete, with supplementary lines 174-221 (beginning ‘All this with indignation have I hurled’) in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 94-101. Walker, pp. 91-7, as ‘Satyr’. Love, pp. 57-63.

The text also briefly discussed in Kristoffer F. Paulson, ‘A Question of Copy-Text: Rochester's “A Satyr against Reason and Mankind”’, N&Q, 217 (May 1972), 177-8. Some texts followed by one or other of three different ‘Answer’ poems (two sometimes ascribed to Edward Pococke or Mr Griffith and Thomas Lessey: see Vieth, Attribution, pp. 178-9).

pp. 130-5

RoJ 104.65: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, The History of Insipids (‘Chaste, pious, prudent, Charles the Second’)

Copy.

See Vivian de Sola Pinto in ‘“The History of Insipids”: Rochester, Freke, and Marvell’, MLR, 65 (1970), 11-15 (and see also Walker, p. xvii). Rejected by Vieth, by Walker, and by Love.

p. 136

MaA 277: Andrew Marvell, Upon Blood's Attempt to Steal the Crown (‘When daring Blood, his rents to have regain'd’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon Blood's stealing the Crowne’.

This MS collated in POAS, I.

First published as a separate poem in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1697). POAS, I, 78. Lord, p. 193. Smith, p. 414.

This poem also appears as lines 178-85 of The Loyal Scot (see MaA 191-8 and Margoliouth, I, 379, 384).

For the Latin version, which accompanies many of the MS texts, see MaA 85-97.

pp. 143-4

MaA 499: Andrew Marvell, Further Advice to a Painter (‘Painter once more thy Pencell reassume’)

Copy, headed ‘Advice to a Painter’.

This MS collated in POAS, I.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1697). Margoliouth, I, 176-7. POAS, I, 163-7. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 38-9. Rejected from the canon by Lord and the authorship considered doubtful by Chernaik, pp. 211-12.

p. 167

RoJ 269: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, On the Women about Town (‘Too long the wise Commons have been in debate’)

Copy, headed ‘A Satyr’.

This MS recorded in Vieth; erroneously cited as ‘Osborn MS fb 54’ and collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1704). Vieth, pp. 46-7. Walker, pp. 68-9, as ‘Lampoone’. Love, p. 42, as ‘Lampoone by the Earle of Rochester’.

pp. 168-71

MaA 471: Andrew Marvell, Advice to a Painter to draw the Duke by (‘Spread a large canvass, Painter, to containe’)

Copy.

This MS collated in POAS, I.

First published [in London], 1679. A Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689), as by ‘A-M-l, Esq’. Thompson III, 399-403. Margoliouth, I, 214-18, as by Henry Savile. POAS, I, 213-19, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 40-2, as by Henry Savile.

p. 178

RoJ 67: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, The Disabled Debauchee (‘As some brave admiral, in former war’)

Copy, headed ‘Lo: R:s Ghost’, imperfect, lacking the last six stanzas.

This MS recorded in Vieth; collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 116-17. Walker, pp. 97-9. Love, pp. 44-5.

Osborn MS fb 142

A folio verse miscellany, predominantly in one hand, chiefly in double columns, 92 pages, lacking covers. Early 18th century.

Formerly ‘Osborn MS. Chest II, Number 4’.

p. 25

RoJ 240: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, On Rome's pardons (‘If Rome can pardon sins, as Romans hold’)

Copy, headed ‘On ye Popes Indulgencies by ye Earle of Rochester Ld: Willmote’.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 161-2. Walker, pp. 127-8, among ‘Poems Possibly by Rochester’. Love, p. 247, among Disputed Works.

pp. 25-6

RoJ 603: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Upon Nothing (‘Nothing! thou elder brother even to Shade’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon Nothing, by ye Earl of Rochester’.

This MS recorded in Vieth; collated in Walker and in Love, ‘The Text of Rochester's “Upon Nothing”’.

First published, as a broadside, [in London, 1679]. Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 118-20. Walker, pp. 62-4. Harold Love, ‘The Text of Rochester's “Upon Nothing”’, Centre for Bibliographical and Textual Studies, Monash University, Occasional Papers 1 (1985). Love, pp. 46-8.

p. 26

RnT 573: Thomas Randolph, Upon the Burning of a School (‘What heat of learning kindled your desire’)

Copy.

Published in Wit and Drollery (London, 1661), ascribed to ‘T. R.’. Usually anonymous in MS copies and the school variously identified as being in Castlethorpe or in Batley, Yorkshire, or in Lewes, Sussex, or elsewhere.

p. 33

HeR 106: Robert Herrick, The Curse. A Song (‘Goe perjur'd man. and if thou ere return’)

Copy, headed ‘On womans Beauty’.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, p. 49. Patrick, p. 69. Musical setting by John Blow published in John Playford, Choice Ayres and Songs (London, 1683).

pp. 38-41

CoA 300: Abraham Cowley, Extracts

Extract(s) from work(s) by Cowley.

pp. 42-3

BuR 1.95: Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy

Extracts.

First published in Oxford, 1621. Edited by A.R. Shilleto (introduced by A.H. Bullen), 3 vols (London, 1893). Edited variously by Thomas C. Faulkner, Nicolas K. Kiessling, Rhonda L. Blair, J.B. Bamborough, and Martin Dodsworth, 6 vols (Oxford, 1989-2000).

pp. 44-5

MaA 24: Andrew Marvell, A Dialogue between Thyrsis and Dorinda (‘When Death, shall part us from these Kids’)

Copy, headed ‘A Sonnet Sett by Matt: Lock’.

First published, in a musical setting by John Gamble, in his Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1659). Miscellaneous Poems (London, 1681). Margoliouth, I, 19-21. Lord, pp. 261-2, as of doubtful authorship. Smith pp. 244-5. The authorship doubted and discussed in Chernaik, pp. 207-8.

Osborn MS fb 143

A folio miscellany entitled Epitaphs Collected 1694, 42 pages. c.1695.

p. 9

RnT 497: Thomas Randolph, On Michaell Drayton (‘Do pious marble let thy readers know’)

Copy.

Unpublished? Generally attributed to Francis Quarles.

p. 14

RaW 99: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Euen such is tyme which takes in trust’

Copy, headed ‘Sr W. Rawleigh's Epitaph on Himself’.

First published in Richard Brathwayte, Remains after Death (London, 1618). Latham, p. 72 (as ‘These verses following were made by Sir Walter Rauleigh the night before he dyed and left att the Gate howse’). Rudick, Nos 35A, 35B, and part of 55 (three versions, pp. 80, 133).

This poem is ascribed to Ralegh in most MS copies and is often appended to copies of his speech on the scaffold (see RaW 739-822).

See also RaW 302 and RaW 304.

p. 15

DaJ 152.5: Sir John Davies, An Epitaph (‘Here lieth Kitt Craker, the kinge of good fellowes’)

Copy, headed ‘On a Bellows maker’ and here beginning ‘Here lies John Cruker a maker of Bellows’.

A version, ascribed to John Hoskyns, first published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1605). Krueger, p. 303. Edited in The Life, Letters, and Writings of John Hoskyns 1566-1638, ed. Louise Brown Osborn (New Haven & London, 1937), p. 170.

p. 19

DaJ 227.5: Sir John Davies, An other Epitaph: of one who died with the Maple Buttons (‘Heere lieth Dick Dobson iwrapped in molde’)

Copy, headed ‘On one yt was Bald’ and here beginning ‘Here lies John Baker inrolled in Mould’.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1637), p. 412. Krueger, p. 304.

p. 24

PsK 139: Katherine Philips, In memory of F.P. who dyed at Acton 24 May.1660 — 13th of her age (‘If I could ever write a lasting verse’)

Copy of a six-line version of the first ten lines, headed ‘On Mary Morris 1695 aged 3 Quarrs of a Year & nine days’.

This MS recorded in Mambretti's 1979 dissertation, p. 45.

First published in Poems (1664), pp. 75-80. Poems (1667), pp. 39-42. Saintsbury, pp. 530-1. Thomas, I, 109-11, poem 30.

p. 28

ShJ 119: James Shirley, Verses on the martyrdom of St. Alban (‘This image of our frailty, painted Glass’)

Copy, here beginning ‘The image...’.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1637), p. 408. Sir Henry Chauncy, Historical Antiquities of Hertfordshire (London, 1700), p. 472. R.G. Howarth, ‘Some Unpublished Poems of James Shirley’, RES, 9 (1933), 24-9 (p. 29). Armstrong, p. 54, as a ‘Doubtful Poem’.

p. 28

DaJ 221: Sir John Davies, On the Deputy of Ireland his child (‘As carefull mothers doe to sleeping lay’)

Copy, headed ‘On ye untimely death of a Child’ and here beginning ‘As Carefull Nurses to their Bed do lay’.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1637), p. 411. Krueger, p. 303.

pp. 32-3

HrJ 55: Sir John Harington, The Author to his wife (‘Mall, once in pleasant company by chance’)

Copy, ‘Taken out of Burton's Abstract upon Malincholy’.

This epigram is quoted in Robert Burton, Anatomy of Melancholy (Oxford, 1621), Part 2, Sect. 2, Memb. 6, subs. 4.

First published in 1615. 1618, Book IV, No. 45. McClure No. 299, pp. 268-9. Kilroy, Book IV, No. 85, pp. 240-1, as ‘To his wife a rule for Church house and bed’ beginning ‘Of late in pleasant company by chaunce’.

p. 34

JnB 136.6: Ben Jonson, Epitaph on Elizabeth, L.H. (‘Would'st thou heare, what man can say’)

Copy, headed ‘On a Genlewoman’ and here beginning ‘Wilt thou hear wt man can say’.

First published in Epigrammes (cxxiiii) in Workes (London, 1616). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 79.

p. 37

HlJ 3.8: Joseph Hall, On his Majestyes Death & his Incomparable Booke (‘Soe falls that stately Coedar, while it stood’)

Copy, unascribed.

First published, as ‘An Epitaph upon King Charles 1st’, in Eikon Basilike (1649), p. 312.

p. 41

BrW 230: William Browne of Tavistock, On the Countess Dowager of Pembroke (‘Underneath this sable herse’)

Copy.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1623), p. 340. Brydges (1815), p. 5. Goodwin, II, 294. Browne's authorship supported in C.F. Main, ‘Two Items in the Jonson Apocrypha’, N&Q, 199 (June 1954), 243-5.

p. 43

WoH 197.8: Sir Henry Wotton, Upon the Death of Sir Albert Morton's Wife (‘He first deceased. she for a little tried’)

Copy, headed ‘On two Louers who di'd before they were Married’, here beginning ‘She ffirst deceas'd, he for a Little tryed’.

First published as an independent couplet in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1636). Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 529. Hannah (1845), p. 44. The authorship is uncertain.

This couplet, which was subject to different versions over the years, is in fact lines 5-6 of a twelve-line poem beginning ‘Here lye two Bodyes happy in their kinds’, which has also been attributed to George Herbert: see HrG 290.5-290.8.

Osborn MS fb 150

A folio miscellany of verse and prose, in several hands, 131 pages (plus numerous blanks), in contemporary calf gilt. Inscribed on a flyleaf ‘Capton Roydome’: i.e. owned and possibly compiled in part by Sir Marmaduke Rawdon (1583-1646), merchant, and one of his servants, perhaps Richard Swinarton, whose name appears elsewhere. c.1629-32.

Sotheby's, 16 May 1972, lot 448.

item 6

MhM 1: Martha Moulsworth, The Memorandum of Martha Moulsworth Widowe (‘The tenth day of the winter month Nouember’)

Copy, in a cursive mixed hand, superscribed ‘Nouember the 10th 1632’, on three pages.

Edited from this MS, and discussed, in Evans and Wiedemann (1993). Also edited (and extensively discussed by various contributors), with a complete facsimile, in the collection of essays on the poem ‘The Muses Females Are’: Martha Moulsworth and Other Women Writers of the English Renaissance, ed. Robert C. Evans and Anne C. Little (West Cornwall, CT, 1995) (esp. pp. 203-20). Facsimile of the first page, with transcription, also in Reading Early Modern Women, ed. Helen Ostovich and Elizabeth Sauer (New York & London, 2004), pp. 258-9.

An autobiographical poem, comprising 55 couplets (corresponding to the author's age), dated 10 November 1632. First published in ‘My Name Was Martha’: A Renaissance Woman's Autobiographical Poem by Martha Moulsworth, ed. Robert C. Evans and Barbara Wiedemann (West Cornwall, CT, 1993).

Osborn MS fb 155

A folio composite volume of state papers, in various hands, c.543 pages (including blanks), in contemporary vellum.

Formerly among the Braye Manuscripts, descending from John Browne (1608-91), Clerk of the Parliaments, whose daughter Martha married Sir Roger Cave, Bt, of Stanford Hall, Rugby, seat of successive Lords Braye. Christie's, 23 June 1954, lot 108.

Recorded in HMC 15, 10th Report, Appendix VI (1887), Appendix, Part VI, p. 122. A complete set of photocopies is in the Parliamentary Archives, BRY/96.

pp. 379-80

RaW 997: Sir Walter Ralegh, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Ralegh to James I.

pp. 381-2

RaW 732.8: Sir Walter Ralegh, Ralegh's Second Testamentary Note

Copy, headed ‘Sr Walter Raleighs Protestacon at his Death’.

Ralegh's note, 1618, denouncing false allegations, beginning ‘I did never receive advise from my Lord Carew to make any escape, neither did I tell ytt Stukeley...’. First published in The Works of Sir Walter Ralegh, ed. Thomas Birch (London, 1751), II, 280-1. Edwards (1868), II, 494-5.

p. 492

RoJ 661: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Letter(s)

Copy of ‘A letter to Dr. Burney from the Earle of Rochester, as he lay on his death Bed wrote wth his own Hand. 25 June 1680 at 12. at night’. c.1680.

Osborn MS fb 158

A folio composite volume of parliamentary papers, in various professional hands and paper sizes, c.440 pages. 17th century.

Formerly among the Braye Manuscripts, descending from John Browne (1608-91), Clerk of the Parliaments, whose daughter Martha married Sir Roger Cave, Bt, of Stanford Hall, Rugby, seat of successive Lords Braye. Christie's, 23 June 1954, lot 111.

Recorded in HMC, 10th Report, Appendix VI. A complete photocopy is in the Parliamentary Archives, Braye MS/51.

pp. 120-5

CtR 134: Sir Robert Cotton, Certaine generall rules Collected concerning money and bullion out of the late Consultacion at Court

Copy of the treatise, as ‘by Sir Robert Cotton kt and Barronett and delivered to his Majesty at the Bord’, incomplete, [1626].

Unpublished?

[unspecified page numbers]

BcF 531: Francis Bacon, Bacon's Humble Submissions and Supplications

Copy of Bacon's submission on 22 April 1621, on six pages.

The Humble Submissions and Supplications Bacon sent to the House of Lords, on 19 March 1620/1 (beginning ‘I humbly pray your Lordships all to make a favourable and true construction of my absence...’); 22 April 1621 (beginning ‘It may please your Lordships, I shall humbly crave at your Lordships' hands a benign interpretation...’); and 30 April 1621 (beginning ‘Upon advised consideration of the charge, descending into mine own conscience...’), written at the time of his indictment for corruption. Spedding, XIV, 215-16, 242-5, 252-62.

Osborn MS fb 164

A Composite volume of speeches and proceedings in the House of Commons, in various professional hands, 170 pages, of various sizes. Mid-17th century.

Once owned by Hudson Gurney (1775-1864), antiquary and banker.

ff. 199v-200

HlJ 29.5: Joseph Hall, Episcopal Admonition, Sent in a Letter to the House of Commons, April 28, 1628

Copy.

See HlJ 17-30.

Osborn MS fb 165

A folio volume principally of proceedings in Parliament from 17 March to 26 June 1628, in various professional hands, 476 pages (plus blanks), in 17th-century reversed calf. 17th century.

The name Thomas Cole inscribed on front pastedown. Later owned by the Rev. Dr Cox Macro (1683-1767), antiquary, and subsequently by Hudson Gurney (1775-1864), antiquary and banker.

pp. 15-24

CtR 202: Sir Robert Cotton, The Danger wherein this Kingdome now Standeth, and the Remedy

Copy. c.1628-30s.

Tract beginning ‘As soon as the house of Austria had incorporated it self into the house of Spaine...’. First published London, 1628. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. 308-20.

pp. 348-9

HlJ 29.6: Joseph Hall, Episcopal Admonition, Sent in a Letter to the House of Commons, April 28, 1628

See HlJ 17-30.

Osborn MS fb 166

Copy, on 25 folio leaves, bound with a parliamentary journal for 1628. c.1630.

CtR 203: Sir Robert Cotton, The Danger wherein this Kingdome now Standeth, and the Remedy

Tract beginning ‘As soon as the house of Austria had incorporated it self into the house of Spaine...’. First published London, 1628. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. 308-20.

Osborn MS fb 175

A folio composite volume of speeches and proceedings in the House of Commons in 1628, c.225 pages, in modern calf. Mid-17th century.

Inscribed on f. iiv‘madam Kelsey’. Owned in 1841 by William Pickering (1796-1854), publisher. Afterwards by Sir Thomas Phillipps (Phillipps MS 10819).

f. 33r

HlJ 29.8: Joseph Hall, Episcopal Admonition, Sent in a Letter to the House of Commons, April 28, 1628

Copy.

See HlJ 17-30.

Osborn MS fb 178

A folio volume of state tracts, in various hands, 273 pages. Early-mid-17th century.

Once owned by Sir Richard Grosvenor (1585-1645). Formerly owned by the Marquis of Westminster, Eaton Hall, Cheshire (‘Liber 5’ = MS 8). Sotheby's, 19 July 1966, lot 485, to Dobell.

Recorded in HMC, 3rd Report (1872), Appendix, p. 212. A microfilm of the MS is in the British Library, RP 45.

ff. 1r-16v

RaW 672: Sir Walter Ralegh, A Discourse touching a War with Spain, and of the Protecting of the Netherlands

Copy.

A tract addressed to James I and beginning ‘It belongeth not to me to judge whether the king of Spain hath done wrong to the Netherlands...’. First published in Three Discourses of Sir Walter Ralegh (London 1702). Works (1829), VIII, 299-316.

ff. 210-31

CtR 522: Sir Robert Cotton, Twenty-four Argvments, Whether it be more expedient to suppress Popish Practises against the due Allegeance of His Majesty, by the Strict Execution touching Jesuits and Seminary Preists? Or, to restraine them to Close Prisons, during life, if no Reformation follow?

Tract beginning ‘I am not ignorant, that this latter age hath brought forth a swarm of busie heads...’, dated 11 August 1613. First published in two editions, as respectively Seriovs Considerations for Repressing of the Increase of Iesvites and A Treatise against Recusants (both London, 1641). Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [109]-159.

Osborn MS fb 190/1

Copy of a letter by Davenant to William Legge, from London, 1 January 1641[/2]. c.1642.

DaW 122: Sir William Davenant, Letter(s)

Osborn MS fb 206

A folio volume comprising two tracts relating to the Earl of Leicester (the second ‘The Earle of Lecisters Ghoast’), probably in a single mixed hand with variations, 292 pages, in contemporary calf gilt. Early 17th century.

pp. 1-204

LeC 89: Anon, Leicester's Commonwealth

Copy.

First published as The Copie of a Leter, Wryten by a Master of Arte of Cambrige, to his Friend in London, Concerning some talke past of late betwen two worshipful and graue men, about the present state, and some procedinges of the Erle of Leycester and his friendes in England ([? Rouen], 1584). Soon banned. Reprinted as Leycesters common-wealth (London, 1641). Edited, as Leicester's Commonwealth, by D.C. Peck (Athens, OH, & London, 1985). Although various attributions have been suggested by Peck and others, the most likely author remains Robert Persons (1546-1610), Jesuit conspirator.

Osborn MS fb 207

A folio miscellany of verse and some prose, principally on affairs of state, 320 pages (plus blanks), with a table of contents, in contemporary vellum. c.1701.

The name Edward H. Finch-Hatton inscribed on a flyleaf. Bookplate of Alfred Morrison (1821-97), autograph manuscript and art collector. Sotheby's, May 1919 (Morrison sale Part IV), lot 2942, sold to George D. Smith for Carl H. Pforzheimer (1879-1957), financier and book collector.

1st Book, p. 8

HrJ 239.5: Sir John Harington, Of certain puritan wenches (‘Six of the weakest sex and purest sect’)

Copy, headed ‘The Holy Sisters’ and here beginning ‘Six Holy Sisters of ye purest Sect’.

First published (anonymously) in Rump: or An Exact Collection of the Choycest Poems and Songs (London, 1662), II, 158-9. McClure No. 356, p. 292. Kilroy, Book II, No. 94, p. 164.

1st Book, p. 38

DoC 209.8: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On the Countess of Dorchester (IV) (‘Tell me, Dorinda, why so gay’)

Copy, headed ‘A Satyr Dorset on Dorchester’.

First published in A Collection of Miscellany Poems, by Mr. Brown (London, 1699). POAS, V (1971), 385. Harris, pp. 45-6.

3rd Book, p. 37

DoC 184.5: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On the Countess of Dorchester (II) (‘Dorinda's sparkling wit and eyes’)

Copy, headed ‘A Satyr or Dorset on Dorchester’.

First published in A Collection of Miscellany Poems, by Mr. Brown (London, 1699). POAS, V (1971), 384. Harris, pp. 43-4.

3rd Book, p. 38

DrJ 78.5: John Dryden, The Lady's Song (‘A Quire of bright Beauties in Spring did appear’)

Copy, headed ‘A Song Made agt May Day 1691 by Mr Dryden’.

First published in Poeticall Miscellanies: The Fifth Part (London, 1704). Kinsley, IV, 1774. California, III, 223. Hammond, III, 247-8.

Osborn MS fb 217

Autograph MS of ten books of epigrams. Containing over 1000 epigrams, on 266 large folio leaves (measuring c.35 x 24 cm and irregularly paginated 1-542), with a dedication to James, Marquess of Hamilton (pp. 1-6), an ‘epistle lectural’ to the Reader (pp. 7-10), a title-page (p. 19: ‘Ten Books of Epigrams, the Curiositie whereof, for Conception, stile, instruction, and other mixtures of show, and substance, being no lesse fruitfull, then pleasing to the diligent peruser, are intituled Apollo, and the Muses: Written by the right Worshipfull Sir Thomas Urchard knight’), an ‘Introduction’ (pp. 20-8), a ‘prolog’ (pp. 29-30), and an ‘invocation To Apollo and the Muses’ (p. 30); the various books also ushered in with separate title-pages, dedications (to the Marquess of Huntley, Earls of Arundel, Northumberland, Pembroke, Dorset, Holland, Newcastle, Strafford, and Lords Craven and Gowran), epistles to the ‘judicious’ or ‘gracious’ Reader, and invocations (to the Muses: Apollo, Clio, Euterpe, Thalia, Melpomene, Urania, Terpsichore, Erato, Poly[hi]mnia, and Calliope); concluding with ‘an epilog’ (pp. 361-2), ‘fareweil to the Patrons’ (pp. 362-3), ‘adiew to Apollo and the Muses’ (p. 364), and a ‘Corollarie’ including prose introduction, verse dialogue, prose ‘Animadversion’, draft notes and more verses (pp. 367-95), ‘A Consertarie from the Printer’ (p. 396), ‘A Table’ under alphabetical headings (pp. 397-449), a list of words (pp. 450-2), a prose ‘advertisement’ (p. 452), ‘An explicatarie index of the harshest and most difficult words contained in the preceeding epigrams’ (pp. 453-77), a prose ‘conclusion’ (pp. 478-9), ‘the aftershot’ (p. 480), another catalogue of words (pp. 481-94), and a prose essay ‘Of Lust, and anger’ followed by further draft epigrams (pp. 485-542); the text including a ‘chronogram of this present year 1640’. c.1640-1.

*UrT 1: Thomas Urquhart, Epigrams (‘Great Monarch, since the Worlds Nativitie’)

Owned in 1683 by George Ogilvie, Master of Banff. Sotheby's, 17 November 1920 (John Ferguson sale), lot 949, to Bain.

This MS discussed in Charles Whibley, Studies in Frankness (London, 1898), p. 245; Willcock (1899), pp. 5, 40-1, 109, 116-17, with quotations and (after p. 116) a facsimile example; Kelsie B. Harder, ‘Sir Thomas Urquhart's Definition of Wit’, N&Q, 199 (April 1954), 154-5; and Jack & Lyall, pp. 6, 38. Complete microfilm in the Bodleian (MS Film 86). Facsimile example also in Laurence Witten, ‘Contemporary Collectors XXIII: James Marshall Osborn’, The Book Collector, 8 (Winter 1959), 383-96 (after p. 392); and see Facsimile XVII in IELM, II/2.

An edition of Epigrams: Divine and Moral, comprising three books of 132 epigrams in all, published in London, 1641. Reprinted in London, 1646. Most of Urquhart's epigrams unpublished.

Osborn MS fb 219

Autograph letter signed by Davenant, to [Edward, second Viscount Conway], from Newcastle, 24 [August 1640]. 1640.

*DaW 121: Sir William Davenant, Letter(s)

Puttick & Simpson, 3 June 1878, lot 91. Sotheby's, 27 February, 1882, lot 20. Sotheby's, 9 November 1965, lot 358, to Dobell.

Quoted in Nethercot, pp. 187-8.

Osborn MS fb 220/1

A folio composite volume of state papers, in various hands, in 19th-century calf.

The spine labelled ‘Monson Mss. CCXII’.

item 10

HrE 142.5: Edward, Lord Herbert of Cherbury, Translation of Bacon's Elogium Elizabethae

Copy, headed ‘The felicitie of Queene Elizabeth written by Sr. ffran: Bacon’, on eight folio pages.

Unpublished.

See also BcF 298-300.

Osborn MS fb 220/2

A folio composite volume of state papers, in various hands, in 19th-century calf.

The spine labelled ‘Monson Mss. CCXIII’.

item 1

WoH 262.8: Sir Henry Wotton, A Parallel between Robert Earl of Essex and George Duke of Buckingham

Copy, in a professional hand, on 21 folio leaves, numbered ‘5’. c.1630.

First published in London, 1641. Edited by Sir Robert Egerton Brydges (Lee Priory Press, Ickham, 1814).

Osborn MS fb 228

A folio composite volume of MS poems presented to, or owned by, James Butler (1610-88), first Duke of Ormonde, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, c.120 pages, of various sizes, in 19th-century calf. Some items docketed by Ormonde or by his private secretary Sir George Lane. Mid-late 17th century.

Formerly British Library Loan MS 37/6. The greater part of the collection sold at Sotheby's, 19 July 1994, lot 276, to C.R. Johnson Rare Books. Photocopies are in the British Library, RP 6829.

Recorded in HMC, 14th Report, Appendix VII, Ormonde I (1895), pp. 105-18.

pp. 1-2

DeJ 103: Sir John Denham, To the Five Members of the Honourable House of Commons. The Humble Petition of the Poets (‘After so many Concurring Petitions’)

Copy on a single folio leaf.

First published in Rump: or an Exact Collection of the Choycest Poems and Songs (London, 1662). Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 128-9.

p. 28

ClJ 224: John Cleveland, The Definition of a Protector (‘What's a Protector? Tis a stately Thing’)

Copy.

Published in J. Cleaveland Revived (London, 1660), pp. 78-9. The Works of Mr. John Cleveland (London, 1687), p. 343. Berdan, p. 185, as ‘probably not genuine’. Rejected ‘as probably not Cleveland's’ by Withington, pp. 321-2.

pp. 56-7

DeJ 21: Sir John Denham, A Dialogue between Sir John Pooley and Mr. Thomas Killigrew (‘To thee, Dear Thom. my self addressing’)

Copy, untitled and here beginning ‘Pooly. Deare Tom, to thee my selfe addressing’ on two conjugate quarto leaves.

This MS collated in Banks.

First published in Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 103-6.

p. 58

WaE 142: Edmund Waller, Of a Tree cut in Paper (‘Fair hand! that can on virgin paper write’)

Copy with corrections, headed ‘Of a fayre Lady that cut Trees in paper’, on a single folio leaf.

First published, in a fourteen-line version, in Poems, ‘Third’ edition (London, 1668). A 22-line version in Thorn-Drury, II, 68.

p. 133

WaE 541: Edmund Waller, To His Majesty, upon his Motto, Beati Pacifici, occasioned by the taking of Buda, 1686 (‘Buda and Rhodes proud Solyman had torn’)

Copy, on the first page of a pair of conjugate folio leaves, endorsed on the fourth page in Ormonde's hand ‘Mr Wallers verses to ye King’. c.1686.

First published as a separate leaf inserted in some exempla of Poems, ‘Fifth’ edition (London, 1686). Thorn-Drury, II, 106-7.

p. 157

DoC 228: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On the Young Statesmen (‘Clarendon had law and sense’)

Copy of lines 1-10, in a non-professional hand, untitled, on a single quarto leaf. Late 17th century.

First published in A Third Collection of…Poems, Satyrs, Songs (London, 1689). POAS, II (1965), 339-41. Harris, pp. 50-4.

p. 195

DeJ 58: Sir John Denham, On Mr. Tho. Killigrew's Return from his Embassie from Venice, and Mr. William Murray's from Scotland (‘Our Resident Tom, From Venice is come’)

Copy, in a neat professional hand, on a single folio leaf. Late 17th century.

First published in Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 111-12.

Osborn MS fb 230

Calligraphic funerary placard for Vincent Corbett, on a membrane of vellum, c.58.5 x 54.5cm, with pin holes. Comprising three English and Latin elegies on Vincent Corbett (‘He Dyed the xxvith: of Aprill in the Yeare of our Lord 1619’), by his son Richard Corbett, John Selden, and Ben Jonson, arranged in columns under the engrossed title ‘Sacred to the Memory of Vincent Corbet’, with an unattributed four-line epitaph at the foot To the Reader (‘Reader whose life and name did ere become’), in the form of a memorial tablet, with borders decorated in colours. This is evidently the original funerary placard for Vincent Corbett hung up in St Mary's Church, Twickenham, after 26 April 1619. 1619.

This MS once owned by John Evelyn. Thomas Rodd, ‘Catalogue of a Collection of Manuscripts’ (1838), item 317. Afterwards owned by William Upcott and sold at the Duke of Berwick sale 1843. Christie's 29 May 1986, lot 199 (with facsimile example in the sale catalogue). Quaritch's sale catalogue No. 1066 (Winter 1986), item 99 (with colour facsimile).

A photograph is in the British Library, RP 3523.

First verses

CoR 93: Richard Corbett, An Elegie Upon the death of his owne Father (‘Vincent Corbet, farther knowne’)

Copy, the first two words in engrossed and decorated lettering, subscribed ‘Rich: Corbet’, in the left column.

First published (omitting the last four lines) in Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Published with the last four lines in Poëtica Stromata ([no place], 1648). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 67-9.

Third verses

JnB 142.5: Ben Jonson, An Epitaph on Master Vincent Corbet (‘I have my Pietie too, which could’)

Copy, headed ‘On the same’, in the right column beneath John Selden's 19-line epitaph Ad ejusdem Manes (‘Æternâ requie jaces beatas’).

First published in The Vnder-wood (xii) in Workes (London, 1640). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 151-2.

Osborn MS fb 236

A folio volume of state and religious tracts and letters, chiefly relating to Ireland, in various predominantly secretary hands, c.240 pages, in contemporary vellum, worn. c.early 1600s.

Inscribed on p. 1 ‘Anne Holland Booke’ [possibly the daughter of Richard Holland (c.1598-1661), lawyer and MP in Lancashire, and wife of Edward Kenyon (c.1630-68), rector of Prestwich near Manchester]. Later owned by Lloyd Tyrell-Kenyon (1917-93), fifth Baron Kenyon, of Gredington, Shropshire, President of the National Portrait Gallery, and then by Martin Schoyen, of Oslo and London, manuscript collector (his MS 2198). Quaritch's sale catalogue (Summer 1996), item 24.

A microfilm of this volume is in the British Library, RP 6317.

pp. 40-[120]

SpE 63.5: Edmund Spenser, A View of the Present State of Ireland

In a single secretary hand, but for the heading in italic: ‘This booke here followinge (called A veiwe of the present state of Ireland) was made by mr Spencer, in the time that Sr Willm Russell knight was lord deputie of Irelande [i.e. Sir William Russell (c.1558-1613), Lord Deputy of Ireland in 1594-7]. Anno domini [no date]/ A veiwe of the prsente state of Ireland discoursed by waye of A Dialogue betweene Eudoxus & Irenivs’.

First published in Sir James Ware, The Historie of Ireland (Dublin, 1633). Variorum, Prose Works (ed. Rudolf Gottfried), pp. 39-231.

Spenser's authorship of this ‘View’ is generally accepted, especially in light of the comparable views about Ireland in The Faerie Queene. A cautionary note about authorship is sounded, however, in Jean R. Brink, ‘Constructing the View of the Present State of Ireland’, Spenser Studies, 11 (1994), 203-28; in her ‘Appropriating the Author of The Faerie Queene: The Attribution of the View of the Present State of Ireland and A Brief Note of Ireland to Edmund Spenser’, in Soundings of Things Done: Essays in Early Modern Literature in Honor of S.K. Heninger, Jr., ed. Peter E. Medine and Joseph Wittreich (Newark, Delaware, 1997), 93-136. See also, inter alia, Andrew Hadfield, ‘Certainties and Uncertainties: By Way of Response to Jean Brink’, Spenser Studies, 12 (1998), 197-202, and Jean R. Brink, ‘Spenser and the Irish Question: Reply to Andrew Hadfield’, Spenser Studies, 13 (1999), 265-6.

Osborn MS fb 243

A folio volume of Jacobean political tracts and verse, 103 leaves. Mid-17th century.

Once owned by John Loveday (1711-89), antiquary and traveller.

[unspecified page numbers]

RaW 739.5: Sir Walter Ralegh, Speech on the Scaffold (29 October 1618)

Copy.

Transcripts of Ralegh's speech have been printed in his Remains (London, 1657). Works (1829), I, 558-64, 691-6. VIII, 775-80, and elsewhere. Copies range from verbatim transcripts to summaries of the speech, they usually form part of an account of Ralegh's execution, they have various headings, and the texts differ considerably. For a relevant discussion, see Anna Beer, ‘Textual Politics: The Execution of Sir Walter Ralegh’, MP, 94/1 (August 1996), 19-38.

fb 249

Copy, headed ‘Observations Political and Civil’.

RaW 1057.5: Sir Walter Ralegh, The Cabinet-Council: containing the Chief Arts of Empire and Mysteries of State

A treatise beginning ‘A Commonwealth is a certain sovereign government of many families...’. First published, attributed to Sir Walter Ralegh in John Milton's preface ‘To the Reader’, as The Cabinet-Council [&c.] (London, 1658). Works (1829), VIII, 35-150.

Widely circulated in MSS as Observations Political and Civil. The various attributions include ‘T.B.’, for whom Thomas Bedingfield (early 1540s?-1613), translator of Machiavelli, is suggested in Ernest A. Strathmann, ‘A Note on the Ralegh Canon’, TLS (13 April 1956), p. 228, and in Lefranc (1968), p. 64.

Osborn MS fc 51

A folio verse miscellany, 317 pages. Owned and possibly compiled by Frances Boscawen (née Glanville, d.1805). Mid-18th century.

p. 22

MkM 20: Mary Monck, Verses Wrote on her Death-Bed at Bath, to her Husband, in London (‘Thou, who dost all my worldly thoughts employ’)

Copy.

Twenty-two lines, first published, introduced ‘The following verses were wrote by her (as I am inform'd) on her death-bed at Bath, to her husband in London’, in George Ballard, Memoirs of Several Ladies of Great Britain (Oxford, 1752), pp. 418-22.

Osborn MS fc 60

A folio verse miscellany, in a single neat hand, with some rubrication, 122 pages, with an index, in contemporary marbled boards. With a title-page: ‘Poems on Various Subjects Extracted cheifly from the Works of Some of the Most Celebrated Poets Scribendo Disces MDCCXLVII’. 1747.

p. 47

WaE 113.5: Edmund Waller, Long and Short Life (‘Circles are praised, not that abound’)

Copy, headed ‘On Long and Short Life. By Mr Waller’.

First published in The Second Part of Mr. Waller's Poems (London, 1690). Thorn-Drury, II, 112.

pp. 48-9

OtT 5: Thomas Otway, The sixteenth Ode Of the second Book of Horace (‘In Storms when Clouds the Moon do hide’)

Copy, headed ‘Horace Ode 16 Liber 2 oluem Dives rogat &ca. By Mr Otway’.

First published in Miscellany Poems (London, 1684). Ghosh, II, 447-8.

pp. 52-3

WaE 663.5: Edmund Waller, Translated out of French (‘Fade, flowers! fade, Nature will have it so’)

Copy, headed ‘From the French By Mr Waller’.

First published in The Maid's Tragedy Altered (London, 1690). Poems, ‘Seventh’ edition (London, 1705). Thorn-Drury, II, 112.

pp. 57-8

DrJ 102.4: John Dryden, The Monument of a Fair Maiden Lady, who dy'd at Bath, and is there Interr'd (‘Below this Marble Monument, is laid’)

Copy, headed ‘The Monument Of a fair Maiden Lady Who dyed at Bath and was there interr'd. By Mr Dryden’.

Kinsley, IV, 1740-1. Hammond, V, 28-9.

pp. 73-6

OrR 1: Roger Boyle, Baron Broghill and Earl of Orrery, On the Death of Mr Abraham Cowley and his Burial in Westminster Abbey. By the Earl of Orrery (‘Our Wit till Cowley did its Lustre raise’)

Copy, ascribed to ‘The Earl of Orrery’.

pp. 77-80

CoA 55.5: Abraham Cowley, The Country Mouse (‘At the large foot of a fair hollow tree’)

Copy, ascribed to ‘Mr Cowley’.

First published in Poems, by Several Persons (Dublin, 1663). Verses, Lately Written upon several Occasions (London, 1663). Waller, II, 414-16.

pp. 80-1

CoA 103.5: Abraham Cowley, Martial. L. 2. Vis fieri Liber? &c. (‘Would you be Free? 'Tis your chief wish, you say’)

Copy, ascribed to ‘Mr Cowley’.

First published, among Several Discourses by way of Essays, in Verse and Prose, in Works (London, 1668). Waller, II, 387.

p. 119

JnB 136.8: Ben Jonson, Epitaph on Elizabeth, L.H. (‘Would'st thou heare, what man can say’)

Copy of line 3 et seq., headed ‘Another [Epitaph] on the Lady Elizabeth LH’ and here beginning ‘Underneath this Stone doth lye’.

First published in Epigrammes (cxxiiii) in Workes (London, 1616). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 79.

Osborn MS fc 61

A folio composite volume of verse, 145 pages, in Middle Hill boards. Late 17th century.

Previously owned by John Wilson (1719-83) of Broomhead Hall. Later Phillipps MS 17696. Later owned by C.K. Ogden (1889-1957) and sold at Sotheby's, 31 July 1962, lot 620, to Dobell.

pp. 1-8

MaA 360: Andrew Marvell, The Second Advice to a Painter (‘Nay, Painter, if thou dar'st design that fight’)

Copy on five folio leaves.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 34-53. Lord, pp. 117-30. Smith, pp. 332-43. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 28-32, as anonymous.

The case for Marvell's authorship supported in George deF. Lord, ‘Two New Poems by Marvell?’, BNYPL, 62 (1958), 551-70, but see also discussion by Lord and Ephim Fogel in Vol. 63 (1959), 223-36, 292-308, 355-66. Marvell's authorship supported in Annabel Patterson, ‘The Second and Third Advices-to-the-Painter’, PBSA, 71 (1977), 473-86. Discussed also in Margoliouth, I, 348-50, and in Chernaik, p. 211, where Marvell's authorship is considered doubtful. A case for Sir John Denham's authorship is made in Brendan O Hehir, Harmony from Discords: A Life of Sir John Denham (Berkeley & Los Angeles, 1968), pp. 212-28.

Osborn MS fc 132/1

One of a set of two commonplace books compiled by James Forbes (1749-1819), c.500 pages in all. 1766-1800.

p. 165

MkM 21: Mary Monck, Verses Wrote on her Death-Bed at Bath, to her Husband, in London (‘Thou, who dost all my worldly thoughts employ’)

Copy.

Twenty-two lines, first published, introduced ‘The following verses were wrote by her (as I am inform'd) on her death-bed at Bath, to her husband in London’, in George Ballard, Memoirs of Several Ladies of Great Britain (Oxford, 1752), pp. 418-22.

Osb MSS File 44.24

A slip of paper inscribed by Cotton ‘present this To the honored Mr Byron. from the humblest of his servants Charles Cotton’. Late 17th century.

*CnC 161: Charles Cotton, Inscription(s)

Osb MSS File 3276

Copy, on six folio pages. Late 17th century.

ClE 89: Edward Hyde, First Earl of Clarendon, The Humble Petition and Address of Clarendon in 1667

Petition beginning ‘I cannot express the insupportable trouble and grief of mind I sustain...’. Published as To the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament Assembled: The Humble Petition and Address of Clarendon, [in London, 1667?] and subsequently reprinted widely, sometimes under the title News from Dunkirk-house: or, Clarendon's Farewell to England Dec 3 1667.

Osb MSS File 3609

Autograph letter signed, to Jacob Tonson, [from Tunbridge], 12 August 1693. 1693.

*CgW 75: William Congreve, Letter(s)

Christie's, 17 December 1907 (Tonson sale), lot 153, to Sotheran.

Hodges, No. 57. McKenzie, III, 137 (Letter 2).

Osborn MSS File 3743

A frontispiece engraving of the Duc d'Espernon, evidently extracted from an exemplum of Cotton's The History of the Life of the Duke of Espernon (London, 1670), inscribed on the verso by Cotton to Thomas Orme. c.1670.

*CnC 162: Charles Cotton, Inscription(s)

Facsimile of the inscription in Parks, p. 16.

Osb MSS File 3744

Copy of a 62-line version, headed ‘Upon my Lady Mary Fitz-Herbert by Charles Cotton esqr.’ and here beginning ‘How blest was I when I was free’, on both sides of a single (extracted) folio leaf.

CnC 17: Charles Cotton, Elegy (‘How was I blest when I was free’)

This MS once formed part of the Derby MS (Derby Central Library, fmss 8470) and is in in Hand H. Later owned by Mrs D.C. Scratchley. Sotheby's, 31 October 1961, lot 219. Formerly in Files/Cotton.

This MS discussed in Parks.

First published in Poems (1689), pp. 382-5. Beresford, pp. 238-9.

Osborn MSS File 3784

Autograph letter signed, [to Dr. Richard Busby], [1662?]

*CoA 244: Abraham Cowley, Letter(s)

Sotheby's, 18 November 1929, lot 146, with a facsimile in the sale catalogue.

Edited in Gentleman's Magazine, 57.ii (October 1787), 847. Reprinted in Grosart, I, xxxiv, and in Nethercot, p. 224.

Osborn MSS File 3785 [item i]

Autograph letter signed, to Sir Robert Long, from Paris, 21 December 1649. 1649.

*CoA 223: Abraham Cowley, Letter(s)

Osborn MSS File 3785, [item ii]

Autograph letter signed, [to Sir Robert Long], from Paris, 12 February ‘1650’. 1650/1.

*CoA 235: Abraham Cowley, Letter(s)

Maggs's sale catalogue No. 451 (1924), item 726, with a facsimile (Plate IV).

Edited from a facsimile in H.P. Vincent, ‘Three Unpublished Letters of Abraham Cowley’, MLN, 54 (1939), 454-8 (pp. 456-7).

Osb MSS File 4171

Autograph letter signed, to Alderman James Watkinson, from Amsterdam, 19 October 1643. 1643.

*DaW 124: Sir William Davenant, Letter(s)

Formerly in Files/Davenant.

Osb MSS File 4185

Copy; 50 pages. c.1619-26.

DaJ 238: Sir John Davies, Charge to the Jurors of the Grand Inquest at York [in 1619]

Charge beginning ‘You my Masters that are sworn, I am to direct my Speech principally unto you...’. First published (from a MS owned by A. Cooper Ramgard, Barrister) in Grosart, III (1876), 243-81.

Osborn MSS File 4299

A quarto booklet of Advice to Painter poems. Late 17th century.

pp. [1-14]

MaA 356: Andrew Marvell, The Second Advice to a Painter (‘Nay, Painter, if thou dar'st design that fight’)

Copy, here ascribed to Denham.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 34-53. Lord, pp. 117-30. Smith, pp. 332-43. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 28-32, as anonymous.

The case for Marvell's authorship supported in George deF. Lord, ‘Two New Poems by Marvell?’, BNYPL, 62 (1958), 551-70, but see also discussion by Lord and Ephim Fogel in Vol. 63 (1959), 223-36, 292-308, 355-66. Marvell's authorship supported in Annabel Patterson, ‘The Second and Third Advices-to-the-Painter’, PBSA, 71 (1977), 473-86. Discussed also in Margoliouth, I, 348-50, and in Chernaik, p. 211, where Marvell's authorship is considered doubtful. A case for Sir John Denham's authorship is made in Brendan O Hehir, Harmony from Discords: A Life of Sir John Denham (Berkeley & Los Angeles, 1968), pp. 212-28.

pp. [14-32]

MaA 385: Andrew Marvell, The Third Advice to a Painter (‘Sandwich in Spain now, and the Duke in love’)

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 67-87. Lord, pp. 130-44. Smith, pp. 346-56. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 32-3, as anonymous.

See discussions of the disputed authorship of this poem, as well as of the ‘Second Advice’, cited before MaA 314.

pp. [33-8]

MaA 418: Andrew Marvell, The Fourth Advice to a Painter (‘Draw England ruin'd by what was giv'n before’)

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 140-6, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 33-5, as anonymous. Regarded as anonymous in Margoliouth, I, 348-50.

pp. [46-50]

MaA 138: Andrew Marvell, Clarindon's House-Warming (‘When Clarindon had discern'd beforehand’)

First published with Directions to a Painter…Of Sir John Denham ([London], 1667). Margoliouth, I, 143-6. POAS, I, 88-96. Lord, pp. 144-51. Smith, pp. 358-61.

pp. [50-1]

MaA 299: Andrew Marvell, Upon his House (‘Here lies the sacred Bones’)

First published with Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). Margoliouth, I, 146-7. Rejected from the canon by Lord and also by Chernaik, p. 211.

p. [51]

MaA 289: Andrew Marvell, Upon his Grand-Children (‘Kendal is dead, and Cambridge riding post’)

First published with Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). Margoliouth, I, 147. Rejected from the canon by Lord and also by Chernaik, p. 211.

Osb MSS File 4629

Copy on a single folio leaf formerly among the papers of the Townshend family. c.1690s.

DrJ 151: John Dryden, Prologue To The Prophetess. Spoken by Mr. Betterton (‘What Nostradame, with all his Art can guess’)

First published in Thomas Betterton, The Prophetess: or, The History of Dioclesian (London, 1690). Poems on Affairs of State, Part III (London, 1698). Kinsley, II, 556-7. California, III, 255-6. Hammond, III, 231-4.

Osb MSS File 4794

Autograph letter signed, to Sir Richard Browne, [from Paris], 9 July [1654]. 1654.

*EaJ 90: John Earle, Bishop of Worcester and Salisbury, Letter(s)

Formerly Osborn Files /Earle.

Osb MSS File 5095

Autograph historical notes on the Leagues of the Grisons on a single quarto leaf. c.May 1646?

*EvJ 110: John Evelyn, History

Sotheby's, 5 May 1919 (Alfred Morrison sale), lot 2821, to Edwards.

Osb MSS File 6327

A warrant authorising payment to Edward Basse, the assignee of William Cotton, signed by Wither as member of the Committee of Trustees for the Sale of the Late King's Goods, 10 October 1651. 1651.

*WiG 77: George Wither, Warrant(s)

Osb MSS File 6478

Copy, in a professional hand, on 82 folio pages. Late 17th century.

HaG 20: George Savile, First Marquess of Halifax, The Character of a Trimmer

Formerly in Files/Halifax.

This MS collated in Brown, I, 345-96.

First published, ascribed to ‘the Honourable Sir W[illiam] C[oventry]’, in London, 1688. Foxcroft, II, 273-342. Brown, I, 178-243.

Osb MSS File 6496

Copy of part of the epistle, headed ‘Ex J: Hall: Epist ad: Com: Essex: in Gall...Observations profitable, and necessarye for those that intent to travell forraine countries’ and here beginning ‘Thinke it not enough that you see...’, in a non-professional italic hand, on two pages of a pair of conjugate folio leaves, endorsed with the date ‘February ye 25t 1633’. c.1634.

HlJ 32.5: Joseph Hall, Epistles. Decade I, Epistle 8. To my Lord, the Earle of Essex. Aduice for his Trauels

Forst published in Epistles, Vol. I (London, 1608). Wynter, VI, 151-5.

Osb MSS File 9940

Copy in a musical setting, endorsed ‘NB. This Tune was found in an old MS. as old as Shakespears Time by Sr J. Hawkins’. 18th century.

MrC 19: Christopher Marlowe, The Passionate Shepherd to his Love (‘Come live with mee, and be my love’)

First published in a four-stanza version in The Passionate Pilgrime (London, 1599). Printed in a six-stanza version in Englands Helicon (London, 1600). Bowers, II, 536-7. Tucker Brooke, pp. 550-1. Gill et al., I, 215. For Ralegh's ‘Answer’ see RaW 189-99.

Osb MSS File 9987, [item i]

Autograph letter signed by Marvell, to Sir Henry Thompson, [24 October 1674]. Dated in pencil ‘1671’. 1674.

*MaA 548: Andrew Marvell, Letter(s)

Formerly MS Files/Marvell.

Caroline Robbins, ‘Six Letters by Andrew Marvell’, Études Anglaises, 17 (1964), 47-55 (pp. 51-3). Margoliouth, II, 329-31.

Osb MSS File 9987, [item ii]

Autograph letter signed by Marvell, to Sir Henry Thompson, 4 February 1674/5. 1675.

*MaA 555: Andrew Marvell, Letter(s)

Maggs's sale catalogue No. 449 (1924), item 288a. Formerly MS Files/Marvell.

Caroline Robbins, ‘Six Letters by Andrew Marvell’, Études Anglaises, 17 (1964), 47-55 (pp. 54-5). Margoliouth, II, 339-40.

Osb MSS File 11212

Otway's signed receipt and promissory note for the sum of £11 to Jacob Tonson, in the cursive hand possibly of a clerk, 30 June 1683. 1683.

*OtT 22: Thomas Otway, Document(s)

Sotheby's, 1 July 1925, lot 779, to Spenser. Formerly MS Files/Otway.

Osb MSS File 11383

An octavo booklet of poems by Thomas Parnell (1679-1718), in an unidentified hand, entitled ‘Some Additional Peices of Dean Parnell's not Publish'd with his Works’, 25 pages, disbound. c.1720s.

pp. 1-12

DnJ 2814.9: John Donne, Satyre III (‘Kinde pitty chokes my spleene. brave scorn forbids’)

Copy of Donne's satire on each left page with Parnell's adaptation or answer (beginning ‘Compassion checks my spleen, yet scorn denies’) on each facing page.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 154-8. Milgate, Satires, pp. 10-14. Shawcross, No. 3.

Osb MSS File 12756

Power of Attorney signed by Rochester, appointing Richard Blancourt to receive £1,000 from the Treasury, 9 December 1674. 1674.

*RoJ 668: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Document(s)

Puttick & Simpson's, 4 June 1878, lot 312, to Waller. Later owned by J. Eliot Hodgkin, FSA (1829-1912), of Richmond, Surrey, engineer and book collector. Sotheby's, 24 April 1914 (Hodgkin sale), lot 321, to Barnard. Formerly Osborn Files/Rochester.

Recorded in HMC, 15th Report, Appendix Part II (1897), p. 315.

Osb MSS File 12757

Copy of the epilogue (lines 174-84, 187-221), headed ‘An Addition to ye Satyr agt Man’ and here beginning ‘All this wth indignation I have hurld’, on two pages of a pair of conjugate folio leaves. Late 17th century.

RoJ 335: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, A Satyr against Reason and Mankind (‘Were I (who to my cost already am)’)

Formerly owned by Sir Thomas Phillipps (part of Phillipps MS 17818). Sotheby's, 29 October 1975, lot 154.

Photocopy in the British Library, RP 686 (4). Mentioned in YULG, 52 (1978), 108-9; collated in Walker.

First published (lines 1-173) as a broadside, A Satyr against Mankind [London, 1679]. Complete, with supplementary lines 174-221 (beginning ‘All this with indignation have I hurled’) in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 94-101. Walker, pp. 91-7, as ‘Satyr’. Love, pp. 57-63.

The text also briefly discussed in Kristoffer F. Paulson, ‘A Question of Copy-Text: Rochester's “A Satyr against Reason and Mankind”’, N&Q, 217 (May 1972), 177-8. Some texts followed by one or other of three different ‘Answer’ poems (two sometimes ascribed to Edward Pococke or Mr Griffith and Thomas Lessey: see Vieth, Attribution, pp. 178-9).

Osb MSS File 13412

Autograph letter signed by Shadwell, to the Earl of Craven, 21 December [1676?]. 1676.

*SdT 45: Thomas Shadwell, Letter(s)

Edited in William J. Burling, ‘A New Shadwell Letter’, Modern Philology, 83 (1985), 168-71. Facsimile in an unspecified sale catalogue, item 37.

Osb MSS File 14243

A series of notes on sermons by Jeremy Taylor, chiefly in the hand of Sir Robert Southwell (1635-1702), Principal Secretary of State for Ireland, on c.13 unbound folio pages. Including three sermons on Matthew 10.16 (‘Christian Simplicity’) and, in an unidentified hand, a sermon on 1 Samuel 15. 22-23, at the opening of the parliament of Ireland, 8 May 1661, endorsed ‘Dr. Jeremy Taylor (Bishop of Down & Connor) his Arguinges against Comprehension & Toleration’. Late 17th century.

TaJ 132: Jeremy Taylor, Extracts

Sotheby's, 23 June 1966, lot 551. Hofmann and Freeman's sale catalogue, March 1967.

Osb MSS File 14856

Autograph letter signed by Taylor, to John Bramhall, Archbishop of Armagh, from Hillsborough, ‘S. Andrew’, [30 November] 1661. 1661.

*TaJ 83: Jeremy Taylor, Letter(s)

Sotheby's, 21 May 1890, lot 114.

Edited in Williams, ATR (1976), 185-6 (Letter III).

Osb MSS File 14857

Autograph letter signed by Taylor, to John Bramhall, Archbishop of Armagh, from Dublin, 6 May 1662. 1662.

*TaJ 87: Jeremy Taylor, Letter(s)

Sotheby's, 10 December 1918, to Maggs. Maggs's sale catalogue No. 536 (1930), item 2309.

Edited in Williams, ATR (1976), 186-8 (Letter IV).

Osb MSS File 14858

Autograph letter signed by Taylor, to John Bramhall, Archbishop of Armagh, from Portmore, 9 July 1662. 1662.

*TaJ 90: Jeremy Taylor, Letter(s)

Maggs's sale catalogue No. 536 (1930), item 2307.

Edited in Williams, ATR (1976), 188-9 (Letter V).

Osb MSS File 14859

Autograph letter signed by Taylor, to John Bramhall, Archbishop of Armagh, from Portmore, 31 December 1662. 1662.

*TaJ 94: Jeremy Taylor, Letter(s)

Sotheby's, 10 December 1918, to Maggs. Maggs's sale catalogue No. 536 (1930), item 2308. Formerly Osborn Files/Taylor.

Edited in Williams, ATR (1976), 190-1 (Letter VI).

Osborn MSS File 15624

Autograph letter signed by Waller, to his cousin Walter Waller, [after 1644]. c.1645 or later.

*WaE 803: Edmund Waller, Letter(s)

Sotheby's, 17 December 1956, lot 155, to Quaritch, with a facsimile of the subscription in the sale catalogue.

Osb MSS File 16328

Copy, including the prefatory poem and postscript, on 18 octavo pages. c.1667.

WiG 34: George Wither, Vox et Lacrimae Anglorum (‘Renowned patriots, open your eyes’)

First published in London, 1668. Probably not by Wither; possibly by Edward Raddon: see Stephen K. Roberts, ‘A Poet, a Plotter and a Postmaster: a Disputed Polemic of 1668’, Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research, 53 (1980), 258-65. See also David Norbrook, ‘Some Notes on the Canon of George Wither’, N&Q, 241 (1996), 276-81.

Osb MSS File 16686

A document signed, giving power of attorney to Michael Wolrich to receive Killigrew's payment from the Royal Exchequer of his £500 annuity, 15 August 1687. 1687.

*KiW 53: Sir William Killigrew, Document(s)

Osb MSS File 16934

Copy, on three pages of a pair of conjugate folio leaves, once folded as a letter. In a neat hand, untitled, subscribed ‘Dr. Hen. King’, and endorsed ‘The kinge of Sweden his Lamentale by Dor Kinge’. c.1630s.

KiH 242: Henry King, An Elegy Upon the most victorious King of Sweden Gustavus Adolphus (‘Like a cold Fatall Sweat which ushers Death’)

Quaritch's sale catalogue No. 1083 (Summer 1988), item 26.

First published in The Swedish Intelligencer, Third Part (London, 1633). Poems (1657). Crum, pp. 77-81.

Osb MSS File 17581

Autograph letter signed by Dryden, to an unnamed correspondent, [c.1682]. Later owned by Robert Crewe-Milnes (1858-1945), Marquess of Crewe, politician. Christie's, 29 June 1995, lot 331, to Quaritch., with a facsimile in the sale catalogue. Also numbered MS 95.6.3. c.1682.

*DrJ 308: John Dryden, Letter(s)

Ward, Letter 7.

Osb MSS File 19488

Autograph letter signed by Killigrew, to Samuel Pepys, 8 January 1667/8. 1668.

*KiT 27: Thomas Killigrew, Letter(s)

A photocopy of this MS is in the British Library, RP 8613.

Osborn Gordonstoun Papers Box I, Folder 4

Copy on fourteen quarto leaves (plus partly unopened blanks), badly stained. Headed (later) ‘Sr Thomas Wrquhart his Letter to the Laird of Cromartie’. c.1658.

UrT 2: Thomas Urquhart, A Challenge

This MS extensively quoted in HMC, 6th Report (1877), Appendix, pp. 686-7, and in Tayler, pp. 55-8. Edited from this MS in Luttrell, with a facsimile example after p. 12.

Urquhart's letter to Sir Robert Farquhar, Laird of Cromarty, 1 July 1658, first published in Luttrell (1948).

Osborn Gordonstoun Papers Box 1, Folder 6, [unnumbered item]

Letter by Urquhart, to Robert Farquhar of Mounie, the text in the hand of an amanuensis and signed by Urquhart (in partly elaborate monogram form), from Cromarty, 18 December 1648. 1648.

*UrT 6: Thomas Urquhart, Letter(s)

Edited in Jack & Lyall, p. 42.

Osborn Gordonstoun Papers Box 1, Folder 6, [unnumbered item]

Copy, headed ‘Sr John Sucklens Letter’, on one page of two conjugate folio leaves of verse. c.1641.

SuJ 152.8: John Suckling, An Answer to a Gentleman in Norfolk that sent to enquire after the Scotish business

First published in Last Remains (London, 1659). Clayton, pp. 142-4.

Osborn Gordonstoun Papers Box 1, Folder 7, No. 798A

Autograph letter siigned by Urquhart, to Robert Farquhar of Mounie, from London, 30 July 1653.

*UrT 8: Thomas Urquhart, Letter(s)

Recorded and briefly quoted in HMC, 6th Report (1877), Appendix, p. 687, and in Tayler, pp. 53-4. Facsimile in Luttrell (1948), facing p. xvii. Edited in Jack & Lyall, p. 44.

Osborn MS Hey 6

Copy, in a single secretary hand, on 283 quarto leaves, in contemporary vellum. 1620.

LeC 90: Anon, Leicester's Commonwealth

Inscriptions on a flyleaf include ‘Robt. hesketh oweth this book’. Later in the collection of Laurence Heyworth.

First published as The Copie of a Leter, Wryten by a Master of Arte of Cambrige, to his Friend in London, Concerning some talke past of late betwen two worshipful and graue men, about the present state, and some procedinges of the Erle of Leycester and his friendes in England ([? Rouen], 1584). Soon banned. Reprinted as Leycesters common-wealth (London, 1641). Edited, as Leicester's Commonwealth, by D.C. Peck (Athens, OH, & London, 1985). Although various attributions have been suggested by Peck and others, the most likely author remains Robert Persons (1546-1610), Jesuit conspirator.

Osborn MS Hey 7

An octavo commonplace book of prose extracts, many under subject headings, written from both ends on rectos only, in contemporary calf. Inscribed, evidently by the compiler, ‘Henry Harpur An: Do: 1674’. c.1675.

ff. [14r-16r]

HkR 78: Richard Hooker, Extracts

Extracts, headed ‘Time. Hooker’.

ff. [17r-40r, 48r], [15r rev.]

TaJ 131: Jeremy Taylor, Extracts

Numerous extracts, under a series of subject headings (‘Voluptuousness’, ‘Adultery’, ‘Death’, etc.).

ff. [41r-7v]

RaW 1041: Sir Walter Ralegh, Extracts

Extracts, ascribed to ‘Sr Walter Rawley’, under various subject headings (‘Prayer its efects’, ‘Of Providence’, ‘A Description of Man’, etc.).

f. [48r]

FeO 106: Owen Felltham, Resolves

Extracts, headed ‘Fellthams Resolves’.

f. [ir-3r rev.]

MoH 33: Henry More, Extracts

Extracts, headed ‘Dr More's Immortality of ye Soule An: Do: 1675’.

Osborn MS Hey 17

A quarto miscellany, in more than one hand, 68 leaves, in contemporary calf. c.1666.

Inscribed ‘A Present from Dr Storer to Henry Cole, Peterborough’. Later donated by Laurence Heyworth.

f. 56v

HlJ 3.9: Joseph Hall, On his Majestyes Death & his Incomparable Booke (‘Soe falls that stately Coedar, while it stood’)

Copy, headed ‘An epitaph upon King Charles’, subscribed ‘J. H.’

First published, as ‘An Epitaph upon King Charles 1st’, in Eikon Basilike (1649), p. 312.

ff. [61r-8r]

WiG 43: George Wither, A Collection of Emblemes, Ancient and Moderne (‘How Fond are they, who spend their pretious Time’)

A series of 200 mottos, headed ‘Withers Emblemes & Mottoe's’, on leaves vertically trimmed to a single narrow column.

First published, in four books, with preliminary material including a dedication to Charles I, in London, 1634-5. Facsimile edition of it edited by Rosemary Freeman and Charles S. Hensley (Columbia, SC, 1975).

Osborn MSS 1, Series I, Box 2, unnumbered items in folders 63, 66 and 75

Three autograph letters signed, to Edmund Poley (Etherege's predecessor at Ratisbon), from Ratisbon, dated respectively 28 July/7 August 1687; 12 September 1687; and 2/12 January 1687/8. Among a collection of Poley's papers. 1687-8.

*EtG 150: Sir George Etherege, Letter(s)

Sotheby's, 20 November 1973, lot 184. ‘Formerly Osborn Collection, Shelves, Poley Papers’.

Osborn MSS 22

A folio composite volume of state and historical papers, once in marbled boards, now disbound.

Inscribed on front paste-down ‘Sr George Ness’. Once owned by John Perceval (1683-1748), first Earl of Egmont. Later owned by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bt (1792-1872), book and manuscript collector: Phillipps MS 13964. Sotheby's, 15 June 1971, lot 16.

Folder 7

WoH 291: Sir Henry Wotton, A Parallel between Robert Earl of Essex and George Duke of Buckingham

Copy, on 18 folio pages, incomplete, inscribed on the final blank ‘Fragment of a Comparison between the Earle of Essex, and Duke of Buckingham, which I judge to be writ about the reign of king Charles the first’.

First published in London, 1641. Edited by Sir Robert Egerton Brydges (Lee Priory Press, Ickham, 1814).

Osborn MS 87.7.1, Vol. 2, lxxvii

Autograph letter signed by Vanbrugh, to [Charles Montagu, Earl of Manchester], from London, 25 December 1699. 1699.

*VaJ 22: Sir John Vanbrugh, Letter(s)

Sotheby's, 24 July 1987, in lot 257 (The Manchester Correspondence), with a facsimile of the last page in the sale catalogue, p. 257.

Edited in Works, IV, 3-5 (No. 1). Facsimile in IELM, II.ii (1993), Facsimile XVIII, after p. xxi.

Osborn MS 87.7.1, Vol. 10, xli.

Autograph letter signed by Vanbrugh, to [Charles Montagu, Earl of Manchester], from London 18 July 1707. 1707.

*VaJ 47: Sir John Vanbrugh, Letter(s)

Sotheby's, 24 July 1987, in lot 257 (The Manchester Correspondence).

Edited in Works, IV, 13-14 (No. 7).

Osborn MS 87.7.1, Vol. 11, iv

Autograph letter signed by Vanbrugh, to [Charles Montagu, Earl of Manchester], from London, 9 September 1707. 1707.

*VaJ 52: Sir John Vanbrugh, Letter(s)

Sotheby's, 24 July 1987, in lot 257 (The Manchester Correspondence).

Edited in Works, IV, 15-16 (No. 8).

Osborn MS 87.7.1, Vol. 13, xxviii.

Autograph letter signed by Vanbrugh, to [Charles Montagu, Earl of Manchester], from London, 24 February 1707/8. 1708.

*VaJ 66: Sir John Vanbrugh, Letter(s)

Sotheby's, 24 July 1987, in lot 257 (The Manchester Correspondence).

Edited in Works, IV, 16-17 (No. 9). Register, No. 1958.

Osborn MS 87.7.1, Vol. 13, xlviii

Autograph letter signed by Vanbrugh, to [Charles Montagu, Earl of Manchester], from London, 16 March 1707/8. 1708.

*VaJ 67: Sir John Vanbrugh, Letter(s)

Sotheby's, 24 July 1987, in lot 257 (The Manchester Correspondence).

Edited in Works, IV, 17-19(No. 10). Register, No. 1970.

Osborn MS 87.7.1, Vol. 13, lii

Autograph letter signed by Vanbrugh, to [Charles Montagu, Earl of Manchester], from Stevenage, 22 March 1707/8. 1708.

*VaJ 60: Sir John Vanbrugh, Letter(s)

Sotheby's, 24 July 1987, in lot 257 (The Manchester Correspondence).

Edited in Works, IV, 19-20 (No. 11).

Osborn MS 87.7.1, Vol. 14, x

Autograph letter signed by Vanbrugh, to [Charles Montagu, Earl of Manchester], from London, 11 May 1708. 1708.

*VaJ 95: Sir John Vanbrugh, Letter(s)

Sotheby's, 24 July 1987, in lot 257 (The Manchester Correspondence).

Edited in Works, IV, 20-3 (No. 12). Register, No. 1979.

Osborn MS 87.7.1, Vol. 14, lvi

Autograph letter signed by Vanbrugh, to [Charles Montagu, Earl of Manchester], 17 July 1708. 1708.

*VaJ 81: Sir John Vanbrugh, Letter(s)

Sotheby's, 24 July 1987, in lot 257 (The Manchester Correspondence).

Edited in Works, IV, 24-5 (No. 14). Register, No. 1988.

Osborn MS 87.7.1, Vol. 14, lxxi

Autograph letter signed by Vanbrugh, to [Charles Montagu, Earl of Manchester], from Biggleswade, 17 August 1708. 1708.

*VaJ 82: Sir John Vanbrugh, Letter(s)

Sotheby's, 24 July 1987, in lot 257 (The Manchester Correspondence).

Edited in Works, IV, 25-6 (No. 15). Register, No. 1991.

Osborn Music MS 13

An oblong quarto miscellany of verse, receipts, and lute music, in possibly several secretary hands, 60 leaves, in modern red morocco. c.1570.

‘The Braye LuteBook’, formerly among the Cave family papers of Lord Braye at Stanford Hall, Rugby.

ff. 22r-3r

SuH 24: Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, ‘If care do cause men cry, why do not I complaine?’

Copy, in double columns.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Padelford, No. 28, pp. 80-2. Jones, pp. 14-16.

f. 41v

SuH 32.5: Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, ‘In winters iust returne, when Boreas gan his raigne’

Copy of the incipit, in a musical setting.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Padelford, No. 24, pp. 75-7. Jones, pp. 12-14.

ff. 50v-1v

DuW 67.5: William Dunbar, ‘In secreit place this hyndir nycht’

Copy.

This MS collated in Bawcutt. Edited in Priscilla Bawcutt, ‘New Texts of William Dunbar, Alexander Scott and Other Scottish Poets’, Scottish Studies Review, 1 (Winter 2000), 9-25 (pp. 17-19).

Mackenzie, No. 28, pp. 53-5. Murdoch, II, 296-8. Ritchie, II, 275-7. Bawcutt, I, 106-8.

ff. 59v-60r

ShW 69.6: William Shakespeare, Much Ado about Nothing, V, iii, 25-28. Song (‘The god of love’)

Copy of Benedick's song.

This MS discussed in James M. Osborn, ‘Benedick's Song in “Much Ado”’, The Times, 17 November 1958, p. 11.

Osborn pb 52

A quarto composite volume of largely printed tracts, in old calf. Late 17th century.

Inscribed on the first page ‘Cuthbert Constable’.

Item 12

DoC 361: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Rochester's Farewell (‘Tir'd with the noisome follies of the age’)

Copy, in a neat italic hand, here beginning ‘Fill'd with the noysome folly of the age’, on six quarto pages. c.1700.

First published in A Third Collection of the Newest and Most Ingenious Poems, Satyrs, Songs &c (London, 1689). POAS, II (1965), 217-27. Discussed and Dorset's authorship rejected in Harris, pp. 190-2. The poem is noted by Alexander Pope as being ‘probably by the Ld Dorset’ in Pope's exemplum of A New Collection of Poems Relating to State Affairs (London, 1705), British Library, C.28.e.15, p. 121.

Osborn pb 53

A printed exemplum of Denham's octavo Poems and Translations with The Sophy (London, 1668) with his autograph additional verses on fourteen tipped-in leaves and autograph alterations in the printed text. 1668-9.

Later in the library of the Rev. Thomas Corser, FSA (1793-1876), book collector, of Stand Rectory, near Manchester, and afterwards in the library of Henry Huth (1815-78), book collector. Sotheby's, 7 August 1869, lot 231, and 13 June 1912, lot 2322. Bookplates of G. Walter Steeves and James Stewart Geikie, MD.

This volume cited in W.C. Hazlitt, Inedited Poetical Miscellanies 1584-1700 ([London], 1870), [pp. 270-3]. The insertions identified as autograph in James M. Osborn's announcement, ‘New Poems by Sir John Denham’, in the TLS of 1 September 1966 (p. 788). Facsimile of two pages in DLB 126: Seventeenth-Century British Nondramatic Poets, Second Series, ed. M. Thomas Hester (Detroit, 1993), p. 106.

p. 2

*DeJ 51: Sir John Denham, On Gondibert The Preface, being Published before the Booke was Written, Upon the Preface (‘Room Room for the best of Poets heroick’)

Autograph, headed ‘One Gondibert Vpon the Preface’.

Edited from this MS in Banks.

First published, as ‘Vpon the Preface’, in Certain Verses (1653), pp. 3-4. Banks, p. 313.

p. 3

*DeJ 110: Sir John Denham, Upon the Preface of Gondibert. Mars. Epig. Lasciva est nobis pagina vita proba est (‘As Martials Life was grave and sad’)

Autograph, crossed out.

Edited from this MS in Banks.

First published in Certain Verses (1653), p. 4. Banks, p. 320.

pp. 3-7

*DeJ 1: Sir John Denham, ‘After so many sad mishaps’

Autograph.

Edited from this MS in Banks.

First published, as ‘To Sir W. Davenant’, in Certain Verses (1653), pp. 5-7. Banks, pp. 313-16.

The Sophy, pp. 6, 12, 35, 39, 43-4, 49, 81, 95

*DeJ 123: Sir John Denham, The Sophy

Autograph alterations on nine pages in the printed text.

These MS alterations recorded in Banks, p. xviii. See also DeJ 126.

First published in London, 1642. Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 232-309.

pp. 7-11

*DeJ 78: Sir John Denham, ‘Raised by a Prince of Lambard blood’

Autograph, untitled.

Edited from this MS in Banks.

First published in Certain Verses (1653), pp. 15-19. Banks, pp. 316-18.

p. 11

*DeJ 37: Sir John Denham, Lord Crofts (‘Denham come helpe to laugh’)

Autograph, headed ‘L‘d’ Crofts’.

First published, as ‘Vpon the Author’, in Certain Verses (1653), p. 14. Banks, p. 321.

p. 12

*DeJ 8: Sir John Denham, Cooper's Hill (‘Sure there are Poets which did never dream’)

An autograph correction in line 97 and six autograph lines inserted between lines 188 and 189 in the printed text.

These MS insertions printed in Banks, p. xvii, and in O Hehir (in his ‘“B” Text, Draft IV’), p. 150.

First published in London, 1642. Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 62-89. O Hehir, Hieroglyphicks.

pp. 12-13

*DeJ 85: Sir John Denham, Song To the Tune of Walsingham (‘As I came from Lombardy’)

Autograph, headed Song to ye tune of Walsi[n]gham.

Edited from this MS in Osborn and in Banks.

First published complete in Banks (1969), pp. 321-2. Extracts in James M. Osborn, ‘New Poems by Sir John Denham’, TLS (1 September 1966), p. 788.

p. 13

*DeJ 95: Sir John Denham, ‘Thou hadst not been so long neglected’

Autograph, untitled.

Edited from this MS in Banks.

First published, as ‘A Letter sent to the good Knight’, in Certain Verses (1653), p. 10. Banks, pp. 318-19.

p. 14

*DeJ 83: Sir John Denham, Song (‘I am old Davenant’)

Autograph, headed ‘Song’.

Edited from this MS in Banks.

First published, as ‘The Author upon himself’, in Certain Verses (1653), p. 9. Banks, p. 319.

pp. 16-17

*DeJ 108: Sir John Denham, To the Tune of Fortunes might (‘Of all ill Poets by their Lumber known’)

Autograph.

Edited from this MS in Banks.

First published, as ‘An Essay in Explanation of Mr. Hobbs…’, in Certain Verses (1653), pp. 21-2. Banks, p. 320.

pp. 25-8

*DeJ 25: Sir John Denham, Elegy on Sir William D'avenant (‘Though hee is dead th'Imortall name’)

Autograph draft with revisions, untitled.

Edited from this MS in Hazlitt, in Osborn and in Banks. Facsimiles of the first two pages in Croft, Autograph Poetry, I, 50, and in in DLB 126: Seventeenth-Century British Nondramatic Poets, Second Series, ed. M. Thomas Hester (Detroit, 1993), p. 106.

First published in Inedited Poetical Miscellanies 1584-1700, ed. W. C. Hazlitt ([London], 1870), pp. [270-3]. James M. Osborn, ‘New Poems by Sir John Denham’, TLS (1 September 1966), p. 788. Banks, pp. 323-5.

p. 63

*DeJ 20: Sir John Denham, The Destruction of Troy (‘While all with silence & attention wait’)

Autograph alteration of one word in the printed text.

First published in London, 1656. Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 159-78.

p. 68

*DeJ 59: Sir John Denham, On My Lord Croft's and My Journey into Poland (‘Tole, tole Gentle Bell, for the Soul’)

Autograph deletion of one line in the printed text.

This MS alteration recorded in Banks, p. xvii.

First published in Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 107-10.

p. 73

*DeJ 97: Sir John Denham, To Sir John Mennis being Invited from Calice to Bologne to Eat a Pig (‘All on a weeping Monday’)

Autograph alteration of one word in the printed text.

This MS alteration recorded in Banks, p. xvii.

First published in Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 100-2.

p. 76

*DeJ 40: Sir John Denham, Natura Naturata (‘What gives us that Fantastick Fit’)

Autograph alteration of one word in the printed text.

First published in Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 106-7.

pp. 78-9

*DeJ 80: Sir John Denham, Sarpedon's Speech to Glaucus in the 12th of Homer (‘Thus to Glaucus spake’)

Autograph alterations in two lines in the printed text.

These MS alterations recorded in Banks, p. xvii.

First published in Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 179-80.

p. 95

*DeJ 86: Sir John Denham, A Speech against Peace at the Close Committee (‘But will you now to Peace incline’)

Autograph alteration in one line in the printed text.

First published as a broadside entitled Mr. Hampdens speech occasioned upon the Londoners Petition for Peace [Lonon, 1643]. Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 122-7.

p. 106

*DeJ 117: Sir John Denham, A Western Wonder (‘Do you not know, not a fortnight ago’)

Autograph alteration in one line in the printed text.

First published in Rump: or an Exact Collection of the Choycest Poems and Songs (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 130-2.

pp. 107-9

*DeJ 81: Sir John Denham, A Second Western Wonder (‘You heard of that wonder, of the Lightning and Thunder’)

Autograph altertions in three lines in the printed text.

First published in Rump: or an Exact Collection of the Choycest Poems and Songs (London, 1662). Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 133-4.

p. 112

*DeJ 41: Sir John Denham, News from Colchester (‘All in the Land of Essex’)

Autograph deletion of one word in the printed text.

First published as A Relation of a Quaker [1659]. Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 91-4.

p. 115

*DeJ 126: Sir John Denham, The Sophy, V, iii, Song (‘Somnus, the humble God that dwells’)

Autograph alteration of the first word of the song (changing ‘Somnus’ to ‘Morpheus’) in the printed text.

Banks, pp. 296-7.

pp. 115-17

*DeJ 107: Sir John Denham, To the Tune of Arthur of Bradley (‘Sir William's no more a Poet’)

Autograph.

Edited from this MS in Osborn and in Banks.

First published complete in Banks (1969), pp. 322-3. Extracts in James M. Osborn, ‘New Poems by Sir John Denham’, TLS (1 September 1966), p. 788.

p. 121

*DeJ 98: Sir John Denham, To Sir Richard Fanshaw Upon His Translation of Pastor Fido (‘Such is our Pride, our Folly, or our Fate’)

Autograph alteration in one line in the printed text.

First published in Fanshawe's translation of Guarini's Il Pastor Fido (London, 1648). Banks, pp. 143-4.

pp. 159, 170

*DeJ 49: Sir John Denham, Of Prudence (‘Wisdoms first Progress is to take a View’)

Two autograph lines inserted between lines 198 and 199 and six autograph lines inserted between lines 202 and 203 in the printed text.

These MS additions edited in Banks, pp. xvii-xviii.

First published in Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 189-98.

Osborn pb 87

An exemplum inscribed by Cotton ‘This booke was given mee by Mr Izack Walton, August ye 22th 1668. Charles Cotton’. c.1668.

*CnC 185: Charles Cotton, Malherbe, François de. Recueil des plus beaux vers (Paris, 1638)

Facsimile of the inscription in Parks, p. 19.

Osborn pb 90

Copy of a version comprising an introductory ‘Argument’ and first stanza (beginning ‘The Grief of Astragon, & whence it springs’), followed by 92 stanzas numbered 11-102, preceded by a lengthy explanation ‘The following Poem I found not altogether, but gleand it vp, out of severall papers, Among my Ld Mordaunts pspers I found this...[&c.]’, on the first 20 of 23 quarto pages bound-in at the end of a printed exemplum of Gondibert (quarto, 1651); dated December 1678. c.1678.

DaW 42: Sir William Davenant, The Philosophers Disquisition directed to the Dying Christian (‘Before by death you newer knowledge gain’)

See also DaW 2.

First published in Works (London, 1673). Gibbs, pp. 182-96. The poem originally intended to form part of Gondibert (see Gibbs, pp. lii et seq., 431).

Osborn pb 91

Copy of an eleven-stanza version, headed ‘Astragon Dying’, followed by a copy of stanzas 6 and 7 of the printed version, on the last three of 23 quarto pages bound-in at the end of a printed exemplum of Gondibert (first edition, 1651), dated December 1678. c.1678.

DaW 2: Sir William Davenant, The Christians Reply to the Phylosopher (‘The Good in Graves as Heavenly Seed are sown’)

First published in Works (London, 1673). Gibbs, pp. 196-8.

Osborn pb 99

A leaf inscribed by Cotton to his ‘honored Cosen Port’, glued down on a flyleaf in a printed exemplum of Cotton's Poems (1689). Late 17th century.

*CnC 163: Charles Cotton, Inscription(s)

Later owned by Major C.H. Simpson. Sotheby's, 15 March 1916, lot 86. Bookplates of Louis H. Silver and Hugh Perkins. Maggs's sale catalogue No. 937 (Autumn 1971), item 23.

Facsimile of the inscription in Parks, p. 14.

Osborn pb 107

An exemplum with Cotton's autograph marginalia on seventeen pages in Books I and II between pp. 1 and 94, given by him to his youngest daughter Olive (‘Olivia’).

*CnC 195: Charles Cotton, Spenser, Edmund. The Faerie Queen…with the other Works (London, 1617)

Inscribed ‘Mary Stanhopes book given me by my father Dr Stanhope dean of Canterbury In the year 1704 January ye 24th: given him by my mother given her by her father Charles Cotton of Beresford in the County of Stafford Esqr’. Bookplate of John Glymn Childs. Sotheby's, 7 April 1981, lot 373, to P. J. Croft. Sotheby's, 18 December 1985, lot 8, to Theodore Hofmann.

A facsimile example in Sotheby's sale catalogue.

Osborn pb 110, Vol. 1

Exemplum of the ‘Fourth’ printed edition of Waller's Poems (8°: London, 1682), accompanying The Second Part of Mr. Waller's Poems (London, 1690), 2 vols. With a collection of 21 poems, including nine by Waller, copied in MS on 47 blank pages at the end of the first volume in the hand of Elizabeth Moyle (afterwards Mrs Gregor), another poem at the very end added in a different hand; the printed text of the poems also containing a number of MS emendations, and some of the poems numbered in MS from 1 to 38. c.1686-90s.

The first volume inscribed as being a gift in 1684 by Sir Walter Moyle (d. 1701), M.P., of Bake, St Germans, Cornwall, to his daughter Elizabeth (afterwards Mrs Gregor), brother of the essayist and politician Walter Moyle (1672-1721).

Cited in IELM, II.ii (1993) as the ‘Moyle Volume’: WaE Δ 17.

pp. 1-2

WaE 705: Edmund Waller, Upon the late Storm, and of the Death of His Highness ensuing the same (‘We must resign! Heaven his great soul does claim’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon ye storm & of ye Death of Oliuer Cromwell ensuing y same by Mr Waller left out of all his Books’, on two pages. The text followed (p. 3) by an ‘Answer’ ascribed to Godolphin, but see Introduction above.

First published as a broadside (London, [1658]). Three Poems upon the Death of his late Highnesse Oliver Lord Protector (London, 1659). As ‘Upon the late Storm, and Death of the late Usurper O. C.’ in The Second Part of Mr. Waller's Poems (London, 1690). The Maid's Tragedy Altered (London, 1690). Thorn-Drury, II, 34-5.

For the ‘answer or construction’ by William Godolphin, see the Introduction.

pp. 7-[16]

WaE 379: Edmund Waller, A Panegyric to my Lord Protector, of the present Greatness, and joint Interest of His Highness, and this Nation (‘While with a strong and yet a gentle hand’)

Copy, apparently transcribed from the folio edition of 1655, on ten pages.

First published London, 1655. The Second Part of Mr. Waller's Poems (London, 1690). in The Maid's Tragedy Altered (London, 1690). Thorn-Drury, II, 10-17.

p. [21]

SeC 42: Sir Charles Sedley, Song (‘Not Celia that I juster am’)

Copy, headed ‘A Song 1685’ and here beginning ‘Not Celia yt I truer am’, on a blank page among twenty-one MS poems added at the end of a printed exemplum of Waller's Poems, ‘fourth’ edition.

First published in A Collection of Poems (London, 1672). Miscellaneous Works (London, 1702). Sola Pinto, I, 6-7.

pp. [23-4]

WaE 197: Edmund Waller, Of Her Royal Highness, Mother to the Prince of Orange. and of her portrait, written by the late Duchess of York while she lived with her (‘Heroic nymph! in tempests the support’)

Copy, headed ‘A Poem made by Mrr Waller left out of all his Bookes, Made one the Princes of orang & ofe ye portraite wch mrs Hide, while she liued wt her made one he Highnes’, on one page.

First published in Poems, ‘Fifth’ edition (London, 1686). Thorn-Drury, II, 74.

p. [28]

StW 1288: William Strode, Jack on both Sides (‘I holde as fayth What Englandes Church Allowes’)

Copy on a blank page among twenty-one MS poems added at the end of a printed exemplum of Edmund Waller's Poems, ‘fourth’ edition (London, 1682), in the hand of Elizabeth Moyle (afterwards Mrs Gregor), daughter of Sir Walter Moyle, M.P. (d.1701).

First published, as ‘The Church Papist’, in Wits Recreations (London, 1640). Reprinted as ‘The Jesuit's Double-faced Creed’ by Henry Care in The Popish Courant (16 May 1679): see August A. Imholtz, Jr, ‘The Jesuits' Double-Faced Creed: A Seventeenth-Century Cross-Reading’, N&Q, 222 (December 1977), 553-4. Dobell, p. 111. Listed, without text, in Forey, p. 339.

pp. [34-40]

WaE 168: Edmund Waller, Of Divine Poesy. Two Cantos (‘Poets we prize, when in their verse we find’)

Copy, the heading including the reference ‘aded in ye last Edistion 1682’ [i.e. 1686], on seven pages.

First published in Divine Poems (London, 1685). Thorn-Drury, II, 131-5.

pp. [42-4]

WaE 427: Edmund Waller, Some reflections of his upon the several Petitions in the same Prayer (‘His sacred name with reverence profound’)

Copy on two pages.

First published in Divine Poems (London, 1685). Thorn-Drury, II, 137-9.

pp. [44-5]

WaE 62: Edmund Waller, Epitaph on Sir George Speke (‘Under this stone lies vertue, youth’)

Copy on two pages.

First published in Poems, ‘Fifth’ edition (London, 1686). Thorn-Drury, II, 107-8.

p. [46]

WaE 185: Edmund Waller, Of Her Majesty, on New-Year's Day, 1683 (‘What revolutions in the world have been’)

Copy in two pages.

First published in Poems, ‘Fifth’ edition (London, 1686). Thorn-Drury, II, 93.

See also WaE 255-6.

pp. [47-9]

WaE 406: Edmund Waller, A Presage of the Ruin of the Turkish Empire. Presented to His Majesty on his Birthday (‘Since James the Second graced the British Throne’)

Copy on three pages.

First published in Poems, ‘Fifth’ edition (London, 1686). Thorn-Drury, II, 103-5.

p. [50]

WaE 282: Edmund Waller, Of the last Verses in the Book (‘When we for age could neither read nor write’)

Copy on one page.

First published in Poems, ‘Fifth’ edition (London, 1686). Thorn-Drury, II, 144.

Osborn pd 118

An interleaved and annotated exemplum of Volume I, Part i, of Edmond Malone's printed edition of The Critical and Miscellaneous Prose Works of John Dryden (London, 1800), xix + 570 printed pages. The annotations, partly by James M. Osborn, copied from those made by Malone himself, in preparation for a second edition, in his own exemplum of his book, now in the Bodleian (Mal. E. 61-63: 3 vols, lacking Vol. I, part ii). c.1800.

Malone's annotations are extensively discussed in Osborn, pp. 133-59.

[unspecified page numbers]

DrJ 341.5: John Dryden, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Dryden to Jacob Tonson, [December 1697].

Edited from this MS in Ward, Letter 49.

[unspecified page numbers]

DrJ 350.5: John Dryden, Letter(s)

Copy of Dryden's letter to Elizabeth Steward, ‘Candlemass-Day’ [2 February] 1698/9.

Edited from this MS in Ward, Letter 57.

[unspecified page numbers]

DrJ 354.5: John Dryden, Letter(s)

Copy of Dryden's letter to Elizabeth Steward, 23 February 1698/9.

Edited from this MS in Ward, Letter 73. NB. Ward dates this letter 23 February [1699/1700], but see W.J. Cameron, ‘John Dryden and Henry Heveningham’, N&Q, 202 (May 1957), 199-203 (p. 203).

Osborn Poetry Box IV/9

A three-line extract, subscribed ‘Rochester’, as preliminary to a long poem headed ‘Rome's Pardon -- a Tale’ (‘It happen'd on a certain Time’), occupying three pages of a pair of conjugate folio leaves. Early 18th century.

RoJ 240.5: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, On Rome's pardons (‘If Rome can pardon sins, as Romans hold’)

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 161-2. Walker, pp. 127-8, among ‘Poems Possibly by Rochester’. Love, p. 247, among Disputed Works.

Osborn Poetry Box IV/53

A small verse miscellany. Early 18th century.

p. 6

EtG 92: Sir George Etherege, To a Very Young Lady (‘Sweetest bud of beauty, may’)

Copy.

First published in The New Academy of Complements (London, 1669). Thorpe, p. 1.

p. 7

EtG 97: Sir George Etherege, Voiture's Urania (‘Hopeless I languish out my days’)

Copy.

First published in A Collection of Poems, Written upon several Occasions (London, 1672). Thorpe, p. 6.

pp. 10-11

SeC 10: Sir Charles Sedley, Constancy (‘Fear not, my Dear, a Flame can never dye’)

Copy, headed ‘The Constancy’ and ascribed to Etherege.

First published in A Collection of Poems (London, 1672). Miscellaneous Works (London, 1702). Sola Pinto, I, 11.

pp. 13-16

SeC 18: Sir Charles Sedley, The Indifference (‘Thanks, fair Vrania. to your Scorn’)

Copy, headed ‘Indifference xcuse'd by Sr George Etheredge’.

First published in A Collection of Poems (London, 1672). Miscellaneous Works (London, 1702). The Works of the Honourable Sir Charles Sedley, Bat (2 vols, London, 1722), I, 69-70. Sola Pinto, I, 29-30.

Osborn Poetry Box IV/54

Quarto booklet of verse by Dryden. Late 17th century.

Formerly Box XII, No. 14.

ff. [1-9]

DrJ 101: John Dryden, Mac Flecknoe (‘All humane things are subject to decay’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Vieth.

First published in London, 1682. Miscellany Poems (London, 1684). Kinsley, I, 265-71. California, II, 53-60. Hammond, I, 313-36.

The text also discussed extensively in G. Blakemore Evans, ‘The Text of Dryden's Mac Flecknoe: The Case for Authorial Revision’, Studies in Bibliography, 7 (1955), 85-102; in David M. Vieth, ‘Dryden's Mac Flecknoe’, Harvard Library Bulletin, 7 (1953), 32-54; and in Vinton A. Dearing, ‘Dryden's Mac Flecknoe: The Case Against Editorial Confusion’, Harvard Library Bulletin, 24 (1976), 204-45. See also David M. Vieth, ‘The Discovery of the Date of MacFlecknoe’ in Evidence in Literary Scholarship: Essays in Memory of James Marshall Osborn, ed. René Wellek and Alvaro Ribeiro (Oxford, 1979), pp. 71-86.

f. [9]

DrJ 242: John Dryden, Upon Young Mr. Rogers of Glocestershire (‘Of gentle Blood, his Parents only Treasure’)

Copy.

First published in Poetical Miscellanies: The Fifth Part (London, 1704). Kinsley, IV, 1775. Hammond, V, 620-1.

f. [10]

DrJ 241: John Dryden, Upon the Death of the Viscount Dundee (‘O Last and best of Scots! who didst maintain’)

Copy.

First published in Poetical Miscellanies: The Fifth Part (London, 1704). Poems on Affairs of State…Part III (London, 1704). Kinsley, IV, 1777. California, III, 222. Hammond, III, 219.

Osborn Poetry Box IV/77

Copy of eleven-stanza version, on two separate quarto leaves of verse paginated 45-48. Headed ‘A sweet & pleasant Sonnet, entituled, My Mind to me a Kingdom is. -- The Tune is, In Crete &c.’, subscribed in another hand ‘Harmony By Dr. Sartin’. Mid-18th century.

DyE 62: Sir Edward Dyer, ‘My mynde to me a kyngdome is’

First published, as two poems (one comprising stanzas 1-4, 6 and 8. the other stanzas 9-12) in a musical setting, in William Byrd, Psalmes, Sonets & Songs (London, 1588). Sargent, No. XIV, pp. 200-1. The uncertain authorship of this poem and its textual history are discussed in Steven W. May, ‘The Authorship of “My mind to me a kingdom is”’, RES, NS 26 (1975), 385-94. EV 15376.

Osborn Poetry Box IV/1126, [unnumbered item]

Copy.

MaA 163.235: Andrew Marvell, The Dream of the Cabal: A Prophetical Satire Anno 1672 (‘As t'other night in bed I thinking lay’)

Phillipps MS 8302.

A lampoon sometimes called The Gamball or a dreame of ye Grand Caball. First published in A Second Collection of the Newest and Most Ingenious Poems, Satyrs, Songs, &c. (London, 1689). Edited in POAS, I (1963), pp. 191-203, as possibly by John Ayloffe. Ascribed to Marvell in two MS copies (MaA 163.4 and MaA 163.92).

Osborn Poetry Box V/3

Copy of the speech, untitled, each line interpersed with a Latin translation, probably produced as an academic exercise, on one side of a single quarto leaf. Mid-18th century.

DrJ 247.55: John Dryden, Aureng-Zebe

First published in London, 1676. California, XIII (1994), pp. 147-250.

Osborn Poetry Box V/8

Copy.

MkM 22: Mary Monck, Verses Wrote on her Death-Bed at Bath, to her Husband, in London (‘Thou, who dost all my worldly thoughts employ’)

Twenty-two lines, first published, introduced ‘The following verses were wrote by her (as I am inform'd) on her death-bed at Bath, to her husband in London’, in George Ballard, Memoirs of Several Ladies of Great Britain (Oxford, 1752), pp. 418-22.

Osborn Poetry Box V/9

Copy, headed ‘A song by [‘Ld. Dorset’ deleted]’ (‘Sr: Charles Hanbury Williams’added in another hand), on a single quarto leaf. Early 18th century.

DoC 7: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, The Advice (‘Phyllis, for shame let us improve’)

This MS collated in Harris.

First published in Westminster Drollery (London, 1671). Harris, pp. 77-8.

Osborn Poetry Box VI/18

Copy of a version.

ClJ 225: John Cleveland, The Definition of a Protector (‘What's a Protector? Tis a stately Thing’)

Published in J. Cleaveland Revived (London, 1660), pp. 78-9. The Works of Mr. John Cleveland (London, 1687), p. 343. Berdan, p. 185, as ‘probably not genuine’. Rejected ‘as probably not Cleveland's’ by Withington, pp. 321-2.

Osborn Poetry Box VI/28

Small group of poems on two conjugate folio leaves. Mid-late 17th century.

p. [2]

ShJ 22: James Shirley, Epitaph On the Duke of Bvckingham (‘Here lies the best and worst of Fate’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Poems (London, 1646). Armstrong, p. 15.

[unspecified pages]

CaE 34: Elizabeth Cary, Viscountess Falkland, An Epitaph upon the death of the Duke of Buckingham (‘Reader stand still and see, loe, how I am’)

Copy of the 50-line version, headed ‘On the Duke of Buckingham’.

Edited from this MS in Donald W. Foster, ‘Resurrecting the Author: Elizabeth Tanfield Cary’, in Privileging Gender in Early Modern England, ed. Jean R. Brink (Kirksville, MO: Sixteenth Century Journal, 1993), 141-73, and in Akermann, pp. 195-6. Recorded in Wolfe, p. 494.

A six-line (epitaph) version is ascribed to ‘the Countesse of Faukland’ in two MS copies. In some sources it is followed by a further 44 lines (elegy) beginning ‘Yet were bidentalls sacred and the place’. The latter also appears, anonymously, as a separate poem in a number of other sources. The authorship remains uncertain. For an argument for Lady Falkland's authorship of all 50 lines, see Akkerman.

Both sets of verse were first published, as separate but sequential poems, in Poems or Epigrams, Satyrs (London, 1658), pp. 101-2. All 50 lines are edited in Akkerman, pp. 195-6.

Osborn Poetry Box VI/31

Copy.

EsR 14: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, ‘Happy were Hee could finish foorth his Fate’

May, Poems, No. 7, p. 47. May, Courtier Poets, p. 254. EV 8176.

Osborn Poetry Box VI/41

A formal copy, in an italic hand, drawn up in a column facing a Latin version, headed on a banderole ‘Poema Pium Or A Holy Hymne’, the poem headed ‘The Twenty Third Psalme By the Pious -- Herbert Much Meliorated’, subscribed in a device ‘W: F:’, on on one side of a decorative broadsheet. Mid-17th century.

HrG 274: George Herbert, The 23d Psalme (‘The God of love my shepherd is’)

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 172-3.

Osborn Poetry Box VI/47

A folio leaf, with verses on the recto only, in a single hand. Mid-late 17th century.

f. 1r

CoA 63.2: Abraham Cowley, The Discovery (‘By 'Heaven I'll tell her boldly that 'tis She’)

Copy.

First published in The Mistresse (London, 1647). Waller, I, 98. Collected Works, II, No. 29, pp. 57.8.

f. 1r

CoA 101.5: Abraham Cowley, Loves Visibility (‘With much of pain, and all the Art I knew’)

Copy, beginning at line 7, here ‘Men without love have often so cunning grown’.

First published in The Mistresse (London, 1647). Waller, I, 123. Collected Works, II, No.56, p. 88.

Osborn Poetry Box VI/58

Copy, headed ‘A Letter from My Lord Rochester to the Earl of M.’, on three pages of two conjugate quarto leaves. Late 17th century.

RoJ 90: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, An Epistolary Essay from M.G. to O.B. upon Their Mutual Poems (‘Dear friend, I hear this town does so abound’)

Formerly Osborn MS. Chest II. Number 28.

This MS recorded in Vieth; collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 144-7. Walker, pp. 107-9. Love, pp. 98-101.

Osborn Poetry Box VI/63

Copy. Late 17th century.

MaA 84.92: Andrew Marvell, A Ballad called The Haymarket Hectors (‘I sing a woeful ditty’)

Sometimes called Upon the cutting of Sr John Coventry's nose. First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1704). Thompson, I, xxxix-xli (from ‘Marvell's writing’). Grosart, I, 456-8. Edited in POAS, I (1963), 168-71, as doubtfully by Marvell.

Osborn Poetry Box VI/68

Two conjugate ledger-size folio leaves. Late 17th century.

Formerly ‘Osborn MS. Chest II, Number 28’.

pp. [1-3]

RoJ 336: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, A Satyr against Reason and Mankind (‘Were I (who to my cost already am)’)

Copy of lines 1-173, headed A satyr, on two conjugate ledger-size folio leaves. Late 17th century.

This MS recorded in Vieth; collated in Walker.

First published (lines 1-173) as a broadside, A Satyr against Mankind [London, 1679]. Complete, with supplementary lines 174-221 (beginning ‘All this with indignation have I hurled’) in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 94-101. Walker, pp. 91-7, as ‘Satyr’. Love, pp. 57-63.

The text also briefly discussed in Kristoffer F. Paulson, ‘A Question of Copy-Text: Rochester's “A Satyr against Reason and Mankind”’, N&Q, 217 (May 1972), 177-8. Some texts followed by one or other of three different ‘Answer’ poems (two sometimes ascribed to Edward Pococke or Mr Griffith and Thomas Lessey: see Vieth, Attribution, pp. 178-9).

p. [3]

RoJ 525: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, A Translation from Seneca's ‘Troades’, Act II, Chorus (‘After death nothing is, and nothing, death’)

Copy, headed ‘Seneca: Tros: Act 2: Chorus’.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution; collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 150-1. Walker, p. 51. Love, pp. 45-5, as ‘Senec. Troas. Act. 2. Chor. Thus English'd by a Person of Honour’.

Osborn Poetry Box VI/84

Copy on a single leaf. Early-mid-17th century.

RaW 380: Sir Walter Ralegh, Epitaph on the Earl of Salisbury (‘Here lies Hobinall, our Pastor while ere’)

First published in Francis Osborne, Traditionall Memoyres on the raigne of King Iames (London, 1658). Works (1829), VIII, 735-6. Latham, p. 53.

Of doubtful authorship according to Latham, p. 146, and Lefranc (1968), p. 84.

Osborn Poetry Box VI/88

Copy, untitled, lacking the last three stanzas, on a single folded leaf. Late 17th century.

RoJ 383: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Song (‘Fair Chloris in a pigsty lay’)

Formerly Osborn MS. Chest II, Number 32.

This MS recorded in Vieth; collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 27-8. Walker, pp. 33-4. Love, pp. 39-40.

Osborn Poetry Box VI/107

A group of five different sized folio leaves, paginated 412-416, now disbound. Comprising verse and prose texts by or relating to Sir Walter Ralegh. and the Duke of Buckingham. c.1625-30s.

Once belonging to Sir Henry Spelman (1563/4-1641), historian and antiquary. Later owned by Hudson Gurney (1775-1864), of Keswick Hall, Norfolk, banker and antiquary.

Recorded in HMC, 12th Report. IX (1891), p. 161.

p. 414

RaW 100: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Euen such is tyme which takes in trust’

Copy, in a secretary hand, headed ‘Sr. Walter Rawleighs Epitaph in his Bible by him made’.

Formerly part of Gurney MS XXXIII at Keswick Hall, Norfolk, this MS recorded in HMC, 12th Report, Appendix IX (1891), p. 161. See also RaW 811.

First published in Richard Brathwayte, Remains after Death (London, 1618). Latham, p. 72 (as ‘These verses following were made by Sir Walter Rauleigh the night before he dyed and left att the Gate howse’). Rudick, Nos 35A, 35B, and part of 55 (three versions, pp. 80, 133).

This poem is ascribed to Ralegh in most MS copies and is often appended to copies of his speech on the scaffold (see RaW 739-822).

See also RaW 302 and RaW 304.

p. 415

RaW 998: Sir Walter Ralegh, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Ralegh to his wife.

Osborn Poetry Box VI/108

Copy on a single folio leaf. Early-mid-17th century.

CoR 55: Richard Corbett, A Certaine Poeme As it was presented in Latine by Divines and Others, before his Maiestye in Cambridge (‘It is not yet a fortnight, since’)

First published in Poëtica Stromata ([no place], 1648). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 12-18.

Some texts accompanied by an ‘Answer’ (‘A ballad late was made’).

Osborn Poetry Box VI/121

Copy, in a neat italic hand, headed ‘In obitum venerabilis generosae Mae Margaretae Kay nunquam satis deploratae carmen lugubre’, on two conjugate folio leaves, once folded as a letter or packet, endorsed ‘To his much honred: and most worthy ffreind Mr. John Kay Junior: at Denbye grange these prsent’ Mid-17th century.

KiH 351: Henry King, An Exequy To his Matchlesse never to be forgotten Freind (‘Accept, thou Shrine of my Dead Saint!’)

Formerly part of Phillipps MS 17696.

First published in Poems (1657). Crum, pp. 68-72.

Osborn poetry Box VII/4

Copy, on five pages of four disbound quarto leaves. Headed ‘A Satyr’ and here beginning ‘As Colen drove his hogs along’. Late 17th century.

DoC 63.5: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Colon (‘As Colon drove his sheep along’)

First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1697). POAS, II (1965), 167-75. Harris, pp. 124-35.

Osborn Poetry Box VII/15

Copy, headed ‘September: 1667’ in a disbound booklet of 38 quarto pages. Late 17th century.

MaA 504: Andrew Marvell, The last Instructions to a Painter (‘After two sittings, now our Lady State’)

This MS collated in POAS, I. Briefly discussed, with a facsimile of f. 11v, in Hilton Kelliher, ‘Marvell's The Last Instructions to a Painter: From Manuscript to Print’, EMS, 13 (2006), 296-343 (pp. 332-6).

First published in The Third Part of the Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689). Margoliouth, I, 147-72. POAS, I, 97-139. Lord, pp. 151-86. Smith, pp. 369-96. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 36-7.

See also MaA 191-8.

Osborn Poetry Box VII/27

Copy of lines 1-36, in a cursive hand, as by ‘Mr Waller’, on three pages of a pair of conjugate quarto leaves, once folded as a letter or packet. Late 17th century.

WaE 556: Edmund Waller, To My Lady Morton, on New-Year's Day, 1650. At the Louvre in Paris (‘Madam! new years may well expect to find’)

First published as a broadside (London, 1661). Poems (London, 1664). Thorn-Drury, II, 6-7.

Osborn Poetry Box VII/31

Copy, headed ‘Sonnetto’, on the last page of a pair of conjugate oblong octavo leaves. Early-mid-17th century.

CmT 238: Thomas Campion, ‘What if a day, or a month, or a yeare’

Possibly first published as a late 16th-century broadside. Philotus (Edinburgh, 1603). Richard Alison, An Howres Recreation in Musicke (London, 1606). Davis, p. 473. The different versions and attributions discussed in A.E.H. Swaen, ‘The Authorship of “What if a Day”, and its Various Versions’, MP, 4 (1906-7), 397-422, and in David Greer, ‘“What if a Day” — An Examination of the Words and Music’, M&L, 43 (1962), 304-19.

See also CmT 239-41.

Osborn Poetry Box VII/37

Copy, in a professional hand, headed ‘The 4th part of Instructions to a Painter’, on two conjugate folio leaves. Late 17th century.

MaA 422.5: Andrew Marvell, The Fourth Advice to a Painter (‘Draw England ruin'd by what was giv'n before’)

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 140-6, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 33-5, as anonymous. Regarded as anonymous in Margoliouth, I, 348-50.

Osborn Poetry Box VII/38

Copy. Early 17th century.

HoJ 89: John Hoskyns, The Censure of a Parliament Fart (‘Downe came graue auncient Sr John Crooke’)

Attributed to Hoskyns by John Aubrey. Cited, but unprinted, as No. III of ‘Doubtful Verses’ in Osborn, p. 300. Early Stuart Libels website.

Osborn Poetry Box VII/42

A booklet of extracts ‘Out of Maruels Poems’, taken from some eighteen poems. Late 17th century.

MaA 576: Andrew Marvell, Extract(s)

Osborn Poetry Box VII/56

Copy, in a professional hand, on two conjugate folio leaves, imperfect. Inscribed as the end ‘The Advice to a Painter A Vile Lampoone’. Late 17th century.

MaA 423: Andrew Marvell, The Fourth Advice to a Painter (‘Draw England ruin'd by what was giv'n before’)

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 140-6, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 33-5, as anonymous. Regarded as anonymous in Margoliouth, I, 348-50.

Osborn Poetry Box VII/73

Copy. Late 17th century.

DoC 326.9991: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On the Death of the Duke of Gloucester (‘For Gloucester's death, which sadly we deplore’)

First published in Tom Browne, Remains (London, 1720), p. 143. Edited and discussed in Harris, pp. 184-5. Possibly by another Lord Dorset.

Osborn Poetry Box VII/74

Copy, headed ‘A Song’, on a small slip of paper. Late 17th century.

CoA 67: Abraham Cowley, The Epicure (‘Fill the Bowl with rosie Wine’)

First published, among Miscellanies, in Poems (London, 1656). Waller, I, 55-6. Sparrow, p. 55.

Musical setting by Henry Purcell published in Comes Amoris (London, 1687). Works of Henry Purcell, XXII (1922), pp. 55-8.

Osborn Poetry Box VIII/1

Copy on a single folio leaf among papers of the Gordon family of Gordonstoun and Cumming family of Allyr. Late 17th century.

MaA 472: Andrew Marvell, Advice to a Painter to draw the Duke by (‘Spread a large canvass, Painter, to containe’)

First published [in London], 1679. A Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689), as by ‘A-M-l, Esq’. Thompson III, 399-403. Margoliouth, I, 214-18, as by Henry Savile. POAS, I, 213-19, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 40-2, as by Henry Savile.

Osborn Poetry Box X/1

Single quarto leaf. Late 17th century.

[no item number]

CoA 128: Abraham Cowley, On the Death of Mr. Crashaw (‘Poet and Saint! to thee alone are given’)

Copy, beginning at line 17 (here ‘Still ye old heathen gods in numbers dwell’),

First published, among Miscellanies, in Poems (London, 1656). Waller, I, 48-9. Sparrow, pp. 46-8.

[no item number]

CoA 154: Abraham Cowley, Reason. The use of it in Divine Matters (‘Some blind themselves, 'cause possibly they may’)

Copy of lines 23-48, here beginning ‘Yet when ye Divill comes up disguisd she cries’, imperfect, lacking the beginning.

First published, among Miscellanies, in Poems (London, 1656). Waller, I, 46-7.

[no item number]

CoA 156: Abraham Cowley, The Resurrection (‘Not Winds to Voyagers at Sea’)

Copy of lines 1-24, imperfect, lacking the rest.

First published, among Pindarique Odes, in Poems (London, 1656). Waller, I, 182-3. Sparrow, pp. 157-9.

Osborn Poetry Box X/38

Copy, untitled, on a single quarto leaf. Late 17th century.

DoC 140: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, My Opinion (‘After thinking this fortnight of Whig and of Tory’)

First published in Miscellaneous Works, Written by…George, late Duke of Buckingham (London, 1704-5). POAS, II (1965), 391-2. Harris, pp. 55-6.

Osborn Poetry Box XIII/32

Extract, comprising book VI, lines 988-1005, 1007-12, in the hand of William Trumbull, on a long strip of paper. c.1700.

DrJ 246.9: John Dryden, The Works of Virgil [Aeneis, Georgics, Pastorals] (‘Arms, and the Man I sing, who forc'd by Fate’)

First published in London, 1697. Kinsley, III, 1003-1427 (Aeneis), and II, 867-1001 (Pastorals and Georgics). California, IV, 436-61 (‘Third Book of the Georgics’ only, first published in Annual Miscellany: for the year 1694).

Osborn Poetry Box XIII/39a-b

Copy, headed ‘The Colchester Quaker’, in the hand of William Trumbull, on both sides of a single octavo-size strip of paper. c.1700.

DeJ 46: Sir John Denham, News from Colchester (‘All in the Land of Essex’)

From the papers of the Trumbull family of Easthampstead Park, Berkshire.

Microfilm of this MS in the British Library, M/690.

First published as A Relation of a Quaker [1659]. Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 91-4.

Osborn Poetry Box XIII/41

Copy on a single folded folio leaf. Copy, the first line in the hand of Sir William Trumbull (1639-1716), the rest in an unidentified cursive hand, untitled, on a single folded folio leaf containing on the verso some accounts in Trumbull's hand for the years 1659-60. 1659-60.

PsK 335: Katherine Philips, Song, to the tune of, Sommes nous pas trop heureux (‘How prodigious is my Fate’)

From the papers of the Trumbull family of Easthampstead Park, Berkshire.

Edited from this MS and briefly discussed, with a facsimile, in Hageman & Sununu, EMS, 4 (1993), pp. 200-2.

First published in Poems (1667), p. 126. Saintsbury, p. 577. Thomas, I, 196-7, poem 79.

Osborn Poetry Box XIII/50

Copy.

DrJ 43.993: John Dryden, An Essay upon Satire (‘How dull and how insensible a beast’)

A satire written in 1675 by John Sheffield, Earl of Mulgrave, but it was widely believed by contemporaries (including later Alexander Pope, who had access to Mulgrave's papers) that Dryden had a hand in it, a belief which led to the notorious assault on him in Rose Alley on 18 December 1679, at the reputed instigation of the Earl of Rochester and/or the Duchess of Portsmouth.

First published in London, 1689. POAS, I (1963), pp. 396-413.

The authorship discussed in Macdonald, pp. 217-19, and see John Burrows, ‘Mulgrave, Dryden, and An Essay upon Satire’, in Superior in His Profession: Essays in Memory of Harold Love, ed. Meredith Sherlock, Brian McMullin and Wallace Kirsop, Script & Print, 33 (2009), pp. 76-91, where is it concluded, from stylistic analysis, that ‘Mulgrave had by far the major hand’. Recorded in Hammond, V, 684, in an ‘Index of Poems Excluded from this Edition’.

Osborn Poetry Box XIII/63

Copy, untitled, on a single oblong octavo leaf, endorsed ‘Ld Dorset on my Lady Dorchester. 94/5’. c.1700.

DoC 185: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On the Countess of Dorchester (II) (‘Dorinda's sparkling wit and eyes’)

From the papers of the Trumbull family of Easthampstead Park, Berkshire.

Microfilm of this MS in the British Library, M/690.

First published in A Collection of Miscellany Poems, by Mr. Brown (London, 1699). POAS, V (1971), 384. Harris, pp. 43-4.

Osborn Poetry Box XIII/91

Extracts. c.1700.

WaE 919: Edmund Waller, Extracts

From the papers of the Trumbull family of Easthampstead Park, Berkshire.

Osborn Poetry Box XIII/92

Copy, untitled, on the first of two unbound conjugate quarto leaves. c.1700.

WaE 289: Edmund Waller, Of the last Verses in the Book (‘When we for age could neither read nor write’)

From the papers of the Trumbull family of Easthampstead Park, Berkshire.

Microfilm of this MS in the British Library (M/690).

First published in Poems, ‘Fifth’ edition (London, 1686). Thorn-Drury, II, 144.