Harvard, other MSS

MS Am 1007

A transcript of the Andover MS of works by Anne Bradstreet (Harvard MS Am 1007.1), including her son Simon's entries there, 100 octavo pages (plus 4 blank pages), in cardboard wrappers. Entirely in the hand of her daughter Sarah Hubbard (née Bradstreet) and signed by her inside the front cover ‘Sarah Bradstreet’. c.1670s.

Donated in 1934 by The Manning Association.

pp. [1-2]

*BdA 41: Anne Bradstreet, For my deare sonne Simon Bradstreet

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet.

Dedication, beginning ‘Parents perpetuate their liues in their posterity...’, dated 20 March 1664. Ellis, p. 47. Hensley, p. 271. McElrath & Robb, p. 195.

pp. [2-47]

*BdA 43: Anne Bradstreet, Meditations Diuine and morall

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet.

77 prose meditations. Ellis, pp. 48-73. Hensley, pp. 272-91. McElrath & Robb, pp. 195-209.

p. [47]

BdA 30: Anne Bradstreet, To my dear children (‘This Book by Any yet vnread’)

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet.

Ellis, p. 3. Hensley, p. 240. McElrath & Robb, p. 215.

pp. [48-61]

BdA 46: Anne Bradstreet, To my dear children

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet.

A prose address beginning ‘My dear children./ I knowing by experc . yt ye exhortats. of parents take most effect wn ye speakers leaue to speak...’. Ellis, pp. 3-10. Hensley, pp. 240-5. McElrath & Robb, pp. 215-19.

pp. [61-2]

BdA 6: Anne Bradstreet, ‘By night when others soundly slept’

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet, under a general heading ‘Here follows severall occasionall Meditations.’

Ellis, p. 11. Hensley, p. 246. McElrath & Robb, p. 220.

pp. [62-4]

BdA 10: Anne Bradstreet, For Deliverc from a feaver (‘When Sorrowes had begyrt me rovnd’)

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet.

Ellis, pp. 12-13. Hensley, p. 247. McElrath & Robb, pp. 220-1.

pp. [64-6]

BdA 14: Anne Bradstreet, From another sore fitt. etc. (‘In my distresse I sovght ye Lord’)

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet.

Ellis, pp. 13-14. Hensley, p. 248. McElrath & Robb, pp. 221-2.

pp. [66-7]

BdA 8: Anne Bradstreet, Deliverc from a fitt of ffainting (‘Worthy art Thou o Ld of praise’)

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet.

Ellis, p. 15. Hensley, p. 249.

pp. [67-94]

BdA 45: Anne Bradstreet, Meditations when my Soul hath been refreshed wth the Consolations wch the world knowes not

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet, the prose passages on pp. [67-70, 74-6, 78-9, 86]. For the verse, see BdA 0000.

Entries in prose and verse, beginning ‘Lord, why should I doubt any more wn thov hast given me Such assured Pledges of thy Loue....’, and including prose meditations dated 8 July 1656, 28 August 1656, 11 May 1657, 30 September 1657, and 11 May 1661.

Ellis, pp. 16-39 (including verse. Prose on pp. 17, 20-6). Hensley, pp. 250-70 (including verse. Prose on pp. 250-1, 254-5, 257, 259). McElrath & Robb, pp. 223-9.

For verse, see BdA 1.

pp. [70-2]

BdA 38: Anne Bradstreet, ‘What God is like to him I serve’

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet.

Ellis, pp. 17-18. Hensley, pp. 251-2. McElrath & Robb, p. 224.

pp. [72-3]

BdA 24: Anne Bradstreet, ‘My Soul rejoice thou in thy God’

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet.

Ellis, pp. 18-19. Hensley, p. 253. McElrath & Robb, pp. 224-5.

pp. [76-7]

BdA 2: Anne Bradstreet, ‘As spring the winter doth succeed’

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet, headed with the date ‘May 13. 1657’.

Ellis, pp. 22-3. Hensley, p. 256. McElrath & Robb, pp. 226-7.

pp. [79-80]

BdA 36: Anne Bradstreet, Vpon my Son Samuel his goeing for England Novem. 6. 1657 (‘Thou mighty God of Sea and Land’)

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet.

Ellis, pp. 24-5. Hensley, p. 258. McElrath & Robb, p. 228.

pp. [80-1]

BdA 26: Anne Bradstreet, ‘My thankfull heart wth glorying Tongve’

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet.

Ellis, p. 26. Hensley, pp. 259-60. McElrath & Robb, pp. 228-9.

pp. [82-3]

BdA 12: Anne Bradstreet, For the restoration of my dear Husband from a burning Ague. June 1661 (‘When feares and sorrowes me besett’)

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet.

Ellis, p. 27. Hensley, p. 261. McElrath & Robb, pp. 229-30.

p. [83]

BdA 32: Anne Bradstreet, Vpon my Daughter Hannah Wiggin her recouery from a dangerous feaver (‘Bles't bee thy Name who did'st restore’)

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet.

Ellis, p. 28. Hensley, p. 262. McElrath & Robb, p. 230.

pp. [84-6]

BdA 28: Anne Bradstreet, On my Sons Return out of England. July. 17. 1661 (‘All praise to him who hath now rurn'd’)

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet.

Ellis, pp. 28-31. Hensley, pp. 263-4. McElrath & Robb, pp. 230-1.

pp. [86-9]

BdA 34: Anne Bradstreet, Vpon my dear & loving husband his goeing into England. Jan. 16. 1661 (‘O thov most high who rulest All’)

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet.

Ellis, pp. 32-4. Hensley, pp. 265-6. McElrath & Robb, pp. 232-3.

pp. [89-92]

BdA 18: Anne Bradstreet, In my Solitary houres in my dear husband his Absence (‘O Lord thou hear'st my dayly moan’)

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet.

Ellis, pp. 34-7. Hensley, pp. 267-8. McElrath & Robb, pp. 233-5.

pp.[92-3]

BdA 20: Anne Bradstreet, In thankfull acknowledgmt for ye lrs rec'd. from my husband ovt of England (‘O Thou that hear'st ye prayers of Thine’)

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet.

Ellis, pp. 37-8. Hensley, p. 269. McElrath & Robb, p. 235.

pp. [93-4]

BdA 22: Anne Bradstreet, In thankfull Remembrc for my dear husbands safe Arrivall. Sept. 3. 1662 (‘What shall I render to thy Name’)

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet.

Ellis, pp. 38-9. Hensley, p. 270. McElrath & Robb, pp. 235-6.

pp. [95-7]

BdA 16: Anne Bradstreet, Here followes some verses vpon ye burning of or house, July 10th. 1666. Copyed ovt of a loose Paper. (‘In silent night when rest I took’)

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet.

Ellis, pp. 40-2. Hensley, pp. 292-3. McElrath & Robb, pp. 236-7.

pp. [98-100]

BdA 4: Anne Bradstreet, ‘As weary pilgrim, now at rest’

Copy by Sarah Bradstreet, headed ‘A Pilgrim’.

Ellis, pp. 42-4. Hensley, pp. 294-5. McElrath & Robb, pp. 210-11.

MS Am 1007.1

A partly autograph octavo notebook of Anne Bradstreet, 74 pages, including a tipped-in leaf (plus 24 blank pages after p. [72]), in contemporary calf with remains of metal clasps. Pages 1-41 and [97-8] are her autograph copies largely of prose meditations written at the request of her second son, the Rev. Simon Bradstreet (1640-83), to whom she dedicated them, 20 March 1664, and one poem by her at the end dated 31 August 1669. Pages 43-66 comprise transcripts (‘A true Copy’) by Simon Bradstreet of his mother's (now lost) manuscript book ‘To my dear children’, including diary entries for 8 July 1656 to 18 July 1666, made by him after her death in 1672. Pages 66-7 contain a poem by her copied by him from a loose paper. Pages 69-72 were then occupied later by Latin translations of some of Anne Bradstreet's prose in the volume made in his younger days by her great-grandson Simon Bradstreet (d.1771). c.1664-72 [and additions c.1720s].

This MS is the Andover MS. Purchased in 1954 by Buchanan Charles from the Seven Gables Bookstore, New York. Donated by him to the Stevens Memorial Library, Andover, Massachusetts, and since 1972 kept on deposit at Harvard. Inside the front cover are earlier inscriptions ‘Harrys His Book’ and ‘Saml. Bradstreet of the 7th Generation from the author 1849’.

pp. 1-2

*BdA 39: Anne Bradstreet, For my deare sonne Simon Bradstreet

Autograph.

Edited from this MS by all editors. Facsimile of both pages in Ellis, pp. [45-6].

Dedication, beginning ‘Parents perpetuate their liues in their posterity...’, dated 20 March 1664. Ellis, p. 47. Hensley, p. 271. McElrath & Robb, p. 195.

pp. 3-41

*BdA 42: Anne Bradstreet, Meditations Diuine and morall

Autograph, subscribed by Simon Bradstreet ‘My hond. & dear mother intended to haue filled up this Book wth the like observations but was pvented by Death.’

Edited from this MS by all editors.

77 prose meditations. Ellis, pp. 48-73. Hensley, pp. 272-91. McElrath & Robb, pp. 195-209.

pp. 43-8

BdA 29: Anne Bradstreet, To my dear children (‘This Book by Any yet vnread’)

Copy by Simon Bradstreet, under his rubric ‘A true Copy of a Book left by my hond & dear mother to her children & found among some papers after her Death.’

Edited from this MS by all editors.

Ellis, p. 3. Hensley, p. 240. McElrath & Robb, p. 215.

p. 49

BdA 5: Anne Bradstreet, ‘By night when others soundly slept’

Copy by Simon Bradstreet, untitled, under a general heading ‘Here follow severall occasionall meditations. &c’.

Edited from this MS by all editors.

Ellis, p. 11. Hensley, p. 246. McElrath & Robb, p. 220.

pp. 49-50

BdA 9: Anne Bradstreet, For Deliverc from a feaver (‘When Sorrowes had begyrt me rovnd’)

Copy by Simon Bradstreet.

Edited from this MS by all editors.

Ellis, pp. 12-13. Hensley, p. 247. McElrath & Robb, pp. 220-1.

pp. 50-1

BdA 13: Anne Bradstreet, From another sore fitt. etc. (‘In my distresse I sovght ye Lord’)

Copy by Simon Bradstreet.

Edited from this MS by all editors.

Ellis, pp. 13-14. Hensley, p. 248. McElrath & Robb, pp. 221-2.

p. 51

BdA 7: Anne Bradstreet, Deliverc from a fitt of ffainting (‘Worthy art Thou o Ld of praise’)

Copy by Simon Bradstreet.

Edited from this MS by all editors.

Ellis, p. 15. Hensley, p. 249.

pp. 51-66

BdA 44: Anne Bradstreet, Meditations when my Soul hath been refreshed wth the Consolations wch the world knowes not

Copy by Simon Bradstreet, the prose sections on pp. 51-3, 54-5, 56-7, 58, and 61; the verse elsewhere.

Edited from this MS by all editors.

Entries in prose and verse, beginning ‘Lord, why should I doubt any more wn thov hast given me Such assured Pledges of thy Loue....’, and including prose meditations dated 8 July 1656, 28 August 1656, 11 May 1657, 30 September 1657, and 11 May 1661.

Ellis, pp. 16-39 (including verse. Prose on pp. 17, 20-6). Hensley, pp. 250-70 (including verse. Prose on pp. 250-1, 254-5, 257, 259). McElrath & Robb, pp. 223-9.

For verse, see BdA 1.

p. 53

BdA 37: Anne Bradstreet, ‘What God is like to him I serve’

Copy by Simon Bradstreet, untitled.

Edited from this MS by all editors.

Ellis, pp. 17-18. Hensley, pp. 251-2. McElrath & Robb, p. 224.

pp. 53-4

BdA 23: Anne Bradstreet, ‘My Soul rejoice thou in thy God’

Copy by Simon Bradstreet, untitled.

Edited from this MS by all editors.

Ellis, pp. 18-19. Hensley, p. 253. McElrath & Robb, pp. 224-5.

p. 56

BdA 1: Anne Bradstreet, ‘As spring the winter doth succeed’

Copy by Simon Bradstreet, untitled, headed with the date ‘May. 13. 1657.’

Edited from this MS by all editors.

Ellis, pp. 22-3. Hensley, p. 256. McElrath & Robb, pp. 226-7.

pp. 57-8

BdA 35: Anne Bradstreet, Vpon my Son Samuel his goeing for England Novem. 6. 1657 (‘Thou mighty God of Sea and Land’)

Copy by Simon Bradstreet.

Edited from this MS by all editors.

Ellis, pp. 24-5. Hensley, p. 258. McElrath & Robb, p. 228.

pp. 58-9

BdA 25: Anne Bradstreet, ‘My thankfull heart wth glorying Tongve’

Copy by Simon Bradstreet, untitled.

Edited from this MS by all editors.

Ellis, p. 26. Hensley, pp. 259-60. McElrath & Robb, pp. 228-9.

p. 59

BdA 11: Anne Bradstreet, For the restoration of my dear Husband from a burning Ague. June 1661 (‘When feares and sorrowes me besett’)

Copy by Simon Bradstreet.

Edited from this MS by all editors.

Ellis, p. 27. Hensley, p. 261. McElrath & Robb, pp. 229-30.

p. 60

BdA 31: Anne Bradstreet, Vpon my Daughter Hannah Wiggin her recouery from a dangerous feaver (‘Bles't bee thy Name who did'st restore’)

Copy by Simon Bradstreet.

Edited from this MS by all editors.

Ellis, p. 28. Hensley, p. 262. McElrath & Robb, p. 230.

pp. 60-1

BdA 27: Anne Bradstreet, On my Sons Return out of England. July. 17. 1661 (‘All praise to him who hath now rurn'd’)

Copy by Simon Bradstreet.

Edited from this MS by all editors.

Ellis, pp. 28-31. Hensley, pp. 263-4. McElrath & Robb, pp. 230-1.

pp. 61-3

BdA 33: Anne Bradstreet, Vpon my dear & loving husband his goeing into England. Jan. 16. 1661 (‘O thov most high who rulest All’)

Copy by Simon Bradstreet.

Edited from this MS by all editors.

Ellis, pp. 32-4. Hensley, pp. 265-6. McElrath & Robb, pp. 232-3.

pp. 63-4

BdA 17: Anne Bradstreet, In my Solitary houres in my dear husband his Absence (‘O Lord thou hear'st my dayly moan’)

Copy by Simon Bradstreet.

Edited from this MS by all editors.

Ellis, pp. 34-7. Hensley, pp. 267-8. McElrath & Robb, pp. 233-5.

pp. 64-5

BdA 19: Anne Bradstreet, In thankfull acknowledgmt for ye lrs rec'd. from my husband ovt of England (‘O Thou that hear'st ye prayers of Thine’)

Copy by Simon Bradstreet.

Edited from this MS by all editors.

Ellis, pp. 37-8. Hensley, p. 269. McElrath & Robb, p. 235.

pp. 65-6

BdA 21: Anne Bradstreet, In thankfull Remembrc for my dear husbands safe Arrivall. Sept. 3. 1662 (‘What shall I render to thy Name’)

Copy by Simon Bradstreet, subscribed ‘This was the last Thing written in that Book by my dear and hon'd Mother’.

Edited from this MS by all editors.

Ellis, pp. 38-9. Hensley, p. 270. McElrath & Robb, pp. 235-6.

pp. 66-7

BdA 15: Anne Bradstreet, Here followes some verses vpon ye burning of or house, July 10th. 1666. Copyed ovt of a loose Paper. (‘In silent night when rest I took’)

Copy by Simon Bradstreet.

Edited from this MS by all editors.

Ellis, pp. 40-2. Hensley, pp. 292-3. McElrath & Robb, pp. 236-7.

pp. 69-70

BdA 40: Anne Bradstreet, For my deare sonne Simon Bradstreet

Autograph copy by Simon Bradstreet (d.1771), great-grandson of Anne Bradstreet, of his Latin translation of her dedicatory letter, headed ‘Ad Sim. Bradstreet filium charissimum meum’, beginning ‘In posteris Parentes vitam perpetuam faciunt...’, and subscribed ‘Hæc Epistola RomanoSermone versus est à Simone Bradstreet hujus Excellentissimæ Fæminæ Pronepote, cum sequentibus Meditatiunculis’. c.1720s.

Edited from this MS in Ellis, p. 74.

Dedication, beginning ‘Parents perpetuate their liues in their posterity...’, dated 20 March 1664. Ellis, p. 47. Hensley, p. 271. McElrath & Robb, p. 195.

pp. 71-2

BdA 43.5: Anne Bradstreet, Meditations Diuine and morall

Autograph copy by Simon Bradstreet (d.1771), great-grandson of Anne Bradstreet, of his Latin translation of the first four meditations, headed ‘Meditationes divinæ & Ethicæ’ and here beginning ‘Est nihil occulis visibile, hominum nullæ actiones...’. c.1720s.

Edited from this MS in Ellis, pp. 75-6.

77 prose meditations. Ellis, pp. 48-73. Hensley, pp. 272-91. McElrath & Robb, pp. 195-209.

pp. [97-8]

*BdA 3: Anne Bradstreet, ‘As weary pilgrim, now at rest’

Autograph, untitled, dated at the end ‘Aug. 31 69’, on a tipped-in leaf.

Edited from this MS by all editors. Facsimile of the last page in P.J. Croft, Autograph Poetry in the English Language, 2 vols (London, 1973), I, No. 48.

Ellis, pp. 42-4. Hensley, pp. 294-5. McElrath & Robb, pp. 210-11.

bMS Am 1631 (230)

Copy of a letter in Italian from the Republic of Venice to the Resident of England, 8 February ‘1650’, with Killigrew's reply.

KiT 24: Thomas Killigrew, Letter(s)

bMS Am 1631 (407)

Autograph letter signed by Vanbrugh, to Peter Le Neve, [from Whitehall], 27 February 1723/4. 1724.

*VaJ 357: Sir John Vanbrugh, Letter(s)

Edited in Judith Milhous, ‘Five New Letters by Sir John Vanbrugh’, HLB, 27 (1979), 434-41 (pp. 440-1).

bMS Am 1631 (412)

An order of Council for Foreign Plantations for payment of £150 to their secretary, Colonel Froude, signed by Waller, Orrery, and others, 9 March 1662[/3]. 1663.

*WaE 848: Edmund Waller, Document(s)

Sotheby's, 14 April 1875, lot 858.

bMS Eng 834 (36)

Copy, in a large rounded hand, untitled, on five pages of three unbound folio leaves. Late 17th century.

PsK 197: Katherine Philips, La Solitude de St. Amant. Englished (‘O! Solitude my sweetest choice’)

First published in Poems (1667), pp. 170-83. Saintsbury, pp. 601-4. Thomas, III, 94-102.

A musical setting by Henry Purcell published in Comes Amoris…The First Book (London, 1687), p. 18. The Theater of Music…The Fourth and Last Book (London, 1687), p. 57. The Works of Henry Purcell, XXV, ed. Arthur Somervell (London, 1928), pp. 137-40; revised edition, ed. Margaret Laurie (1985), pp. 75-9.

bMS Eng 870 (11)

Autograph petition signed, to Parliament, from the Tower, [1652]. 1652.

*DaW 135: Sir William Davenant, Letter(s)

bMS Eng 870 (22)

Autograph letter signed, to Sir Richard Bulstrode, Envoy at Brussels, from Ratisbon, 12/20 February 1685/6. 1686.

*EtG 145: Sir George Etherege, Letter(s)

Owned in 1870 by T.E.P. Lefroy, of Hillcote, Bournemouth, Hampshire. Puttick & Simpson's, 8 June 1852, lot 105, and 25 January 1853, lot 183. Waller's sale catalogue for 1871, item 85. Sotheby's, 3 May 1889, lot 33, to Bennett.

Recorded in HMC, 1st Report (1870), Appendix, p. 56.

bMS Eng 991

Miscellaneous papers of Samuel Pepys and John Evelyn, 1656-1700.

[unnumbered item]

*EvJ 208: John Evelyn, Theology, Prayers and Devotions

Autograph drafts of an attempted translation of the Dies Irae, on pages 2-3 of a letter to Evelyn by William Fuller (1608-75), Bishop of London, dated 27 February 1656[/7]. 1657.

[unnumbered item]

*TaJ 56: Jeremy Taylor, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to [John Evelyn], 9 June 1657 (the verso containing Evelyn's draft reply). 1657.

Thomas Rodd's sale catalogues, [1836], p. 16, and 1838, p. 87. Puttick & Simpson, 19 March 1850, lot 385.

Edited in Bray, II, i, 174. Eden, I, lxv-lxvi. Wheatley, III, 238-40. Facsimile in The Autograph Portfolio; A Collection of Fac-simile Letters from Eminent Persons (London, 1837).

[unnumbered item]

*TaJ 62: Jeremy Taylor, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Taylor, to [John Evelyn], 12 May 1658, now lacking the signature. 1658.

Edited in Eden, I, lxxviii-lxxix. Wheatley, III, 248-9.

bMS Eng 1107

Papers of the Gell family, formerly of Hopton Hall, Derbyshire, in different hands and paper sizes, now disbound in folders.

Sotheby's, 16 December 1950, lot 560. Owned by Arthur A. Houghton, Jr (1906-90), American businessman and collector. Given to the Houghton Library by Robert S. Pirie in 1959.

Folder 5

RnT 108: Thomas Randolph, An Elegie upon the Lady Venetia Digby (‘Death, who'ld not change prerogatives with thee’)

Copy, headed ‘An Elegie on the most beauteous Lady Madam Venetia Digbye’, imperfect, on the first page of two conjugate folio leaves, subscribed ‘T: R:’.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 52-3.

Folder 5A

DaW 24: Sir William Davenant, For the Lady, Olivia Porter. A present, upon a New-yeares day (‘Goe! hunt the whiter Ermine! and present’)

Copy, headed ‘Davenats new yeares guift to Mrs Porter’, on the first page of two conjugate folio leaves. The text followed on the same page by ‘The mock new-yeares guift’ (‘Goe hunt ye stinking fox’).

First published in Madagascar (London, 1638). Gibbs, p. 43.

Folder 6

BaR 6: Richard Barnfield, An Ode (‘As it fell upon a Day’)

Copy, with the second line (‘In the merry month of May’) placed first, in the hand of Katherine Packer (b.1623/4), later (1644) wife of John Gell, on a single leaf. c.1638.

Edited from this MS in Dobson, pp. 64-5.

First published in Poems: In Divers Humors (London, 1598). Grosart, pp. 190-2. Arber, pp. 120-1. Klawitter, pp. 183-4.

Folder 11

WiG 7: George Wither, The Author's Resolution in a Sonnet (‘Shall I wasting in despair’)

Copy, in the hand of Thomas Gell, MP (1595-1657), of the Inner Temple, untitled, on one side of a single folio leaf.

First published in Fidelia (London, 1615). Sidgwick, I, 138-9. A version, as ‘Sonnet 4’, in Faire-Virtue, the Mistresse of Phil'Arete, generally bound with Juvenilia (London, 1622). Spenser Society No. 11 (1871), pp. 854-5. Sidgwick, II, 124-6.

For the ‘answer’ attributed to Ben Jonson, but perhaps by Richard Johnson, see Sidgwick, I, 145-8, and Ben Jonson, ed. C.H. Herford and Percy & Evelyn Simpson, VIII (Oxford, 1947), 439-43. MS versions of Wither's poem vary in length.

Folder 14

HeR 171: Robert Herrick, A Nuptiall Song, or Epithalamie, on Sir Clipseby Crew and his Lady (‘What's that we see from far?’)

Copy in the hand of Thomas Gell, MP (1595-1657), of the Inner Temple, headed ‘Hericks Epithalamie:’, imperfect, on the remains of two conjugate quarto leaves.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 112-16. Patrick, pp. 154-8.

Folder 15

DnJ 1584: John Donne, A Hymne to God the Father (‘Wilt thou forgive that sinne where I begunne’)

Copy, in the hand of Thomas Gell, MP (1595-1657), of the Inner Temple, headed ‘To Christ’, on a single folio leaf; imperfect.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 369 (and variant text p. 370). Gardner, Divine Poems, p. 51. Shawcross, No. 193. Variorum, 7 Pt 1 (2005), pp. 10, 16, 26, 110 (in four sequences).

bMS Eng 1143

A collection of unbound separate verse manuscripts.

[unnumbered folder]

DoC 47: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Colon (‘As Colon drove his sheep along’)

Copy, in double columns, untitled, on the first two pages of two conjugate folio leaves. Late 17th century.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1697). POAS, II (1965), 167-75. Harris, pp. 124-35.

MS Eng 36

Copy, on seventeen quarto leaves, in paper wrappers. With a title-page in a predominantly italic hand, ‘Monarchie in its Excellence compared with Aristocratie, and Democratie seuerally, and with both Joyntly Written by the honble and learned Sr Foulke Greuill Lord Brooke and left in A Manuscript’; with a dedicatory epistle in a mixed hand ‘To the Honored and worpll Doctor Saint Barbe’ subscribed ‘Sr ffouck Greuill Lord Brooke, by him at his death bequeathed vnto my brother then his Lorps Chaplan And by my brother at his death giuen as A Legacy vnto mee for my better supportance ... The humblest of yor seruants / Richard Graues’; the text (ff. [3r-16v]) in yet another, professional mixed hand. c.1630s-40s.

GrF 13: Fulke Greville, A Treatise of Monarchy (‘There was a tyme before the tymes of story’)

First published in The Remains of Sir Fulke Grevill (London, 1670). Wilkes, II, 31-203.

MS Eng 121

Epigrams. Fair copy of eighteen Epigrams (McClure Nos. 261, 5, 67, 308, 262, 326, 338, 121, 122 (same as 329), 142, 356, 337, 366, 246, 270, 263, 248, 421), plus a Latin version of No. 421 (‘The Like in Latten’, beginning ‘Stirpis Haringtoniæ Soboles pulcherrima Sara’), in a secretary and italic hand, on six quarto leaves, inscribed on the front paper wrapper in a later hand ‘A Booke of verses made by Sr: John Harrington knight who dwelt at Bathe’. Early 17th century.

HrJ 24: Sir John Harington, Epigrams

Seven Epigrams first published in Epigrammes by Sir J. H. and others appended to J[ohn] C[lapham], Alcilia, Philoparthens Louing Folly (London, 1613). 116 Epigrams published in London, 1615. 346 Epigrams published in London, 1618. 428 Epigrams edited in McClure (1930), pp. 145-322. See also HrJ 26.5-314.8. All the Epigrams published as The Epigrams of Sir John Harington, ed. Gerard Kilroy (Farnham, 2009).

MS Eng 218.2 (v.3)

Papers of John Boyle, fifth Earl of Cork and Orrery.

pp. 37-40

WyW 23: William Wycherley, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Wycherley, to John Sheffield, Earl of Mulgrave, from London, 20 August 1677. c.1677.

Edited in Robert J. Allen, ‘Two Wycherley Letters’, TLS (18 April 1935), p. 257. Reedited in McCarthy, pp. 86-8.

pp. 41-2

WyW 24: William Wycherley, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Wycherley, to John Sheffield, Earl of Mulgrave, from Fleet Prison, 24 October 1685. c.1685.

Edited in Robert J. Allen, ‘Two Wycherley Letters’, TLS (18 April 1935), p. 257. Reedited in McCarthy, pp. 145-6.

[unspecified page number]

DoC 335.5: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On the Revolution in 1688 (‘Of a splenetic nation I sing’)

Copy of lines 1-8.

Recorded in Harris.

Edited in Harris (1940), pp. 152-3. Discussed in Harris (1979), p. 188. Unlikely to be by Dorset.

MS Eng 228

A quarto volume of poems by Thomas Pestell (1584-1659), royal chaplain, headed ‘Perditi poëmata’, in a single neat roman hand (?autograph), 57 leaves, in paper wrappers. c.1637.

Maggs's sale catalogue No. 481 (1940?), item 1496.

f. 29v

HeR 377.5: Robert Herrick, To a disdaynefull fayre (‘Thou maist be proud, and be thou so for me’)

Copy of an adapted version of Herrick's poem, headed ‘The patchd Song. 1636’ and beginning ‘Thou mayst be proud, & bee thou so for mee’.

Edited from this MS text in The Poems of Thomas Pestell, ed. Hannah Buchan (Oxford, 1940), pp. 59-60, and see also R.G. Howarth, ‘Attributions to Herrick’, N&Q, 203 (June 1958), 249.

First published in Norman Ault, A Treasury of Unfamiliar Lyrics (London, 1938), p. 134. Martin, p. 421. Patrick, pp. 553-4.

MS Eng 228*

Copy, headed ‘Jo: Bea: / On Ascension day’ and here beginning Yee yt to starrs direct your curious eyes. With other verse, on the two inner pages of an independent pair of conjugate folio leaves accompanying the MS of Thomas Pestell's poems.

BeJ 35: Sir John Beaumont, On Ascension day (‘Ye that to heav'n direct your curious eyes’)

This MS collated in Sell.

First published in Bosworth-field (1629). Sell, p. 101.

MS Eng 266

A transcript of Complaints made from the edition of 1591, neatly copied in one or more accomplished hands in variant styles of italic and secretary, with title-pages in facsimile imitation of the printed edition. In an octavo volume of 96 leaves also containing (ff. 80r-96v) three other English and Latin texts in other hands, in contemporary limp vellum (rebacked). c.1591.

Inscribed inside the front cover ‘Scudamore’ and on the main title-page (f. 1r) ‘Her: Leek’. Donated in 1940 by Owen D. Young.

ff. 2r-15r

SpE 25: Edmund Spenser, The Ruines of Time (‘It chaunced me on day beside the shore’)

Copy, including the prose dedication to the Countess of Pembroke.

First published in Complaints (London, 1591). Variorum, Minor Poems, II, 35-56.

ff. 16r-26r

SpE 30: Edmund Spenser, The Teares of the Muses (‘Rehearse to me ye sacred Sisters nine’)

Copy, including the prose dedication to Lady Strange.

This MS recorded in Minor Poems, II, 678, 687.

First published in Complaints (London, 1591). Variorum, Minor Poems, II, 59-79.

ff. 26v-37v

SpE 34: Edmund Spenser, Virgils Gnat (‘We now haue playde (Augustus) wantonly’)

Copy, including the verse dedication to the late Earl of Leicester (beginning ‘Wrong'd, yet not daring to expresse my paine’).

First published in Complaints (London, 1591). Variorum, Minor Poems, II, 678, 687.

ff. 38r-58r

SpE 17: Edmund Spenser, Prosopopoia: or Mother Hubberds Tale (‘It was the month, in which the righteous Maide’)

Copy, including the prose dedication to Lady Compton and Mounteagle.

First published in Complaints (London, 1591). Variorum, Minor Poems, II, 103-40.

ff. 59r-67r

SpE 22: Edmund Spenser, Ruines of Rome: by Bellay (‘Ye heauenly spirites, whose ashie cinders lie’)

Copy, including ‘L'Envoy’.

First published in Complaints (London, 1591). Variorum, Minor Poems, II, 141-54.

ff. 68r-75v

SpE 13: Edmund Spenser, Muiopotmos: or The Fate of the Butterflie (‘I sing of deadly dolorous debate’)

Copy, including the prose dedication to Lady Carey.

First published (with a separate title-page dated 1590) in Complaints (London, 1591). Variorum, Minor Poems, II, 157-73.

ff. 77r-9r

SpE 41: Edmund Spenser, Visions of the worlds vanitie (‘One day, whiles that my daylie cares did sleepe’)

Copy.

First published in Complaints (London, 1591). Variorum, Minor Poems, II, 174-8.

MS Eng 584

A quarto volume entitled ‘Miscellany Poems, By Severall Hands. Collected by B. Cumberlege’, in various hands or styles of script, with occasional pen-and-ink drawings and use of coloured inks, xiv + 195 pages, including a table of contents, in later calf. c.1703.

Bookplate of Frederick Lewis Gay, of Brookline, Massachusetts, 1916.

pp. 20-35

DrJ 8.5: John Dryden, Britannia Rediviva (‘Our vows are heard betimes, and heaven takes care’)

Copy, with a title-page, as ‘Written By Mr. Dryden. 1688. L-Sp 1703.’

First published in London, 1688. Kinsley, II, 541-51. Hammond, III, 201-17.

p. 38

TaJ 7.5: Jeremy Taylor, Job's Curse (‘Let the Night perish curs'd by ye Morn’)

Extracts from ‘Job's Curse’.

Published, as one of the ‘Festival Hymns’ in The Golden Grove (London, 1655). A musical setting by Henry Purcell published in Harmonia Sacra (London, 1688).

p. 66

DrJ 156.5: John Dryden, Prologue to the University of Oxford (‘Discord, and Plots which have undone our Age’)

Copy, as ‘By Mr Dryden’.

First published in Miscellany Poems (London, 1684). Kinsley, I, 374-5. California, I, 164-5. Hammond, I, 371-3.

p. 67

DrJ 110.5: John Dryden, The Prologue at Oxford, 1680 (‘Thespis, the first Professor of our Art’)

Copy, as ‘by Mr Dryden 1680’.

First published in Nathaniel Lee, Sophonisba, 2nd edition (London, 1681). Miscellany Poems (London, 1684). Kinsley, I, 211-12. California, I, 160-1. Hammond, I, 413-16.

p. 147

RoJ 76.8: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, An Epistolary Essay from M.G. to O.B. upon Their Mutual Poems (‘Dear friend, I hear this town does so abound’)

Copy of lines 89-96, beginning ‘To ev'ry Rule their mustie Customers spawn?’.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 144-7. Walker, pp. 107-9. Love, pp. 98-101.

p. 152

RoJ 316: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, A Satyr against Reason and Mankind (‘Were I (who to my cost already am)’)

Copy of lines 1-13, untitled, this text quoted after the title-page (p. 151) ‘Corinna. or Human Frailty. A Poem. Also An Answer to ye Earl of Rochesters Satyr. against Man, which begins thus’, ‘An Answer to the Satyr Against Man’ (beginning ‘Were I a Spirit free (which thought's as vain’) occurring on pp. 162-4.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution.

First published (lines 1-173) as a broadside, A Satyr against Mankind [London, 1679]. Complete, with supplementary lines 174-221 (beginning ‘All this with indignation have I hurled’) in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 94-101. Walker, pp. 91-7, as ‘Satyr’. Love, pp. 57-63.

The text also briefly discussed in Kristoffer F. Paulson, ‘A Question of Copy-Text: Rochester's “A Satyr against Reason and Mankind”’, N&Q, 217 (May 1972), 177-8. Some texts followed by one or other of three different ‘Answer’ poems (two sometimes ascribed to Edward Pococke or Mr Griffith and Thomas Lessey: see Vieth, Attribution, pp. 178-9).

pp. 165-7

CoA 84.5: Abraham Cowley, The Extasie (‘I leave Mortality, and things below’)

Copy, as ‘By Mr Abraham Cowley’, here beginning ‘Heare Mortalitie, & things below’.

First published, among Pindarique Odes, in Poems (London, 1656). Waller, I, 204-6. Sparrow, pp. 161-4.

pp. 168-9

CoA 100.4: Abraham Cowley, Life and Fame (‘Oh Life, thou Nothings younger Brother!’)

Copy.

First published, among Pindarique Odes, in Poems (London, 1656).

pp. 169-71

CoA 37.8: Abraham Cowley, Christs Passion, Taken out of a Greek Ode, written by Mr. Masters of New College in Oxford (‘Enough, my Muse, of Earthly things’)

Copy.

First published in Poems, by Several Persons (Dublin, 1663). Verses, Lately Written upon several Occasions (London, 1663). Waller, I, 402-4.

Musical setting by Henry Bowman published in Songs for i 2 & 3 Voyces Composed by Henry Bowman (Oxford, 1679).

pp. 178-82

SpE 101: Edmund Spenser, Extracts

MS Eng 585

A quarto miscellany of poems on affairs of state, 475 pages (plus a six-page index and a number of blanks), in contemporary black morocco gilt. In two professional hands (A: pp. 1-126; B: pp. 129-45 and probably the ‘Index’). c.1690.

Once owned by James Bindley. Sale December 1818 (Bindley sale). Phillipps MS 8418. Sotheby's, 18 June 1908, lot 627.

A transcript of this volume made by George Thorn-Drury, KC (1860-1931), literary scholar and editor, is Harvard MS Eng 633.

p. 107

EtG 72: Sir George Etherege, Song (‘Ye happy Youths, whose hearts are free’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Thorpe.

First published in Choice Ayres and Songs, Fifth Book (London, 1684). Thorpe, p. 32.

p. 108

DoC 245: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, A Song (‘May the ambitious ever find’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Harris.

First published in Choice Ayres and Songs (London, [1684]). Harris, pp. 79-80.

p. 140

DoC 326.8: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Dorsetts Lamentation for Moll Howards Absence (‘Dorset no gentle Nimph can find’)

Copy.

Recorded in Harris, p. 55, as ‘obviously not by Dorset’.

pp. 141-2

DoC 131: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, My Opinion (‘After thinking this fortnight of Whig and of Tory’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in POAS and in Harris.

First published in Miscellaneous Works, Written by…George, late Duke of Buckingham (London, 1704-5). POAS, II (1965), 391-2. Harris, pp. 55-6.

pp. 145-9

EtG 103: Sir George Etherege, Mrs. Nelly's Complaint (‘If Sylla's ghost made bloody Catiline start’)

Copy, headed ‘Nellys Complaint’.

This MS collated in Thorpe.

First published in Miscellaneous Works, Written by…Buckingham, Vol. I (London, 1704). Thorpe, pp. 62-4.

p. 188 et seq.

DoC 361.6: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, The Town Life (‘Once how I doted on this jilting town’)

Copy.

This MS collated in POAS.

First published in State Poems (London, 1697). POAS, IV, 62-7. An argument for Dorset's authorship advanced in O.S. Pickering, ‘An Attribution of the Poem The Town Life (1686) to Charles Sackville, Earl of Dorset’, N&Q, 235 (September 1990), 296-7.

pp. 326-7

EtG 76: Sir George Etherege, A Song on Basset (‘Let equipage and dress despair’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Thorpe.

First published (lines 1-16 only) in Choice Ayres and Songs, Fourth Book (London, 1683). Published complete in Lycidas (London, 1688). Thorpe, pp. 11-12.

pp. 347-8

BeA 2: Aphra Behn, The Coquet (‘Melinda, who had never been’)

Copy.

First published in La Monstre, or, The Lover's Watch (London, 1686). Summers, VI, 29-30.

pp. 382-5

EtG 51: Sir George Etherege, Second Letter to Lord Middleton (‘Since love and verse, as well as wine’)

Copy, headed ‘Sir George Etheridge to the Earl of Middleton’.

This MS collated in Thorpe.

First published in The History of Adolphus (London, 1691). Thorpe, pp. 48-50.

pp. 386-9

DrJ 206: John Dryden, To Sir George Etherege Mr. D.- Answer (‘To you who live in chill Degree’)

Copy, headed ‘Mr Dryden's Letter to Sr. George Etheridge’.

This MS collated in California.

First published at the end of The History of Adolphus (London, 1691). Kinsley, II, 578-80. California, III, 224-6. Hammond, III, 21-7. The Letterbook of Sir George Etherege, ed. Sybil Rosenfeld (London, 1928), pp. 346-8. Letters of Sir George Etherege, ed. Frederick Bracher (Berkeley, Los Angeles & London, 1974), pp. 270-2.

pp. 390-1

EtG 29: Sir George Etherege, A Letter to Lord Middleton (‘From hunting whores and haunting play’)

Copy, headed ‘Sr. George Etheridge to the Earl of Middleton. 2d. Letter’.

This MS collated in Thorpe.

First published, as ‘Another from Sir G.E. to the E. of M--Greeting’, in The History of Adolphus (London, 1691). Thorpe, pp. 46-7.

pp. 445-66

DoC 94: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, A Faithful Catalogue of our Most Eminent Ninnies (‘Curs'd be those dull, unpointed, doggerel rhymes’)

Copy.

This MS collated in POAS and in Harris.

First published in The Works of the Earls of Rochester, Roscommon, and Dorset (London, 1707). POAS, IV (1968), 189-214. Harris, pp. 136-67.

MS Eng 586

A quarto commonplace book and miscellany of verse and prose, in various hands, with additions up to 1751, ii + 662 pages (some erratically numbered), in contemporary calf. c.1672-1715 [plus later additions].

Ownership inscriptions (pp. [i] and [662]), dated 1672, by John Digby, of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. Other inscribed names including (p. 662) ‘Thomas Digby’, ‘Edward Digby’, ‘Robert Debnam’, and (p. [640]) ‘Josh: Churchill 1694’.

pp. 188-9

RoJ 229: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, On Rome's pardons (‘If Rome can pardon sins, as Romans hold’)

Copy, headed ‘I remember to haVe seen a Copy of Verses written by the Earl of Rochester (who had read and seen all the Fopperies and Idolatries of the Church of Rome, as they are practis'd abroad) to which our poor deluded English Papists are utter Strangers; I think they are very pathetick as follows’.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 161-2. Walker, pp. 127-8, among ‘Poems Possibly by Rochester’. Love, p. 247, among Disputed Works.

p. 190

DoC 230: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On the Young Statesmen (‘Clarendon had law and sense’)

Copy of lines 26-30, untitled, beginning ‘Protect us, mighty Providence’, dated ‘Tuesday June 29. 1714.’

This MS collated in POAS and in Harris.

First published in A Third Collection of…Poems, Satyrs, Songs (London, 1689). POAS, II (1965), 339-41. Harris, pp. 50-4.

p. 205

HrJ 53.5: Sir John Harington, The Author to his wife (‘Mall, once in pleasant company by chance’)

Copy, headed ‘Coniugium & matrimonium Nuptiæ’, subscribed ‘Sr Jo: Harrington Epigram ye 50th’.

First published in 1615. 1618, Book IV, No. 45. McClure No. 299, pp. 268-9. Kilroy, Book IV, No. 85, pp. 240-1, as ‘To his wife a rule for Church house and bed’ beginning ‘Of late in pleasant company by chaunce’.

p. [541]

CoA 57: Abraham Cowley, Davideis, Book I, Psalm 114 (‘When Israel was from bondage led’)

Copy, subscribed ‘by A. Cowley’.

Waller, I, 254-5.

pp. [543-71]

FuT 5.238: Thomas Fuller, The History of the Holy War

Extracts, headed ‘Observations out of Dr: Fullers holy warre’.

First published in Cambridge, 1639.

ff. [572-6]

FuT 6.4: Thomas Fuller, The Holy State

Extracts.

First published in London, 1642. Edited by M.G. Walten, 2 vols (New York, 1938).

pp. [577-8]

BcF 713: Francis Bacon, An Essay of a King

Copy, headed ‘The King’.

Essay, beginning ‘A king is a mortal god on earth...’. Spedding, VI, 595-7 (discussed pp. 592-4).

p. [629]

RoJ 521: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, A Translation from Seneca's ‘Troades’, Act II, Chorus (‘After death nothing is, and nothing, death’)

Copy, headed in another hand ‘Seneca's Troas. Chorus of the 2d Act ... Translated by ye Earl of Rochester’.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 150-1. Walker, p. 51. Love, pp. 45-5, as ‘Senec. Troas. Act. 2. Chor. Thus English'd by a Person of Honour’.

p. [640]

DrJ 295: John Dryden, Tyrannick Love: or, The Royal Martyr, Act IV, scene i, lines 125-48. Song (‘Ah, how sweet it is to love’)

Copy of Damilcar's song, headed ‘Song out of Tyrannick Love or ye Royal Martyr. Dryden’, subscribed ‘Transcribed by Josh: Churchill 1694’.

First published in London, 1670. California, X, 105-93 (p. 151). Kinsley, I, 121-2. Hammond, I, 231-2.

MS Eng 598

Copy, including a title-page, prefatory poem ‘To the Parliament’, and postscript, in a predominantly secretary hand, on 21 quarto pages (plus blanks), in later calf. c.1660s.

WiG 32: George Wither, Vox et Lacrimae Anglorum (‘Renowned patriots, open your eyes’)

Bookplate of the Huth library.

First published in London, 1668. Probably not by Wither; possibly by Edward Raddon: see Stephen K. Roberts, ‘A Poet, a Plotter and a Postmaster: a Disputed Polemic of 1668’, Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research, 53 (1980), 258-65. See also David Norbrook, ‘Some Notes on the Canon of George Wither’, N&Q, 241 (1996), 276-81.

MS Eng 606

A quarto miscellany entitled Poems, tracts & memoirs Collected by J Rolf beginning Anno 1700, in several neat hands, written over a period from both ends, 195 pages, with a tipped-in index, in contemporary green vellum. c.1700-5 [with additions to 1777].

Inscribed inside the front cover ‘N.H.W. Tytheridge, St James's Square, Notting Hill, W.’ Bookplate of G. Davies. Bequeathed by Susan Greene Dexter.

p. 8

RoJ 230: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, On Rome's pardons (‘If Rome can pardon sins, as Romans hold’)

Copy, headed ‘The Earl of Rochester on Romes pardons’.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 161-2. Walker, pp. 127-8, among ‘Poems Possibly by Rochester’. Love, p. 247, among Disputed Works.

p. 15 rev.

WoH 245.5: Sir Henry Wotton, A Farewell to the Vanities of the World (‘Farewell, ye gilded follies, pleasing troubles!’)

Copy, headed ‘A farwell to the world’.

First published, as ‘a farewell to the vanities of the world, and some say written by Dr. D[onne], but let them bee writ by whom they will’, in Izaak Walton, The Complete Angler (London, 1653), pp. 243-5. Hannah (1845), pp. 109-13. The Poems of John Donne, ed. Herbert J.C. Grierson, 2 vols (Oxford, 1912), I, 465-7.

pp. 18-20 rev.

PsK 130: Katherine Philips, Happyness (‘Nature courts happiness, although it be’)

Copy, headed ‘on Happinesse’.

First published in Poems (1664), pp. 228-31. Poems (1667), pp. 118-19. Saintsbury, pp. 573-4. Thomas, I, 188-90, poem 74.

p. 21 rev.

PsK 571: Katherine Philips, The World (‘Wee falsly think it due unto our friends’)

Copy.

First published in Poems (1664), pp. 217-22. Poems (1667), pp. 111-13. Saintsbury, pp. 569-71. Thomas, I, 182-5, poem 72.

MS Eng 611

A set of three quarto verse miscellanies, largely in a single cursive hand, all transcribed from printed books, 276 + 340 + c.350 pages, in contemporary vellum boards. Volume I with a title-page ‘Scraps of Poetry On Winter, Its Opposites, & Concomitants: and many other agreeable Fragments all Collected Chiefly from borrowed Books Begun April 7th: 1760. and finished May 20th: 1760. By me Tho: Austen, Rochester’. 1760-7.

Volume II, written from both ends, some pages in a second hand, dated 1765.

Volume III, written from both ends, entitled ‘An Abstract of curious, odd, & comical Passages from old Plays as they came casually to hand, Begun Novembr. 1767’.

Donated by Edgar Huidekoper Wells (class of 1897).

Vol. I, pp. 162-5

PsK 45.5: Katherine Philips, A Countrey life (‘How sacred and how innocent’)

Copy, transcribed from a printed source.

First published in Poems (1664), pp. 177-82. Poems (1667), pp. 88-91. Saintsbury, pp. 588. Thomas, I, 159-62, poem 61. Anonymous musical setting published in The Banquet of Musick (London, 1691).

Vol. I, pp. 252-5

CoA 54.6: Abraham Cowley, The Country Mouse (‘At the large foot of a fair hollow tree’)

Copy.

First published in Poems, by Several Persons (Dublin, 1663). Verses, Lately Written upon several Occasions (London, 1663). Waller, II, 414-16.

Vol. I, pp. 255-6

CoA 129.5: Abraham Cowley, On the Death of Mr. William Hervey (‘It was a dismal, and a fearful night’)

Copy of line 25 onwards, beginning ‘He was my Friend, ye truest Friend on Earth’, subscribed ‘Cowley’.

First published, among Miscellanies, in Poems (London, 1656). Waller, I, 32-7. Sparrow, pp. 36-41.

Vol. I, pp. 256-62

MnJ 141: John Milton, Extracts

Extracts from Milton's poems.

Vol. III, pp. 20-7

OtT 28: Thomas Otway, Extracts

A series of extracts from ‘Alcibiades. a Tragedy, Written by Tho: Otway. 4to. 1675. in Heroic Verse’.

MS Eng 624

A quarto miscellany of poems on affairs of state, in several cursive hands, viii + 136 pages, in contemporary calf. Late 17th century.

Ownership inscription (p. [iv]) by Edward Dowden (1843-1913), of Trinity College, Dublin. Colbeck Radford & Co., undated sale catalogue, item 207. Item 117 in an unidentified sale catalogue.

pp. [1-12]

MaA 341: Andrew Marvell, The Second Advice to a Painter (‘Nay, Painter, if thou dar'st design that fight’)

Copy.

This MS collated in POAS, I. Recorded in Osborne.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 34-53. Lord, pp. 117-30. Smith, pp. 332-43. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 28-32, as anonymous.

The case for Marvell's authorship supported in George deF. Lord, ‘Two New Poems by Marvell?’, BNYPL, 62 (1958), 551-70, but see also discussion by Lord and Ephim Fogel in Vol. 63 (1959), 223-36, 292-308, 355-66. Marvell's authorship supported in Annabel Patterson, ‘The Second and Third Advices-to-the-Painter’, PBSA, 71 (1977), 473-86. Discussed also in Margoliouth, I, 348-50, and in Chernaik, p. 211, where Marvell's authorship is considered doubtful. A case for Sir John Denham's authorship is made in Brendan O Hehir, Harmony from Discords: A Life of Sir John Denham (Berkeley & Los Angeles, 1968), pp. 212-28.

pp. [12-25]

MaA 378: Andrew Marvell, The Third Advice to a Painter (‘Sandwich in Spain now, and the Duke in love’)

Copy.

This MS collated in POAS, I. Recorded in Osborne.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 67-87. Lord, pp. 130-44. Smith, pp. 346-56. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 32-3, as anonymous.

See discussions of the disputed authorship of this poem, as well as of the ‘Second Advice’, cited before MaA 314.

pp. [26-30]

MaA 408: Andrew Marvell, The Fourth Advice to a Painter (‘Draw England ruin'd by what was giv'n before’)

Copy.

This MS collated in POAS, I. Recorded in Osborne.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 140-6, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 33-5, as anonymous. Regarded as anonymous in Margoliouth, I, 348-50.

pp. [30-4]

MaA 430: Andrew Marvell, The Fifth Advice to a Painter (‘Painter, where was't thy former work did cease?’)

Copy.

This MS collated in POAS, I, and lines 143-56 edited from it. Recorded in Osborne.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 146-52, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 35-6, as anonymous. Regarded as anonymous in Margoliouth, I, 348-50.

pp. [35-9]

MaA 134: Andrew Marvell, Clarindon's House-Warming (‘When Clarindon had discern'd beforehand’)

Copy, headed ‘The Warming of Clarendon house’.

First published with Directions to a Painter…Of Sir John Denham ([London], 1667). Margoliouth, I, 143-6. POAS, I, 88-96. Lord, pp. 144-51. Smith, pp. 358-61.

pp. [39-40]

MaA 296: Andrew Marvell, Upon his House (‘Here lies the sacred Bones’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon Clarendon house’.

This MS collated in George A. Aitken, ‘Marvell's Satires’, The Academy, No. 1214 (10 August 1895), 112-13, and thence recorded in Margoliouth.

First published with Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). Margoliouth, I, 146-7. Rejected from the canon by Lord and also by Chernaik, p. 211.

p. [40]

MaA 286: Andrew Marvell, Upon his Grand-Children (‘Kendal is dead, and Cambridge riding post’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon the E of Clarendons Grand Children’.

First published with Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). Margoliouth, I, 147. Rejected from the canon by Lord and also by Chernaik, p. 211.

pp. [61-78]

WiG 33: George Wither, Vox et Lacrimae Anglorum (‘Renowned patriots, open your eyes’)

Copy, including the prefatory poem ‘To ye Parliamt’ and ‘Postscript’.

First published in London, 1668. Probably not by Wither; possibly by Edward Raddon: see Stephen K. Roberts, ‘A Poet, a Plotter and a Postmaster: a Disputed Polemic of 1668’, Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research, 53 (1980), 258-65. See also David Norbrook, ‘Some Notes on the Canon of George Wither’, N&Q, 241 (1996), 276-81.

pp. [79-80]

DoC 275: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, To Mr. Edward Howard, on his Incomparable, Incomprehensible Poem Called ‘The British Princes’ (‘Come on, ye critics! Find one fault who dare’)

Copy, headed ‘L.B. on Mr Howards Poem’.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions, By the Right Honourable, the E. of R[ochester] (‘Antwerpen’ [i.e. London], 1680). POAS, I (1963), 338-9. Harris, pp. 7-9.

pp. [88-92]

MaA 456: Andrew Marvell, Advice to a Painter to draw the Duke by (‘Spread a large canvass, Painter, to containe’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS collated in George A. Aitken, ‘Marvell's Satires’, The Academy, No. 1214 (10 August 1895), 112-13. Recorded in Osborne.

First published [in London], 1679. A Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689), as by ‘A-M-l, Esq’. Thompson III, 399-403. Margoliouth, I, 214-18, as by Henry Savile. POAS, I, 213-19, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 40-2, as by Henry Savile.

pp. [93-100]

MaA 117: Andrew Marvell, Britannia and Rawleigh (‘Ah! Rawleigh, when thy Breath thou didst resign’)

Copy, with cropped heading ‘A Dialogue between Britannia & Sr Walter Rawley’.

This MS collated in George A. Aitken, ‘Marvell's Satires’, The Academy, No. 1214 (10 August 1895), 112-13, and thence in Margoliouth.

First published in A Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689). Margoliouth, I, 194-9, as of doubtful authorship. POAS, I, 228-36, attributed to John Ayloffe. See also George deF. Lord, ‘Satire and Sedition: The Life and Work of John Ayloffe’, HLQ, 29 (1965-6), 255-73 (p. 258).

p. [101]

DoC 231: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On the Young Statesmen (‘Clarendon had law and sense’)

Copy, untitled and here beginning ‘Clarendon had witt & sence’.

This MS collated in POAS and in Harris.

First published in A Third Collection of…Poems, Satyrs, Songs (London, 1689). POAS, II (1965), 339-41. Harris, pp. 50-4.

pp. [102-7]

DoC 347: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Rochester's Farewell (‘Tir'd with the noisome follies of the age’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Filld with ye noysome follyes of ye age’.

First published in A Third Collection of the Newest and Most Ingenious Poems, Satyrs, Songs &c (London, 1689). POAS, II (1965), 217-27. Discussed and Dorset's authorship rejected in Harris, pp. 190-2. The poem is noted by Alexander Pope as being ‘probably by the Ld Dorset’ in Pope's exemplum of A New Collection of Poems Relating to State Affairs (London, 1705), British Library, C.28.e.15, p. 121.

p. [132]

BrT 0.6: Sir Thomas Browne, Colloquy with God (‘The night is come like to the day’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Religio Medici, where Browne describes it as ‘the dormitive I take to bedward…to make me sleepe’. Published later, in an anonymous musical setting, in Harmonia Sacra, II (1693). Keynes, I, 89-90.

MS Eng 628

An octavo miscellany of verse and prose, closely written in probably a single secretary hand, ii + 393 pages, in old calf. c.1620.

Inscribed (p. [i]) ‘This curious Manuscript was bought by me of Mr Muskett the Bookseller. Norwich - J. P. B.’ Unidentified Dobell sale catalogue, item 182.

pp. 317-18

OvT 8: Sir Thomas Overbury, The Authours Epitaph (‘The span of my daies measur'd, here I rest’)

Copy, headed ‘Sr Thomas Ouerburies Epitaph’.

First published in A Wife now the Widdow of Sir T. Ouerbury (London, 1614). Rimbault, p. 46.

p. 319

RaW 408: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘ICUR, good Mounser Carr’

Copy.

First published in Love-Poems and Humourous Ones, ed. Frederick J. Furnivall, The Ballad Society (Hertford, 1874; reprinted in New York, 1977), p. 20. Listed but not printed in Latham, p. 174. Rudick, No. 48, p. 121 (as ‘Sir Walter Raleigh to the Lord Carr’).

pp. 321-2

OvT 9: Sir Thomas Overbury, The Authours Epitaph (‘The span of my daies measur'd, here I rest’)

Copy.

First published in A Wife now the Widdow of Sir T. Ouerbury (London, 1614). Rimbault, p. 46.

p. 331

HoJ 109: John Hoskyns, A Dreame (‘Me thought I walked in a dreame’)

Copy of a version of lines 43-68, here beginning ‘The worst is known, the best is hid’.

Osborn, No. XXXIV (pp. 206-8). Whitlock, pp. 480-2.

A shortened version of the poem, of lines 43-68, beginning ‘the worst is tolld, the best is hidd’ and ending ‘he errd but once, once king forgiue’, was widely circulated.

pp. 335-6

BmF 150.83: Francis Beaumont, Love's Freedom (‘Why should man be only tied’)

Copy.

Rejected by Dyce, XI, 442, and attributed to Henry Harrington.

pp. 362-74

RaW 947: Sir Walter Ralegh, Letter(s)

Copy of Ralegh's letter to Winwood, 21 March 1617.

p. 385

RaW 68: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Euen such is tyme which takes in trust’

Copy, headed ‘Sr walter Rawleigh hys verses written in his byble a lyttell before his deathe’ and here beginning ‘Yeouen suche ys tyme wch takes in haste’.

Edited from this MS in Rudick, No. 35A, p. 80. Recorded in Latham (1929), p. 166, and in Latham (1951), p. 154.

First published in Richard Brathwayte, Remains after Death (London, 1618). Latham, p. 72 (as ‘These verses following were made by Sir Walter Rauleigh the night before he dyed and left att the Gate howse’). Rudick, Nos 35A, 35B, and part of 55 (three versions, pp. 80, 133).

This poem is ascribed to Ralegh in most MS copies and is often appended to copies of his speech on the scaffold (see RaW 739-822).

See also RaW 302 and RaW 304.

pp. 387-9

RaW 785: Sir Walter Ralegh, Speech on the Scaffold (29 October 1618)

Copy, headed ‘october 29 1618 The full effecte and substance of Sr walter Rawliethes speeches at his Execution’.

Transcripts of Ralegh's speech have been printed in his Remains (London, 1657). Works (1829), I, 558-64, 691-6. VIII, 775-80, and elsewhere. Copies range from verbatim transcripts to summaries of the speech, they usually form part of an account of Ralegh's execution, they have various headings, and the texts differ considerably. For a relevant discussion, see Anna Beer, ‘Textual Politics: The Execution of Sir Walter Ralegh’, MP, 94/1 (August 1996), 19-38.

MS Eng 630

A folio commonplace book of verse, in several hands, 102 leaves, in half-sheepskin. Early 19th century.

Once owned by ‘the master of the Europe, the ship that Byron was suposed to have traveled on when he went to Greace [sic]’.

f. 32r

MkM 10: Mary Monck, Verses Wrote on her Death-Bed at Bath, to her Husband, in London (‘Thou, who dost all my worldly thoughts employ’)

Copy.

Twenty-two lines, first published, introduced ‘The following verses were wrote by her (as I am inform'd) on her death-bed at Bath, to her husband in London’, in George Ballard, Memoirs of Several Ladies of Great Britain (Oxford, 1752), pp. 418-22.

MS Eng 631

A large quarto miscellany of verse extracts, comprising 182 entries, in a single cursive hand varying in style, 115 unnumbered leaves (plus 26 blanks), in contemporary calf. Entitled (f. [1r]) ‘A Collection of Miscellany Poems from the Greatest Poets, both Ancient and Modern That i have Read, & here place for my own entertainment, to diuert Malincolly Thoughts, & to assist My Memory, That was neuer Good at no Time:’. Late-17th century.

From the library at Newburgh Priory, Yorkshire.

Nos 1-69

SaG 65: George Sandys, Extracts

Extracts, from Sandys's translations of Homer, Virgil, Ovid etc.

Nos 70-88

SpE 102: Edmund Spenser, Extracts

Extracts, headed ‘Verses taken out of Mr Edmond Spenser's works’.

Nos 89-118

HrG 331: George Herbert, Extracts

Extracts, headed ‘These Verses taken out of Mr George Herbert's Poems’.

Nos 119-32

CrR 457: Richard Crashaw, Extracts

Extracts, headed ‘These Verses Taken out of Mr Richard crashaws Poems’.

Nos 133-45

WaE 916: Edmund Waller, Extracts

Extracts, headed ‘These Verses Taken out of The Poems of Edmond Waller Esqr:’.

Nos 146-58

CoA 289: Abraham Cowley, Extracts

Extracts, headed ‘These Verses Taken out of The works of Mr Abraham Cowley’.

Nos 159-79

ClJ 270: John Cleveland, Extracts

Extracts, headed ‘Taken out of the Works of Mr John Cleveland’.

Nos 180-2

RnT 593: Thomas Randolph, Extracts

Extracts, headed ‘Taken out of the Poems of Mr Thomas Randolph Fellow of Trinity college In cambridge’.

MS Eng 634

An octavo volume of nine poems by Henry King, written in oblong format in a single stylish hand up to f. 24v, subsequently used in upright format for culinary and medical receipts in other hands, 48 leaves, in later blind-stamped calf. c.1630s.

Bookplate of J. Eliot Hodgkin, FSA (1829-1912), engineer and book collector, of Richmond, Surrey. Sotheby's, 12 May 1914 (Hodgkin sale).

Recorded in HMC, 15th Report, 41-2, and Appendix II [30].

f. 1r

KiH 256.5: Henry King, Epigram (‘I would not in my Love too soone prevaile’)

Copy.

First published in The Gentleman's Magazine, 5 (July 1735), 380. The English Poems of Henry King, ed. Lawrence Mason (New Haven, 1914), p. 174. Crum, p. 157.

f. 2r-v

KiH 308.5: Henry King, An Epitaph On Niobe turn'd to Stone (‘This Pile thou see'st, built out of Flesh not Stone’)

Copy.

First published in Poems (1657). Crum, p. 156.

ff. 2v-3v

KiH 738.5: Henry King, To One demanding why Wine sparkles (‘So Diamonds sparkle, and thy Mistriss' eyes’)

Copy of an early version, headed ‘Vpon a Demand why the Wyne sparkles’ and beginning ‘Wee doe not giue this wyne a sparkling name’.

First published in Poems (1657). Crum, pp. 188-9, 243.

ff. 3v-4r

KiH 754.5: Henry King, Upon a Braid of Haire in a sent by Mris. E.H. (‘In this small Character is sent’)

Copy.

First published in Poems (1657). Crum, p. 155.

ff. 4v-5r

KiH 761: Henry King, Upon a Table-book presented to a Lady (‘When your faire hand receaves this Little Book’)

Copy, here beginning ‘When that fairie hand receiues this Little booke’.

First published in Poems (1657). Crum, p. 154.

ff. 5v-7v

KiH 215: Henry King, An Elegy Upon the Bishopp of London John King (‘Sad Relick of a Blessed Soule! whose trust’)

Copy.

First published in Poems (1657). Crum, pp. 172-3.

ff. 8r-11v

KiH 166: Henry King, An Elegy Upon Mrs. Kirk unfortunately drowned in Thames (‘For all the Ship-wracks, and the liquid graves’)

Copy, headed ‘An Elegie Vppon a Lady unfortunately Drowned in the Thames’.

First published in Poems (1657). Crum, pp. 96-7.

ff. 12r-15r

KiH 217: Henry King, An Elegy Upon the death of Mr. Edward Holt (‘Whether thy Father's, or Disease's rage’)

Copy.

First published in Poems (1657). Crum, pp. 98-9.

ff. 15v-24v

KiH 237: Henry King, An Elegy Upon the most victorious King of Sweden Gustavus Adolphus (‘Like a cold Fatall Sweat which ushers Death’)

Copy.

First published in The Swedish Intelligencer, Third Part (London, 1633). Poems (1657). Crum, pp. 77-81.

MS Eng 640

An octavo volume principally of verse, in a single hand, unpaginated, in contemporary calf. Entitled ‘Poems on Several Occasions written By Sr Wm. Dawes Barnt. An: Dni. 1692do Ætat. suæ 20mo...Transcrib'd from the Original. by C. B.’: i.e. by Charles Blake, whose name, dated 1692, appears on the flyleaf. 1692.

Dobell's sale catalogue The Literature of the Restoration (1918), item 1241. Item 33 in an unidentified sale catalogue of ‘Autograph Letters and Manuscripts’.

[unspecified page numbers]

MoH 3: Henry More, The Sure Guide

Copy on 29 pages, rectos only, with a preliminary two pages of ‘The Contents of the ensuing Discourse. Chap 1st-3d’ by ‘C. B.’; headed ‘The Copy of a M.S. Treatise penn'd by that Great Man the truly Learned Dr.Henry More, which he left unfinish'd at his Death’, and subscribed ‘N.B. The foregoing Treatise is Part of what Dr. More intended to have intitul'ed, The sure Guide wherefore I can't but heartily Lament the unspeakable Loss which the world has sustain'd, by our Author's being prevented by Death from the farther Prosecution of this his great and charitable Designe C. B.’

Unfinished and unpublished treatise, beginning ‘That short but weighty Prophecy of the Prophet Malachi, ch.4. v.2 “But unto you that fear my name...”’

MS Eng 686

An octavo verse miscellany, predominantly in two very small hands (A: ff. 1r-44v; B: ff. 44v-87v), with further verse and prose pieces in other hands on ff. 88r-121r, written from both ends, associated with Oxford, possibly New College, and probably afterwards with the Inns of Court, 155 leaves (including 33 blanks), in modern black morocco elaborately gilt. Including 23 poems by Strode (and second copies of two poems) and one poem of doubtful authorship. c.1630s.

Including (ff. 98r-100r) a letter by one ‘Pet[er] Wood’. Inscribed (ff. 90r-1r), ‘Thease verses I borroed to write out of John Sherly [d. 1666] a booke seller in litle Brittaine, 28th of March 1633’. Later in the library of Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bt (1792-1872), manuscript and book collector: Phillipps MS 9235. Sotheby's, 21 February 1938, lot 243.

Cited in IELM II.ii (1993), as the ‘Wood MS’: StW Δ 21. Discussed in C.F. Main, ‘New Texts of John Donne’, SB, 9 (1957), 225-33.

ff. 5r-6

CoR 361: Richard Corbett, A letter To the Duke of Buckingham, being with the Prince of Spaine (‘I've read of Ilands floating, and remov'd’)

Copy, headed ‘On the Spanish Match Dr Corbet to the Duke of Buckingame’.

First published in Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 76-9.

ff. 9v-10r

WoH 110: Sir Henry Wotton, On his Mistress, the Queen of Bohemia (‘You meaner beauties of the night’)

Copy of a five-stanza version, headed ‘To the Spanish Lady’ and beginning ‘Yee meaner beauties of the night’.

First published (in a musical setting) in Michael East, Sixt Set of Bookes (London, 1624). Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 518. Hannah (1845), pp. 12-15. Some texts of this poem discussed in J.B. Leishman, ‘“You Meaner Beauties of the Night” A Study in Transmission and Transmogrification’, The Library, 4th Ser. 26 (1945-6), 99-121. Some musical versions edited in English Songs 1625-1660, ed. Ian Spink, Musica Britannica XXXIII (London, 1971), Nos. 66, 122.

f. 10r

GrF 42: Fulke Greville, Mustapha, IV, iv, 116-117 (‘Mischiefe is like the Cockatrices eyes’)

Copy, headed ‘On Treason’, here beginning ‘Treason is like the Basiliscus eye’.

Bullough, II, 118.

f. 10r

HrJ 268: Sir John Harington, Of Treason (‘Treason doth neuer prosper, what's the reason?’)

Copy, headed ‘Aliter’.

First published in 1615. 1618, Book IV, No. 5. McClure No. 259, p. 255. This epigram also quoted in a letter to Prince Henry, 1609 (McClure, p. 136). Kilroy, Book III, No. 43, p. 185.

f. 11r-v

RaW 332: Sir Walter Ralegh, Sir Walter Ralegh to the Queen (‘Our Passions are most like to Floods and streames’)

Copy, headed ‘Of Passions’ and here beginning ‘Passions are likened best to flouds & streames’.

First published, prefixed to “Wrong not, deare Empresse of my Heart” (see RaW 500-42) and headed ‘To his Mistresse by Sir Walter Raleigh’, in Wits Interpreter (London, 1655). Edited in this form in Latham, p. 18. Rudick, No 39A, p. 106.

For a discussion of the authorship and different texts of this poem, see Charles B. Gullans, ‘Raleigh and Ayton: the disputed authorship of “Wrong not sweete empresse of my heart”’, SB, 13 (1960), 191-8, reprinted in The English and Latin Poems of Sir Robert Ayton, ed. Gullans, STS, 4th Ser. 1 (Edinburgh & London, 1963), pp. 318-26.

f. 14r

DnJ 409: John Donne, The Bracelet (‘Not that in colour it was like thy haire’)

Copy of lines 27-8, headed ‘On the French Crownes’ and here beginning ‘Although ye King eclepd most Xtian bee’.

Edited from this MS in C.F. Main, ‘New Texts of John Donne’, SB, 9 (1957), 225-33, (p. 228). Recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published, as ‘Eleg. XII. The Bracelet’, in Poems (1635). Grierson, I, 96-100 (as ‘Elegie XI’). Gardner, Elegies, pp. 1-4. Shawcross, No. 8. Variorum, 2 (2000), pp. 5-7.

f. 14r

HoJ 288: John Hoskyns, Mr Hoskins wrott in the windowe when he came out of the Tower (‘Sic luo, sic merui; sed quod meruique luoque’)

Copy.

Osborn, No. XXXV (p. 208).

ff. 15v-16r

WoH 36: Sir Henry Wotton, The Character of a Happy Life (‘How happy is he born and taught’)

Copy, headed ‘Sr Henry Wooton’ and here beginning ‘How happy is he borne or taught’.

This MS recorded in Main.

First published in Sir Thomas Overbury, A Wife, 5th impression (London, 1614). Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), pp. 522-3. Hannah (1845), pp. 28-31. Some texts of this poem discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Wotton's “The Character of a Happy Life”’, The Library, 5th Ser. 10 (1955), 270-4, and in Ted-Larry Pebworth, ‘New Light on Sir Henry Wotton's “The Character of a Happy Life”’, The Library, 5th Ser. 33 (1978), 223-6 (plus plates).

f. 16r

RaW 319: Sir Walter Ralegh, Sir Walter Rauleigh to his sonne (‘Three thinges there bee that prosper up apace’)

Copy, headed ‘Sr. Walter Rawleigh to his sonne, Waltr’.

Edited from this MS in Rudick, No. 52, p. 125.

First published in Latham (1929), p. 102. Latham (1951), p. 49. Rudick, No. 52, p. 125.

f. 17r

RaW 268: Sir Walter Ralegh, On the Life of Man (‘What is our life? a play of passion’)

Copy.

First published, in a musical setting, in Orlando Gibbons, The First Set of Madrigals and Mottets (London, 1612). Latham, pp. 51-2. Rudick, Nos 29A, 29B and 29C (three versions, pp. 69-70). MS texts also discussed in Michael Rudick, ‘The Text of Ralegh's Lyric “What is our life?”’, SP, 83 (1986), 76-87.

f. 17v

HrJ 43: Sir John Harington, Against Swearing (‘In elder times an ancient custome was’)

Copy, headed ‘The degrees of Swearing’.

First published in Henry Fitzsimon, S.J., The Justification and Exposition of the Divine Sacrifice of the Masse (Douai, 1611). 1615. 1618, Book IV, No. 9. McClure No. 263, p. 256. Kilroy, Book IV, No. 30, p. 220.

f. 17v

RaW 352: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘The word of deniall, and the letter of fifty’

Copy, headed ‘Rawly his reply’, here beginning ‘The word of denyall & the figure of fifty’, following ‘Noell To Sr Walter Rawleigh’ (‘Th' offence of the stomach and the word of disgrace’).

Edited from this MS in Rudick, No. 19C, p. 29.

First published, as ‘The Answer’ to ‘A Riddle’ (‘Th'offence of the stomach, with the word of disgrace’), in Works (1829), VIII, 736. Latham, pp. 47-8. Rudick, Nos 19A, 19B and 19C (three versions, pp. 28-9).

f. 28v

CoR 271: Richard Corbett, In Quendam Anniversariorum Scriptorem (‘Even soe dead Hector thrice was triumph'd on’)

Copy, headed ‘Ad Authorem de Anniversarijs ejusdem in Henricu Principem’.

First published in Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 8-9.

The poem is usually followed in MSS by Dr Daniel Price's ‘Answer’ (‘So to dead Hector boyes may doe disgrace’), and see also CoR 227-46.

ff. 28v-9r

DyE 88: Sir Edward Dyer, ‘The lowest trees haue topps, the ante her gall’

Copy of an 18-line version, headed ‘A lovers conceipt’.

First published in A Poetical Rapsody (London, 1602). Sargent, No. XII, p. 197. May, Courtier Poets, p. 307. EV 23336.

f. 29r

TiC 36: Chidiock Tichborne, Tichborne's Lament (‘My prime of youth is but a frost of cares’)

Copy, headed ‘Tichbournes Elegy in the Tower before his execution’.

First published in the single sheet Verses of Prayse and Joy Written Upon her Maiesties Preseruation Whereunto is annexed Tychbornes lamentation, written in the Towre with his owne hand, and an answer to the same (London, 1586). Hirsch, pp. 309-10. Also ‘The Text of “Tichborne's Lament” Reconsidered’, ELR, 17, No. 3 (Autumn 1987), between pp. 276 and 277. May EV 15464 (recording 37 MS texts). For the ‘answer’ to this poem, see KyT 1-2.

f. 32r

MrC 7: Christopher Marlowe, Ovid's Elegies. I, v (‘In summers heate, and midtime of the day’)

Copy, headed ‘Corinnæ concubitus Ovid. lib. 1° Amorum Eleg. 5 Æstus erat &c.’.

Ten of Marlowe's Elegies (including I, v and II, iv) first published ‘Middleburg’ [i.e. London], [c.1595-6]. Bowers, II, 307-421 (p. 321). Tucker Brooke, pp. 553-627 (pp. 564-5). Gill et al., I, 13-83 (pp. 18-19).

f. 32r

RaW 424: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘I cannot bend the bow’

Copy, headed ‘A Riddle upon the Lady Bendbow’.

First published in Rudick (1999), No. 37, p. 105. Listed but not printed, in Latham, pp. 173-4 (as an ‘indecorous trifle’).

f. 33r

CoR 385: Richard Corbett, Little Lute (‘Little lute, when I am gone’)

Copy, headed ‘One wrot this in his loves asence on her lute’.

First published in Bennett & Trevor-Roper (1955), p. 8.

Some texts followed by an answer beginning ‘Little booke, when I am gone’.

f. 34v

HrJ 151: Sir John Harington, Of a Lady that left open her Cabbinett (‘A vertuose Lady sitting in a muse’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in ‘Epigrammes’ appended to J[ohn] C[lapham], Alcilia, Philoparthens Louing Folly (London, 1613). McClure No. 404, p. 312. Kilroy, Book IV, No. 57, p. 231.

f. 35r

PeW 250: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, A Paradox in praise of a painted Woman (‘Not kiss? by Love I must, and make impression’)

Copy of the abridged version, untitled and here beginning ‘Nay pish, nay phew, in faith & will you? flye’.

Poems (1660), pp. 93-5, superscribed ‘P.’. First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656), p. 97. Listed in Krueger's Appendix I: ‘Spurious Poems in the 1660 Edition’ as possibly by William Baker. The Poems of John Donne, ed Herbert J.C. Grierson, 2 vols (Oxford, 1912), I, 456-9, as ‘A Paradox of a Painted Face’, among ‘Poems attributed to Donne in MSS’. Also ascribed to James Shirley.

A shorter version, beginning ‘Nay pish, nay pew, nay faith, and will you, fie’, was first published, as ‘A Maids Denyall’, in Richard Chamberlain, The Harmony of the Muses (London, 1654) [apparently unique exemplum in the Huntington, edited in facsimile by Ernest W. Sullivan, II (Aldershot, 1990), pp. 49-50].

ff. 35v-6v

DnJ 3213: John Donne, To his Mistris Going to Bed (‘Come, Madam, come, all rest my powers defie’)

Copy, untitled, subscribed ‘John Dean’.

This MS collated in C.F. Main, ‘New Texts of John Donne’, SB, 9 (1957), 225-33 (pp. 226-8). Recorded in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (London, 1669). Grierson, I, 119-21 (as ‘Elegie XIX. Going to Bed’). Gardner, Elegies, pp. 14-16. Shawcross, No. 15. Variorum, 2 (2000), pp. 163-4.

The various texts of this poem discussed in Randall McLeod, ‘Obliterature: Reading a Censored Text of Donne's “To his mistress going to bed”’, EMS, 12: Scribes and Transmission in English Manuscripts 1400-1700 (2005), 83-138.

ff. 36v-7r

HoJ 330: John Hoskyns, John Hoskins to the Lady Jacob (‘Oh loue whose powre & might non euer yet wthstood’)

Copy, headed ‘In Loves contempt’ and here beginning ‘O Love whose force and might’.

Osborn, p. 301.

f. 37r-v

DnJ 2358: John Donne, ‘Natures lay Ideot, I taught thee to love’

Copy, headed ‘Vppon a woman whom the Author taught to Love & Complement’, subscribed ‘J. Deane.’

This MS collated in C.F. Main, ‘New Texts of John Donne’, SB, 9 (1957), 225-33 (p. 228). Recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published, as ‘Elegie VIII’, in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 89-90 (as ‘Elegie VII’). Gardner, Elegies, p. 12. Shawcross, No. 13. Variorum, 2 (2000), p. 127.

f. 38v

JnB 263: Ben Jonson, A Grace by Ben: Johnson. extempore. before King James (‘Our King and Queen the Lord-God blesse’)

Copy of an eight-line version headed ‘A grace said before the King by a Jester’ and beginning ‘The King, the Queen the Prince God bless’.

First published (?) in John Aubrey, Brief Lives, ed. Andrew Clark (Oxford, 1898), II, 14. Herford & Simpson, VIII, 418-19.

f. 42r

CmT 172: Thomas Campion, ‘Young and simple though I am’

Copy, untitled.

First published in Alfonso Ferrabosco, Ayres (London, 1609). Campion, The Third and Fourth Booke of Ayres (London [1617]), Book IV, No. ix. Davis, p. 177. Doughtie, p. 295.

f. 44v

BrW 12: William Browne of Tavistock, Britannia's Pastorals, Books I and II

Copy of Book I, Song 3, lines 481-2, headed ‘a girdle’ and here beginning ‘This during light I give to clip your waist’

Book I first published London, 1613. Book II first published London, 1616. Goodwin, Vol. I.

f. 50v

CwT 1251.5: Thomas Carew, A Louers passion (‘Is shee not wondrous fayre? but oh I see’)

Copy.

First published, as ‘The Rapture, by J.D.’, in Robert Chamberlain, The Harmony of the Muses (London, 1654), pp. 3-4 [unique exemplum in the Huntington edited in facsimile by Ernest W. Sullivan (Aldershot, 1990)]. Cupids Master-Piece (London, [?1656]). Dunlap, p. 192.

f. 51r

CwT 585: Thomas Carew, A prayer to the Wind (‘Goe thou gentle whispering wind’)

Copy, headed ‘On a sigh’ and here beginning ‘Goe thou gentle whistlinge winde’.

First published in Poems (1640) and in Poems: written by Wil. Shake-speare, Gent. (London, 1640). Dunlap, pp. 11-12.

f. 51r

CwT 716: Thomas Carew, Secresie protested (‘Feare not (deare Love) that I'le reveale’)

Copy, headed ‘To his loue’ and here beginning ‘Thinke not sweet loue that Ile reveale’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 11. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in The Second Book of Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1655).

See also Introduction.

f. 51v

DnJ 1708: John Donne, A Jeat Ring sent (‘Thou art not so black, as my heart’)

Copy of lines 1-4, untitled.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 65-6. Gardner, Elegies, p. 38. Shawcross, No. 73.

f. 52r

CoR 725.8: Richard Corbett, Upon the Same Starre (‘A Starre did late appeare in Virgo's trayne’)

Copy, headed ‘On the blasinge starre’ and here beginning ‘A starre of late appeared in Virgoes traine’.

First published in Bennett & Trevor-Roper (1955), p. 65.

f. 52r

DaJ 202: Sir John Davies, On the Deputy of Ireland his child (‘As carefull mothers doe to sleeping lay’)

Copy, headed ‘On an vntimely death’ and here beginning ‘As carefull mothers in theire bedes doe lay’.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1637), p. 411. Krueger, p. 303.

f. 52r

MrJ 86: John Marston, Upon the Dukes Goeing into Fraunce (‘And wilt thou goe, great duke, and leave us heere’)

Copy.

f. 52v

DnJ 3308: John Donne, To Mr S.B. (‘O Thou which to search out the secret parts’)

Copy, headed ‘Epigrammes of Dr Donnes makinge to Mis S. P.’.

This MS collated in Shawcross. Recorded in Milgate.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 211. Milgate, Satires, pp. 66-7. Shawcross, No. 124.

f. 54r

HrJ 114: Sir John Harington, Of a Lady that giues the cheek (‘Is't for a grace, or is't for some disleeke’)

Copy, headed ‘Of a gentlewoman that painted her face’.

First published in 1615. 1618, Book III, No. 3. McClure No. 201, p. 230. Kilroy, Book IV, No. 84, p. 201.

f. 54v

HrJ 200: Sir John Harington, Of a pregnant pure sister (‘I learned a tale more fitt to be forgotten’)

Copy of a ten-line version, headed ‘On a maiden conceived by a scholler’ and here beginning ‘A godly maiden wth one of her societie’.

First published (13-line version) in The Epigrams of Sir John Harington, ed. N.E. McClure (Philadelphia, 1926), but see HrJ 197. McClure (1930), No. 413, p. 315. Kilroy, Book IV, No. 80, p. 239.

f. 54v

HoJ 16: John Hoskyns, ‘A zealous Lock-Smith dy'd of late’

Copy, headed ‘Of a locke smith’.

Whitlock, p. 108.

f. 56v

CmT 57: Thomas Campion, ‘If Love loves truth, then women doe not love’

Copy, untitled.

First published in The Third and Fourth Booke of Ayres (London, [c.1617]), Book III, No. xi. Davis, p. 146.

f. 59r

StW 1049: William Strode, A Superscription on Sir Philip Sidneys Arcadia sent for a Token (‘Whatever in Philoclea the Faire’)

Copy.

First published in Dobell (1907), p. 43. Forey, p. 18.

ff. 59v-60r

DrW 117.37: William Drummond of Hawthornden, For the Kinge (‘From such a face quois excellence’)

Copy.

Often headed in MSS ‘The [Five] Senses’, a parody of Patrico's blessing of the King's senses in Jonson's Gypsies Metamorphosed (JnB 654-70). A MS copy owned by Drummond: see The Library of Drummond of Hawthornden, ed. Robert H. Macdonald (Edinburgh, 1971), No. 1357. Kastner printed the poem among his ‘Poems of Doubtful Authenticity’ (II, 296-9), but its sentiments are alien to those of Drummond: see C.F. Main, ‘Ben Jonson and an Unknown Poet on the King's Senses’, MLN, 74 (1959), 389-93, and MacDonald, SSL, 7 (1969), 118. Discussed also in Allan H. Gilbert, ‘Jonson and Drummond or Gil on the King's Senses’, MLN, 62 (January 1947), 35-7. Sometimes also ascribed to James Johnson.

f. 60v

StW 683: William Strode, A pursestringe (‘Wee hugg, imprison, hang and save’)

Copy.

First published in Dobell (1907), pp. 44-5. Forey, p. 210.

f. 60v

StW 762: William Strode, Song (‘I saw faire Cloris walke alone’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Walter Porter, Madrigales and Ayres (London, 1632). Dobell, p. 41. Forey, pp. 76-7. The poem also discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Notes on some Poems attributed to William Strode’, PQ, 34 (1955), 444-8 (pp. 445-6), and see Mary Hobbs, ‘Early Seventeenth-Century Verse Miscellanies and Their Value for Textual Editors’, EMS, 1 (1989), 182-210 (pp. 199, 209).

f. 61r

StW 670: William Strode, Poses for Braceletts (‘This keepes my hande’)

Copy.

Third stanza (beginning ‘Voutchsafe my Pris'ner thus to be’) and fourth stanza (beginning ‘When you putt on this little bande’) first published in Wits Interpreter (London, 1655), Part II, p. 386. Published complete in Dobell (1907), pp. 43-4. Forey, p. 34.

f. 61r

StW 80: William Strode, An Earestring (‘'Tis vaine to adde a ring or Gemme’)

Copy.

First published in Poems…by William Earl of Pembroke…[and] Sr Benjamin Ruddier, [ed. John Donne the Younger] (London, 1660), p. 101. Dobell, p. 44. Forey, pp. 34-5.

f. 61r-v

StW 257: William Strode, A Necklace (‘These Vaines are Natures Nett’)

Copy.

First stanza first published in Wits Interpreter (London, 1655), Part II, p. 386. Second stanza (‘Loe on my necke…’) first published in Poems…by William Earl of Pembroke…[and] Sr Benjamin Ruddier, [ed. John Donne the Younger] (London, 1660), p. 100. Complete in Dobell, p. 45. Forey, p. 35.

f. 61v

StW 150: William Strode, A Girdle (‘When ere the wast makes too much hast’)

Copy.

First published in Dobell (1907), pp. 45-6. Forey, p. 193.

f. 61v

DnJ 93: John Donne, The Anagram (‘Marry, and love thy Flavia, for, shee’)

Copy of lines 35-6, here beginning ‘Beautie is barren oft good husbans say’.

Edited from this MS (or DnJ 94) in C.F. Main, ‘New Texts of John Donne’, SB, 9 (1957), 225-33 (p. 228). Recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published as ‘Elegie II’ in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 80-2 (as ‘Elegie II’). Gardner, Elegies, pp. 21-2. Shawcross, No. 17. Variorum, 2 (2000), pp. 217-18.

f. 62r

StW 216: William Strode, A Letter impos'd (‘Goe, happy paper, by commande’)

Copy.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656). Dobell, pp. 100-1. The Poems and Amyntas of Thomas Randolph, ed. John Jay Parry (New Haven & London, 1917), pp. 219-20. Forey, pp. 32-3.

f. 62v

StW 715: William Strode, A Sigh (‘O tell mee, tell, thou God of winde’)

Copy, headed ‘On a Sigh’.

First published in Wit Restor'd (London, 1658). Dobell, pp. 6-8. Forey, pp. 194-6.

f. 63r

StW 883: William Strode, Song (‘O when will Cupid shew such Art’)

Copy.

First published in Dobell (1907), p. 6. Forey, p. 76.

f. 63r-v

StW 734: William Strode, Song (‘As I out of a Casement sent’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Dobell (1907), pp. 11-12. Forey, pp. 77-9.

f. 63v

StW 873: William Strode, Song (‘O sing a new song to the Lord’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Dobell (1907), p. 54. Forey, p. 108.

ff. 63v-4v

StW 725: William Strode, Song (‘As I my flockes lay keeping, mine Eyes fell a sleeping’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in C.F. Main, ‘Notes on some Poems attributed to William Strode’, PQ, 34 (1955) 444-8 (p. 448).

First stanza only first published in Dobell (1907), p. 130. The remaining six stanzas unpublished. Complete in Forey, pp. 80-2.

ff. 64v-5r

StW 132: William Strode, For a Gentleman who kissing his frinde, at his departure out of England, left a Signe of blood upon her (‘What Mystery was this, that I should finde’)

Copy.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656). Dobell, pp. 32-3. Forey, pp. 22-3.

f. 65r

StW 234: William Strode, Loves Ætna. Song (‘In your sterne beauty I can see’)

Copy, headed ‘Another’.

First published in Dobell (1907), p. 47. Forey, p. 93.

f. 65r

StW 418: William Strode, On a Gentlewoman who escapd the marks of the Pox (‘A Beauty smoother then an Ivory plaine’)

Copy, headed ‘On a Gentlewoman disfigured by the Pox’.

First published in Wits Interpreter (London, 1655), Part II, p. 272. Dobell, p. 49. Forey, p. 15.

f. 65v

StW 1096: William Strode, To a Gentlewoman with Black Eyes, for a Frinde (‘Noe marvaile, if the Suns bright Eye’)

Copy, headed ‘To a gentlewoman from a freind’.

Lines 15-20 (beginning ‘Oft when I looke I may descrie’) first published in Thomas Carew, Poems (London, 1640). Published complete in Dobell (1907), pp. 29-30. Forey, pp. 37-9.

f. 66r

StW 552: William Strode, On the death of doctor Langton, President of Maudlin Colledg (‘When men for injuries unsatisfied’)

Copy of a version of lines 23-46, here beginning ‘Such store of flesh How seldome haue wee seene’.

First published in Dobell (1907), pp. 68-70. Forey, pp. 121-3.

ff. 66v-7r

StW 934: William Strode, Song A Parallel betwixt bowling and preferment (‘Preferment, like a Game at bowles’)

Copy.

First published in Dobell (1907), pp. 103-4. Forey, pp. 94-5.

f. 67r-v

StW 171: William Strode, In commendation of Musique (‘When whispering straines do softly steale’)

Copy, headed ‘The Comendation of Musicke’.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656). Dobell, pp. 2-3. Four Poems by William Strode (Flansham, Bognor Regis, 1934), pp. 1-2. Forey, pp. 196-7. The poem also discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Notes on some Poems attributed to William Strode’, PQ, 34 (1955), 444-8 (p. 445).

f. 67v

RaW 269: Sir Walter Ralegh, On the Life of Man (‘What is our life? a play of passion’)

Copy, headed ‘Of Man’.

First published, in a musical setting, in Orlando Gibbons, The First Set of Madrigals and Mottets (London, 1612). Latham, pp. 51-2. Rudick, Nos 29A, 29B and 29C (three versions, pp. 69-70). MS texts also discussed in Michael Rudick, ‘The Text of Ralegh's Lyric “What is our life?”’, SP, 83 (1986), 76-87.

f. 68v

MoG 32: George Morley, An Epitaph upon King James (‘All that have eyes now wake and weep’)

Copy, headed ‘Mr Morley on King James’, incomplete.

A version of lines 1-22, headed ‘Epitaph on King James’ and beginning ‘He that hath eyes now wake and weep’, published in William Camden's Remaines (London, 1637), p. 398.

Attributed to Edward Fairfax in The Fairfax Correspondence, ed. George Johnson (1848), I, 2-3 (see MoG 54). Edited from that publication in Godfrey of Bulloigne: A critical edition of Edward Fairfax's translation of Tasso's Gerusalemme Liberata, together with Fairfax's Original Poems, ed. Kathleen M. Lea and T.M. Gang (Oxford, 1981), pp. 690-1. The poem is generally ascribed to George Morley.

f. 69v

CwT 288: Thomas Carew, A flye that flew into my Mistris her eye (‘When this Flye liv'd, she us'd to play’)

Copy, headed ‘On a flye’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 37-9. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in The Treasury of Musick, Book 2 (London, 1669).

f. 71r

StW 848: William Strode, Song (‘Keepe on your maske, yea hide your Eye’)

Copy, headed ‘A Songe’.

First published, in a musical setting by Henry Lawes, in Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1653). Wits Interpreter (London, 1655). Dobell, pp. 3-4. Forey, pp. 88-9.

f. 71r-v

StW 277: William Strode, On a blisterd Lippe (‘Chide not thy sprowting lippe, nor kill’)

Copy.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656). Dobell, pp. 28-9. Forey, pp. 92-3.

f. 72v

StW 419: William Strode, On a Gentlewoman who escapd the marks of the Pox (‘A Beauty smoother then an Ivory plaine’)

Copy, headed ‘Of Mrs Bettie Lambert’.

First published in Wits Interpreter (London, 1655), Part II, p. 272. Dobell, p. 49. Forey, p. 15.

f. 73v

BrW 213: William Browne of Tavistock, On the Countess Dowager of Pembroke (‘Underneath this sable herse’)

Copy, headed ‘The Countess of Pembrookes Epitaph’.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1623), p. 340. Brydges (1815), p. 5. Goodwin, II, 294. Browne's authorship supported in C.F. Main, ‘Two Items in the Jonson Apocrypha’, N&Q, 199 (June 1954), 243-5.

f. 75r

RaW 219: Sir Walter Ralegh, On the Cardes, and Dice (‘Beefore the sixt day of the next new year’)

Copy, untitled.

First published as ‘A Prognostication upon Cards and Dice’ in Poems of Lord Pembroke and Sir Benjamin Ruddier (London, 1660). Latham, p. 48. Rudick, Nos 50A and 50B, pp. 123-4 (two versions, as ‘Sir Walter Rawleighs prophecy of cards, and Dice at Christmas’ and ‘On the Cardes and dice’ respectively).

f. 78v

DnJ 94: John Donne, The Anagram (‘Marry, and love thy Flavia, for, shee’)

Copy of lines 35-6, here beginning ‘Beautie is barren oft good husbans say’.

Edited from this MS (or DnJ 93) in C.F. Main, ‘New Texts of John Donne’, SB, 9 (1957), 225-33 (p. 228). Recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published as ‘Elegie II’ in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 80-2 (as ‘Elegie II’). Gardner, Elegies, pp. 21-2. Shawcross, No. 17. Variorum, 2 (2000), pp. 217-18.

f. 81r

StW 1004: William Strode, A Sonnet (‘My Love and I for kisses played’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in A Banquet of Jests (London, 1633). Dobell, p. 47. Forey, p. 211. The poem also discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Notes on some Poems attributed to William Strode’, PQ, 34 (1955), 444-8 (p. 446-7).

f. 83r

StW 1005: William Strode, A Sonnet (‘My Love and I for kisses played’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in A Banquet of Jests (London, 1633). Dobell, p. 47. Forey, p. 211. The poem also discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Notes on some Poems attributed to William Strode’, PQ, 34 (1955), 444-8 (p. 446-7).

f. 84r

WoH 111: Sir Henry Wotton, On his Mistress, the Queen of Bohemia (‘You meaner beauties of the night’)

Copy of a four-stanza version, headed ‘In reginam Bohemiæ per Henricum Wotton: milite:’.

First published (in a musical setting) in Michael East, Sixt Set of Bookes (London, 1624). Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 518. Hannah (1845), pp. 12-15. Some texts of this poem discussed in J.B. Leishman, ‘“You Meaner Beauties of the Night” A Study in Transmission and Transmogrification’, The Library, 4th Ser. 26 (1945-6), 99-121. Some musical versions edited in English Songs 1625-1660, ed. Ian Spink, Musica Britannica XXXIII (London, 1971), Nos. 66, 122.

f. 85r

HrJ 282: Sir John Harington, Of Women learned in the tongues (‘You wisht me to a wife, faire, rich and young’)

Copy, untitled and here beginning ‘Youle wishe mee to a wife that is rich faire & yonge’.

First published in 1615. 1618, Book IV, No. 7. McClure No. 261, pp. 255-6. Kilroy, Book I, No. 7, p. 96.

f. 86r

CoR 199: Richard Corbett, An Epitaph on Doctor Donne, Deane of Pauls (‘Hee that would write an Epitaph for thee’)

Copy, headed ‘An Epitaph made by Dr Corbett Bishop of Oxford; on Dr Dun Deane of Paules’, here beginning ‘Hee that will write an Epitaph on thee’.

First published in John Donne, Poems (London, 1633). Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, p. 89.

f. 86v

DaJ 119: Sir John Davies, Verses given to the Lord Treasuer upon Newyeares Day upon a Dosen of Trenchers, by Mr. Davis (‘Longe have I servd in Court, yet learned not all this while’)

Copy of poem 2 (‘The Divine’), headed ‘A Parson to his mistris’ and here beginning ‘My callinge is divine’, followed by ‘Her Answer’.

First published as ‘Yet other 12. Wonders of the World never yet published’ in Francis Davison, A Poetical Rhapsody (London, 1608). Doughtie, Lyrics from English Airs, pp. 381-4. Krueger, pp. 225-8.

f. 87v

RaW 472: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Say not you love, unless you do’

Copy, untitled.

First published in Inedited Poetical Miscellanies, 1584-1700, ed. W.C. Hazlitt ([London], 1870), p. [179]. Listed but not printed in Latham, p. 174. Rudick, No. 38, p. 106.

f. 87v

StW 1299: William Strode, A Lover to his Mistress (‘Ile tell you how the Rose did first grow redde’)

Copy, untitled.

First published, in Wits Recreations (London, 1640). Dobell, p. 48. Listed, without text, in Forey, p. 339.

ff. 90r-1r

CwT 1013: Thomas Carew, To A.L. Perswasions to love (‘Thinke not cause men flatt'ring say’)

Copy, headed ‘Thease verses I borroed to write out of John Sherly a booke seller in litle Brittaine. 28th of March 1633’ and subscribed in a later hand ‘This, by Tho. Carew Esqr. printed in his Poems’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 4-6.

f. 91r

CwT 230: Thomas Carew, An Excuse of absence (‘You'le aske perhaps wherefore I stay’)

Copy.

First published in Hazlitt (1870), p. 28. Dunlap. p. 131.

ff. 91v-2r

PoW 49: Walton Poole, ‘If shadows be a picture's excellence’

Copy, untitled.

First published, as ‘In praise of black Women; by T.R.’, in Robert Chamberlain, The Harmony of the Muses (London, 1654), p. 15 [unique exemplum in Huntington, edited in facsimile by Ernest W. Sullivan, II (Aldershot, 1990)]; in Abraham Wright, Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656), pp. 75-7, as ‘On a black Gentlewoman’. Poems (1660), pp. 61-2, as ‘On black Hair and Eyes’ and superscribed ‘R’; in The Poems of John Donne, ed Herbert J.C. Grierson, 2 vols (Oxford, 1912), I, 460-1, as ‘on Black Hayre and Eyes’, among ‘Poems attributed to Donne in MSS’; and in The Poems of William Herbert, Third Earl of Pembroke, ed. Robert Krueger (B.Litt. thesis, Oxford, 1961: Bodleian, MS B. Litt. d. 871), p. 61.

f. 94v

DnJ 2971: John Donne, Song (‘Stay, O sweet, and do not rise’)

Copy of a 16-line version, headed ‘A Gentlewoman to her sweetheart risinge’, here beginning ‘Stay (sweet) a while, why doest thou rise’, and incorporating lines 3-6 of Breake of day.

This MS discussed in C. F. Main, ‘New Texts of Donne’, SB, 9 (1957), 225-33 (pp. 229-30). Collated in Doughtie, pp. 609-11. Recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published (in a two-stanza version) in John Dowland, A Pilgrim's Solace (London, 1612) and in Orlando Gibbons, The First Set of Madrigals and Mottets (London, 1612). Printed as the first stanza of Breake of day in Poems (London, 1669). Grierson, I, 432 (attributing it to Dowland). Gardner, Elegies, p. 108 (in her ‘Dubia’). Doughtie, Lyrics from English Airs, pp. 402-3. Not in Shawcross.

See also DnJ 428.

f. 95r

PoW 50: Walton Poole, ‘If shadows be a picture's excellence’

Copy, untitled.

First published, as ‘In praise of black Women; by T.R.’, in Robert Chamberlain, The Harmony of the Muses (London, 1654), p. 15 [unique exemplum in Huntington, edited in facsimile by Ernest W. Sullivan, II (Aldershot, 1990)]; in Abraham Wright, Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656), pp. 75-7, as ‘On a black Gentlewoman’. Poems (1660), pp. 61-2, as ‘On black Hair and Eyes’ and superscribed ‘R’; in The Poems of John Donne, ed Herbert J.C. Grierson, 2 vols (Oxford, 1912), I, 460-1, as ‘on Black Hayre and Eyes’, among ‘Poems attributed to Donne in MSS’; and in The Poems of William Herbert, Third Earl of Pembroke, ed. Robert Krueger (B.Litt. thesis, Oxford, 1961: Bodleian, MS B. Litt. d. 871), p. 61.

ff. 155v-137v rev.

EaJ 79: John Earle, Bishop of Worcester and Salisbury, Microcosmography

Copy of 35 characters, untitled.

First published (anonymously), comprising 54 characters and with a preface by Edward Blount, London, 1628. 77 characters in the edition of 1629. 78 characters in the edition of 1664. Edited by Philip Bliss (London, 1811).

MS Eng 703

A quarto miscellany, in several hands, written over a period, 80 leaves (plus 67 blanks and stubs of numerous extracted leaves), in contemporary vellum gilt. Compiled by or for Sir Henry Cholmley, brother of Sir Hugh Cholmley (1600-57), the ascription ‘by my brother Sr Hugh Cholmley’ (1600-57) inserted on f. 19r in a cursive hand responsible for entries on ff. 3r-12v, 15v-29r, 41r-v, 75v-7r, the contents including twelve poems by Thomas Carew and poems by members of the circle of Lucius Cary (1610?-43), second Viscount Falkland, of Great Tew, Oxfordshire, by the St Leger family of Ulcombe, Kent, and by Sir William Twysden of Kent. c.1624-41.

Later bookplate of Henry B. Humphrey.

Recorded in IELM, II.i (1987), as the ‘Cholmley MS’: CwT Δ 27.

f. 12v

ToA 60: Aurelian Townshend, To the Countess of Salisbury (‘Victorious beauty, though your eyes’)

Copy, untitled, subscribed ‘ignoto’.

First published, in a musical setting by William Webb, in John Playford, Select Musical Ayres (London, 1652), p. 22. Chambers, pp. 4-5. Brown, pp. 19-21.

f. 15v

RaW 270: Sir Walter Ralegh, On the Life of Man (‘What is our life? a play of passion’)

Copy, untitled, subscribed ‘by one ready to dye’.

First published, in a musical setting, in Orlando Gibbons, The First Set of Madrigals and Mottets (London, 1612). Latham, pp. 51-2. Rudick, Nos 29A, 29B and 29C (three versions, pp. 69-70). MS texts also discussed in Michael Rudick, ‘The Text of Ralegh's Lyric “What is our life?”’, SP, 83 (1986), 76-87.

f. 16r-v

BcF 34: Francis Bacon, ‘The world's a bubble, and the life of man’

Copy, untitled, subscribed ‘ignoto’.

First published in Thomas Farnaby, Florilegium epigrammatum Graecorum (London, 1629). Poems by Sir Henry Wotton, Sir Walter Raleigh and others, ed. John Hannah (London, 1845), pp. 76-80. Spedding, VII, 271-2. H.J.C. Grierson, ‘Bacon's Poem, “The World”: Its Date and Relation to certain other Poems’, Modern Language Review, 6 (1911), 145-56.

f. 19r

HrE 71: Edward, Lord Herbert of Cherbury, To Mrs. Diana Cecyll (‘Diana Cecyll, that rare beauty thou dost show’)

Copy, untitled and omitting the first two words, subscribed ‘by Sr Edward Herbert’.

First published in Occasional Verses (1665). Moore Smith, pp. 34-5.

f. 19v

WoH 150: Sir Henry Wotton, A Poem written by Sir Henry Wotton in his Youth (‘O faithless world, and thy most faithless part’)

Copy, untitled, subscribed ‘by Sr Hen: Wotton’.

Facsimile of this page in Pebworth's AEB article, p. 221.

First published in Francis Davison, Poetical Rapsody (London, 1602), p. 157. As ‘A poem written by Sir Henry Wotton, in his youth’, in Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 517. Hannah (1845), pp. 3-5. Edited and texts discussed in Ted-Larry Pebworth, ‘Sir Henry Wotton's “O Faithless World”: The Transmission of a Coterie Poem and a Critical Old-Spelling Edition’, Analytical & Enumerative Bibliography, 5/4 (1981), 205-31.

f. 20r

PeW 43: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, ‘If her disdain least change in you can move’

Copy, untitled.

First published in 1635. Poems (1660), pp. 3-5, superscribed ‘P.’. Krueger, p. 2, among ‘Poems by Pembroke and Rudyerd’.

f. 20r

PeW 111: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, ‘'Tis Love breeds Love in me, and cold Disdain’

Copy, headed ‘Answer’.

Poems (1660), pp. 4-5, superscribed ‘R’. Krueger, p. 3, among ‘Poems by Pembroke and Rudyerd’.

f. 22r-v

CwT 562: Thomas Carew, A prayer to the Wind (‘Goe thou gentle whispering wind’)

Copy, untitled, subscribed ‘by Mr Tho: Carewe’.

First published in Poems (1640) and in Poems: written by Wil. Shake-speare, Gent. (London, 1640). Dunlap, pp. 11-12.

f. 22v

CwT 253: Thomas Carew, A flye that flew into my Mistris her eye (‘When this Flye liv'd, she us'd to play’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon A flye lightinge in to his mistres eye’, subscribed ‘by T: C:’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 37-9. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in The Treasury of Musick, Book 2 (London, 1669).

ff. 23r-4r

CwT 191: Thomas Carew, An Elegie on the La: Pen: sent to my Mistresse out of France (‘Let him, who from his tyrant Mistresse, did’)

Copy, headed ‘An Elegie’, subscribed ‘by ye same T: C:’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 19-21.

ff. 24r-5r

CwT 466: Thomas Carew, My mistris commanding me to returne her letters (‘So grieves th'adventrous Merchant, when he throwes’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon the returne of certayne papers to his Mistres’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 9-11.

f. 25v

CwT 125: Thomas Carew, A cruel Mistris (‘Wee read of Kings and Gods that kindly tooke’)

Copy, untitled, subscribed ‘T. C.’

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 8.

ff. 27v-8r

DrM 27: Michael Drayton, The Cryer (‘Good Folke, for Gold or Hyre’)

Copy, untitled.

First published, among Odes with Other Lyrick Poesies, in Poems (London, 1619). Hebel, II, 371.

f. 29

CwT 162: Thomas Carew, Disdaine returned (‘Hee that loves a Rosie cheeke’)

Copy.

First published (stanzas 1-2), in a musical setting, in Walter Porter, Madrigales and Ayres (London, 1632). Complete in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 18. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1653).

f. 29v

CwT 151: Thomas Carew, A deposition from Love (‘I was foretold, your rebell sex’)

Copy.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 16-17. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in The Treasury of Musick, Book 2 (London, 1669).

f. 30r

CwT 377: Thomas Carew, Ingratefull beauty threatned (‘Know Celia, (since thou art so proud,)’)

Copy.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 17-18. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in The Second Book of Ayres, and Dialogues (London, 1655).

f. 30v

CwT 1107: Thomas Carew, To my Rivall (‘Hence vaine intruder, hast away’)

Copy.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 41.

ff. 30v-1r

CwT 424: Thomas Carew, A Looking-Glasse (‘That flattring Glasse, whose smooth face weares’)

Copy.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 19.

ff. 31v-2v

GrJ 56: John Grange, ‘Not that I wish my Mistris’

Copy, untitled.

First published in Wits Recreations Augmented (London, 1641), sig. V7v. John Playford, Select Ayres and Dialogues (1652), Part II, p. 28. Poems (1660), pp. 79-81, unattributed. Prince d'Amour (1660), p. 123, ascribed to ‘J.G.’. Listed in Krueger's Appendix I: ‘Spurious Poems in the 1660 Edition’ as by John Grange.

ff. 32v-3r

WoH 112: Sir Henry Wotton, On his Mistress, the Queen of Bohemia (‘You meaner beauties of the night’)

Copy of a five-stanza version, untitled and here beginning ‘You glorious trifles of the Easte’.

First published (in a musical setting) in Michael East, Sixt Set of Bookes (London, 1624). Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 518. Hannah (1845), pp. 12-15. Some texts of this poem discussed in J.B. Leishman, ‘“You Meaner Beauties of the Night” A Study in Transmission and Transmogrification’, The Library, 4th Ser. 26 (1945-6), 99-121. Some musical versions edited in English Songs 1625-1660, ed. Ian Spink, Musica Britannica XXXIII (London, 1971), Nos. 66, 122.

f. 33r

CwT 690: Thomas Carew, Secresie protested (‘Feare not (deare Love) that I'le reveale’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 11. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in The Second Book of Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1655).

See also Introduction.

f. 34r

B&F 144: Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher, The Nice Valour, III, iii, 36-4. Song (‘Hence, all you vain delights’)

Copy, untitled.

Discussed and edited from this MS in Peter J. Seng, ‘Early Version of a Song in Fletcher's Nice Valour’, N&Q, 228 (April 1983), 151-2.

Bowers, VII, 468-9. This song first published in A Description of the King and Queene of Fayries (London, 1634). Thomas Middleton, The Collected Works, general editors Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (Oxford, 2007), pp. 1698-9.

For William Strode's answer to this song (which has sometimes led to both songs being attributed to Strode) see StW 641-663.

f. 34v

JnB 51: Ben Jonson, The Dreame (‘Or Scorne, or pittie on me take’)

Copy, untitled, here beginning ‘Or skorne or on me pity take’.

First published in The Vnder-wood (xi) in Workes (London, 1640). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 150-1.

f. 54v

MoG 33: George Morley, An Epitaph upon King James (‘All that have eyes now wake and weep’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon the death of king James’.

A version of lines 1-22, headed ‘Epitaph on King James’ and beginning ‘He that hath eyes now wake and weep’, published in William Camden's Remaines (London, 1637), p. 398.

Attributed to Edward Fairfax in The Fairfax Correspondence, ed. George Johnson (1848), I, 2-3 (see MoG 54). Edited from that publication in Godfrey of Bulloigne: A critical edition of Edward Fairfax's translation of Tasso's Gerusalemme Liberata, together with Fairfax's Original Poems, ed. Kathleen M. Lea and T.M. Gang (Oxford, 1981), pp. 690-1. The poem is generally ascribed to George Morley.

f. 59r-v

JnB 178: Ben Jonson, Eupheme. or, The Faire Fame Left to Posteritie Of that truly noble Lady, the Lady Venetia Digby. 3. The Picture of the Body (‘Sitting, and ready to be drawne’)

Copy, headed in another hand ‘By Ben Johnson upon Mrs Venetia Stanley’.

First published (Nos. 3 and 4) in John Benson's 4to edition of Jonson's poems (1640) and (all poems) in The Vnder-wood (lxxxiv) in Workes (London, 1640). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 272-89 (pp. 275-7).

f. 59v

JnB 216: Ben Jonson, Eupheme. or, The Faire Fame Left to Posteritie Of that truly noble Lady, the Lady Venetia Digby. 4. The Mind (‘Painter, yo'are come, but may be gone’)

Copy of a ten-line version, untitled.

Herford & Simpson, VIII, 277-81.

f. 60v

KiH 76: Henry King, The Boy's answere to the Blackmore (‘Black Mayd, complayne not that I fly’)

Copy, headed ‘The Answer’.

First published in The Academy of Complements (London, 1646). Poems (1657). Crum, p. 151. The text almost invariably preceded, in both printed and MS versions, by (variously headed) ‘A Blackmore Mayd wooing a faire Boy: sent to the Author by Mr. Hen. Rainolds’ (‘Stay, lovely Boy, why fly'st thou mee’). Musical settings by John Wilson in Henry Lawes, Select Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1669).

f. 61r

KiH 599: Henry King, Sonnet (‘Tell mee no more how faire shee is’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Poems (1657). Crum, p. 158.

f. 62r

CwT 908: Thomas Carew, Song. Perswasions to enjoy (‘If the quick spirits in your eye’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 16. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in Select Musicall Ayres, and Dialogues (London, 1652).

f. 63r

JnB 313: Ben Jonson, A Hymne to God the Father (‘Heare mee, O God!’)

Copy, untitled, ascribed to ‘Beniamin Johnson’.

First published in The Vnder-wood (i.2) in Workes (London, 1640). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 129-30.

f. 67r-v

WaE 102: Edmund Waller, In Answer to One who Writ against a Fair Lady (‘What fury has provoked thy wit to dare’)

Copy, headed in another hand ‘By Mr Edward Waler. the answer’ [i.e. to a poem on Lady Carlisle by Roger Twysden, 1639].

First published, in a four-stanza version headed ‘In Answer to a libell against her, &c’, in Workes (1645). Thorn-Drury, I, 24-5.

f. 68r

SuJ 31: John Suckling, The constant Lover (‘Out upon it, I have lov'd’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS collated in Clayton.

First published, untitled, in Wit and Drollery (London, 1656). Last Remains (London, 1659). Clayton, pp. 55-6.

f. 68r-v

SuJ 13: John Suckling, The Answer (‘Say, but did you love so long?’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Clayton.

See SuJ 11-15.

ff. 70r-2r

SuJ 96: John Suckling, The Wits (A Sessions of the Poets) (‘A Sessions was held the other day’)

Copy, headed ‘The Witts’.

Edited from this MS in Beaurline, loc. cit. Collated in Clayton.

First published in Fragmenta Aurea (London, 1646). Clayton, pp. 71-6. L.A. Beaurline, ‘An Editorial Experiment: Suckling's A Session of the Poets’, Studies in Bibliography, 16 (1963), 43-60.

f. 72v

WaE 302: Edmund Waller, Of the Misreport of her being Painted (‘As when a sort of wolves infest the night’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon the misreport of the Lady: D: S: being painted’.

First published in Workes (1645). Thorn-Drury, I, 50.

f. 73r

WaE 277: Edmund Waller, Of the Lady who can Sleep when she Pleases (‘No wonder sleep from careful lovers flies’)

Copy.

First published in Workes (1645). Thorn-Drury, I, 49.

f. 75v

WaE 457: Edmund Waller, Song (‘Stay, Phoebus! stay’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon Madamelle de Morneys eyes a Lady of ye Queene Mothers Trayne 1638’, subscribed ‘by Mr. Waler’.

This MS recorded in Warren L. Chernaik, The Poetry of Limitation: A Study of Edmund Waller (New Haven & London, 1968), p. 69.

First published in Workes (1645). Thorn-Drury, I, 123.

ff. 75v-6r

DeJ 72: Sir John Denham, On the Earl of Strafford's Tryal and Death (‘Great Strafford! worthy of that Name, though all’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon ye Death of Thomas wentworth Earl of Strafford beheaded ye < > of May 1641’, subscribed ‘by Mr Sidney Godolpin’.

First published in Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 153-4.

f. 76r

ClJ 198: John Cleveland, Epitaph on the Earl of Strafford (‘Here lies Wise and Valiant Dust’)

Copy, under a heading ‘Other verses then made of the same subject’.

First published in Character (1647). Edited in CSPD, 1640-1641 (1882), p. 574. Berdan, p. 184, as ‘Internally unlike his manner’. Morris & Withington, p. 66, among ‘Poems probably by Cleveland’. The attribution to Cleveland is dubious. The epitaph is also attributed to Clement Paman: see Poetry and Revolution: An Anthology of British and Irish Verse 1625-1660, ed. Peter Davidson (Oxford, 1998), notes to No. 275 (p. 363).

ff. 79r-80v

ClJ 105: John Cleveland, Smectymnuus, or the Club-Divines (‘Smectymnuus? The Goblin makes me start’)

Copy.

First published in Character (1647). Morris & Withington, pp. 23-6.

MS Eng 704

An octavo verse miscellany, chiefly in one predominantly secretary hand, with a series of additions in a second hand, 36 leaves (plus blanks and stubs of extracted leaves), in contemporary calf gilt. c.1640.

Inscribed on a flyleaf (in a different hand) ‘Charles Tyrrell Anno Domini 1643’.

f. 34r

FeO 18: Owen Felltham, Elegie on Henry Earl of Oxford (‘When thou didst live and shine, thy Name was then’)

Copy of lines 22-48, here beginning ‘like lowe Orbes wantinge Primum mobile’, subscribed ‘:Owen feltham:’, imperfect, lacking a heading and the first 21 lines.

First published in Lusoria (London, 1661). Pebworth & Summers, pp. 9-10.

MS Eng 705.1

Copy, in a professional hand, ii + 93 quarto leaves, in calf gilt (rebacked). c.1630s.

NaR 25: Sir Robert Naunton, Fragmenta Regalia

This MS recorded (as ‘Unnumbered MS’) in Cerovski, p. 87.

Fragmenta Regalia (or, Observations on the late Q. Elizabeth, her Times and Favorites), first published in London, 1641. Edited by John S. Cerovski (Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington, D.C., etc., 1985).

MS Eng 740

MS of an English translation by Moses Wall, written for presentation to Elizabeth St John, 89 octavo leaves (plus some blanks), in contemporary calf gilt, stamped ‘E S’ on each cover. With a formal title-page, Henochisme: Or A Treatise Shewinge Howe to walke with God: Written in Latin by Ioseph Hall Bishop of Exeter And Translated into English By M: W:; a five-page dedicatory epistle to Hall; a seven-page presentation epistle to Mrs Elizabeth St John; and 75 pages of text; the presentation epistle in a very small hand, signed ‘Moses Wall’ and dated ‘Octob: 2. an. 1639’, evidently in Wall's hand; all the rest in a neat secretary hand. 1639.

HlJ 53: Joseph Hall, Henochismus

Inscribed (f. [ir]) ‘Anne Bernard Her Book / Johanna’.

Original Latin version first published London, 1635; Wynter, X, 188-207. Wall's translation unpublished.

The original Latin version first published in London, 1635. Wynter, X, 188-214. Wall's translation unpublished.

MS Eng 749

A quarto volume of Catholic tracts, in a probably professional secretary hand, 163 leaves (plus blanks), in 18th-century calf gilt. Late 16th-early 17th century.

Inscribed on a flyleaf ‘John Burns, November 30 1926’: i.e. the Rt. Hon. John Elliott Burns (1858-1943), labour leader and politician. Acquired in 1944 from Quaritch.

Some verse contents of the volume briefly discussed or edited in Peter J. Seng, ‘Recusant Poems in a More Circle Manuscript’, Moreana, 19 (March 1982), 21-4.

ff. 3r-99v

MrT 76: Sir Thomas More, Nicholas Harpsfield's Life of Sir Thomas More

Copy, imperfect, lacking the first two leaves and title.

First published, edited by Elsie Vaughan Hitchcock and R.W. Chambers, as The life and death of Sr Thomas Moore. knight, sometymes Lord high Chancellor of England...by Nicholas Harpsfield (EETS, London, 1932).

ff. 101r-16v

SoR 267.8: Robert Southwell, S.J., Catholic Saint, A Foure-fold Meditation: of the foure last things (‘O wretched man, which louest earthlie thinges’)

Copy, headed ‘Of the fowre last things, which are these, Death, Iudgment, Hell, and Heaven’.

First published, as ‘By R: S. The author of S. Peters complaint’, in London, 1606. The poem is more commonly ascribed to Philip Howard (1557-95), first Earl of Arundel, Catholic Saint, with whom Southwell was acquainted (see McDonald, pp. 6-7, 121-2). EV17760.

f. 163r

TiC 37: Chidiock Tichborne, Tichborne's Lament (‘My prime of youth is but a frost of cares’)

Copy, headed ‘Verses made by Mr Titchburne before he suffered death’.

First published in the single sheet Verses of Prayse and Joy Written Upon her Maiesties Preseruation Whereunto is annexed Tychbornes lamentation, written in the Towre with his owne hand, and an answer to the same (London, 1586). Hirsch, pp. 309-10. Also ‘The Text of “Tichborne's Lament” Reconsidered’, ELR, 17, No. 3 (Autumn 1987), between pp. 276 and 277. May EV 15464 (recording 37 MS texts). For the ‘answer’ to this poem, see KyT 1-2.

MS Eng 764

Copy, in a professional cursive hand, with a title-page in engrossed lettering ‘The life of Master Thomas Wolsey Archbishoppe of yorke and Cardinall, written by George Cavendish his Gentleman Vsher’, 109 folio leaves (plus blanks), in old calf. c.1600s.

CvG 31: George Cavendish, The Life of Cardinal Wolsey

From the library of Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bt (1792-1872), manuscript and book collector: Phillipps MS 6930. No 1321 in an unidentified sale catalogue. From the library of Arthur Vicars, FSA, Ulster King of Arms. Acquired in 1946 from George Bates.

Recorded in Sylvester, p. 287.

First published in George Cavendish, The Life of Cardinal Wolsey and Metrical Visions, ed. Samuel W. Singer, 2 vols (Chiswick, 1825). The Life and Death of Cardinal Wolsey by George Cavendish, ed. Richard S. Sylvester, EETS, orig. ser. 243 (London, New York and Toronto, 1959).

MS Eng 765

A folio volume of tracts, in several hands, dating at the end up to 1642, 105 leaves, unfoliated, in contemporary limp vellum. Early 17th century.

Charles J. Sawyer, London, bookseller, sold 2 July 1919. Inscribed inside the front cover ‘John Burns. Feb 27 1919’: i.e. the Rt. Hon. John Elliott Burns (1858-1943), labour leader and politician. Burns sale, 1944, lot 534, to Maggs. Bought from Raphael King by Imre de Vegh in 1950 and donated to Harvard.

This MS (‘MS Burns’) collated in Hitchcock & Hallett and briefly described, pp. xiii-xiv.

ff. [1r-89r]

MrT 84: Sir Thomas More, Ro. Ba.'s Life of Sir Thomas More

Copy, in at least three secretary hands, lacking a title-page. 1599.

A life of More written in 1599, possibly by Robert Basset (1574-1641), of Devon, a zealous Catholic and kinsman of More: see Andrew Breeze, ‘Sir Robert Basset and The Life of Syr Thomas More’, N&Q, 249 (September 2004), 263. The work first published in Christopher Wordsworth, Ecclesiastical History, vol. II (London, 1839). Edited, as The Lyfe of Syr Thomas More Sometymes Lord Chancellor of England, by Elsie Vaughan Hitchcock and P.E. Hallett (EETS, London, 1950).

MS Eng 846

Copy; imperfect; lacking the ending. c.1612.

DaJ 240: Sir John Davies, A Discovery of the State of Ireland

A treatise, dedicated to James I, beginning ‘During the time of my service in Ireland (which began in the first yeare of his Majesties raigne) I haue visited all the Prouinces...’. First published as A Discoverie of the Trve Cavses why Ireland was neuer entirely subdued...vntill...his Maiesties happie Raigne ([London], 1612). Grosart, II, 1-168.

MS Eng 886

Copy, headed ‘Of ye Springe: S: Hen: Wotton’ and here beginning ‘This day Dame nature seem'd in loue’, later subscribed ‘Iz: W.’, on one side of an octavo leaf. c.1620s-30s.

WoH 61: Sir Henry Wotton, On a Bank as I sat a-Fishing. A Description of the Spring (‘And now all nature seemed in love’)

A later note on this MS incorrectly claims that it is in the hand of Izaak Walton.

First published in Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 524. Hannah (1845), pp. 32-5.

MS Eng 886.1

Autograph affidavit signed by Walton, about land in Halfhead, 23 October 1676. 1676.

*WtI 33: Izaak Walton, Document(s)

Edited in Keynes (1929), p. 601. Facsimile in E. Marston, Thomas Ken and Izaak Walton (London, 1908), p. 116.

MS Eng 887

MS Eng 901 (Lobby XI.2.69)

Copy, in a cursive hand, headed ‘The Digression in Miltons History of England. To com in Lib. 3. page 110. after these words. <from one misery to another.>’, on twelve quarto pages, in later diced russia gilt. This MS represents text excluded from Milton's The History of Britain (London, 1670-1) and later edited by Anglesey in 1681, but includes two additional pages of text suppressed in that edition as well. Late 17th century.

MnJ 47: John Milton, The Digression in The History of Britain

Bookplate of Thomas Mostyn 1744 (‘No [98 deleted] 81’) and derived from the library of Sir Roger Mostyn, first Baronet (1625?-90), of Mostyn Hall, near Hollywell, Flintshire, Wales. Sotheby's, 13 July 1920 (Mostyn sale), lot 82, and 11 December 1922, lot 129.

Edited from this MS in Columbia and in Yale. Recorded in LR, V, 18-19, 259-60. This MS may conceivably relate to a text in the possession of the Earl of Anglesey, whom, according to Edward Phillips, Milton ‘presented with a Copy of the unlicens'd Papers of his History’ (see Columbia, XVIII, 378).

A version of this first published as Mr. John Miltons Character of the Long Parliament and Assembly of Divines in MDCXLI (London 1681). Columbia, X, 317-25. Yale, V, Part 1, 405-67.

MS Eng 942

A posthumous presentation copy of Elizabeth's translation of Margarite de Navarre's devotional treatise and of passages from Scripture, 32 quarto leaves, in contemporary vellum gilt, with remains of ties. c.1603-6.

From the library of Edmund Butler (1771-1846), Earl of Kilkenny, Kilkenny Castle, Ireland.

ff. [1r-31r]

ElQ 63: Queen Elizabeth I, Marguerite de Navarre's ‘Le Miroir de l'Âme Pécheresse’ (The Glass of the Sinful Soul)

A semi-calligraphic copy, prepared by or for Thomas Blundeville (1522?-1606?), author and translator, as a formal presentation copy to Catherine Knyvet (1547-1622), Lady Paget, in a professional italic hand, with a title-page, ‘A Godly Meditation of the Soule, concerning a loue towards our Lord Christ. Composed in french, by ye Vertuous Ladie Margaret Q: of Nauarre, and aptly translated into English, by the right high and most vertuous Princesse, of Late memorie and euer in memorie, Queene Elizabeth -- Who now raigns wth Christ in heauen’; with a dedicatory epistle ‘To the Right Worthy, Vertuous and most honor'd Ladie The Ladie Pagett, Yor honors humble deuoted Seruante Thomas Blunville, Wisheth all prosperitie in this life, and life euerlasting in Christ or Sauiour’; the main text (ff. 4r-29v]) followed (f. 30r) by extracts from Ecclesiastes ‘added to the worke, by the Queenes Matie:’ and (f. 31r) by an anagram on ‘Elizabeth Regina’.

The translation first published, edited by John Bale, in A Godly Medytacyon of the Christen Sowle (Marburg, 1548). Translations, pp. 23-125.

f. [3v]

ElQ 53: Queen Elizabeth I, Certaine Sentences out of the Xiiij Psalme, written by the Queenes Maiestie, in Latine, french and Italian (‘Stultus dixit in corde suo: non est’)

Semi-calligraphic copy.

Three quatrains, beginning respectively ‘Stultus dixit in corde suo: non est’, ‘Le fol dit en son coeur, il n'ya point de’, and ‘Le stolto disse ne'l suo cuore, Egli non’. Unpublished.

MS Eng 966

An octavo transcript of annotations by Coleridge to his exemplum of poems by Donne, made by Barron Field (1786-1846) for an intended Percy Society edition of Donne's Songs and Sonnets.

DnJ 4168: John Donne, Poems

Recorded in The Collected Works of Samuel Coleridge, Vol. 12: Marginalia II, ed. Kathleen Coburn et al. (London & Princeton, 1984), p. 214.

MS Eng 966.2

MS copy of twenty-nine poems supposedly by Donne (only six actually by him) plus an epitaph by him, in a single hand, transcribed from the O' Flahertie MS (Harvard MS Eng 966.5), with a title-page ‘Poems on several Occasions Written by the Reverend John Donne, D.D. Late Dean of St Pauls’, 57 quarto pages, in cardboard wrappers. 19th century.

p. 6

JnB 294.5: Ben Jonson, The Houre-glasse (‘Doe but consider this small dust’)

Copy.

First published in John Benson's 4to edition of Jonson's poems (1640) and in The Vnder-wood (viii) in Workes (London, 1640). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 148-9.

pp. 20-4

DnJ 2199.5: John Donne, Loves Warre (‘Till I have peace with thee, warr other men’)

Copy.

First published in F. G. Waldron, A Collection of Miscellaneous Poetry (London, 1802), pp. 1-2. Grierson, I, 122-3 (as ‘Elegie XX’). Gardner, Elegies, pp. 13-14. Shawcross, No. 14. Variorum, 2 (2000), pp. 142-3.

pp. 27-8

JnB 115.5: Ben Jonson, Epitaph [on Cecilia Bulstrode] (‘Stay, view this stone: And, if thou beest not such’)

Copy.

First published in John A. Harper, ‘Ben Jonson and Mrs. Bulstrode’, N&Q, 3rd Ser. 4 (5 September 1863), 198-9. Herford & Simpson, VIII, 371-2.

pp. 35-6

DnJ 430.5: John Donne, Breake of day (‘'Tis true, 'tis day. what though it be?’)

Copy.

First published in William Corkine, Second Book of Ayres (London, 1612), sig. B1v. Grierson, I, 23. Gardner, Elegies, pp. 35-6. Shawcross, No. 46.

pp. 37-8

JnB 706.5: Ben Jonson, The Poetaster, II, ii, 163 et seq. Song (‘If I freely may discouer’)

Copy.

pp. 41-2

HoJ 26: John Hoskyns, Absence (‘Absence heare my protestation’)

Copy, headed ‘Song 2d’.

First published in Francis Davison, A Poetical Rapsody (London, 1602). The Poems of John Donne, ed. Herbert J.C. Grierson, 2 vols (Oxford, 1912), pp. 428-9. Osborn, No. XXIV (pp. 192-3).

p. 51

DnJ 2895.5: John Donne, Sir Iohn Wingefield (‘Beyond th'old Pillers many have travailed’)

Copy.

First published in Gosse (1899), I, 51. Grierson, I, 76. Milgate, Satires, p. 51. Shawcross, No. 92. Variorum, 8 (1995), p. 8 (as ‘Il Caualliere Gio: Wingefield’).

p. 52

DnJ 532.5: John Donne, Cales and Guyana (‘If you from spoyle of th' old worlds farthest end’)

Copy.

First published in Gosse (1899), I, 47. Grierson, I, 76. Milgate, Satires, p. 51. Shawcross, No. 91. Variorum, 8 (1995), p. 7 (as ‘Calez and Guyana’).

p. 52

DnJ 2673.5: John Donne, Ralphius (‘Compassion in the world againe is bred’)

Copy.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 78. Milgate, Satires, p. 54. Shawcross, No. 100. Variorum, 8 (1995), pp. 6, 9 and 11.

p. 53

DnJ 1909.5: John Donne, The Lier (‘Thou in the fields walkst out thy supping howers’)

Copy.

First published in Sir John Simeon, ‘Unpublished Poems of Donne’, Miscellanies of the Philobiblon Society, 3 (London, 1856-7), No. 3, p. 31. Grierson, I, 78. Milgate, Satires, p. 53. Shawcross, No. 95. Variorum, 8 (1995), pp. 5 (untitled) and 8.

pp. 54-6

DnJ 4065.4: John Donne, Epitaph for Ann Donne (‘Fæminæ lectissimæ, dilectissimæque’)

Copy.

Donne's Latin epitaph on his wife Ann More, who died 15 August 1617. First published in John Stow, The Survey of London (London, 1633). Edited and discussed in M. Thomas Hester, ‘“miserrimum dictu”: Donne's Epitaph for His Wife’, JEGP, 94/4 (October 1995), 513-29. Variorum, 8 (1995), 187.

MS Eng 979

Copy. Copy, in a single cursive hand, i + 18 quarto leaves, the last leaf imperfect, in remains of paper wrappers. c.1634-41.

WoH 285: Sir Henry Wotton, A Parallel between Robert Earl of Essex and George Duke of Buckingham

This MS sold at Sotheby's, 5 July 1955 (André De Coppet sale), lot 1019.

First published in London, 1641. Edited by Sir Robert Egerton Brydges (Lee Priory Press, Ickham, 1814).

MS Eng 980

A quarto volume of proceedings in the House of Commons in 1624, in at least two probably professional cursive hands, 249 pages (plus numerous blanks and eight pages of shorthand at the reverse end), in contemporary vellum. c.1624.

[?Sotheby's], 31 March 1936, lot 174.

pp. 41-2

RuB 6: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, March 1623/4

Speech beginning ‘We are bound to bless God that we are mett againe in this place. And we ought to acknowledge his Mats favour towards vs...’.

pp. 123-4

RuB 11: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, March 1623/4

Copy, headed ‘Sr Beniamin Rudiere:’.

Speech beginning ‘We are bound to bless God that we are mett againe in this place. And we ought to acknowledge his Mats favour towards vs...’.

MS Eng 982

A quarto volume of proceedings in Parliament from 13 April to 5 May 1640, in a cursive predominantly secretary hand, 84 leaves, in quarter-vellum marbled boards. c.1640s.

[?Sotheby's], 5 October 1937, lot 19.

ff. 24r-6r

RuB 127: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, ?15-25 April 1640

Copy of a report on the speech, headed in the margin ‘Sr. Benia: Rudyard’ and here beginning ‘Then Sr Ben: Rudyard said Sr. there is a dore now opened to vs of doeing good if wee take the advantage thereof...’.

Edited from this MS in Proceedings of the Short Parliament of 1640 (1977), pp. 138-40.

Speech beginning ‘There is a great dore now opened unto us of doing good...’. Variant version in Manning, pp. 148-51.

ff. 54v-5r

RuB 137: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, ?23 April 1640

Copy of a report on the speech.

Speech beginning in a reported version ‘Sr: Ben: Rudierd said the house had done wiseley in taking the kings buisnesse into prsent consideration...’.

MS Eng 983

A quarto volume of proceedings in Parliament from 3 November 1640 to 13 April 1641, in a professional secretary hand, 320 pages, in contemporary vellum.

Item 178 in an unidentified sale catalogue.

pp. 15-21

RuB 166: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, ?7 November 1640

Copy, headed ‘Sr Beniamin Ruddiars speech in Parliament’.

Speech (variously dated 4, 7, 9 and 10 November 1640) beginning ‘We are here assembled to do God's business and the King's...’. First published in The Speeches of Sr. Benjamin Rudyer in the high Court of Parliament (London, 1641), pp. 1-10. Manning, pp. 159-65.

pp. 115-16

RuB 182: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, 29 December 1640

Copy, headed ‘Sr Beniamin Ruddiars 2d speech in Parliament the 29 of December 1640’.

Speech beginning ‘The principal part of this business is money...’. Manning, pp. 166-7.

pp. 163-7

RuB 191: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, 21-22 January 1640/1

Copy, headed ‘Sr Beniamin Ruddiars 3d speech in parliament January the 22th Concerning the Scottish affayres 1640’.

Speech beginning ‘It well becometh vs thankefully to acknowledge the prudent & painfull endeuours of my Lords the Peers Comissioners...’. First published in The Speeches of Sr. Benjamin Rudyer in the high Court of Parliament (London, 1641), pp. 11-‘18’ [i.e. 14]. Manning, pp. 169-72.

pp. 195-6

RuB 188: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, 20 January 1640/1

Copy, headed ‘Sr Beniamine Ruddiars speech concerning the Queenes Joynture January the 20th: 1640’.

Speech beginning ‘God hath blessed the Queenes Matie with a blessed and hopefull progenie alreadie...’. Manning, p. 213.

pp. 196-9

RuB 196: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, 7-9 February 1640/1

Copy, headed ‘Sr Beniamine Ruddiars speech concerning Bisho ffebruary the 7th 1640’.

Speech beginning ‘I doe verily beleeue that there are manie of the Clergie in one Church who doe thinke...’. First published in The Speeches of Sr. Benjamin Rudyer in the high Court of Parliament (London, 1641), pp. 15-‘12’ [i.e. 20]. Manning, pp. 185-7.

MS Eng 992

Autograph fair copy, with revisions, v + 85 quarto pages (plus blanks), in contemporary red morocco elaborately gilt, ‘J E’ stamped on each side, with silver clasps. With a title-page, ‘The Life of Mris: Godolphin, Writen at the Request of my Lady Sylvius. By a Friend’, a dedicatory epistle to Lord Godolphin, and the text of a letter to Evelyn dated from London 22 September 1678. c.1702.

*EvJ 114: John Evelyn, The Life of Mrs. Godolphin

Harcourt Library. Sotheby's, 1869 (Mr Dillon's collection), lot 366. Booklabels of Howard A. Levis and of the John Evelyn Collection of Carelton R. Richmond.

Edited from this MS in Sampson (1939). Recorded in Keynes, with facsimile examples.

Facsimile of the first page in The Houghton Library 1942-67: A Selection of Books and Manuscripts in Harvard Collections (Cambridge, Mass., 1967), p. 54.

A prose account, including verses. First published in London, 1847, ed. Samuel Wilberforce, Bishop of Oxford. Edited by Harriet Sampson (London, New York and Toronto, 1939). Keynes, pp. 244-50.

MS Eng 992.1

Copy, without preliminaries, in the neat italic hand of an amanuensis, headed ‘The Life of Mrs. Godolphin Written at the request of my Lady Sylvius} by a Friend’, on 90 quarto leaves (including 32 blanks), in contemporary black morocco gilt. c.1686.

EvJ 115: John Evelyn, The Life of Mrs. Godolphin

Inserted letter by James P. Muirhead, to [Samuel Wilberforce], Bishop of Oxford, discussing EvJ 992, from Henley Court, Telsworth, Oxfordshire, 21 June 1869. Owned before 1956 by Dr Octavia Wilberforce. Sotheby's, 8 May 1956, lot 42, to Maggs. Booklabel of the John Evelyn Collection of Carelton R. Richmond and booklabel of Martha Venables Vernon.

Edited from this MS in Wilberforce (1847). Discussed in Sampson (1939), pp. 116-23 (when the MS was lost and presumed autograph), and in Keynes, p. 250.

A prose account, including verses. First published in London, 1847, ed. Samuel Wilberforce, Bishop of Oxford. Edited by Harriet Sampson (London, New York and Toronto, 1939). Keynes, pp. 244-50.

MS Eng 992.2

A small autograph pocket notebook (c.11.5 x 6 cm.), headed ‘A Particular of My Estate in Svrrey & mid Svssex. 1703’, 88 pages (including blanks), in panelled calf. Containing particulars of Evelyn's estates in Surrey, Sussex and Kent, ‘Things left in my Closet in Dover-streete. May 1703’, ‘Abstract of my last Acc[om]pt. as Tress[ure]r of Gr[eenwich]: Hospital’ and other personal accounts and memoranda. 1681-1704.

*EvJ 65: John Evelyn, Domestic Accounts, Inventories, Instructions, and Estate Papers

Sotheby's, 5 May 1919 (Alfred Morrison sale), lot 2823, to Maggs. John Evelyn Collection of Carelton R. Richmond.

Facsimile examples of this MS in Maggs's sale catalogue No. 449 (1924), item 173, plate XL, and in Sotheby's sale catalogue, 4 March 1937 (Moss sale), lot 686.

MS Eng 992.7

An autograph commonplace book, 80 octavo pages (the majority blank), in contemporary calf gilt. Containing miscellaneous anecdotes, proverbs, maxims, extracts in English and Latin, and other notes, headed ‘1650 Vade Mecum’. c.1650.

EvJ 32: John Evelyn, Adversaria and Commonplace Books

Inscribed inside the front cover ‘B. J. Ashley’ (or ‘Astley’?). Sotheby's, 10 November 1964, lot 456.

See also EvJ 170.

MS Eng 992.8

Copy, in a large rounded juvenile hand, possibly a member of the Evelyn family, 89 octavo pages (plus blanks), in contemporary calf, with metal clasps. Late 17th century.

EvJ 11: John Evelyn, A Character of England

John Evelyn's motto, Meliora Retinete, on a flyleaf.

First published in London, 1659. Miscellaneous Writings, pp. 141-67. Keynes, pp. 59-67.

MS Eng 995 (Lobby X.3.10a)

Autograph draft, untitled, on six quarto leaves, in modern cloth. [1645?].

*HrE 143: Edward, Lord Herbert of Cherbury, Translation of Descartes' Discours de la méthode

Formerly among Herbert's papers at Powis Castle. Sotheby's, 16 January 1956 (Powis Castle sale), lot 216, with a facsimile page in the sale catalogue.

Discussed in Rossi, II, 537-8, and III, 542. Sotheby's, 16 January 1956, lot 216. A microfilm is in the British Library (M/471).

An unpublished translation of Chapter IV and part of Chapter V of Descartes' Discours, beginning ‘I know not whether I may entertaine you with my first Meditations. since they are so Metaphysicall…’.

MS Eng 1019, [item 1]

Autograph letter signed by Taylor, to John Evelyn, 16 April, 1656. 1656.

*TaJ 47: Jeremy Taylor, Letter(s)

Anderson Galleries, New York, sale No. 2275 (George D. Smith Book Company liquidation sale, Part 3), 18 May 1928, lot 240.

Edited in Bray, II, i, 164-6; Eden, I, l-lii; Wheatley, III, 211-13.

MSS Eng 1019, [item 2]

Autograph letter signed by Taylor, to [John Evelyn], [? from Llangadock], 19 July 1656. 1656.

*TaJ 48: Jeremy Taylor, Letter(s)

Sotheby's, 27 November 1945.

Edied in Eden, I, lii-liii; Wheatley, III, 215-17.

MS Eng 1021

A folio volume of writings by or or related to Sir Walter Ralegh, in a professional secretary hand, 34 leaves, in modern quarter-morocco. Early 17th century.

Inscribed name ‘Edward Blandy’: possibly of the Middle Temple (1617) and of Inglewood, Berkshire. Bought from Hamill & Barker, Chicago, December 1956.

ff. [1r-28r]

RaW 728.215: Sir Walter Ralegh, Ralegh's Arraignment(s)

Copy of Ralegh's arraignment in November 1603 (here dated 1605).

Accounts of the arraignments of Ralegh at Winchester Castle, 17 November 1603, and before the Privy Council on 22 October 1618. The arraignment of 1603 published in London, 1648. For documentary evidence about this arraignment, see Rosalind Davies, ‘“The Great Day of Mart”: Returning to Texts at the Trial of Sir Walter Ralegh in 1603’, Renaissance Forum, 4/1 (1999), 1-12.

ff. [28v-32v]

RaW 948: Sir Walter Ralegh, Letter(s)

Copies of three letters by Ralegh, to James I (1603), to Lady Ralegh (1603), and to Sir Robert Carr.

MS Eng 1035

A quarto verse miscellany, in two neat hands, 14 leaves (plus blanks), in modern quarter-calf cloth. A (misapplied) title-page (f. 1r) possibly in another hand: ‘Copy of Verses upon ye Government under the Protectour Cromwel -- By Edmund Waller 1650’. Late 17th century.

Inscribed (f. [ir]) ‘C F’[?].

ff. [2r-8r]

MaA 30: Andrew Marvell, The First Anniversary of the Government under O.C. (‘Like the vain Curlings of the Watry maze’)

Copy, untitled, subscribed ‘Written for Gregory Boteler’.

First published in London, 1655. Miscellaneous Poems (London, 1681), but cancelled from all known exempla except one in the British Library. Margoliouth, I, 108-19. Lord, pp. 93-104. Smith, pp. 287-98.

f. [9v]

SeC 57: Sir Charles Sedley, To Celia (‘As in those Nations, where they yet adore’)

Copy, headed ‘A Copy of Verses dedicated to ye vertue & beauty of Mrs Mary Knapp, of Oxon (while ye K. & Court were there upon the accident of the plague in London) by Sr Charles Sidley, Barr.tt A.D. 1665’.

First published in The New Academy of Complements (London, 1671). Miscellaneous Works (London, 1702). The Works of the Honourable Sir Charles Sedley, Bat (2 vols, London, 1722), I, 62-3. Sola Pinto, I, 22.

f. [10r]

WoH 37.5: Sir Henry Wotton, The Character of a Happy Life (‘How happy is he born and taught’)

Copy, ascribed to ‘Sr Henry Wootten’.

First published in Sir Thomas Overbury, A Wife, 5th impression (London, 1614). Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), pp. 522-3. Hannah (1845), pp. 28-31. Some texts of this poem discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Wotton's “The Character of a Happy Life”’, The Library, 5th Ser. 10 (1955), 270-4, and in Ted-Larry Pebworth, ‘New Light on Sir Henry Wotton's “The Character of a Happy Life”’, The Library, 5th Ser. 33 (1978), 223-6 (plus plates).

ff. [12v-13v]

BcF 34.5: Francis Bacon, ‘The world's a bubble, and the life of man’

Copy, headed ‘Humane Life charactered by Fra. Bacon, Viscount St. Albans’.

First published in Thomas Farnaby, Florilegium epigrammatum Graecorum (London, 1629). Poems by Sir Henry Wotton, Sir Walter Raleigh and others, ed. John Hannah (London, 1845), pp. 76-80. Spedding, VII, 271-2. H.J.C. Grierson, ‘Bacon's Poem, “The World”: Its Date and Relation to certain other Poems’, Modern Language Review, 6 (1911), 145-56.

ff. [13v-14v]

OvT 21: Sir Thomas Overbury, A Wife (‘Each woman is a brief of woman kind’)

Extract, 66 lines headed ‘The Choice of a Wife in a poem by Sr Thomas Overbury’, here beginning ‘If I were to chuse a Woman’ and ending ‘Both may bud, grow green, & wither’.

First published, as A Wife now the Widdow of Sir T. Ouerbury, in London, 1614. Rimbault, pp. 33-45. Beecher, pp. 190-8.

MS Eng 1091

A small octavo volume of verse and prose relating to the Earl of Strafford, in a single hand, ii + 31 leaves, in red morocco gilt. Mid-17th century.

ff. [1r-2r]

DeJ 73: Sir John Denham, On the Earl of Strafford's Tryal and Death (‘Great Strafford! worthy of that Name, though all’)

Copy.

First published in Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 153-4.

MS Eng 1132

MS of ‘Hudibras: a drama, founded on the Poem of Butler’, in a single hand, with some apparent revisions, 14 + 131 large quarto pages, on rectos only, in stiff paper wrappers. 19th century.

BuS 1.3: Samuel Butler, Hudibras (‘Sir Hudibras his passing worth’)

Part I first published in London, ‘1663’ [i.e. 1662]. Part II published in London, ‘1664’ [i.e. 1663]. Part III published in London ‘1678’ [i.e. 1677]. the whole poem first published in London, 1684. Edited by John Wilders (Oxford, 1967).

MS Eng 1178

Drawings of inscriptions on panes of glass at Wotton House, on a single leaf.

EvJ 122: John Evelyn, Maps, Drawings and Coats of Arms

MS Eng 1239

Copy of the Ordinances, unnumbered, on 22 quarto leaves, dated ‘1618’, with ‘Additionall Rules’ on ff. 22v-3v, in a secretary hand, with various corrections and emendations in another hand, disbound. Copy, with corrections in another hand; the text followed by additional Ordinances. c.1619.

BcF 247: Francis Bacon, Ordinances in Chancery

Acquired from Frank Hollings, London bookdealer.

First published as Ordinances made by...Sir Francis Bacon Knight...being then Lord Chancellor For the better and more regular Administration of Iustice in the Chancery (London, 1642), beginning ‘No decree shall be reversed, altered, or explained, being once under the Great Seale...’. Spedding, VII, 755-74 (mentioning, on p. 757, having seen some ‘MSS and editions’ of this work but without specifying them or his copy-text).

MS Eng 1264

A quarto volume of poems and other works by Clement Paman (1612-63) ‘left behind him’, in a neat hand, 225 leaves, in leather gilt. 1667.

Later owned by Sir Henry Bunbury (1778-1860) and Edward Herbert Bunbury (1811-95).

f. 41v

ClJ 199: John Cleveland, Epitaph on the Earl of Strafford (‘Here lies Wise and Valiant Dust’)

Copy, ascribed to Clement Paman.

Edited from this MS in Davidson, No. 275 (p. 363).

First published in Character (1647). Edited in CSPD, 1640-1641 (1882), p. 574. Berdan, p. 184, as ‘Internally unlike his manner’. Morris & Withington, p. 66, among ‘Poems probably by Cleveland’. The attribution to Cleveland is dubious. The epitaph is also attributed to Clement Paman: see Poetry and Revolution: An Anthology of British and Irish Verse 1625-1660, ed. Peter Davidson (Oxford, 1998), notes to No. 275 (p. 363).

MS Eng 1266 (v. 1)

A folio composite volume of state tracts, ii + 317 leaves (plus numerous ruled blanks), with a table of contents, in contemporary calf, with metal clasps. In various professional hands (including the ‘Feathery Scribe’), one distinctive secretary hand responsible for ff. 1r-141v, 177r-8v, 206r-11r, 230r-5r.

Owned by Sir Richard Grosvenor (1585-1645); later by the Duke of Westminster, Eaton Hall, Cheshire, with his bookplate (inscribed ‘XXI No. 6’) and a label with No. ‘4’ on the spine. Assembled largely from ‘Liber 9’ (= MS 4). Sotheby's, 19 July 1966, lot 486, to Hofmann.

Recorded in HMC, 3rd Report (1872), Appendix, p. 212. Briefly described in Peter Beal, In Praise of Scribes: Manuscripts and their Makers in Seventeenth-Century England (Oxford, 1998), pp. 218-19 (No. 12). A microfilm of the MS is in the British Library, RP170.

ff. 1r-30r

RaW 616: Sir Walter Ralegh, A Discourse of the Original and Fundamental Cause of Natural, Arbitrary, Necessary, and Unnatural War

Copy, as ‘written by Sr walter Rawleigh’. c.1630s.

A tract beginning ‘The ordinary theme and argument of history is war...’. First published (in part), as ‘The Misery of Invasive Warre’, in Judicious and Select Essays and Observations (London 1650). Published complete in Three Discourses of Sir Walter Ralegh (London 1702). Works (1829), VIII, 253-97.

See also RaW 610.

ff. 32r-41r

CtR 46: Sir Robert Cotton, An Answer to Certain Arguments raised from Supposed Antiquity, and urged by some Members of the lower House of Parliament, to prove that Ecclesiasticall Lawes ought to be Enacted by Temporall Men

Copy, as ‘written by Sr Robert Cotton Bruceus’. c.1630s.

Tract beginning ‘What, besides self-regard, or siding faction, hath been...’. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [203]-217.

ff. 45r-63r

RaW 607: Sir Walter Ralegh, A Discourse of the Invention of Ships, Anchors, Compass, &c.

Copy, as ‘written by Sr Walter Rawleigh’. c.1630s.

An epistolary tract addressed to Prince Henry, beginning ‘That the ark of Noah was the first ship because the invention of God himself...’. First published, as ‘Upon the first Invention of Shipping’, in Judicious and Select Essayes and Observations (London, 1650). Works (1829), VIII, 317-34.

ff. 111r-17r

CtR 457: Sir Robert Cotton, A Speech Made by Sir Rob Cotton Knight and Baronet, before the Lords of his Majesties most Honorable Privy Covncel, At the Councel Table being thither called to deliver his Opinion touching the Alteration of Coyne. 2. Sept. [1626]

Copy, followed (on ff. 120r-8v) by the ‘Answere by the Comittees appointed’, etc. c.1630s.

Speech beginning ‘My Lords, Since it hath pleased this Honourable Table to command...’. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [283]-294, with related texts (‘The Answer of the Committees Appointed...2 September 1626’ and ‘Questions to be proposed’, etc.) on pp. 295-307. W.A. Shaw, Writers on English Monetary History, pp. 21-38.

ff. 132r-41v

CtR 379: Sir Robert Cotton, A Remonstrance of the Treaties of Amitie and Marriage before time, and of late, of the House of Austria and Spaine, with the Kinges of England, to advance themselves to the Monarchy of Europe

Copy, as ‘written by Sr Robert Cotton Knight and Baronett’. c.1630s.

Tract beginning ‘Most excellent Majesty, Wee your Lords Spirituall and Temporal, and the Commons of your Realm assembled...’. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [91]-107.

ff. 206r-11r

CoR 772: Richard Corbett, A speech made by Doctor Corbet Bpp of Norwich to the Clergie of his Diocesse about theire Benevolence for the repayre of St Paules Church London [29 April] Anno domini 1634

Copy. c.1635.

Sermon, beginning ‘My worthy freinds & brethren of the Clergy, I did not send for you before, though I had a commission...’, first published in James Peller Malcolm, Londinium Redivivum, 4 vols (London, 1802-7), II (1803), 77-80. Edited (with omissions) in Gilchrist, pp. xli-xlviii.

MS Eng 1266 (v.2)

A folio composite volume of state tracts, ii + 296 leaves, with a table of contents, in contemporary calf, with metal clasps. In various professional hands, the predominant and distinctive secretary hand in Harvard MS Eng 1266 (v. 1) here responsible for ff. 1r-41v, 142r-9r, 202r-54r, 257r-73r, 283r-94v.

Owned by Sir Richard Grosvenor (1585-1645); later by the Duke of Westminster, Eaton Hall, Cheshire, with his bookplate (inscribed ‘XXI No. 4’) and a label with No.‘15’ on the spine. Assembled largely from ‘Liber 7’ (= MS 15). Sotheby's, 19 July 1966, lot 482.

This volume recorded in HMC, 3rd Report (1872), Appendix, p. 212.

ff. 283r-94v

HrJ 327: Sir John Harington, A Short View of the State of Ireland

Copy. c.1635.

First published, edited by W.D. Macray (Oxford, 1879). Facsimile of f. 13 (which includes the epigram ‘Musa Jocosa, meos solari assueta dolores’) in Kathleen M. Lea, ‘Harington's Folly’, Elizabethan and Jacobean Studies Presented to F.P. Wilson (Oxford, 1959), pp. 42-58 (facing p. 48).

MS Eng 1266.1

A folio composite volume of speeches in Parliament 1623-8, in professional hands, iii + 116 leaves, in contemporary vellum.

Booklabel with an ‘AF’ monogram.

f. [11v]

RuB 204: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech(es)

Brief notes on an undated speech of ?1623-4, headed ‘Heads of Sr Ben: Rudyards speach’, on one page of a tipped-in pair of conjugate quarto leaves, the verso bearing ‘The heads of the Dukes [Buckingham's] Relation’ which is dated on an endorsement (f. [12v]) ‘24to ffeb: 1623[/4]’.

MS Eng 1266.2

A folio composite volume of state letters, tracts, parliamentary speeches, etc., in various professional hands, c.160 leaves, in contemporary calf.

A flyleaf inscribed ‘This belongs to Mrs Carewe of Crowcombe, Co. Somerset / T Philli’: i.e.formerly among the Carew MSS at Crowcombe Court, Somerset, and borrowed at some time by Sir Thomas Phillips, Bt (1792-1872), manuscript and book collector.

Recorded in HMC, 4th Report (1874), Appendix, p. 373.

f. [106r-v]

BcF 482: Francis Bacon, Bacon's Humble Submissions and Supplications

Copy of Bacon's submission on 22 April 1621, in a secretary hand, the first page foliated ‘52’.

The Humble Submissions and Supplications Bacon sent to the House of Lords, on 19 March 1620/1 (beginning ‘I humbly pray your Lordships all to make a favourable and true construction of my absence...’); 22 April 1621 (beginning ‘It may please your Lordships, I shall humbly crave at your Lordships' hands a benign interpretation...’); and 30 April 1621 (beginning ‘Upon advised consideration of the charge, descending into mine own conscience...’), written at the time of his indictment for corruption. Spedding, XIV, 215-16, 242-5, 252-62.

ff. [107r-8r]

CtR 183: Sir Robert Cotton, The Danger wherein this Kingdome now Standeth, and the Remedy

Copy, in a professional secretary hand, the first page foliated ‘53’, incomplete. c.1620s.

Tract beginning ‘As soon as the house of Austria had incorporated it self into the house of Spaine...’. First published London, 1628. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. 308-20.

f. 112r-v

BcF 483: Francis Bacon, Bacon's Humble Submissions and Supplications

Copy.

The Humble Submissions and Supplications Bacon sent to the House of Lords, on 19 March 1620/1 (beginning ‘I humbly pray your Lordships all to make a favourable and true construction of my absence...’); 22 April 1621 (beginning ‘It may please your Lordships, I shall humbly crave at your Lordships' hands a benign interpretation...’); and 30 April 1621 (beginning ‘Upon advised consideration of the charge, descending into mine own conscience...’), written at the time of his indictment for corruption. Spedding, XIV, 215-16, 242-5, 252-62.

ff. [125v-6r]

RuB 7: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, March 1623/4

Copy, in a secretary hand, headed ‘Sr Beniamyn Rudyers Speech taken as he spake itt, beinge the first in the greate businesse concerninge the Treatise’, undated, beginning on the verso of a speech by the Duke of Buckingham dated 24 February ‘1624’, in a section on parliamentary proceedings. c.1620s.

Speech beginning ‘We are bound to bless God that we are mett againe in this place. And we ought to acknowledge his Mats favour towards vs...’.

f. [134r]

HlJ 25: Joseph Hall, Episcopal Admonition, Sent in a Letter to the House of Commons, April 28, 1628

Copy, in a cursive secretary hand, headed ‘Lo: Bish of Exeus Speech’, on a single folio leaf.

See HlJ 17-30.

ff. [153r-9r]

EsR 132: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Apology

Copy, in a professional secretary hand, on seven folio leaves, the first page foliated ‘99’, the work dated 1598. Early 1600s.

First published, addressed to Anthony Bacon, as An Apologie of the Earle of Essex, against those which jealously and maliciously tax him to be the hinderer of the peace and quiet (London, [1600]), but immediately suppressed. Reprinted in 1603.

MS Eng 1278

Collection of papers relating to George Villiers, first Duke of Buckingham.

Folders 12-17, No. 14

MrJ 43: John Marston, The Duke Return'd Againe. 1627 (‘And art returned again with all thy faults’)

Copy.

Folders 12-17, No. 15

CaE 24: Elizabeth Cary, Viscountess Falkland, An Epitaph upon the death of the Duke of Buckingham (‘Reader stand still and see, loe, how I am’)

Copy of the six-line epitaph. c.1630.

This MS recorded in Akkerman.

A six-line (epitaph) version is ascribed to ‘the Countesse of Faukland’ in two MS copies. In some sources it is followed by a further 44 lines (elegy) beginning ‘Yet were bidentalls sacred and the place’. The latter also appears, anonymously, as a separate poem in a number of other sources. The authorship remains uncertain. For an argument for Lady Falkland's authorship of all 50 lines, see Akkerman.

Both sets of verse were first published, as separate but sequential poems, in Poems or Epigrams, Satyrs (London, 1658), pp. 101-2. All 50 lines are edited in Akkerman, pp. 195-6.

MS Eng 1290

Autograph letter signed by Donne, to Sir Nicholas Carew, 21 June 1625. 1625.

*DnJ 4135: John Donne, Letter(s)

Edited by T. Spencer (Charles River, Massachusetts, 1930).

MS Eng 1341

A quarto volume of autograph poems by Elizabeth Rowe (née Singer, 1674-1737), 306 pages, in contemporary vellum boards. Early 18th century.

A tipped-in letter by Thomas Stevenson, Cambridge bookseller, to J.A. Wickham, 2 August 1841, says this volume came to him with other books from the Rev. J.W. Berry, vicar of Foxton. A note inside the front cover by one ‘M. J.’ also records his purchase of ‘this Valuable book’ from ‘Mr Kerslake’.

Sotheby's, 21-22 July 1980, lot 552, with a facsimile of p. 82 in the sale catalogue.

pp. 288-9

MoH 2: Henry More, A Hymn on the Creation (‘When God the first Foundations laid’)

Copy, by Elizabeth Rowe, headed ‘A Hymn by Der Henry More’.

First published in More's Philosophical Poems (Cambridge, 1647).

MS Eng 1356

A small octavo commonplace book, in various hands, over a period from c.1649 to1815, unpaginated and imperfect, in contemporary calf. Including 64 pages with descriptions of dance steps, fifteen pages of verse, and a number of pages of miscellaneous, household and legal memoranda. Chiefly mid-late 17th century.

Inscribed names passim including ‘Richard Pattricke’, ‘Richard Lewis 1654’,

[unspecified page numbers]

ClJ 8: John Cleveland, The Antiplatonick (‘For shame, thou everlasting Woer’)

Copy, on three pages in a ten-page section headed ‘Verses on severall occurrenses 1649’ in the middle of the volume.

First published in Poems, by J. C., With Additions (1651), the edition with yet more additions. Morris & Withington, pp. 54-6.

[unspecified page numbers]

CaW 29: William Cartwright, On Mr Stokes his Book on the Art of Vaulting (‘Reader, here is such a booke’)

Copy, on five pages.

First published in Works (1651), pp. 209-12. Evans, pp. 462-5.

[unspecified page numbers]

LoR 16.5: Richard Lovelace, The Scrutinie. Song (‘Why should you sweare I am forsworn’)

Copy, headed ‘Songs’, on one page in a five-page section of verse near the end of the volume.

First published in Lucasta (London, 1649). Wilkinson (1925), II, 24. (1930), pp. 26-7. A musical setting by Thomas Charles published in Select Musicall Ayres, and Dialogues (London, 1652).

MS Eng 1359

A folio volume of proceedings in Parliament, the Exchequer and Star Chamber, 1628/9-34, in several professional hands, c.315 leaves (including blanks), in contemporary calf. c.1635.

Delivered by Edward Jones Smith to Lady Masserene on 19 June 1824.

f. [29r]

RuB 116: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, 10 February 1628/9

Copy, headed ‘Sr Beniamin Rudyard’.

A speech beginning ‘There be diverse recantations, submissions and sentences remaining on record...’. Variant versions include one beginning ‘That there have been many publique censures and recantacions...’. See Commons Debates for 1629, ed. Wallace Notestein and Frances Helen Relf (Minneapolis, 1921), pp. 137, [274]-5.

MS Eng 1382

Copy of a 581-stanza version, ii + 59 octavo leaves (plus numerous blanks), in contemporary panelled calf. In a single minute hand, untitled and here beginning ‘I singe thy sad disaster fatall kinge’, subscribed ‘Finis By Infortunio’. c.1620s.

HuF 12: Sir Francis Hubert, Edward II (‘It is thy sad disaster which I sing’)

Inscribed (at the top of f. 1r), possibly by the scribe, ‘A North her book’.

First published, in an unauthorised edition as The Deplorable Life and Death of Edward the Second. Together with the Downefall of the two Unfortunate Favorits, Gavestone and Spencer. Storied in an Excellent Pöem, London, 1628. First authorised edition, as The Historie of Edward the Second, Surnamed Carnarvan, one of our English Kings. Together with the Fatall down-fall of his two vnfortunate Favorites Gaveston and Spencer, London, 1629. An edition of a 576-stanza version in three cantos, entitled The Life of Edward II, was printed in London 1721 from an unidentified MS.

Mellor, pp. 4-169 (664-stanza version, headed ‘The Life and Death of Edward the Second’, including ‘The Authors Preface’ beginning ‘Rebellious thoughts why doe you tumult so’?).

MS Eng 1400

An octavo commonplace book, with entries under headings, in a single cursive hand, 512 pages (plus numerous blanks), in vellum boards. c.1705.

p. 80

JnB 568.5: Ben Jonson, Cynthia's Revels

Extracts.

First published in London, 1601. Herford & Simpson, IV, 1-184.

passim

BcF 206.7: Francis Bacon, Essays or Counsels Civil and Moral

Extracts, on numerous pages throughout the volume.

Ten Essayes first published in London, 1597. 38 Essaies published in London, 1612. 58 Essayes or Counsels, Civill and Morall published in London, 1625. Spedding, VI, 365-591. Edited by Michael Kiernan, The Oxford Francis Bacon, Vol. XV (Oxford, 2000).

passim

DaW 29.8: Sir William Davenant, Gondibert (‘Of all the Lombards, by their Trophies knowne’)

Extracts, on pages including pp. 88, 315, 356, 572.

First published in London, ‘1651’ [i.e. December 1650]. The Seventh and Last Canto of the Third Book published in London, 1685. Gladish (1971).

See also DaW 1-2, DaW 37-42.

passim

SpE 103: Edmund Spenser, Extracts

Extracts, including from The Faerie Queene and Colin Clouts Come Home Againe, on numerous pages throughout the volume.

MS Eng 1490

An octavo composite miscellany of verse and prose, in English and Latin, relating to angling, 284 pages (lacking pp. 161-84), in quarter-calf marbled boards. In several neat, small, chiefly italic hands, one on pp. 1-203 that of Nathaniel Bridges, of Magdalen College, Oxford, whose inscription on f. [iiir] is dated ‘1694’. c.1691-early 18th century.

Bookplate of George Weare Braikenridge, Broomwell House. A flyleaf is inscribed by him, November 1834, ‘The Book belonged to the late Dr. Nathl. Bridges Lecturer of St Mary Radcliffe & St Nicholas in the City of Bristol & purchased out of a private sale of his library at his decease.’ Other names inscribed after p. 212 including ‘William Trumbu[ll]’, ‘Joseph Brampton 1691’, and ‘Hen Sacheverell / Coll. Magd.’. A later bookplate inside the lower cover: ‘Gift of Daniel B. Fearing of Newport, 1915’.

p. 123 et seq.

WtI 4: Izaak Walton, The Complete Angler

Extracts, with a title-page: ‘Mr. Isaac Walton's Compleat Angler or the Contemplative Mans Recreation’.

First published in London, 1653.

p. 198

WoH 61.5: Sir Henry Wotton, On a Bank as I sat a-Fishing. A Description of the Spring (‘And now all nature seemed in love’)

Copy, headed ‘A Copy of Verses of Sr. H. Wottons. who made this description of that pleasantness that possess'd him, as he sat quietly in a summers evening on a Bank a Fishing: it is a Description of the Spring’ and here beginning ‘This Day Dame nature seem'd in love’.

First published in Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 524. Hannah (1845), pp. 32-5.

pp. 201-2

WoH 217.5: Sir Henry Wotton, A Description of the Country's Recreations (‘Quivering fears, heart-tearing cares’)

Copy, headed ‘A Copy of Verses, thought to be of Sr. H. Wottons composing, in which is an elegat description of the Recreations & pleasures of the Country’.

First published in Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), pp. 531-3, subscribed ‘Ignoto’, among ‘Poems Found among the Papers of S. H. Wotton’. Described in Izaak Walton, The Complete Angler (London, 1653), pp. 239-40, as ‘a Copy printed amongst Sir Henry Wottons Verses, and doubtless made either by him, or by a lover of Angling’. Hannah (1845), pp. 55-9.

p. 202

DnJ 320.5: John Donne, The Baite (‘Come live with mee, and bee my love’)

Copy, headed ‘Some Verses of Dr Donne's, which because they relate Rivers, fish & fishing were inserted, in the Author's Book. The Bait’.

First published in William Corkine, Second Book of Ayres (London, 1612). Grierson, I, 46-7. Gardner, Elegies, pp. 32-3. Shawcross, No. 27.

2nd section, f. [18r]

RaW 68.5: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Euen such is tyme which takes in trust’

Copy, headed ‘Sr Walter Raleighs Epitaph written himself the night before he suffered’.

First published in Richard Brathwayte, Remains after Death (London, 1618). Latham, p. 72 (as ‘These verses following were made by Sir Walter Rauleigh the night before he dyed and left att the Gate howse’). Rudick, Nos 35A, 35B, and part of 55 (three versions, pp. 80, 133).

This poem is ascribed to Ralegh in most MS copies and is often appended to copies of his speech on the scaffold (see RaW 739-822).

See also RaW 302 and RaW 304.

2nd section, f. [28v]

DoC 204.5: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On the Countess of Dorchester (IV) (‘Tell me, Dorinda, why so gay’)

Copy, headed ‘To the Lady Dorchester’.

First published in A Collection of Miscellany Poems, by Mr. Brown (London, 1699). POAS, V (1971), 385. Harris, pp. 45-6.

MS Eng 1534

Copy, 155 large quarto leaves, unbound. With a title-page: ‘A Treatise on Witchcraft Demonstrated by Facts In the family of Edward Fairfax Esq. Of Fuystone, Yorkshire, 1624. With many curious Plates, Transcribed from an old Manuscript. By Ebenezer Sibley. M. D. 1793 Copied by C. Forrest Sen. Jany 1870.’ 1870.

FaE 6.3: Edward Fairfax, A Discourse of Witchcraft

First published in Miscellanies of the Philobiblon Society, 5 (London, 1858-9), No. 3, ed. R. Monckton Milnes. Edited by William Grainge as Daemonologia (Harrogate, 1882; reprinted in London, 1971).

MS Eng 1544 (Lobby X.1.1)

An octavo volume of some 137 poems from George Herbert's The Temple, in a single minute hand, many with revisions, 237 pages, in later black morocco. Possibly written by one ‘I.B.’ (p. 86), perhaps of ‘Hasleborow’ (p. 25), who refers to himself (p. 136) as ‘the translatr’, in versions adapted as hymns to be sung to (frequently specified) Psalm tunes, with page references to his printed exemplar (conforming to the 1633 edition) bearing complementary annotations, and with references (on pp. 42, 44, 46, 67, 78, 80, 117, 137, 152, 163, 171, 191, 196, 206, 207, 213, and 218) to those poems which are not copied here (though assigned Psalm tunes) probably because he had made no alterations to the printed versions. 1680/1-1682.

Bookplates of James Bindley, FSA (1737-1818), book collector, and of F.W. Cosens, FSA (1819-89), of Clapham Park, book collector, and of Professor George Herbert Palmer (1842-1933), American scholar and author (his gift to Harvard in 1922). Formerly Her. 2.5.

This MS discussed by the Rev. Alexander B. Grosart in his edition of The Complete Works of George Herbert (3 vols, printed for private circulation, 1874), II, pp. xxv-xxxi.

pp. 1-25

HrG 51.5: George Herbert, The Church-porch (‘Thou, whose sweet youth and early hopes inhance’)

Copy, docketed ‘Sing it as the C XIII Psalm’, subscribed ‘scripsi...apd Hasleborow, diebus prdict. et Feb. 12. 1680/1’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 6-24.

pp. 26-38

HrG 230.5: George Herbert, The Sacrifice (‘Oh all ye, who passe by, whose eyes and minde’)

Copy, subscribed ‘scripsi Feb. 7. et nunc ulto ejusd 24. 1680/1’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 26-34.

pp. 39-41

HrG 261.5: George Herbert, The Thanksgiving (‘Oh King of grief! a title strange, yet true’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 35-6.

p. 42

HrG 226.5: George Herbert, The Reprisall (‘I have consider'd it, and finde’)

Copy, docketed ‘as Psal. C’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 36-7.

pp. 42-3

HrG 10.5: George Herbert, The Agonie (‘Philosophers have measur'd mountains’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Philosophers haue by their art’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 37.

pp. 43-4

HrG 241.5: George Herbert, The Sinner (‘Lord, how I am all ague, when I seek’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Lord I'm all ague when I seek’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 38.

p. 44

HrG 120.5: George Herbert, Good Friday (‘O my chief good’)

Copy, here beginning ‘O thou that art my chiefest good’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 38-9.

pp. 45-6

HrG 222.5: George Herbert, Redemption (‘Having been tenant long to a rich Lord’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 40.

pp. 46-7

HrG 233.5: George Herbert, Sepulchre (‘O blessed bodie! Whither art thou thrown?’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Oh blessed body (now)’, docketed ‘as Ps. 113’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 40-1.

p. 48

HrG 92.2: George Herbert, Easter (‘Rise heart. thy Lord is risen. Sing his praise’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Rise heart; thy Lord is risen up’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 41-2.

pp. 48-9

HrG 94.5: George Herbert, Easter-wings (‘Lord, who createdst man in wealth and store’)

Copy, here beginning ‘My tender youthful age’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 43.

pp. 49-50

HrG 126.5: George Herbert, H. Baptisme (I) (‘As he that sees a dark and shadie grove’)

Copy, here beginning ‘As he that sees a darksome Grove’.

First published in The Temple (1613). Hutchinson, pp. 43-4.

p. 50

HrG 128.5: George Herbert, H. Baptisme (II) (‘Since, Lord, to thee’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 44.

p. 51

HrG 187.5: George Herbert, Nature (‘Full of rebellion, I would die’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 45.

p. 51

HrG 187.8: George Herbert, Nature (‘Full of rebellion, I would die’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 45.

p. 52

HrG 237.5: George Herbert, Sinne (I) (‘Lord, with what care hast thou begirt us round!’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 45-6.

pp. 53-5

HrG 3.5: George Herbert, Affliction (I) (‘When first thou didst entice to thee my heart’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 46-8.

pp. 55-6

HrG 224.2: George Herbert, Repentance (‘Lord, I confesse my sinne is great’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 48-9.

pp. 56-8

HrG 109.5: George Herbert, Faith (‘Lord, how couldst thou so much appease’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 49-51.

p. 59

HrG 209.5: George Herbert, Prayer (I) (‘Prayer the Churches banquet, Angels age’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Prayer the Churches banquet is’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 51.

p. 60

HrG 130.5: George Herbert, The H. Communion (‘Not in rich furniture, or fine aray’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Not in the richest furniture’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 52-3.

p. 61

HrG 307.5: George Herbert, Dum petit Infantem (‘Dvm petit Infantem Princeps, Grantámque Iacobus’)

Copy, here beginning ‘O thou immortal Loue’.

First published in True Copies Of all the Latine Orations, made on the 25. and 27. of Februarie 1622 (London, 1623). Hutchinson, pp. 437-8. McCloskey & Murphy, with a translation, pp. 172-3.

pp. 61-2

HrG 169.5: George Herbert, Love II. (‘Immortall Heat, O let thy greater flame’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 54.

pp. 62-3

HrG 259.5: George Herbert, The Temper (II) (‘It cannot be. Where is that mightie joy’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 56.

pp. 63-4

HrG 257.5: George Herbert, The Temper (I) (‘How should I praise thee, Lord! how should my rymes’)

Copy, docketed ‘medu this should haue bin placed before the last,.being pag. 46’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 55.

pp. 64-5

HrG 152.5: George Herbert, Jordan (I) (‘Who sayes that fictions onely and false hair’)

Copy, heading ‘Who sayes that fiction & false hair’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 56-7.

pp. 65-6

HrG 98.5: George Herbert, Employment (I) (‘If as a flowre doth spread and die’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 57.

p. 66

HrG 134.5: George Herbert, The H. Scriptures (‘Oh Book! infinite sweetnessse! let my heart’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Oh Book so infinite’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 58.

p. 67

HrG 285.5: George Herbert, Whitsunday (‘Listen sweet Dove unto my song’)

Copy of the heading (‘Whitsunda’) and first line only (here ‘Listen sweet dove unto my song’), docketed ‘& vid coelora in libro -- onely take out the words thus enclosed [*]’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 59-60.

p. 67

HrG 122.5: George Herbert, Grace (‘My stock lies dead, and no increase’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 60-1.

pp. 68-9

HrG 205.5: George Herbert, Praise (I) (‘To write a verse or two is all the praise’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 61.

p. 69

HrG 4.5: George Herbert, Affliction (II) (‘Kill me not ev'ry day’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 62.

pp. 69-70

HrG 180.5: George Herbert, Mattens (‘I cannot ope mine eyes’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 62-3.

p. 71

HrG 239.5: George Herbert, Sinne (II) (‘O that I could a sinne once see!’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 63.

pp. 71-3

HrG 106.5: George Herbert, Even-song (‘Blest be the God of love’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 63-4.

p. 73

HrG 48.5: George Herbert, Church-monuments (‘While that my soul repairs to her devotion’)

Copy, here beginning ‘While that my soul faily repairs’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 64-5.

pp. 74-5

HrG 50.5: George Herbert, Church-musick (‘Sweetest of sweets, I thank you: when displeasure’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Sweetest of sweets I do you think’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 65-6.

pp. 75-6

HrG 44.2: George Herbert, Church-lock and key (‘I know it is my sinne, which locks thine eares’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Full well I know it is’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 66.

pp. 76-8

HrG 42.8: George Herbert, The Church-floore (‘Mark you the floore? that square & speckled stone’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Sir, do you mark that handsome floor?’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 66-7.

pp. 78-80

HrG 68.5: George Herbert, Content (‘Peace mutt'ring thoughts, and do not grudge to keep’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Peace muttering thoughts, o peace & rest’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 68-9.

pp. 80-2

HrG 145.5: George Herbert, Humilitie (‘I saw the Vertues sitting hand in hand’)

Copy, here beginning ‘I saw the virtues all’, subscribed ‘March 28. 1682’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 70-1.

pp. 82-3

HrG 115.5: George Herbert, Frailtie (‘Lord, in my silence how do I despise’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 71-2.

pp. 83-6

HrG 65.5: George Herbert, Constancie (‘Who is the honest man?’)

Copy, subscribed ‘ita .I.B. mar. 30. 82.’

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 72-3.

pp. 86-7

HrG 5.5: George Herbert, Affliction (III) (‘My heart did heave, and there came forth, O God!’)

Copy, here beginning ‘My heart did heave and presently’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 73.

pp. 87-8

HrG 246.5: George Herbert, The Starre (‘Bright spark, shot from a brighter place’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 74.

pp. 88-90

HrG 253.5: George Herbert, Sunday (‘O day most calm, most bright’)

Copy, here beginning ‘O day most calm, most sweet, most bright’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 75-7.

pp. 90-1

HrG 22.5: George Herbert, Avarice (‘Money, thou bane of blisse, & sourse of wo’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 77.

p. 91

HrG 14.8: George Herbert, Ana-{MARY/ARMY} gram (‘How well her name an Army doth present’)

Copy, here beginning ‘How well doth her great Name’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 77.

pp. 92-3

HrG 264.5: George Herbert, To all Angels and Saints (‘Oh glorious spirits, who after all your bands’)

Copy, here beginning ‘oh glorious spirits, who on high’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 77-8.

pp. 93-5

HrG 100.5: George Herbert, Employment (II) (‘He that is weary, let him sit’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 78-9.

pp. 95-6

HrG 81.5: George Herbert, Deniall (‘When my devotions could not pierce’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 79-80.

pp. 96-9

HrG 40.5: George Herbert, Christmas (‘All after pleasures as I rid one day’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 80-1.

pp. 99-100

HrG 276.5: George Herbert, Ungratefulnesse (‘Lord, with what bountie and rare clemencie’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Lord with what bounty rare’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 82.

pp. 101-2

HrG 235.5: George Herbert, Sighs and Grones (‘O do not use me’)

Copy, here beginning ‘After my sins, o do not use’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 83.

pp. 102-3

HrG 288.5: George Herbert, The World (‘Love built a stately house. where Fortune came’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 84.

pp. 104-5

HrG 279.5: George Herbert, Vanitie (I) (‘The fleet Astronomer can bore’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 85-6.

pp. 105-8

HrG 162.5: George Herbert, Lent (‘Welcome deare feast of Lent: who loves not thee’)

Copy, with the scribe's marginal comment on p. 108 ‘In my poor judgt. the Poetry is better then the Reason -- therefore though I translated it as piously intended, yet I cannpt say yt. I am like-minded wth ys worthy Author. May. 30. 1682.’

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 86-7.

pp. 109-11

HrG 199.5: George Herbert, The Pearl. Matth. 13. 45. (‘I know the wayes of Learning. both the head’)

Copy, here beginning ‘I know the wayes of Learning well’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 88-9.

pp. 111-12

HrG 7.5: George Herbert, Affliction (IV) (‘Broken in pieces all asunder’)

Copy, docketed ‘As Psal. 25’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 89-90.

pp. 112-15

HrG 176.5: George Herbert, Man (‘My God, I heard this day’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 90-2.

pp. 115-16

HrG 278.5: George Herbert, Unkindnesse (‘Lord, make me coy and tender to offend’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Lord make me very coy’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 93-4.

p. 117

HrG 163.5: George Herbert, Life (‘I made a posie, while the day ran by’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 94.

pp. 117-18

HrG 9.5: George Herbert, Affliction (V) (‘My God, I read this day’)

Copy, here beginning ‘My glorious God, I read this day’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 97.

pp. 118-20

HrG 185.5: George Herbert, Mortification (‘How soon doth man decay!’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 98-9.

pp. 121-2

HrG 77.5: George Herbert, Decay (‘Sweet were the dayes, when thou didst lodge with Lot’)

Copy, here beginning ‘The dayes were sweet wn thou (o Ld)’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 99.

pp. 122-7

HrG 183.5: George Herbert, Miserie (‘Lord, let the Angles praise thy name’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Lord, Let the Angels high’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 100-2.

pp. 127-8

HrG 154.5: George Herbert, Jordan (II) (‘When first my lines of heav'nly joyes made mention’)

Copy, here beginning ‘when first my lines began’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 102-3.

pp. 128-9

HrG 212.5: George Herbert, Prayer (II) (‘Of what an easie quick accesse’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 103.

pp. 129-32

HrG 189.5: George Herbert, Obedience (‘My God, if writings may’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 104-5.

p. 132

HrG 64.5: George Herbert, Conscience (‘Peace pratler, do not lowre’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 105-6.

pp. 133-4

HrG 243.5: George Herbert, Sion (‘Lord, with what glorie wast thou serv'd of old’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 106-7.

pp. 134-6

HrG 140.5: George Herbert, Home (‘Come Lord, my head doth burn, my heart is sick’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 107-9.

pp. 136-7

HrG 30.4: George Herbert, The British Church (‘I joy, deare Mother, when I view’)

Copy, docketed at the foot of p. 136 ‘the translatrs who in this is not like minded wth the Reverd. Author’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 109-10.

p. 137

HrG 280.5: George Herbert, Vanitie (II) (‘Poore silly soul, whose hope and head lies low’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 111.

p. 138

HrG 73.5: George Herbert, The Dawning (‘Awake sad heart, whom sorrow ever drowns’)

Copy, here beginning ‘wake heart, whom sorrow ever drowns’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 112.

p. 138

HrG 147.5: George Herbert, Jesu (‘Jesu is in my heart, his sacred name’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 112.

pp. 139-41

HrG 32.2: George Herbert, Businesse (‘Canst be idle? canst thou play’)

Copy, untitled, here beginning ‘Canst thou be idle man’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 113-14.

p. 141

HrG 90.5: George Herbert, Dulnesse (‘Why do I languish thus, drooping and dull’)

Copy, here beginning ‘why do I languish drooping thus’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 115-16.

p.. 141

HrG 173.2: George Herbert, Love-joy (‘As on a window late I cast mine eye’)

Copy, in double columns, here beginning ‘As on a window lately I’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 116.

pp. 142-51

HrG 215.5: George Herbert, Providence (‘O sacred Providence, who from end to end’)

Copy, subscribed ‘March. 3. 1680/1’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 116-21.

p. 151

HrG 143.5: George Herbert, Hope (‘I gave to Hope a watch of mine: but he’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 121.

pp. 151-2

HrG 242.5: George Herbert, Sinnes round (‘Sorrie I am, my God, sorrie I am’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Sorry I am, my God, I am’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 122.

pp. 153-4

HrG 197.5: George Herbert, Peace (‘Sweet Peace, where dost thou dwell? I humbly crave’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Sweet Peace, where dost thou dwel, I trow’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 124-5.

pp. 154-5

HrG 63.5: George Herbert, Confession (‘O what a cunning guest’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 126.

pp. 155-6

HrG 116.5: George Herbert, Giddinesse (‘Oh, what a thing is man! how farre from power’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 127.

pp. 156-7

HrG 31.5: George Herbert, The Bunch of Grapes (‘Joy, I did lock thee up: but some bad man’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 128.

pp. 157-60

HrG 174.5: George Herbert, Love unknown (‘Deare Friend, sit down, the tale is long and sad’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 129-31.

pp. 160-2

HrG 177.5: George Herbert, Mans medley (‘Heark, how the birds do sing’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Heark how the birds do sweetly sing’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 131-2.

pp. 162-3

HrG 249.5: George Herbert, The Storm (‘If as the windes and waters here below’)

Copy, here beginning ‘If as the furious winds’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 132.

pp. 163-5

HrG 103.5: George Herbert, Ephes. 4. 30. Grieve not the Holy Spirit, &c (‘And art thou grieved, sweet and sacred Dove’)

Copy, here beginning ‘And art thou griev'd, o dove’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 135-6.

p. 165

HrG 110.5: George Herbert, The Familie (‘What doth this noise of thoughts within my heart’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 136-7.

pp. 166-7

HrG 244.5: George Herbert, The Size (‘Content thee, greedie heart’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Content thee oh my greedy heart’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 137-8.

pp. 168-9

HrG 20.5: George Herbert, Artillerie (‘As I one ev'ning sat before my cell’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Sitting one night before my cell’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 139.

pp. 169-71

HrG 57.5: George Herbert, Church-rents and schismes (‘Brave rose, (alas!) where art thou? in the chair’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Brave Rose (alas) where art yu now’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 140.

pp. 171-2

HrG 159.5: George Herbert, Justice (II) (‘O dreadfull Justice, what a fright and terrour’)

Copy, here beginning ‘O dreadful Justice unto man’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 141.

pp. 172-3

HrG 201.5: George Herbert, The Pilgrimage (‘I travell'd on, seeing the hill, where lay’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 141-2.

pp. 173-4

HrG 139.5: George Herbert, The Holdfast (‘I threatned to observe the strict decree’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 143.

pp. 174-5

HrG 62.5: George Herbert, Complaining (‘Do not beguile my heart’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 143-4.

pp. 175-7

HrG 84.5: George Herbert, The Discharge (‘Busie enquiring heart, what wouldst thou know?’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Busy enquireing heart, I pray’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 144-5.

pp. 177-80

HrG 192.5: George Herbert, An Offering (‘Come, bring thy gift. If blessings were as slow’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Come bring thy gift away’, subscribed ‘oct. 17. 1682’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 147-8.

pp. 181-3

HrG 164.5: George Herbert, Longing (‘With sick and famisht eyes’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 148-50.

pp. 184-5

HrG 25.8: George Herbert, The Bag (‘Away despair! my gracious Lord doth heare’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 151-2.

pp. 185-6

HrG 150.5: George Herbert, The Jews (‘Poore nation, whose sweet sap and juice’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Poor nation long be wildered’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 152.

pp. 186-8

HrG 61.2: George Herbert, Coloss. 3. 3. Our life is hid with Christ in God (‘My words & thoughts do both expresse this notion’)

Copy, here beginning ‘I struck upon the board’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 84-5.

pp. 188-9

HrG 118.5: George Herbert, The Glimpse (‘Whither away delight?’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 154-5.

pp. 189-91

HrG 21.5: George Herbert, Assurance (‘O spitefull bitter thought!’)

Copy, here beginning ‘O spiteful woful bitter thought!’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 155-6.

pp. 191-3

HrG 207.5: George Herbert, Praise (III) (‘Lord, I will mean and speak thy praise’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 157-9.

p. 193

HrG 155.5: George Herbert, Josephs coat (‘Wounded I sing, tormented I indite’)

Copy, here beginning ‘wounded most sore I sing’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 159.

p. 194

HrG 217.5: George Herbert, The Pulley (‘When God at first made man’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 159-60.

pp. 195-6

HrG 213.5: George Herbert, The Priesthood (‘Blest Order, which in power dost so excell’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 160-1.

pp. 196-7

HrG 124.5: George Herbert, Grief (‘O who will give me tears? Come all ye springs’)

Copy, here beginning ‘O, who will give me brinish tears’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 164.

pp. 197-9

HrG 71.5: George Herbert, The Crosse (‘What is this strange and uncouth thing?’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 164-5.

pp. 199-200

HrG 111.5: George Herbert, The Flower (‘How fresh, O Lord, how sweet and clean’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 165-7.

p. 201

HrG 89.2: George Herbert, Dotage (‘False glozing pleasures, casks of happinesse’)

Copy, here beginning ‘False glozeing pleasures, empty casks’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 167.

pp. 201-2

HrG 245.5: George Herbert, The Sonne (‘Let forrain nations of their language boast’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Let forraign Nations loudly boast’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 167-8.

p. 202

HrG 269.5: George Herbert, A true Hymne (‘My joy, my life, my crown!’)

Copy, here beginning ‘my dearest joy, My life, my Crown!’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 168.

p. 203

HrG 16.5: George Herbert, The Answer (‘My comforts drop and melt away like snow’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 169.

pp. 203-4

HrG 83.5: George Herbert, A Dialogue-Antheme (‘Alas, poore Death, where is thy glorie?’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Alas poore sorry death!’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 169.

pp. 204-5

HrG 283.5: George Herbert, The Water-couse (‘Thou who dost dwell and linger here below’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Thou who impatiently dost dwell’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 170.

p. 205

HrG 232.5: George Herbert, Self-condemnation (‘Thou who condemnest Jewish hate’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 170-1.

p. 206

HrG 117.5: George Herbert, The Glance (‘When first thy sweet and gracious eye’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 171-2.

pp. 206-7

HrG 178.5: George Herbert, Marie Magdalene (‘When blessed marie wip'd her Saviours feet’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 173.

pp. 207-9

HrG 1.5: George Herbert, Aaron (‘Holinesse on the head’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 174.

pp. 209-10

HrG 190.5: George Herbert, The Odour. 2. Cor. 2. 15 (‘How sweetly doth My Master sound! My Master!’)

Copy, here beginning ‘How sweetly doth this sentence sound’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 174-5.

p. 210

HrG 112.5: George Herbert, The Foil (‘If we could see below’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 175-6.

pp. 211-13

HrG 113.5: George Herbert, The Forerunners (‘The harbingers are come. See, see their mark’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 176-7.

p. 213

HrG 146.5: George Herbert, The Invitation (‘Come ye hither All, whose taste’)

Copy of a 32-line version beginning ‘Come ye up hither all’, in double columns.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 179-80.

pp. 214-15

HrG 146.8: George Herbert, The Invitation (‘Come ye hither All, whose taste’)

Copy of a 48-line version headed ‘aliter’ and beginning ‘Come hither ye, ye all whose taste’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 179-80.

pp. 215-16

HrG 27.5: George Herbert, The Banquet (‘Welcome sweet and sacred cheer’)

Copy, headed ‘O welcome sweet and sacred cheer’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 181-2.

p. 217

HrG 202.5: George Herbert, The Posie (‘Let wits contest’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 182-3.

pp. 217-18

HrG 195.9: George Herbert, A Parodie (‘Souls joy, when thou art gone’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). John Donne, Poems, By J.D. (London, 1635). Hutchinson, pp. 183-4.

Herbert's poem is a ‘Parodie’ of a poem by William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke, first published in John Donne, Poems (2nd edition, London, 1635). Entries below include both poems indiscriminately.

p. 218

HrG 290.2: George Herbert, On Henry Danvers earl of Danby (‘Sacred Marble, safely keepe’)

Copy, here beginning ‘A wreathed Garland Lord’.

Inscribed on Danby's tomb in Dauntsey Church, Wiltshire. First published in Izaak Walton, Lives, ed. Thomas Zouch (London, 1776). Hutchinson, pp. 208-9.

pp. 218-19

HrG 76.5: George Herbert, Death (‘Death, thou wast once an uncouth hideous thing’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Death, thou wast once an uncouth thing’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 185-6.

pp. 219-20

HrG 88.5: George Herbert, Dooms-day (‘Come away’)

Copy, here beginning ‘oh come, come, come away’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 186-7.

pp. 220-1

HrG 157.5: George Herbert, Judgement (‘Almightie Judge, how shall poore wretches brook’)

Copy, here beginning ‘All mighty judge, how shall we brook’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 187-8.

p. 221

HrG 138.5: George Herbert, Heaven (‘O who will show me those delights on high?’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 188.

pp. 221-2

HrG 171.5: George Herbert, Love III (‘Love bade me welcome: yet my soul drew back’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Dec. 12. 1682’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 188-9.

pp. 222-36

HrG 46.5: George Herbert, The Church Militant (‘Almightie Lord, who from thy glorious throne’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Allmighty God the Lord, who from’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 190-8.

pp. 236-7

HrG 102.5: George Herbert, L'Envoy (‘King of Glorie, King of Peace’)

Copy, here beginning ‘O King of Glory, King of Peace’, subscribed ‘Finis. Dec. 14. 1682’.

fMS Eng 64

Autograph letter signed by Dryden, to the Rev. Richard Busby, [1682]. 1682.

*DrJ 310: John Dryden, Letter(s)

Ward, Letter 9.

fMS Eng 602

A folio volume principally of poems, the majority (at least 20) by Edmund Waller, some probably by members of his family, 73 unnumbered leaves, in calf gilt. Including copies of various drafts, fragments and extracts, as well as poems by other writers such as Anne Wharton, Sir Charles Berkeley, Sir Thomas Higgons (including part of a play by him), Elizabeth Taylor (Lady Wythens, afterwards Lady Colepeper), ‘Ephelia’, George Granville, the Duke of Buckingham, Sir George Etherege, the Earl of Rochester, James Shirley, and Thomas Rymer, also extracts from Dryden and Davenant; almost entirely in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, with considerable variation of style; an apparently second, unidentified, hand copying verse and prose (‘Memoire…par le Sieur Lycelot…Le 9me de Decembre 1687’ and ‘Instructions to the Judges of Assize &c Lent 1687/8’) on ff. [23r, 62r-7v, 70v]; two of these leaves ([65r and 70v]) docketed in a later hand (after 1713) ‘The Handwriting of Dr Atterbury’ and ‘Bishp Atterbury’ [meaning perhaps copied from Atterbury's writing (see WaE Δ 15)]; a draft letter addressed (as is clear from the content) to Catherine, Lady Ranelagh (1614-91), sister of the ‘noble and learned…Mr [Robert] Boyle’, on f. [16v], enclosing ‘ffathers last verses’ [not specified], noting his reluctance to write anything for the forthcoming marriage of Princess Anne and Prince George of Denmark [which took place on 28 July 1684], and observing that he has ‘now consecrated his remayning facullty in vers to devotion’; a poem ‘Of his voyage vp the river to vissett’ (beginning ‘In my breast Eternall flames’) on f. [71r] ascribed to ‘Mrs M Waller’ (presumably Waller's second wife, Mary Bresse or Breaux, d. 1677); some scribbling and calculations on ff. 3r, 71v, 72v, 73v, a label on the spine erroneously identifying the volume as a compilation by Brian Fairfax (1637-1711). c.1693-8.

Later owned by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bt (1798-1872), manuscript and book collector: Phillipps MS 9096.

Cited in IELM, II.ii (1993) as the ‘Harvard MS’: WaE Δ 6.

ff. [1r-2r]

WaE 158: Edmund Waller, Of Divine Love. Six Cantos (‘The Grecian muse has all their gods survived’)

Copy of Canto I, lines 1-22, 45-54, and Canto II, lines 1-8 only, in the hand of one of Waller's daughters.

First published in Poems, ‘Fourth’ edition (London, 1682). Thorn-Drury, II, 119-30.

f. [2v]

WaE 68: Edmund Waller, Epitaph Unfinished (‘Great soul! for whom Death will no longer stay’)

Copy of the last four lines in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, untitled and here beginning ‘Here beauty, youth, and Noble Virtue Shin'd’.

First published in The Second Part of Mr. Waller's Poems (London, 1690). Thorn-Drury, II, 116.

ff. [3v-4v], [8r]

WaE 798.5: Edmund Waller, The Maid's Tragedy Altered

Copy of a series of passages, at least some relating to Waller's adaptation and possibly incorporating rejected drafts, in the hand of one of Waller's daughters on four pages.

Besides 12 lines (on f. [4]) begininng ‘When I consider life tis all a cheate’ from Dryden's Aureng-Zebe, IV, i, the passages on these four pages include (i) 16 lines beginning ‘Under what Tyranny are women born!’, the first two lines being a version of Evadne's couplet beginning ‘Under how hard a Fate are Women born!’ near the opening of the play (lines 9-10); and (on lower half of f. [8]) 16 lines beginning ‘Noe forrest, Cave, or Savage Denn’, being Aspasia's lines 7-22 in her scene in the Forest. Some of the other, unidentified passages also occur in other Waller family papers.

Recorded in IELM, II.ii (1993), as WaE 788.

First published in The Second Part of Mr. Waller's Poems (London, 1690). The Maid's Tragedy Altered (1690).

See also WaE 145, WaE 765.

f. [5r]

WaE 278: Edmund Waller, Of the last Verses in the Book (‘When we for age could neither read nor write’)

Copy in the hand of one of Waller's daughters.

First published in Poems, ‘Fifth’ edition (London, 1686). Thorn-Drury, II, 144.

f. [6v]

WaE 425: Edmund Waller, Some reflections of his upon the several Petitions in the same Prayer (‘His sacred name with reverence profound’)

Copy of lines 10-12 in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, untitled and here beginning ‘—his precepts bring’, subscribed ‘to be added to the verses of the Lords prayer in the second petition’.

First published in Divine Poems (London, 1685). Thorn-Drury, II, 137-9.

f. [7v]

WaE 196: Edmund Waller, Of Her Royal Highness, Mother to the Prince of Orange. and of her portrait, written by the late Duchess of York while she lived with her (‘Heroic nymph! in tempests the support’)

Copy in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, headed ‘Of hir R: H: Mother to the present Prince of Orange and of hir Portraite written by the late Duchesse of Y. while shee liv'd with hir’.

First published in Poems, ‘Fifth’ edition (London, 1686). Thorn-Drury, II, 74.

f. [8r]

WaE 661: Edmund Waller, Translated out of French (‘Fade, flowers! fade, Nature will have it so’)

Copy in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, untitled.

First published in The Maid's Tragedy Altered (London, 1690). Poems, ‘Seventh’ edition (London, 1705). Thorn-Drury, II, 112.

f. [8v]

WaE 156: Edmund Waller, Of an Elegy made by Mrs. Wharton on the Earl of Rochester (‘Thus mourn the Muses! on the hearse’)

Copy in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, headed ‘Of an Eligy vpon the Earl of Rochester: written by a Lady &c.’.

First published in The Maid's Tragedy Altered (London, 1690). Thorn Drury, II, 89.

ff. [9r-10r]

WaE 665: Edmund Waller, The Triple Combat (‘When through the world fair Mazarin had run’)

Copy in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, here arranged in the order of lines 1-22, 25-6, 23-4, 27-46.

First published in The Second Part of Mr. Waller's Poems (London, 1690). The Maid's Tragedy Altered (London, 1690). Thorn-Drury, II, 77-8.

f. [10r]

WaE 410: Edmund Waller, Prologue for the Lady-Actors: Spoken before King Charles II (‘Amaze us not with that majestic frown’)

Copy in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, headed ‘prologue for the Lady actors &c.’.

First published in The Second Part of Mr. Waller's Poems (London, 1690). The Maid's Tragedy Altered (London, 1690). Thorn-Drury, II, 95.

ff. [11r-12r]

WaE 345: Edmund Waller, On the Duke of Monmouth's Expedition into Scotland in the Summer Solstice, 1679 (‘Swift as Jove's messenger, the winged god’)

Copy in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, headed ‘Of the Duke of Mounmouths expedition to Scotland in the Summer Solstis——1678’; c.1683-8.

First published in The Second Part of Mr. Waller's Poems (London, 1690). The Maid's Tragedy Altered (London, 1690). Thorn-Drury, II, 84-5.

f. [12r]

EtG 69: Sir George Etherege, Song (‘Tell me no more I am deceived’)

This MS collated in Thorpe.

First published in Nahum Tate, A Duke and No Duke (London, 1685). Thorpe, p. 30.

For the song by Congreve with the same opening line, see CgW 43-4.

ff. [12v-13v]

WhA 47: Anne Wharton, To Doc: Burnett upon his retirement (‘If darkest Shades could cloud so bright a Mind’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Greer & Hastings.

First published, as ‘Upon the D. of Buckingham's Retirement: By Madame Wharton, Jan. 1683’, in Miscellany Poems upon Several Occasions (London, 1692), pp. Greer & Hastings, No. 17, pp. 177-9.

ff. [14r-15r]

WhA 54: Anne Wharton, To Mr. Waller (‘Now I shall live indeed, not by my skill’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Greer & Hastings.

First published, in a 52-line version, in Poems by Several Hands (London, 1685), pp. 222-5. A 62-line version in The Gentleman's Magazine, Vol. 85, pt. i (June 1815), p. 493, and in Greer & Hastings, No. 19, pp. 182-3.

f. [15r]

WhA 2: Anne Wharton, The Despair. To D. Burnet by Mrs Wharton (‘The use of Knowledge is to find it poor’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Greer & Hastings.

First published in Greer & Hastings (1997), No. 18, pp. 180-1.

f. [16r]

WhA 25: Anne Wharton, A Paraphrase on the 53 of Isaiah (‘Who hath beleived on Earth what we report’)

Copy of lines 1-8.

This MS collated in Greer & Hastings.

First published in Greer & Hastings (1997), No. 14, pp. 169-71.

f. [17v]

WaE 254: Edmund Waller, Of Tea, commended by Her Majesty (‘Venus her myrtle, Phoebus has his bays’)

Copy of a 21-line version in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, untitled and beginning ‘What Mity Princes doe bestow’.

First published in The Second Part of Mr. Waller's Poems (London, 1690). Thorn-Drury, II, 94.

ff. [18r-21v]

WaE 161: Edmund Waller, Of Divine Poesy. Two Cantos (‘Poets we prize, when in their verse we find’)

Copy of a version in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, here arranged as Canto I, lines 1-20, 40-1, 21-39, 42-54, and Canto II.

First published in Divine Poems (London, 1685). Thorn-Drury, II, 131-5.

f. [22r-v]

WaE 407: Edmund Waller, Pride (‘Not the brave Macedonian youth alone’)

Copy of a 39-line version in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, untitled and beginning ‘Not the brave Alexander alone’.

First published in The Second Part of Mr. Waller's Poems (London, 1690). in The Maid's Tragedy Altered (London, 1690). Thorn-Drury, II, 114.

f. [23r]

WaE 112: Edmund Waller, Long and Short Life (‘Circles are praised, not that abound’)

Copy in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, headed ‘Argumentum’ and including four lines of prose.

First published in The Second Part of Mr. Waller's Poems (London, 1690). Thorn-Drury, II, 112.

f. [23r]

WaE 408: Edmund Waller, Pride (‘Not the brave Macedonian youth alone’)

Copy of the eighteen-line version, untitled, in an unidentified hand.

First published in The Second Part of Mr. Waller's Poems (London, 1690). in The Maid's Tragedy Altered (London, 1690). Thorn-Drury, II, 114.

f. [25v]

WaE 762: Edmund Waller, ‘The' advantage man ore Beasts in Reason getts’

Copy of twenty lines of dramatic verse in the hand of one of Waller's daughters.

Apparently unpublished.

f. [26v]

WaE 256: Edmund Waller, Of Tea, commended by Her Majesty (‘Venus her myrtle, Phoebus has his bays’)

Copy of a sixteen-line version in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, headed ‘Of Tea Commended by hir Maty’ and beginning ‘Venus hir Martle, Phoebus has his bayes’, incorporating (as the last six lines) lines subsequently used in Of Her Majesty, on New-Year's Day, 1683 [see WaE 177-86].

First published in The Second Part of Mr. Waller's Poems (London, 1690). Thorn-Drury, II, 94.

f. [26r-v]

WaE 255: Edmund Waller, Of Tea, commended by Her Majesty (‘Venus her myrtle, Phoebus has his bays’)

Copy of a 33-line version in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, headed ‘Of Tea Commended by hir Maty’ and beginning ‘The best of Queens and best of harbs we owe’, incorporating (as the last six lines) lines subsequently used in Of Her Majesty, on New-Year's Day, 1683 [see WaE 177-86].

First published in The Second Part of Mr. Waller's Poems (London, 1690). Thorn-Drury, II, 94.

f. [27r]

WaE 177: Edmund Waller, Of Her Majesty, on New-Year's Day, 1683 (‘What revolutions in the world have been’)

Copy of a ten-line version in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, headed ‘Of hir Maty on hir birth day’ and beginning ‘Still like themselves the Sun and shee appears’ with various alternative readings and interlineations.

First published in Poems, ‘Fifth’ edition (London, 1686). Thorn-Drury, II, 93.

See also WaE 255-6.

f. [27v]

WaE 178: Edmund Waller, Of Her Majesty, on New-Year's Day, 1683 (‘What revolutions in the world have been’)

Copy of a ten-line version in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, untitled and beginning ‘May every birth-day find hir still the same’ with an alternative version of five lines.

First published in Poems, ‘Fifth’ edition (London, 1686). Thorn-Drury, II, 93.

See also WaE 255-6.

f. [27v]

WaE 179: Edmund Waller, Of Her Majesty, on New-Year's Day, 1683 (‘What revolutions in the world have been’)

Copy of a ten-line version in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, headed ‘Of hir Maty on hir birth day’ and beginning ‘Shee and the Sunn still like themselves appear’.

First published in Poems, ‘Fifth’ edition (London, 1686). Thorn-Drury, II, 93.

See also WaE 255-6.

f. [28r]

WaE 60: Edmund Waller, Epitaph on Sir George Speke (‘Under this stone lies vertue, youth’)

Copy in the hand of one of Waller's daughters.

First published in Poems, ‘Fifth’ edition (London, 1686). Thorn-Drury, II, 107-8.

f. [28v]

WaE 180: Edmund Waller, Of Her Majesty, on New-Year's Day, 1683 (‘What revolutions in the world have been’)

Copy of a nine-line version in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, headed ‘Nov: 21’ and beginning ‘What revolutions in the world are seen’.

First published in Poems, ‘Fifth’ edition (London, 1686). Thorn-Drury, II, 93.

See also WaE 255-6.

f. [28v]

WaE 181: Edmund Waller, Of Her Majesty, on New-Year's Day, 1683 (‘What revolutions in the world have been’)

Copy of a thirteen-line version in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, headed ‘Of hir Maty on hir birth day’ and beginning ‘What revolutions in the world are seen’, with an alternative version of four lines.

First published in Poems, ‘Fifth’ edition (London, 1686). Thorn-Drury, II, 93.

See also WaE 255-6.

f. [29v]

WaE 182: Edmund Waller, Of Her Majesty, on New-Year's Day, 1683 (‘What revolutions in the world have been’)

Copy of a five-line version in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, headed ‘The Queen’ and beginning ‘Shee and the Sun alone unchang'd appear’.

First published in Poems, ‘Fifth’ edition (London, 1686). Thorn-Drury, II, 93.

See also WaE 255-6.

f. [34v]

WaE 183: Edmund Waller, Of Her Majesty, on New-Year's Day, 1683 (‘What revolutions in the world have been’)

Copy of a sixteen-line version in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, headed ‘Of hir Maty on Newyears day’, with alternative readings.

First published in Poems, ‘Fifth’ edition (London, 1686). Thorn-Drury, II, 93.

See also WaE 255-6.

f. [35r]

WaE 184: Edmund Waller, Of Her Majesty, on New-Year's Day, 1683 (‘What revolutions in the world have been’)

Copy of the eighteen-line version in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, headed ‘Of hir Maty on Newyears day’, with an alternative version of two lines.

First published in Poems, ‘Fifth’ edition (London, 1686). Thorn-Drury, II, 93.

See also WaE 255-6.

ff. [35v-6]

WaE 700: Edmund Waller, Upon the late Storm, and of the Death of His Highness ensuing the same (‘We must resign! Heaven his great soul does claim’)

Copy in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, untitled and lacking lines 11-12.

First published as a broadside (London, [1658]). Three Poems upon the Death of his late Highnesse Oliver Lord Protector (London, 1659). As ‘Upon the late Storm, and Death of the late Usurper O. C.’ in The Second Part of Mr. Waller's Poems (London, 1690). The Maid's Tragedy Altered (London, 1690). Thorn-Drury, II, 34-5.

For the ‘answer or construction’ by William Godolphin, see the Introduction.

f. [36v]

ShJ 160: James Shirley, The Contention of Ajax and Ulysses for the Armour of Achilles, Act III, Song (‘The glories of our blood and state’)

Copy of the dirge, untitled.

Gifford & Dyce, VI, 396-7. Armstrong, p. 54. Musical setting by Edward Coleman published in John Playford, The Musical Companion (London, 1667).

f. [38v]

WaE 754: Edmund Waller, On Mrs. Higgons (‘Ingenious Higgons never sought’)

Copy of a six-line version in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, headed ‘Of Higgons’ and beginning ‘Noe woundes shee so well indites’.

First published in The Works of the English Poets, ed. Alexander Chalmers, 21 vols (London, 1810), VIII, 75. Thorn-Drury, II, 118.

f. [38v]

WaE 755: Edmund Waller, On Mrs. Higgons (‘Ingenious Higgons never sought’)

Copy of a twelve-line version in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, untitled and beginning ‘Ingenious Higgions that ne're sought’.

First published in The Works of the English Poets, ed. Alexander Chalmers, 21 vols (London, 1810), VIII, 75. Thorn-Drury, II, 118.

f. [39r]

WaE 756: Edmund Waller, On Mrs. Higgons (‘Ingenious Higgons never sought’)

Copy of a 24-line version in the hand of one of Waller's daughters, untitled.

First published in The Works of the English Poets, ed. Alexander Chalmers, 21 vols (London, 1810), VIII, 75. Thorn-Drury, II, 118.

ff. [52v-5v]

DaW 160: Sir William Davenant, Extracts

f. [56r-v]

EtG 6: Sir George Etherege, Ephelia to Bajazet (‘How far are they deceived who hope in vain’)

This MS collated in Thorpe.

First published in Female Poems On several Occasions: Written by Ephelia (London, 1679). Thorpe, pp. 9-10. Harold Love's edition of Rochester (1999), pp. 94-5.

f. [57r-v]

RoJ 616: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, A Very Heroical Epistle in Answer to Ephelia (‘Madam. / If you're deceived, it is not by my cheat’)

Copy, headed ‘Answere’.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution.

First published in the broadside A Very Heroical Epistle from My Lord All-Pride to Dol-Common (London, 1679). Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 113-15. Walker, pp. 112-14. Love, pp. 95-7.

ff. [58r-9v]

RoJ 86: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, An Epistolary Essay from M.G. to O.B. upon Their Mutual Poems (‘Dear friend, I hear this town does so abound’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 144-7. Walker, pp. 107-9. Love, pp. 98-101.

f. [70v]

WaE 784: Edmund Waller, Written before a Lady's Waller (‘The lovely Owner of this book’)

Copy of a 27-line poem in an unidentified hand, docketed ‘Bishp Atterbury’ [i.e. found in the handwriting of Atterbury: see f. [65] for a similar note].

Apparently unpublished. An elaborate compliment to a lady, suggesting that ‘ye Old Bard would have celebrated her instead of Sacharissa had he been younger’. Its authorship is uncertain.

fMS Eng 623

A folio composite miscellany of verse MSS, chiefly poems on affairs of state, in various hands and paper sizes, now disbound in folders.

Among papers of the Hastings family, Earls of Huntingdon.

Folder 12, pp. 39-42

RoJ 87: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, An Epistolary Essay from M.G. to O.B. upon Their Mutual Poems (‘Dear friend, I hear this town does so abound’)

Copy, in a professional hand, headed ‘A Letter To My Lord Musgraue’, subscribed ‘Rochester’, in a disbound fragment of a folio miscellany of poems. Late 17th century.

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 144-7. Walker, pp. 107-9. Love, pp. 98-101.

Folder 12, pp. 52-7

RoJ 481: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Timon (‘What, Timon! does old age begin t'approach’)

Copy, headed ‘Satyr vpon a Siner’, in two hands, in a disbound fragment of a folio miscellany of poems.

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker and in Love, ‘Text of “Timon”’ (the heading misread by all editors as ‘Diner’).

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 65-72. Walker, pp. 78-82, as ‘Satyr. [Timon]’. Harold Love, ‘The Text of “Timon. A Satyr”’, Bibliographical Society of Australia and New Zealand Bulletin, 6 (1982), 113-40. Love, pp. 258-63, as Satyr. [Timon], among Disputed Works.

Folder 13, pp. 37-8

RoJ 255: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, On the Supposed Author of a Late Poem in Defence of Satyr (‘To rack and torture thy unmeaning brain’)

Copy, headed ‘On the Author of the Defence of Satyr’, in a professional hand, on pp. 37-8, in a disbound fragment of a folio miscellany of poems paginated 35-8. Late 17th century

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 132-3. Walker, pp. 114-15. Love, pp. 106-7. Texts are often followed by Sir Car Scroope's ‘Answer’ (‘Raile on poor feeble Scribbler, speake of me’: Walker, p. 115. Love, p. 107).

Folder 14, pp. 1-9

RoJ 161: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, A Letter from Artemisia in the Town to Chloe in the Country (‘Chloe, In verse by your command I write’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Rochester’, in a professional hand, on pp. 1-9, in a disbound fragment of a folio miscellany of poems paginated 1-34. Late 17th century.

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published, as a broadside, in London, 1679. Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 104-12. Walker, pp. 83-90. Love, pp. 63-70.

Folder 14, pp. 10-11

RoJ 586: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Upon Nothing (‘Nothing! thou elder brother even to Shade’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Rochester’, in a professional hand, on pp. 10-11, in a disbound fragment of a folio miscellany of poems paginated 1-34. Late 17th century.

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker and in Love, ‘The Text of Rochester's “Upon Nothing”’.

First published, as a broadside, [in London, 1679]. Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 118-20. Walker, pp. 62-4. Harold Love, ‘The Text of Rochester's “Upon Nothing”’, Centre for Bibliographical and Textual Studies, Monash University, Occasional Papers 1 (1985). Love, pp. 46-8.

Folder 14, pp. 12-19

RoJ 317: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, A Satyr against Reason and Mankind (‘Were I (who to my cost already am)’)

Copy, headed ‘Satyr On Man’, subscribed ‘Rochester’, in a professional hand, on pp. 12-19, in a disbound fragment of a folio miscellany of poems paginated 1-34. Late 17th century

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published (lines 1-173) as a broadside, A Satyr against Mankind [London, 1679]. Complete, with supplementary lines 174-221 (beginning ‘All this with indignation have I hurled’) in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 94-101. Walker, pp. 91-7, as ‘Satyr’. Love, pp. 57-63.

The text also briefly discussed in Kristoffer F. Paulson, ‘A Question of Copy-Text: Rochester's “A Satyr against Reason and Mankind”’, N&Q, 217 (May 1972), 177-8. Some texts followed by one or other of three different ‘Answer’ poems (two sometimes ascribed to Edward Pococke or Mr Griffith and Thomas Lessey: see Vieth, Attribution, pp. 178-9).

Folder 14, pp. 28-32

RoJ 31: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, An Allusion to Horace, the Tenth Satyr of the First Book (‘Well, sir, 'tis granted I said Dryden's rhymes’)

Copy, headed ‘A Satyr on the Poets’, subscribed ‘Rochester’, in a professional hand, on pp. 28-32, in a disbound fragment of a folio miscellany of poems paginated 1-34. Late 17th century

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 120-6. Walker, pp. 99-102. Love, pp. 71-4.

Folder 15

RoJ 587: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Upon Nothing (‘Nothing! thou elder brother even to Shade’)

Copy, in a professional hand, on a single folio leaf. Late 17th century.

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker and in Love, ‘The Text of Rochester's “Upon Nothing”’.

First published, as a broadside, [in London, 1679]. Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 118-20. Walker, pp. 62-4. Harold Love, ‘The Text of Rochester's “Upon Nothing”’, Centre for Bibliographical and Textual Studies, Monash University, Occasional Papers 1 (1985). Love, pp. 46-8.

Folder 26

*MaB 3: Bathsua Makin, To the right honorable the Countesse Douager of Huntingdon (‘Illustrious Lady, where shall I begin’)

Autograph presentation MS, signed ‘Bathsua Makin’, on the first page of a pair of conjugate quarto leaves, undated.

Kissing the Rod, ed. Germaine Greer et al. (New York, 1988), p. 228.

fMS Eng 626

A folio verse miscellany, in a single probably professional rounded hand (except for a poem on f. 81r and later scribbling); ii + 81 leaves, in contemporary calf gilt. Including 16 poems by or attributed to Herrick and 24 poems by Randolph (plus two of doubtful authorship). This MS related to HeR Δ 2 and to RnT Δ 1. c. late 1630s.

Inscriptions including (on a flyleaf) ‘Anthony St John/ Ann: St John/ 1640 Bletso’: i.e. Anthony St John (1618-73), of Christ's College, Cambridge, fourth son of Oliver, fourth Baron St John and first Earl of Bolingbroke (c.1584-1646), of Bletsoe, Bedfordshire, and Anthony's wife, Ann Kensham (married 1639); (flyleaf) ‘Oliver Beeesfor[d]’; and (f. 81v) ‘John Watts’. Later in the library of Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bt (1792-1872), manuscript and book collector: Phillipps MS 13187. Sotheby's, 6 June 1910, lot 672, to Quaritch. Item 1415 in an unidentified sale.

Cited in IELM, II.i-ii (1987-93), as the ‘St John MS’: HeR Δ 4 and RnT Δ 8. Complete microfilm at the University of Birmingham, Shakespeare Institute (Mic S 72).

ff. 2v-3r

CwT 1251.8: Thomas Carew, A Louers passion (‘Is shee not wondrous fayre? but oh I see’)

Copy, untitled.

First published, as ‘The Rapture, by J.D.’, in Robert Chamberlain, The Harmony of the Muses (London, 1654), pp. 3-4 [unique exemplum in the Huntington edited in facsimile by Ernest W. Sullivan (Aldershot, 1990)]. Cupids Master-Piece (London, [?1656]). Dunlap, p. 192.

f. 3r-v

DnJ 3024: John Donne, Song (‘Sweetest love, I do not goe’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 18-19. Gardner, Elegies, pp. 31-2. Shawcross, No. 42.

ff. 3v-4r

CwT 1035.8: Thomas Carew, To Celia, upon Love's Vbiquity (‘As one that strives, being sick, and sick to death’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 123-4.

f. 4r-v

FeO 31: Owen Felltham, A Farewell (‘When by sad fate from hence I summon'd am’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Lusoria (London, 1661). Pebworth & Summers, p. 18.

ff. 6v-7r

HeR 4: Robert Herrick, The admonition (‘Seest thou those Diamonds which she weares’)

Copy, untitled and here beginning ‘Seest thou those Jewells that shee weares’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 130-1. Patrick, p. 177.

f. 7r

CwT 1001.5: Thomas Carew, To A.L. Perswasions to love (‘Thinke not cause men flatt'ring say’)

Copy of lines 37-48, untitled and here beginning ‘Those curious locks soe aptly twin'd’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 4-6.

f. 7v

CwT 715: Thomas Carew, Secresie protested (‘Feare not (deare Love) that I'le reveale’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 11. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in The Second Book of Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1655).

See also Introduction.

f. 8r-v

WoH 109: Sir Henry Wotton, On his Mistress, the Queen of Bohemia (‘You meaner beauties of the night’)

Copy of a five-stanza version, untitled and here beginning ‘You glorious trifles of the East’.

First published (in a musical setting) in Michael East, Sixt Set of Bookes (London, 1624). Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 518. Hannah (1845), pp. 12-15. Some texts of this poem discussed in J.B. Leishman, ‘“You Meaner Beauties of the Night” A Study in Transmission and Transmogrification’, The Library, 4th Ser. 26 (1945-6), 99-121. Some musical versions edited in English Songs 1625-1660, ed. Ian Spink, Musica Britannica XXXIII (London, 1971), Nos. 66, 122.

f. 9v

CwT 948: Thomas Carew, Song. To my Mistris, I burning in love (‘I burne, and cruell you, in vaine’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 34.

ff. 9v-10r

CwT 929: Thomas Carew, Song. To her againe, she burning in a Feaver (‘Now she burnes as well as I’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 34-5.

f. 10r-v

HeR 324: Robert Herrick, ‘Hide not thy love and mine shall be’

Copy, untitled.

First published in Aurelian Townshend's poems and Masks, ed. E. K. Chambers (Oxford, 1912), pp. 28-32. The Poems and Masques of Aurelian Townshend, ed. Cedric R. Brown (Reading, 1983), pp. 34-41 (Version One, First Part, pp. 35-7; Second Part pp. 35-7; Version Two, pp. 38-41). Ascribed to Herrick in several MSS.

ff. 10v-12r

FlJ 12: John Fletcher, Upon An Honest Man's Fortune (‘You that can look through heaven, and tell the stars’)

Copy, untitled.

First published, appended to The Honest Man's Fortune, in Comedies and Tragedies (London, 1647). Dyce, III, 453-6.

ff. 12v-13r

GrJ 41: John Grange, ‘Come you swarms of thoughts and bring’

Copy, untitled.

First published in Poems: Written by Wil. Shakespeare. Gent. (London, 1640), as ‘An Allegoricall allusion of melancholy thoughts to Bees’, subscribed ‘I. G.’ Listed in Krueger.

ff. 13v-14r

GrJ 57: John Grange, ‘Not that I wish my Mistris’

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Krueger.

First published in Wits Recreations Augmented (London, 1641), sig. V7v. John Playford, Select Ayres and Dialogues (1652), Part II, p. 28. Poems (1660), pp. 79-81, unattributed. Prince d'Amour (1660), p. 123, ascribed to ‘J.G.’. Listed in Krueger's Appendix I: ‘Spurious Poems in the 1660 Edition’ as by John Grange.

f. 14r-v

GrJ 37.4: John Grange, ‘Blind beauty! If it be a loss’

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Krueger.

First published in Poems (1660), pp. 67-9, headed ‘Sonnet. P.’. Listed in Krueger's Appendix I: ‘Spurious Poems in the 1660 Edition’ as probably by John Grange.

ff. 18v-19r

HrE 49: Edward, Lord Herbert of Cherbury, The Thought (‘If you do love, as well as I’)

Copy.

First published in Occasional Verses (1665). Moore Smith, pp. 43-4.

f. 19r-v

CwT 357: Thomas Carew, In praise of his Mistris (‘You, that will a wonder know’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Poems (1651). Dunlap, p. 122.

ff. 22v-3r

HeR 329: Robert Herrick, His Mistris to him at his farwell (‘You may vow Ile not forgett’)

Copy, untitled.

Edited in part from this MS in Patrick. Collated in Martin.

First published in Hazlitt (1869), II, 445. Martin, p. 414. Patrick, p. 46.

ff. 23r-6r

HeR 109: Robert Herrick, An Epithalamie to Sir Thomas Southwell and his Ladie (‘Now, now's the time. so oft by truth’)

Copy of a twenty-stanza version, headed ‘An Epithalamie’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 53-8. Patrick, pp. 76-81.

ff. 26r-9r

HeR 165: Robert Herrick, A Nuptiall Song, or Epithalamie, on Sir Clipseby Crew and his Lady (‘What's that we see from far?’)

Copy of a twenty-stanza version, headed ‘An Epithalamie’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 112-16. Patrick, pp. 154-8.

ff. 29r-31v

HeR 129: Robert Herrick, His age, dedicated to his peculiar friend, Master John Wickes, under the name of Posthumus (‘Ah Posthumus! Our yeares hence flye’)

Copy, headed ‘His old Age to Mr Weekes’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 132-6. Patrick, pp. 179-83.

ff. 31v-3v

HeR 354: Robert Herrick, Mr Hericke his daughter's Dowrye (‘Ere I goe hence and bee noe more’)

Copy, headed ‘My [The deleted] Daughters Dowry’.

Edited from this MS in Patrick. Collated in Martin.

First published in Hazlitt (1869), II, 436-9. Martin, pp. 407-9. Patrick, pp. 539-42.

ff. 33v-4v

HeR 196: Robert Herrick, The parting Verse, or charge to his supposed Wife when he travelled (‘Go hence, and with this parting kisse’)

Copy, headed ‘My Charge’ and here beginning ‘Goe and with this parting kisse’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 174-6. Patrick, pp. 233-5.

ff. 34v-5v

HeR 143: Robert Herrick, The Lilly in a Christal (‘You have beheld a smiling Rose’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 75-6. Patrick, pp. 107-9.

f. 35v

HeR 29: Robert Herrick, The Bubble. A Song (‘To my revenge, and to her desp'rate feares’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, p. 87. Patrick, p. 124.

ff. 35v-6v

HeR 403: Robert Herrick, Upon a Cherrystone sent to the tip of the Lady Jemmonia Walgraves eare (‘Lady I intreate yow weare’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon a Carued Cherriestone’.

Edited in part from this MS in Patrick. Collated in Martin.

First published in Delattre (1912), 519-21. Martin, pp. 417-18. Patrick, pp. 547-8.

ff. 36v-7v

HeR 314: Robert Herrick, Elegy (‘Since, louely sweete, much like vnto a Dewe’)

Copy, untitled.

Edited from this MS in Martin.

First published in Martin (1956), pp. 443-4 (in his section ‘Not attributed to Herrick hitherto’). Not included in Patrick.

ff. 37v-8r

HeR 318: Robert Herrick, The farewell (‘Sweetest Loue since wee must part’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Martin (1956), pp. 441-2 (in his section ‘Not attributed to Herrick hitherto’). Not included in Patrick.

f. 38r-v

HeR 371: Robert Herrick, A Sonnet (‘Ile dote noe more, nor shall mine eyes’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Martin (1956), p. 442 (in his section ‘Not attributed to Herrick hitherto’). Not included in Patrick.

ff. 38v-9r

HeR 255: Robert Herrick, Upon the death of his Sparrow. An Elegie (‘Why doe not all fresh maids appeare’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 103-4. Patrick, pp. 143-4.

ff. 39r-40r

RnT 578: Thomas Randolph, Upon the First Newes of Sr Edward Burton being blind (‘Sir as for him that told me first 'twas true’)

Copy.

Unpublished? Probably written by Burton's eldest son.

ff. 40r-1v

RnT 582: Thomas Randolph, Upon the Newes of his Recoverie (‘Sir that same darksome cloud it is o'erpast’)

Copy.

f. 41v

RnT 405: Thomas Randolph, ‘When gratefull Charles went to Paules hollowed shrine’

Copy of an untitled translation by ‘T.R:’ of Latin verses (on f. 41r-v) ascribed to ‘Ser: Hosk:’ [i.e. John Hoskins (1566-1638)] and beginning ‘Dum Rex Paulinas accessit gratus ad aras’

Edited from this MS in Day.

First published in Day (1932), pp. 33-4.

ff. 41v-4r

RnT 43: Thomas Randolph, A complaint against Cupid that he never made him in Love (‘How many of thy Captives (Love) complaine’)

Copy, headed ‘His Complaint on Cupid that hee neuer yett made him enamour'd’.

This MS recorded in Day, p. 31.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 35-40.

f. 44v

RnT 257: Thomas Randolph, On the Passion of Christ (‘What rends the temples vail, where is day gone?’)

Copy, headed ‘Englished’ and preceded (f. 44r-v) by the Latin version headed ‘In Eclipsem solis, christo patienti Contingentem’.

This MS recorded in Day, p. 31.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, p. 57. This poem is the ‘Englished’ version of Latin verses beginning ‘Quid templum abscindit? quo luxque diesque recessit’, printed in Thorn-Drury, pp. 178-9.

ff. 44v-5v

RnT 24: Thomas Randolph, An answer to Mr Ben Johnson's Ode to perswade him not to leave the stage (‘Ben doe not leave the stage’)

Copy, headed ‘A Parody to Mr. Johnsons Ode’, subscribed ‘Tho Rand:’.

This MS recorded in Day, p. 31. Collated in Davis.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 82-4. Davis, pp. 63-76.

For the poem by Ben Jonson, which appears with Randolph's ‘answer’ in many of the MSS, see JnB 367-81.

ff. 45v-6v

RnT 333: Thomas Randolph, Upon a very deformed Gentlewoman, but of a voice incomparably sweet (‘I chanc'd sweet Lesbia's voice to heare’)

Copy, headed ‘On a very deformed gentlewoeman, but of a voice incomparably sweete’, subscribed ‘Tho: Rand:’.

This MS recorded in Day, p. 31, and in Davis.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 115-17. Davis, pp. 92-105.

f. 46v

RnT 157: Thomas Randolph, In Eandem Dystichon. Englished (‘By thy lookes Hecuba, Helen by thy songe’)

Copy, following the Latin version, subscribed ‘Tho: R:’.

Edited from this MS in Day.

First published, following a Latin version beginning ‘Vox Hellenum, vultus Hecubam te Lesbia clamat’, in Day (1932), p. 35.

f. 46v

RnT 165: Thomas Randolph, In Natalem Augustissimi Principis Caroli. [Englished] (‘Thy first birth Mary was unto a tombe’)

Copy, headed ‘Englished’ and following the Latin version which is headed ‘In Natalem Principis ad Reginam Mariam’.

This MS recorded in Day, p. 31.

First published, following a Latin version beginning ‘Prima tibi periit soboles (dilecta Maria)’, in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 78-9.

f. 47r

RnT 153: Thomas Randolph, In Diem Baptizationis Principis Caroli. Englished (‘Why att thy Christ'ening did it rayne deare Prince’)

Copy, following the Latin version.

Edited from this MS in Day.

First published, following a Latin version beginning ‘Inviditne tibi Tellus tua gaudia caelum’, in Day (1932), p. 35.

f. 47r

RnT 303: Thomas Randolph, The Song of Discord (‘Let Linus and Amphions lute’)

Copy, subscribed ‘T: R:’.

This MS recorded in Day, p. 31.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, p. 87.

f. 47r

RnT 432: Thomas Randolph, The Muses' Looking-Glass, Act I, scene iv. Song (‘Say in a dance how shall we go’)

Copy, headed ‘The Masque of Vices’, subscribed ‘Tho: Rand:’.

This MS recorded in Day, p. 31.

First published (with Poems) Oxford, 1638. Hazlitt, I, 173-266 (p. 192).

ff. 47v-8r

RnT 51: Thomas Randolph, De Histrice. Ex Claudiano (‘Fam'd Stymphall, I have heard, thy birds in flight’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Tho: Rand:’.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 44-5.

f. 48r-v

RnT 142: Thomas Randolph, In Archimedis Sphaeram ex Claudiano (‘Jove saw the Heavens fram'd in a little glasse’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Tho: Randolph’.

This MS recorded in Day, p. 31.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, p. 46.

f. 48v

RnT 408: Thomas Randolph, ‘When Jove sawe Archimedes world of glasse’

Copy, subscribed ‘Tho: R:’.

Edited from this MS in Day.

First published in Day (1932), p. 35.

ff. 48v-9v

RnT 162: Thomas Randolph, In Lesbiam, & Histrionem (‘I wonder what should Madam Lesbia meane’)

Copy, headed ‘In Lesbiam’, subscribed ‘Tho: Rand:’.

This MS recorded in Day, p. 31.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 42-4.

ff. 49v-50r

RnT 62: Thomas Randolph, De Sene Veronensi. Ex Claudiano (‘Happy the man that all his dayes hath spent’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Tho: Rand:’.

This MS recorded in Day, p. 31.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 48-9.

ff. 50r-1r

RnT 53: Thomas Randolph, De Magnete. Ex Claudiano (‘Who in the world with busy reason pryes’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Tho: Rand:’.

This MS recorded in Day, p. 31.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 46-8.

ff. 52v-4

RnT 140: Thomas Randolph, In Anguem, qui Lycorin dormientem amplexus est. Englished thus παραψρ (‘The Spring was come, and all the fields growne fine’)

Copy, following (ff. 51r-2r) the Latin version, subscribed ‘Tho: Rand:’.

This MS recorded in Day, p. 31.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 28-34, following a Latin version beginning ‘Ver erat, & flores per apertum libera campum’.

ff. 54v-5r

RnT 150: Thomas Randolph, In corydonem & Corinnam. Paraphras'd (‘Ah wretch in thy Corinna's love unblest!’)

Copy, following the Latin version, subscribed ‘Tho: Rand.’

This MS recorded in Day, p. 31.

First published, following a Latin version beginning ‘Ah miser, & nullo felix in amore! Corinnam’, in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 98-9.

f. 55r-v

RnT 17: Thomas Randolph, Ad Amicum Litigantem (‘Would you commence a Poet Sr, and be’)

Copy, headed ‘Excludit sanos Helicone Poetas —— Democritus Ad Amicum Litigantem’, subscribed ‘Tho: Rand.’

This MS recorded in Day, p. 31.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 97-8.

ff. 55v-8r

RnT 242: Thomas Randolph, On the Inestimable Content He Injoyes in the Muses, To those of his Friends that dehort him from Poetry (‘Goe sordid earth, and hope not to bewitch’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Tho: Randolph’.

This MS recorded in Day, p. 31.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 23-8.

f. 58r

RnT 57: Thomas Randolph, De Moderatione Animi in vtraque fortuna (‘Is thy poore Barke becalm'd, and forc'd to staye’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Tho: Rand:’.

Edited from this MS in Day.

First published in Day (1932), p. 36.

ff. 58r-9r

RnT 69: Thomas Randolph, A Dialogue. Thirsis. Lalage (‘My Lalage when I behold’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Tho: Randolph’.

This MS recorded in Day, p. 31.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 84-5.

ff. 59r-60r

RnT 173: Thomas Randolph, A Maske for Lydia (‘Sweet Lydia take this maske, and shroud’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Tho: R:’.

This MS recorded in Day, p. 32.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 126-7.

ff. 60r-2v

MsP 12: Philip Massinger, The Virgins Character (‘Such as doe Trophies striue to raise’)

Copy, subscribed ‘P: M:’.

This MS collated in Edwards & Gibson.

First published in A.K. McIlwraith, ‘The Virgins Character: A New Poem by Philip Massinger’, RES, 4 (1928), 64-8. Edwards & Gibson, IV, 409-13.

ff. 62v-3r

ShJ 25: James Shirley, Friendship, Or Verses sent to a Lover, in Answer of a Copie which he had writ in praise of His Mistris (‘O how I blush, to have ador'd the face’)

Copy of a version headed ‘To a Gentleman (that magnified his Mistresse) The praise of a Maister’ and beginning ‘I have no humour to adore the face’.

This MS recorded in Armstrong.

First published in Poems (London, 1646). Armstrong, p. 16.

f. 63r

ShJ 129: James Shirley, ‘Would you know what's soft?’

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Armstrong.

First published, as a ‘Song’, in Thomas Carew, Poems (London, 1640). Shirley, Poems (London, 1646). Armstrong, p. 3.

f. 63r-v

RaW 303: Sir Walter Ralegh, A Poem of Sir Walter Rawleighs (‘Nature that washt her hands in milke’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in A.H. Bullen, Speculum Amantis (London, 1889), pp. 76-7. Latham, pp. 21-2. Rudick, Nos 43A and 43B (two versions, pp. 112-14).

f. 64r

RnT 325: Thomas Randolph, To Time (‘Why should we not accuse thee of a crime’)

Copy, headed ‘Against Time’.

This MS recorded in Day, p. 32.

First published in Moore Smith (1925), pp. 254-5. Thorn-Drury, p. 163.

f. 64r-v

RnT 284: Thomas Randolph, A Pastoral Ode (‘Coy Coelia dost thou see’)

Copy, headed ‘A Madrigall’.

This MS recorded in Day, p. 32.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 86-7.

f. 64v

ShJ 4: James Shirley, Another (‘Harke, harke how in euery groue’)

Copy, headed ‘Curtesan’.

This MS recorded in Armstrong.

First published, adapted as stanzas 3 and 4 of ‘Cupid's Call’ (‘Ho! Cupid calls, come Lovers, come’), in Poems (London, 1646). Armstrong, p. 89.

f. 65r

ShJ 52: James Shirley, A Lover that durst not speak to his Mistris (‘I can no longer hold, my body growes’)

Copy, headed ‘One that lou'd a Mistresse & durst not discouer it’.

This MS recorded in Armstrong.

First published in Poems (London, 1646). Armstrong, p. 4.

f. 65r-v

ShJ 45: James Shirley, Love for Enjoying (‘Fair Lady, what's your face to me?’)

Copy of a version headed ‘To his Mistresse, whome hee lou'd to enioye her’ and beginning ‘Ladie what's your face to mee’.

This MS recorded in Armstrong.

First published in Poems (London, 1646). Armstrong, p. 7.

ff. 65v-6r

JnB 618: Ben Jonson, The Gypsies Metamorphosed, Lady Purbeck's fortune (‘Helpe me wonder, here's a booke’)

Copy.

Herford & Simpson, lines 522-43. Greg, Burley version, lines 447-68.

f. 66r-v

GrJ 74.5: John Grange, ‘Since every man I come among’

Copy, untitled, here beginning ‘Since all men that I come among’.

This MS recorded in Krueger.

First published in Poems (1660), pp. 53-4. Listed in Krueger's Appendix I: ‘Spurious Poems in the 1660 Edition’ as by John Grange.

ff. 66v-7r

JnB 50: Ben Jonson, The Dreame (‘Or Scorne, or pittie on me take’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in The Vnder-wood (xi) in Workes (London, 1640). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 150-1.

f. 67r-v

DnJ 320: John Donne, The Baite (‘Come live with mee, and bee my love’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Shawcross.

First published in William Corkine, Second Book of Ayres (London, 1612). Grierson, I, 46-7. Gardner, Elegies, pp. 32-3. Shawcross, No. 27.

ff. 67v-8r

JnB 177: Ben Jonson, Eupheme. or, The Faire Fame Left to Posteritie Of that truly noble Lady, the Lady Venetia Digby. 3. The Picture of the Body (‘Sitting, and ready to be drawne’)

Copy, headed ‘The Picture of the Bodie’.

First published (Nos. 3 and 4) in John Benson's 4to edition of Jonson's poems (1640) and (all poems) in The Vnder-wood (lxxxiv) in Workes (London, 1640). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 272-89 (pp. 275-7).

ff. 68v-9v

JnB 215: Ben Jonson, Eupheme. or, The Faire Fame Left to Posteritie Of that truly noble Lady, the Lady Venetia Digby. 4. The Mind (‘Painter, yo'are come, but may be gone’)

Copy, headed ‘The Picture of the Minde’.

Herford & Simpson, VIII, 277-81.

f. 73r

HeR 52: Robert Herrick, The Curse. A Song (‘Goe perjur'd man. and if thou ere return’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, p. 49. Patrick, p. 69. Musical setting by John Blow published in John Playford, Choice Ayres and Songs (London, 1683).

f. 73r

JnB 293: Ben Jonson, The Houre-glasse (‘Doe but consider this small dust’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in John Benson's 4to edition of Jonson's poems (1640) and in The Vnder-wood (viii) in Workes (London, 1640). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 148-9.

ff. 73v-4r

CwT 584: Thomas Carew, A prayer to the Wind (‘Goe thou gentle whispering wind’)

Copy, untitled and here beginning ‘Goe thou gentle whistleing Winde’.

First published in Poems (1640) and in Poems: written by Wil. Shake-speare, Gent. (London, 1640). Dunlap, pp. 11-12.

ff. 74v-6r

BmF 107: Francis Beaumont, Master Francis Beaumont's Letter to Ben Jonson (‘The sun which doth the greatest comfort bring’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in ‘An addition of some excellent Poems...By other Gentlemen’ in Poems: Written by Wil. Shake-speare Gent. (London, 1640). Dyce, XI, 500-3. Ben Jonson, ed. C.H. Herford and Percy and Evelyn Simpson, XI (Oxford, 1952), 374-7.

Nearly all recorded MS texts of this poem are discussed and collated, with an edited text (pp. 170-4), in Mark Bland, ‘Francis Beaumont's Verse Letters to Ben Jonson and “The Mermaid Club”’, EMS, 12 (2005), 139-79.

f. 76r-v

CwT 229: Thomas Carew, An Excuse of absence (‘You'le aske perhaps wherefore I stay’)

Copy.

First published in Hazlitt (1870), p. 28. Dunlap. p. 131.

f. 77r

DnJ 207: John Donne, The Apparition (‘When by thy scorne, O murdresse, I am dead’)

Copy, headed ‘Apparition’.

This MS recorded in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 47-8. Gardner, Elegies, p. 43. Shawcross, No. 28.

f. 77r-v

DnJ 519: John Donne, The broken heart (‘He is starke mad, who ever sayes’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Shawcross.

Lines 1-16 first published in A Helpe to Memory and Discourse (London, 1630), pp. 45-6. Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 48-9. Gardner, Elegies, pp. 51-2. Shawcross, No. 29.

ff. 77v-8r

DnJ 2068: John Donne, Loves diet (‘To what a combersome unwieldinesse’)

Copy of lines 1-12, untitled.

This MS recorded in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 55-6. Gardner, Elegies, pp. 45-6. Shawcross, No. 65.

f. 78r-v

JnB 358: Ben Jonson, My Picture left in Scotland (‘I now thinke, Love is rather deafe, then blind’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in John Benson's 4to edition of Jonson's poems (1640) and in The Vnder-wood (ix) in Workes (London, 1640). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 149-50.

f. 78v

JnB 42: Ben Jonson, A Celebration of Charis in ten Lyrick Peeces. 7. Begging another, on colour of mending the former (‘For Loves-sake, kisse me once againe’)

Copy, untitled.

Herford & Simpson, VIII, 139.

f. 79v

JnB 725: Ben Jonson, The Sad Shepherd, I, v, 65-80. Song (‘Though I am young, and cannot tell’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Workes (London, 1641). Herford & Simpson, VII, 1-49.

f. 80r-v

JnB 333: Ben Jonson, The Musicall strife. In a Pastorall Dialogue (‘Come, with our Voyces, let us warre’)

Copy, headed ‘A Dialogue in Song betweene a Nymph and a Shepheard’.

First published in The Vnder-wood (iii) in Workes (London, 1640). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 143-4.

fMS Eng 629

A large folio verse miscellany, headed (p. 1) ‘Poems on Severall Occasions’, 298 pages, in contemporary calf (rebacked). c.1735.

p. 33

DrJ 222.3: John Dryden, Upon the Death of the Viscount Dundee (‘O Last and best of Scots! who didst maintain’)

Copy, headed ‘An Epitaph on Dundee’.

First published in Poetical Miscellanies: The Fifth Part (London, 1704). Poems on Affairs of State…Part III (London, 1704). Kinsley, IV, 1777. California, III, 222. Hammond, III, 219.

p. 45

SeC 92: Sir Charles Sedley, Against his Mistress's Cruelty (‘Love, How unequal are thy Laws’)

Copy, headed ‘Against his Mistress's Cruelty, by Sr Chas: Sedley’.

First published in Miscellaneous Works, Written by His Grace, George, Late Duke of Buckingham (London, 1704). Sola Pinto, II, 149-50.

p. 48

MkM 11: Mary Monck, Verses Wrote on her Death-Bed at Bath, to her Husband, in London (‘Thou, who dost all my worldly thoughts employ’)

Copy.

Twenty-two lines, first published, introduced ‘The following verses were wrote by her (as I am inform'd) on her death-bed at Bath, to her husband in London’, in George Ballard, Memoirs of Several Ladies of Great Britain (Oxford, 1752), pp. 418-22.

pp. 53-4

DoC 88: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Epitaph on Mrs. Lundy (‘Here lies little Lundy a yard deep or more’)

Copy, headed ‘An Epitaph’ and here beginning ‘Here lyes little Patty, a yard deep & more’.

This MS collated in Harris. Recorded in Wright & Spears.

First published in Poetical Miscellanies: The Fifth Part (London, 1704). The Literary Works of Matthew Prior, ed. H. Bunker Wright and Monroe K. Spears, 2nd edition (Oxford, 1971), II, 777-8 (among ‘Works of Doubtful Authenticity’). Harris pp. 93-4.

p. 54

CgW 41: William Congreve, Song (‘Pious Selinda goes to Pray'rs’)

Copy, headed ‘A Song by Mr Congreve’, deleted.

First published in Poetical Miscellanies: The Fifth Part [by John Dryden et al.] (London, 1704). Summers, IV, 78. Dobrée, p. 245. McKenzie, II, 326.

pp. 68-9

WaE 73.5: Edmund Waller, The Fall (‘See! how the willing earth gave way’)

Copy.

First published, as ‘The Reply’, in Wits Recreations (London, 1645). Workes (1645). Thorn-Drury, I, 96.

pp. 73-4

DrJ 102.2: John Dryden, The Monument of a Fair Maiden Lady, who dy'd at Bath, and is there Interr'd (‘Below this Marble Monument, is laid’)

Copy, headed ‘Engrav'd on the Monument of a young Lady who dy'd att Bath & is there Interr'd’.

Kinsley, IV, 1740-1. Hammond, V, 28-9.

pp. 75-6

CoR 554.8: Richard Corbett, A Proper New Ballad intituled The Faeryes Farewell: Or God-a-Mercy Will (‘Farewell, Rewards & Faeries’)

Copy, headed ‘An Old Ballad made in 1647, by Bishop Corbett entitul'd the Fairies Farewel’.

First published (omitting lines 57-64) in Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Published complete in Poëtica Stromata ([no place], 1648). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 49-52.

p. 77

CoR 578.5: Richard Corbett, To his sonne Vincent Corbett (‘What I shall leave thee none can tell’)

Copy, headed ‘To his Son Vincent Corbet by the same hand’.

First published in Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, p. 88.

p. 152

RaW 369: Sir Walter Ralegh, Epitaph on the Earl of Salisbury (‘Here lies Hobinall, our Pastor while ere’)

Copy, headed ‘The following Lines were written by Sir Walter Rawleigh, upon ye Death of that famous Statesman Robert Earl of Surrey, his Most Implacable Enemy’, subscribed ‘The two last lines allude to ye manner of ye Earls Death wch was sd. to be Occasioned by his Amours’, in a section entitled Miscellany Poems, Song &c from the year 1727.

First published in Francis Osborne, Traditionall Memoyres on the raigne of King Iames (London, 1658). Works (1829), VIII, 735-6. Latham, p. 53.

Of doubtful authorship according to Latham, p. 146, and Lefranc (1968), p. 84.

fMS Eng 636

A folio miscellany of poems chiefly on affairs of state, entitled A Collection of Poems, including 27 poems by Rochester (all ascribed to him), xii + 299 pages (plus a number of blanks), including a table of contents, in contemporary calf (rebacked). In a single professional hand but for a few later additions at the very end (pp. 295-8, with some pages tipped-in). c.1690s.

Recorded in IELM, II.ii as the Harvard MS: RoJ Δ 7.

pp. 1-3

RoJ 50: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, The Disabled Debauchee (‘As some brave admiral, in former war’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 116-17. Walker, pp. 97-9. Love, pp. 44-5.

pp. 4-8

RoJ 77: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, An Epistolary Essay from M.G. to O.B. upon Their Mutual Poems (‘Dear friend, I hear this town does so abound’)

Copy, headed ‘To My Lord Mulgrave, from Rochester. An Epistolary Essay From M.G. to O.B. Upon their Mutuall Poems’.

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 144-7. Walker, pp. 107-9. Love, pp. 98-101.

pp. 8-10

RoJ 482: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, To a Lady in a Letter (‘Such perfect bliss fair Chloris, we’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS and discussed (as text C) in Vieth, art. cit., pp. 153-4. Edited in part from this MS in Love.

First published, as ‘Against jealousie’, in A New Collection of the Choicest Songs (London, 1676). Vieth, pp. 84-5. Walker, pp. 41-2. See also David Vieth, ‘A Textual Paradox: Rochester's “To a Lady in a Letter”’, PBSA, 54 (1960), 147-62 (and sequel in Vol. 55 (1961), 130-3). Love, pp. 24-5.

For the earlier versions of this lyric, see RoJ 396-401.

pp. 10-12

SeC 102: Sir Charles Sedley, Song (‘In the Fields of Lincolns Inn’)

Copy, here ascribed to ‘Rochester’.

This MS recorded in Vieth, loc. cit.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions By the Right Honourable, the E. of R— (‘Antwerp’ [i.e. London], 1680). Possibly by Sedley: see David M. Vieth, Attribution in Restoration Poetry (New Haven & London, 1963), pp. 172-4, 404-5.

pp. 12-20

RoJ 277: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, A Ramble in St. James's Park (‘Much wine had passed, with grave discourse’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon ye Nightwalkers in St. James Parke’.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution. Collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 40-6. Walker, pp. 64-8. Love, pp. 76-80.

pp. 20-32

RoJ 140: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, A Letter from Artemisia in the Town to Chloe in the Country (‘Chloe, In verse by your command I write’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published, as a broadside, in London, 1679. Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 104-12. Walker, pp. 83-90. Love, pp. 63-70.

pp. 40-6

RoJ 14: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, An Allusion to Horace, the Tenth Satyr of the First Book (‘Well, sir, 'tis granted I said Dryden's rhymes’)

Copy, headed ‘In Imitation of the 10th Satire Hor: 1th Lib.’

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 120-6. Walker, pp. 99-102. Love, pp. 71-4.

p. 48

MkM 12: Mary Monck, Verses Wrote on her Death-Bed at Bath, to her Husband, in London (‘Thou, who dost all my worldly thoughts employ’)

Copy.

Twenty-two lines, first published, introduced ‘The following verses were wrote by her (as I am inform'd) on her death-bed at Bath, to her husband in London’, in George Ballard, Memoirs of Several Ladies of Great Britain (Oxford, 1752), pp. 418-22.

pp. 51-3

RoJ 244: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, On the Supposed Author of a Late Poem in Defence of Satyr (‘To rack and torture thy unmeaning brain’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 132-3. Walker, pp. 114-15. Love, pp. 106-7. Texts are often followed by Sir Car Scroope's ‘Answer’ (‘Raile on poor feeble Scribbler, speake of me’: Walker, p. 115. Love, p. 107).

pp. 54-5

DoC 34: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Catch (‘When rebels first push'd at the Crown’)

Copy, headed ‘Catch’, here beginning ‘When first Rebellion struck at ye Crowne’ and ascribed to Rochester.

This MS collated in Harris.

First published in Harris (1979), p. 49.

pp. 55-8

RoJ 569: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Upon Nothing (‘Nothing! thou elder brother even to Shade’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker and in Love, ‘The Text of Rochester's “Upon Nothing”’.

First published, as a broadside, [in London, 1679]. Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 118-20. Walker, pp. 62-4. Harold Love, ‘The Text of Rochester's “Upon Nothing”’, Centre for Bibliographical and Textual Studies, Monash University, Occasional Papers 1 (1985). Love, pp. 46-8.

pp. 58-61

RoJ 486: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, To Love (‘O Love! how cold and slow to take my part’)

Copy, headed ‘Love’.

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 35-7. Walker, pp. 49-50. Love, pp. 12-13.

pp. 61-2

RoJ 556: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Upon His Leaving His Mistress (‘Tis not that I am weary grown’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution. Collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, p. 81. Walker, p. 37. Love, pp. 17-18.

pp. 62-4

RoJ 548: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Upon His Drinking a Bowl (‘Vulcan, contrive me such a cup’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon drinking of A Bowle’.

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 52-3. Walker, pp. 37-8. Love, pp. 41-2, as Nestor.

pp. 64-5

RoJ 415: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Song (‘Phyllis, be gentler, I advise’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution. Collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, p. 32. Walker, p. 36. Love, pp. 19-20.

pp. 65-6

RoJ 623: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Woman's Honor (‘Love bade me hope, and I obeyed’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution. Collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, p. 14. Walker, pp. 22-3. Love, p. 21.

pp. 66-7

RoJ 93: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, The Fall (‘How blest was the created state’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, p. 86. Walker, p. 26. Love, p. 26.

pp. 67-8

RoJ 450: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Song (‘While on those lovely looks I gaze’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published in A New Collection of the Choicest Songs (London, 1676). Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 12-13. Walker, pp. 43-4. Love, pp. 26-7.

pp. 68-9

RoJ 203: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, On Mrs. Willis (‘Against the charms our ballocks have’)

Copy, headed ‘Song’.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution. Collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 137-8. Walker, pp. 44-5. Love, p. 37.

pp. 69-70

RoJ 376: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Song (‘By all love's soft, yet mighty powers’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, p. 139. Walker, pp. 45-6. Love, pp. 37-8.

pp. 77-9

RoJ 378: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Song (‘Fair Chloris in a pigsty lay’)

Copy.

Edited in part from this MS in Love. Recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 27-8. Walker, pp. 33-4. Love, pp. 39-40.

pp. 79-80

RoJ 514: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, A Translation from Seneca's ‘Troades’, Act II, Chorus (‘After death nothing is, and nothing, death’)

Copy, headed ‘A Paraphrase upon Seneca Trag. Act: 2d Chorus…’.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution. Collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 150-1. Walker, p. 51. Love, pp. 45-5, as ‘Senec. Troas. Act. 2. Chor. Thus English'd by a Person of Honour’.

pp. 80-90

RoJ 291: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, A Satyr against Reason and Mankind (‘Were I (who to my cost already am)’)

Copy, headed ‘A Satyre Agst: Man’, lines 174-221 separately headed ‘An Addition to the Satyr Against Man’.

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published (lines 1-173) as a broadside, A Satyr against Mankind [London, 1679]. Complete, with supplementary lines 174-221 (beginning ‘All this with indignation have I hurled’) in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 94-101. Walker, pp. 91-7, as ‘Satyr’. Love, pp. 57-63.

The text also briefly discussed in Kristoffer F. Paulson, ‘A Question of Copy-Text: Rochester's “A Satyr against Reason and Mankind”’, N&Q, 217 (May 1972), 177-8. Some texts followed by one or other of three different ‘Answer’ poems (two sometimes ascribed to Edward Pococke or Mr Griffith and Thomas Lessey: see Vieth, Attribution, pp. 178-9).

pp. 99-102

DoC 111: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, A Letter from the Lord Buckhurst to Mr. George Etherege (‘Dreaming last night on Mrs. Farley’)

Copy.

Edited in part from this MS in Thorpe (and collated pp. 112-13) and in Harris.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions, By the Right Honourable, the E. of R[ochester] (‘Antwerpen’ [i.e. London], 1680). The Poems of Sir George Etherege, ed. James Thorpe (Princeton, 1963), pp. 35-7. Harris, pp. 105-8.

For other poems in this series see DoC 18-22, EtG 34-8, and EtG 39-43.

pp. 103-5

EtG 35: Sir George Etherege, Mr. Etherege's Answer [to A Letter from Lord Buckhurst] (‘As crafty harlots use to shrink’)

Copy, headed ‘The Answer’.

Edited in part from this MS in Thorpe and collated p. 113.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions By the Right Honourable, the E. of R[ochester] (‘Antwerpen’ [i.e. London], 1680). Thorpe, pp. 38-9.

For other poems in this series, see EtG 39-43, DoC 18-22, and DoC 110-13.

pp. 106-10

DoC 19: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Another Letter by the Lord Buckhurst to Mr. Etherege (‘If I can guess the Devil choke me’)

Copy.

Edited in part from this MS in Thorpe (and collated pp. 113-14) and in Harris.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions, By the Right Honourable, the E. of R[ochester] (‘Antwerpen’ [i.e. London], 1680). The Poems of Sir George Etherege, ed. James Thorpe (Princeton, 1963), pp. 40-2. Harris, pp. 112-14.

For other poems in this series see DoC 110-13, EtG 34-8, and EtG 39-43.

pp. 110-14

EtG 40: Sir George Etherege, Mr. Etherege's Answer [to Another Letter from Lord Buckhurst] (‘So soft and amorously you write’)

Copy, untitled.

Edited in part from this MS in Thorpe and collated, p. 114.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions By the Right Honourable, the E. of R[ochester] (‘Antwerpen’ [i.e. London], 1680). Thorpe, pp. 43-5.

For other poems in this series, see EtG 34-8, DoC 18-22, and DoC 110-13.

pp. 114-17

RoJ 107: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, The Imperfect Enjoyment (‘Naked she lay, clasped in my longing arms’)

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 37-40. Walker, pp. 30-2. Love, pp. 13-15.

pp. 117-24

BeA 5: Aphra Behn, The Disappointment (‘One day the Amorous Lysander’)

Copy, headed ‘An Imperfect Enjoyment, By Mris A. Behn’.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions, by the Right Honourable, the E[arl] of R[ochester] (‘Antwerp’ [i.e. London], 1680). Poems upon Several Occasions (London, 1684). Summers, VI, 178-82. Todd, I, No. 28, pp. 65-9.

Discussed in Vieth, Attribution, pp. 448-50.

pp. 131-40

RoJ 527: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Tunbridge Wells (‘At five this morn, when Phoebus raised his head’)

Copy, headed ‘A Satyre upon Tunbridge Wells’.

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published in Richard Head, Proteus Redivivus: or the Art of Wheedling (London, 1675). Vieth, pp. 73-80. Walker, pp. 69-74. Love, pp. 49-54.

pp. 148-51

DeJ 6: Sir John Denham, ‘After so many sad mishaps’

Copy, headed ‘To Sr William Davenant on his Gondibert’.

First published, as ‘To Sir W. Davenant’, in Certain Verses (1653), pp. 5-7. Banks, pp. 313-16.

pp. 161-71

DrJ 92: John Dryden, Mac Flecknoe (‘All humane things are subject to decay’)

Copy.

This MS collated in California, in Blakemore Evans and in Vieth.

First published in London, 1682. Miscellany Poems (London, 1684). Kinsley, I, 265-71. California, II, 53-60. Hammond, I, 313-36.

The text also discussed extensively in G. Blakemore Evans, ‘The Text of Dryden's Mac Flecknoe: The Case for Authorial Revision’, Studies in Bibliography, 7 (1955), 85-102; in David M. Vieth, ‘Dryden's Mac Flecknoe’, Harvard Library Bulletin, 7 (1953), 32-54; and in Vinton A. Dearing, ‘Dryden's Mac Flecknoe: The Case Against Editorial Confusion’, Harvard Library Bulletin, 24 (1976), 204-45. See also David M. Vieth, ‘The Discovery of the Date of MacFlecknoe’ in Evidence in Literary Scholarship: Essays in Memory of James Marshall Osborn, ed. René Wellek and Alvaro Ribeiro (Oxford, 1979), pp. 71-86.

pp. 172-4

DrJ 169: John Dryden, Prologue to the University of Oxon. Spoken by Mr. Hart, at the Acting of the Silent Woman (‘What Greece, when Learning flourish'd, onely Knew’)

Copy, headed ‘Prologue to the University Spoaken there 1672’.

First published in Miscellany Poems (London, 1684). Kinsley, I, 369-70. California, I, 146-7. Hammond, I, 277-9.

pp. 174-6

DrJ 43: John Dryden, Epilogue [to the University of Oxon.], Spoken by the same [Mr. Hart] (‘No poor Dutch Peasant, wing'd with all his Fear’)

Copy, headed ‘The Epilogue’.

First published in Miscellany Poems (London, 1684). Kinsley, I, 370-1. California, I, 147-8. Hammond, I, 279-81.

pp. 176-83

DrJ 58: John Dryden, Heroique Stanza's, Consecrated to the Glorious Memory of his most Serene and Renowned Highnesse Oliver Late Lord Protector of this Common-Wealth, &c. (‘And now 'tis time. for their Officious haste’)

Copy, headed ‘An Elegy upon Oliver Cromwell Late Lord Protector, by Jn° Dryden’.

First published in Three Poems Upon the Death of his late Highnesse Oliver Lord Protector of England, Scotland and Ireland (London, 1659). Kinsley, I, 6-12. California, I, 11-16. Hammond, I, 18-29.

pp. 201-2

WaE 722: Edmund Waller, Upon the late Storm, and of the Death of His Highness ensuing the same (‘We must resign! Heaven his great soul does claim’)

Copy, headed ‘On the Same Subject By Mr Waller’.

First published as a broadside (London, [1658]). Three Poems upon the Death of his late Highnesse Oliver Lord Protector (London, 1659). As ‘Upon the late Storm, and Death of the late Usurper O. C.’ in The Second Part of Mr. Waller's Poems (London, 1690). The Maid's Tragedy Altered (London, 1690). Thorn-Drury, II, 34-5.

For the ‘answer or construction’ by William Godolphin, see the Introduction.

p. 220-7

RoJ 285.5: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Satyr (‘Say Heav'n-born Muse, for only thou can'st tell’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Love.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Love, pp. 81-5.

pp. 228-36

RoJ 475: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Timon (‘What, Timon! does old age begin t'approach’)

Copy, headed ‘Satyr Bye Sr Charles Sidley’.

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker and in Love, ‘Text of “Timon”’.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 65-72. Walker, pp. 78-82, as ‘Satyr. [Timon]’. Harold Love, ‘The Text of “Timon. A Satyr”’, Bibliographical Society of Australia and New Zealand Bulletin, 6 (1982), 113-40. Love, pp. 258-63, as Satyr. [Timon], among Disputed Works.

pp. 236-40

LeN 4: Nathaniel Lee, To the Prince and Princess of Orange, upon Their Marriage (‘Hail, happy Warriour! hail! whose Arms have won’)

Copy of the 85-line version, headed ‘To the Prince and Princess of orrange’ and beginning ‘Hail happy Warriour! whose Armes haue won’.

First published, possibly as a broadside, 1677 [no exemplum known]. 85-line version in Examen Poeticum: being the Third Part of Miscellany Poems (London, 1693), pp. 168-74. Stroup & Cooke, II, 553-4. Earlier, 65-line version, headed ‘On the Marriage of the Prince and Princess of Orange’ and beginning ‘Hail happy Warrior! whose Arms have won’, published in Poems on Affairs of State, Vol. III (London, 1704). Stroup & Cooke, II, 555-6.

pp. 246-7

RoJ 171: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Love and Life (‘All my past life is mine no more’)

Copy, headed ‘Song’.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution. Collated in Walker.

First published in Songs for i 2 & 3 Voyces Composed by Henry Bowman [London, 1677]. Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, p. 90. Walker, p. 44. Love, pp. 25-6.

pp. 247-8

RoJ 409: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Song (‘Love a woman? You're an ass!’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, p. 51. Walker, p. 25. Love, p. 38, as ‘Love to a Woman’.

pp. 250-3

WaE 774: Edmund Waller, To the Prince of Orange, 1677 (‘Welcome, great Prince, unto this land’)

Copy.

First published in The Works of the English Poets, ed. Alexander Chalmers, 21 vols (London, 1810), VIII, 68-9. Thorn-Drury, II, 82-3.

pp. 253-5

DoC 150: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On Mr. Edward Howard upon his ‘New Utopia’ (‘Thou damn'd antipodes to common sense!’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon Mr Edward Howards Playes’ and here ascribed to ‘Witherley’.

This MS collated in POAS and in Harris.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions, By the Right Honourable, the E. of R[ochester] (‘Antwerpen’ [i.e. London], 1680). POAS, I (1963), 340-1. Harris, pp. 15-17.

pp. 255-7

DoC 276: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, To Mr. Edward Howard, on his Incomparable, Incomprehensible Poem Called ‘The British Princes’ (‘Come on, ye critics! Find one fault who dare’)

Copy, headed ‘Verses on the same subject’ [i.e. Edward Howard's play].

This MS collated in Harris.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions, By the Right Honourable, the E. of R[ochester] (‘Antwerpen’ [i.e. London], 1680). POAS, I (1963), 338-9. Harris, pp. 7-9.

pp. 267-74

BuS 26: Samuel Butler, Dildoides (‘Such a sad Tale prepare to hear’)

Copy.

Dated in some sources 1672 but not published until 1706.

p. 277

RoJ 432: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Song (‘Quoth the Duchess of Cleveland to counselor Knight’)

Copy, headed ‘Mis: Knights Advice to the Dutchess, of Cleavland, in Distress For A Prick’.

Edited from this MS in Walker. Recorded in Vieth.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, p. 48. Walker, p. 61. Love, p. 90.

pp. 286-93

DoC 48: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Colon (‘As Colon drove his sheep along’)

Copy, headed ‘Satyr’.

This MS collated in POAS and in Harris.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1697). POAS, II (1965), 167-75. Harris, pp. 124-35.

pp. 293-5

RoJ 341: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, A Satyr on Charles II (‘I' th' isle of Britain long since famous grown’)

Copy, headed ‘Verses By Ld: Roc.’ and here beginning ‘There is a Monarch in an Isle say som’.

This MS recorded in Vieth.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1704). Vieth, pp. 60-1. Walker, pp. 74-5. Love (five versions), pp. 85-6, 86-7, 88, 89-90, 90. The manuscript texts discussed, with detailed collations, in Harold Love, ‘Rochester's “I' th' isle of Britain”: Decoding a Textual Tradition’, EMS, 6 (1997), 175-223.

fMS Eng 652

A folio volume of ‘Miscellanies Collected in the Yeare 1683 at Kingstone upon Thames May the 11th’, in verse and prose, predominantly in one neat hand, c.141 pages (usually on rectos only), gilt-edged, in contemporary calf gilt. Compiled between 11 May and 25 June 1683 by someone whose monogram is possibly (?) ‘JMD’. 1683.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution. Collated in Walker.

f. 61r

RoJ 522: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, A Translation from Seneca's ‘Troades’, Act II, Chorus (‘After death nothing is, and nothing, death’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution. Collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 150-1. Walker, p. 51. Love, pp. 45-5, as ‘Senec. Troas. Act. 2. Chor. Thus English'd by a Person of Honour’.

fMS Eng 676

A folio commonplace book of chiefly Quaker authors, 49 leaves, in a paper wrapper. c.1745.

f. 32r

MkM 13: Mary Monck, Verses Wrote on her Death-Bed at Bath, to her Husband, in London (‘Thou, who dost all my worldly thoughts employ’)

Copy.

Twenty-two lines, first published, introduced ‘The following verses were wrote by her (as I am inform'd) on her death-bed at Bath, to her husband in London’, in George Ballard, Memoirs of Several Ladies of Great Britain (Oxford, 1752), pp. 418-22.

fMS Eng 705

Copy, in a single professional hand, 28 folio leaves (plus numerous blanks), in contemporary limp vellum with traces of ties. Mid-17th century.

NaR 26: Sir Robert Naunton, Fragmenta Regalia

Bookplate of James P.R. Lyell. Given to the library in 1939 by Thomas W. Lamont.

This MS recorded (as ‘Unnumbered MS’) in Cerovski, p. 87.

Fragmenta Regalia (or, Observations on the late Q. Elizabeth, her Times and Favorites), first published in London, 1641. Edited by John S. Cerovski (Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington, D.C., etc., 1985).

fMS 757

A large coucher-size volume of accounts, state letters, speeches, legal documents and other papers, in several professional secretary hands, 402 pages, in a contemporary vellum wallet binding with remains of ties and a strap. Early 17th century.

Inscribed (p. i) ‘Per me Johannem Fry’ and ‘Per me Gul: Fry’.

pp. 174, 179

EsR 301: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Essex's speech at his execution

Copy, headed ‘Speeches vsed by the Earle of Essex at his deathe’.

Generally incorporated in accounts of Essex's execution and sometimes also of his behaviour the night before.

pp. [175-7]

EsR 79: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, A Poem made on the Earle of Essex (being in disgrace with Queene Eliz): by mr henry Cuffe his Secretary (‘It was a time when sillie Bees could speake’)

Copy of a thirteen-stanza version, untitled, on two tipped-in long narrow ledger-size conjugate folio leaves.

This MS collated in May, pp. 128-32.

First published, in a musical setting by John Dowland, in his The Third and Last Booke of Songs or Aires (London, 1603). May, Poems, No. IV, pp. 62-4. May, Courtier Poets, pp. 266-9. EV 12846.

fMS Eng 771

Autograph letter signed by Walton, to Mrs Dorothy Smith, from Worcester, 21 March 1661/2. 1662.

*WtI 9: Izaak Walton, Letter(s)

Edited in HMC 36, Ormonde NS III (1904), pp. 14-15. Facsimile in The Houghton Library 1942-1967 (1967), p. 54. Limited facsimile edition also edited as Good Mrs. Smith: A Letter from Izaak Walton ([Cambridge, Mass., 1948]).

fMS Eng 820

Copy, in a professional hand, headed ‘A Collection of proceedings in the House of Commons, touching the Impeachment of the late Earle of Clarendon...1667’, 207 folio pages, in vellum boards. Late 17th century.

ClE 114: Edward Hyde, First Earl of Clarendon, Impeachment Proceedings against Clarendon in 1667

Donated by Dr Benjamin Burley.

Articles of Treason exhibited in Parliament against Clarendon, 14 November 1667 published in London, 1667. The Proceedings in the House of Commons touching the Impeachment of Clarendon 1667 published in London, 1700.

fMS Eng 826

A partly autograph presentation copy, 232 large folio leaves, in 19th-century dark blue morocco gilt. For Robert Devereux (1566-1601), second Earl of Essex, written in the accomplished hands of two or more of Howard's principal amanuenses; with a formal title-page in engrossed lettering (f. 3r) including an autograph four-line quotation in Latin from Daniel 13.57 by Howard; the arms of Essex emblazoned in their proper colours (f. 3v) superscribed by six autograph lines of Latin verse and subscribed by six more autograph lines of Latin verse by Howard; (ff. [4r-25v]); the Dedication ‘To the Queenes most Excellent Maiestie’ in secretary script, with autograph sidenotes by Howard and signed by him ‘Henry Hwward’; (ff. 26r-232v) the main text, in predominantly secretary hands, with variant styles of script for headings, sub-headings and sidenotes; with a separate title-page for the second book (f. [127v]) and a title in the second half of the page (f. [157r]) for the third book, with autograph corrections and sidenotes by Howard occasionally in the first book and throughout the third book. c.1590s.

*HoH 79: Henry Howard, Earl of Northampton, A dutiful defence of the lawful regiment of women

Inscribed (f. [iiv]) ‘Tho: Chomley is the true ouner of this Booke by the Gifte of his good Mother the Ladie Marie chomley 1623’. Sale of the Royal Library, Earl de la Ware, Baron Delamire. American Art Association, 11 March 1936 (Marsden J. Perry sale), lot 218. Charles S. Boesen's sale catalogue No. 1 (c.1951), item 160.

Facsimile examples of the illuminated arms and Dedication in the 1936 sale catalogue.

An unpublished answer to, and attack upon, John Knox's ‘railing invective’ against Mary Queen of Scots, First Blast of the Trumpet against the Monstrous Regiment of Women (1558). Written, Howard claims in his Dedication, some thirteen years after he was asked to do so by a Privy Councillor [i.e. c.1585-90]. The Dedication to Queen Elizabeth beginning ‘It pricketh now fast upon the point of thirteen years (most excellent most gratious and most redoubted Soveraign...’; the main text, in three books, beginning ‘It may seem strange to men of grounded knowledge...’, and ending ‘...Sancta et individuae Trinitati sit omnis honor laus et gloria in secula seculorum. Amen.’

fMS Eng 830

Copy, as ‘by Sr Robert Cotton’, in a professional secretary hand, on thirteen folio leaves. In a volume also containing numerous blanks and a one-page Italian text at the reverse end, in contemporary limp vellum. c.1620s.

CtR 416: Sir Robert Cotton, A Short View of the Long Life and Reign of Henry the Third, King of England

Bookplate of Thomas Philip, Earl de Grey, of Wrest Park, Bedfordshire.

Treatise, written c.1614 and ‘Presented to King James’, beginning ‘Wearied with the lingering calamities of Civil Arms...’. First published in London, 1627. Cottoni posthuma (1651), at the end (i + pp. 1-27).

fMS Eng 868

A large folio volume comprising two tracts in different hands, the second (ff. [31r-42r]) Vox Populi, 43 leaves, in contemporary limp vellum. Early 17th century.

ff. [1r-30r]

LeC 57: Anon, Leicester's Commonwealth

Copy, in a predominantly italic hand, complete with a title-page (possibly in another secretary and italic hand), dedicatory epistle, and meditation from Job.

First published as The Copie of a Leter, Wryten by a Master of Arte of Cambrige, to his Friend in London, Concerning some talke past of late betwen two worshipful and graue men, about the present state, and some procedinges of the Erle of Leycester and his friendes in England ([? Rouen], 1584). Soon banned. Reprinted as Leycesters common-wealth (London, 1641). Edited, as Leicester's Commonwealth, by D.C. Peck (Athens, OH, & London, 1985). Although various attributions have been suggested by Peck and others, the most likely author remains Robert Persons (1546-1610), Jesuit conspirator.

fMS Eng 870 (13)

Autograph letter signed by Waller, to John Evelyn, from Pont de l'Arche, 1 October 1648. 1648.

*WaE 815: Edmund Waller, Letter(s)

Evans's [i.e. Sotheby's], 10 February 1836 (Heber sale, Part XI), lot 286, to Young.

Facsimile in F. G. Netherclift and R. Sims, The Autograph Souvenir, a Collection of Autograph Letters, 1st Ser. (London, 1865). Facsimile example also in Lawrence B. Phillips, The Autographic Album (London, 1866), p. 12.

fMS Eng 870 (16)

Autograph letter signed by Taylor, to [John Evelyn], St Paul's Conversion [25 January] 1655/6. 1656.

*TaJ 44: Jeremy Taylor, Letter(s)

Sotheby's (Evans), 16 November 1836, lot 698. Sotheby's, 6 February 1865, lot 934, to Ellis.

Edited in Eden, I, xlviii-xlix. Wheatley, III, 209-11.

fMS Eng 870 (17)

Autograph letter signed by Cowley, to John Davis, from Mortlake, 20 February ‘1665’. 1665/6.

*CoA 247: Abraham Cowley, Letter(s)

fMS Eng 870 (18)

Autograph letter signed by Marvell, to Edward Thompson, from Westminster, 28 December 1675. 1675.

*MaA 560: Andrew Marvell, Letter(s)

Later owned (before 1869) by John Young.

Margoliouth, II, 344. Facsimile in F.G. Netherclift, The Autograph Souvenir (1st Series, 1865). Facsimile example also in Lawrence B. Phillips, The Autographic Album (London, 1866), 11.

fMS Eng 870 (20)

Autograph letter signed by Dryden, to Elizabeth Steward, 23 February [1698/9]. 1699.

*DrJ 353: John Dryden, Letter(s)

Ward, Letter 73. NB. Ward dates this letter 23 February [1699/1700], but see W.J. Cameron, ‘John Dryden and Henry Heveningham’, N&Q, 202 (May 1957), 199-203 (p. 203).

fMS Eng 870 (24)

Autograph letter signed by Wycherley, to Alexander Pope, from London, 23 May 1709. 1709.

*WyW 25: William Wycherley, Letter(s)

Facsimile in IELM, II.ii (1993), Facsimile XXIII, after p. xxi.

fMS Eng 870 (29)

Autograph letter signed by Congreve, to Alexander Pope, 23 June [1720?]. 1720.

*CgW 108: William Congreve, Letter(s)

Hodges, No. 137. McKenzie, III, 185-6 (Letter 69).

fMS Eng 870 (32)

Autograph letter signed by Vanbrugh, to Henry Joynes [Comptroller at Blenheim Palace], from London, 19 December 1706. 1706.

*VaJ 41: Sir John Vanbrugh, Letter(s)

Edited in Judith Milhous, ‘Five New Letters by Sir John Vanbrugh’, HLB, 27 (1979), 434-41 (pp. 434-5).

fMS Eng 917

A folio volume of speeches and proceedings in Parliament 1627-29, in several professional hands, 380 leaves, in contemporary calf gilt. c.1630.

Bookplate of Algernon Capell (1654-1710), second Earl of Essex, Privy Councillor, dated 1701.

Item 2, ff. 28r-30v

RuB 20: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, c.20-22 March 1627/8

Copy, headed ‘Sr. Beniamin Ruddyard speech xxijth of March 1627’.

Speech. Yale 1628, II, 58-60, two parallel versions: (1) beginning ‘This is the crisis of parliaments...’; (2) beginning ‘It is the goodness of God and the favour of the King...’; II, 68, third version, beginning ‘If we be thankful, all is well. By this we shall know whether parliaments will live or die...’; II, 73, fourth, brief reported version, beginning ‘We are not now upon the bene esse of our kingdom but the esse...’.

Item 2, f. 50v

HoJ 346: John Hoskyns, Speech in the House of Commons, 2 April 1628

Copy of a brief summary.

Speech, beginning (in a brief summary) ‘That knowing our own rights we might be better enabled to give...’.

Item 2, ff. 197r-200r

RuB 21: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, c.20-22 March 1627/8

Copy, headed ‘A Speeche made by Sir Beniamin Rudyard in the Comons house of Parliament March. 22. 1628’.

Speech. Yale 1628, II, 58-60, two parallel versions: (1) beginning ‘This is the crisis of parliaments...’; (2) beginning ‘It is the goodness of God and the favour of the King...’; II, 68, third version, beginning ‘If we be thankful, all is well. By this we shall know whether parliaments will live or die...’; II, 73, fourth, brief reported version, beginning ‘We are not now upon the bene esse of our kingdom but the esse...’.

Item 2, ff. 251v-4v

RuB 101: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, ?22 May 1628

Copy, headed ‘Sir Beniamin Ruddyarts speech Concerning maintenance of ministers the 22th: of May 1628’.

Speech beginning ‘I did not think to have spoken...’. First published, as Sir Benjamin Rudierd His speech in Behalfe of the Clergie and of Parishes destitute of Instruction through want of Maintenance, Oxford, 1628. Manning, pp. 135-8. Yale 1628, III, 17-19, where it is dated probably 21 April 1628.

Item 2, ff. 289v-90r

HlJ 25.2: Joseph Hall, Episcopal Admonition, Sent in a Letter to the House of Commons, April 28, 1628

Copy, headed ‘The Bishop of Exceters Lre to the howse of Coms’, subscribed ‘Josuah Hall’.

See HlJ 17-30.

fMS Eng 919

A folio composite volume of political and parliamentary tracts, in professional hands, c.400 leaves, in contemporary speckled calf gilt.

Bookplate of Algernon Capell, Earl of Essex, 1701.

Item 1, pp. 1-14

CtR 493: Sir Robert Cotton, That the Soveraignes Person is Required in the Great Covncells, or Assemblies of the State, aswell at the Consultations as at the Conclusions

Copy, as ‘By Sr Robert Cotton’. Mid-17th century.

Tract beginning ‘Since at these Assemblies few Diaries, or exact Iournall Books are remaining...’. First published as A Treatise, shewing that the Soveraignes Person is Required in the great Councells or Assemblies of the State, aswell at the Consultations as at the conclusions, London, 1641. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [41]-57.

fMS Eng 930

Autograph letter signed by Donne, to Sir Henry Marten, 9 May 1622. 1622.

*DnJ 4127: John Donne, Letter(s)

Edited in Gosse, II, 156.

fMS Eng 966.1

A folio volume of 69 poems by Donne, together with a few poems by others, in a single neat hand, 99 pages, in contemporary limp vellum. c.1620s-33.

Inscribed inside the rear cover ‘J. D. Dune Rainsford …Chiltearns’ probably by a member of the family of Sir Henry Goodyer's brother-in-law Sir Henry Rainsford (1575-1622), of Clifford Chambers, Stratford-upon-Avon. Later owned by J. Carnaby. Puttick and Simpson's, 25 November 1886, lot 334. Then owned by the Rev. T.R. O'Flahertie (d.1894), of Capel, near Dorking, Surrey, book collector, and by Charles Eliot Norton (1827-1908), American professor and art historian. Formerly MS Nor 4502.

Cited in IELM, I.i (1980), as the ‘Carnaby MS’: DnJ Δ 22. Briefly discussed in C.E. Norton, ‘The Text of Donne's Poems’, [Harvard] Studies and Notes in Philology and Literature, 5 (1896), 1-22 (pp. 10-11).

pp. 3-5

DnJ 1121: John Donne, Elegie upon the untimely death of the incomparable Prince Henry (‘Looke to mee faith, and looke to my faith, God’)

Copy, headed ‘Elegie of Prince Henrie’.

This MS collated in Grierson and in Shawcross. Recorded in Milgate.

First published in Joshua Sylvester, Lachrymae Lachrymarum (London, 1613). Poems (London, 1633). Grierson, I, 267-70. Shawcross, No. 152. Milgate, Epithalmions, pp. 63-6 (as ‘Elegie on Prince Henry’). Variorum, 6 (1995), pp. 160-2.

pp. 5-6

DnJ 3529: John Donne, To the Countesse of Bedford (‘Reason is our Soules left hand, Faith her right’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Grierson. Recorded in Milgate and in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 189-90. Milgate, Satires, pp. 90-1. Shawcross, No. 134.

pp. 6-8

DnJ 3555: John Donne, To the Countesse of Bedford (‘You have refin'd mee, and to worthyest things’)

Copy, headed ‘Another to her’, subscribed ‘J D.’

This MS collated in Grierson. Recorded in Milgate and in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 191-3. Milgate, Satires, pp. 91-4. Shawcross, No. 137.

pp. 8-9

DnJ 3730: John Donne, A Valediction: forbidding mourning (‘As virtuous men passe mildly away’)

Copy, headed ‘A Valediction’, subscribed ‘J. D.’