The British Library: Egerton MSS

Egerton MS 203

Copy of the complete text, transcribed from the edition of 1674, on 186 octavo leaves. Late 17th or early 18th century.

MnJ 23: John Milton, Paradise Lost (‘Of Mans First Disobedience, and the Fruit’)

This MS recorded in Shawcross, Bibliography, No. 406.

First published in London, 1667. Columbia, II. Darbishire I. Carey & Fowler, pp. 417-1060.

See also MnJ 67.

Egerton MS 607

Copy, in a formal probably professional roman hand, with (ff. 150r-2v) ‘A Table’ of contents, 152 octavo leaves, in contemporary calf gilt. Entitled ‘True Coppies of certaine Loose Papers left by ye Right hoble Elizabeth Countesse of Bridgewater Collected and Transcribed together here since Her Death Anno Dni 1663’, and inscribed by her husband John Egerton (1623-86), second Earl of Bridgewater, Privy Councillor, ‘Examined by J. Bridgewater’. c.1660s.

C&E 190: Jane Cheyne and Elizabeth Egerton, Loose Papers and Meditations of Elizabeth Egerton, Countess of Bridgewater

Inscribed (on an affixed slip inside the front cover) ‘Sam. Egerton Brydges The Gift of his mother’; (f. 2r) ‘Samuel Egerton Brydges Feb. 12: 1795’; (f. 4r) ‘C. Hammond’ and ‘Jemima Bridges’.

This MS discussed by Betty S. Travitsky in ‘“His wife's prayers and meditations” MS Egerton 607’, in The Renaissance Englishwoman in Print: Counterbalancing the Canon, ed. Anne M. Haselkorn and Betty S. Travitsky (Amherst, Mass., 1990), pp. 241-60; and in ‘Reconstructing the Still Small Voice: The Occasional Journal of Elizabeth Egerton’, in Women's Studies, 19 (1991), 193-200. Collated in Travitsky, Subordination, with a facsimile of the title-page on p. 4.

Edited in Travitsky, Subordination (1999), pp. 172-207 (collations pp. 208-40).

Egerton MS 669

A duodecimo miscellany of verse and prose, in a single hand, 95 leaves in all. This MS is a companion volume to British Library, Add. MS 69823, and in the same hand. Folios 1-45 contain academic speeches of 1651-63, chiefly in Latin, relating to both Oxford and Cambridge (but chiefly Christ Church, Oxford), and ff. 46-95 verses written sideways across the length of the pages. Some poems are docketed later c.1686 ‘Mihi - Edited’ [i.e. presumably that the owner has the Edited version]. c.1667.

Inscribed on first page ‘Mr Mathews, the Bbinder D: Frown[?]. Mar. 16. 67. 0.0.6.7’ [i.e. ? the bookseller Thomas Mathews (fl.1650s-60s)]. Also (on f. 95v): ‘Charles Trumbull’ [D.D. (c.1646-1724), chaplain to Bishop Sancroft], ‘Ralphe Trumbull’ [(c.1640-1708), both brothers of the lawyer and government official Sir William Trumbull (1639-1716)]; and ‘Sandys’. Later note on upper endpaper that this MS was No. CCVIII of Dr Adam Clarke's MSS and was purchased 29 May 1838 from Baynes.

ff. 64r-81r

HbT 2: Thomas Hobbes, De Mirabilibus Pecci (‘Alpibus Angliacis, ubi Pecci nomine surgit’)

Copy, subscribed ‘mihi.-Edited’.

First published, dedicated to William Cavendish, Earl of Devonshire, [c.1636?] (no title-page known). 2nd edition [London, 1666]. Molesworth, Latin, V, 319-40.

ff. 81v-4r

WaE 386: Edmund Waller, A Panegyric to my Lord Protector, of the present Greatness, and joint Interest of His Highness, and this Nation (‘While with a strong and yet a gentle hand’)

Copy, headed ‘A Panegyrick to the lord Protectour, by A. Gentleman’ and subscribed ‘mihi Edited 2d pt. of Wallers Poems p. 62 xi’.

First published London, 1655. The Second Part of Mr. Waller's Poems (London, 1690). in The Maid's Tragedy Altered (London, 1690). Thorn-Drury, II, 10-17.

ff. 84v-9r

DrJ 56: John Dryden, Heroique Stanza's, Consecrated to the Glorious Memory of his most Serene and Renowned Highnesse Oliver Late Lord Protector of this Common-Wealth, &c. (‘And now 'tis time. for their Officious haste’)

Copy, headed ‘A Poem to the memory of ye Protectour oliver. Written after a celebration of his funerall’.

This MS collated in Dearing et al., loc. cit.

First published in Three Poems Upon the Death of his late Highnesse Oliver Lord Protector of England, Scotland and Ireland (London, 1659). Kinsley, I, 6-12. California, I, 11-16. Hammond, I, 18-29.

ff. 89v-90v

WaE 714: Edmund Waller, Upon the late Storm, and of the Death of His Highness ensuing the same (‘We must resign! Heaven his great soul does claim’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Edited. mihi. 2d pt. of Wallers Poems. p. 72’.

First published as a broadside (London, [1658]). Three Poems upon the Death of his late Highnesse Oliver Lord Protector (London, 1659). As ‘Upon the late Storm, and Death of the late Usurper O. C.’ in The Second Part of Mr. Waller's Poems (London, 1690). The Maid's Tragedy Altered (London, 1690). Thorn-Drury, II, 34-5.

For the ‘answer or construction’ by William Godolphin, see the Introduction.

ff. 90v-1

WaE 678: Edmund Waller, Upon Her Majesty's New Buildings at Somerset House (‘Great Queen! that does our island bless’)

Copy, later subscribed ‘Edited in Mr Wallers Poems - p. 227 mihi. 1686’.

First published as a broadside (London, 1665). Poems, ‘Third’ edition (London, 1668). Thorn-Drury, II, 61-2.

ff. 91r-5r

CoA 133: Abraham Cowley, On the Queens Repairing Somerset House (‘When God (the Cause to Me and Men unknown)’)

Copy, headed ‘The Speech of her Maiety the Queen Mothers Palace upon the Reparation & Enlargement of it by her Majesty’ and subscribed ‘By Mr Cowley Supposed Edited in his workes - after his Latin Davideid. p. 26’.

This MS recorded in Jean Loiseau, Abraham Cowley's Reputation in England (Paris, 1931), p. 26, n. 17.

First published, among Verses written on several Occasions, in Works (London, 1668). Waller, I, 433-40.

Egerton MS 895

A folio composite volume of Exchequer documents.

ff. 48r-9v

*KiH 827: Henry King, Document(s)

An Exchequer receipt signed by King, 5 December 1667. 1667.

Egerton MS 922

f. 27r

WaE 828: Edmund Waller, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Waller to Mrs Myddelton, from Beaconsfield, 12 May 1678. c.1678.

Cited and discussed in Warren L. Chernaik, The Poetry of Limitation: A Study of Edmund Waller (New Haven & London, 1968), pp. 36-7 (where the date is erroneously read as ‘1670’ and a suggested emendation of ‘1675’ made). Edited in Steinman (1864), pp. 34-5. Text in Deas, pp. 179-80. The original letter was owned in 1733 by Mrs Myddelton's daughter Jane, Mrs May (c.1662-1740).

f. 27r

WaE 833: Edmund Waller, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Waller to Mrs Myddelton, 4 August [1683?]. c.1683.

Edited in Steinman (1864), p. 40. Text in Deas, p. 180. The original letter was owned in 1733 by Mrs Myddelton's daughter Jane, Mrs May (c.1662-1740).

f. 27v

WaE 830: Edmund Waller, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Waller to Mrs Myddelton, from Beaconsfield, 8 August [1680]. c.1680.

Edited in Steinman (1864), pp. 35-7. Text in Deas, pp. 181-3. The original letter was owned in 1733 by Mrs Myddelton's daughter Jane, Mrs May (c.1662-1740).

f. 28r

WaE 834: Edmund Waller, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Waller [to Mrs Myddelton], from Hall Barn, 22 August [1683]. c.1683.

Edited in Steinman (1864), pp. 41-2. Text in Deas, pp. 183-5. The original letter was owned in 1733 by Mrs Myddelton's daughter Jane, Mrs May (c.1662-1740).

f. 28v

WaE 827: Edmund Waller, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Waller to Mrs Myddelton, [May 1677]. c.1677.

Edited in Steinman (1864), pp. 32-3. Text in Deas, pp. 187-8. The original letter was owned in 1733 by Mrs Myddelton's daughter Jane, Mrs May (c.1662-1740).

f. 28r-v

WaE 832: Edmund Waller, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Waller [to Mrs Myddelton], 23 March [1680/1]. c.1681.

Edited in Steinman (1864), pp. 37-9. Text in Deas, pp. 185-7. The original letter was owned in 1733 by Mrs Myddelton's daughter Jane, Mrs May (c.1662-1740).

Egerton MS 923

A duodecimo verse miscellany, in several small non-professional hands, 88 leaves, imperfect at the beginning. c.1630s-40s.

ff. 1r-3r

RaW 429: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Like to a Ring without a finger’

Copy of lines 1-32, 49-80, plus four additional stanzas.

This MS recorded and additional stanzas edited in Latham, pp. 169-70.

First published in Latham (1951), pp. 165-7, as ‘A poem doubtfully ascribed to Ralegh’. Since, in fact, it is a parody of a poem by Francis Quarles printed in 1629 it cannot be by Ralegh.

ff. 4r-5v

CwT 1009: Thomas Carew, To A.L. Perswasions to love (‘Thinke not cause men flatt'ring say’)

Copy, headed ‘Preswasions to loue’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 4-6.

ff. 5v-7v

EsR 67: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, A Poem made on the Earle of Essex (being in disgrace with Queene Eliz): by mr henry Cuffe his Secretary (‘It was a time when sillie Bees could speake’)

Copy of a fifteen-stanza version, headed ‘A Poem made on Robt Deuorex Earle of Essex by mr. Henry Cuff his Chaplaine’.

This MS text collated in May, pp. 128-32.

First published, in a musical setting by John Dowland, in his The Third and Last Booke of Songs or Aires (London, 1603). May, Poems, No. IV, pp. 62-4. May, Courtier Poets, pp. 266-9. EV 12846.

f. 8r

RaW 248: Sir Walter Ralegh, On the Life of Man (‘What is our life? a play of passion’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Latham, p. 144.

First published, in a musical setting, in Orlando Gibbons, The First Set of Madrigals and Mottets (London, 1612). Latham, pp. 51-2. Rudick, Nos 29A, 29B and 29C (three versions, pp. 69-70). MS texts also discussed in Michael Rudick, ‘The Text of Ralegh's Lyric “What is our life?”’, SP, 83 (1986), 76-87.

f. 8v

DaJ 140: Sir John Davies, An Epitaph (‘Here lieth Kitt Craker, the kinge of good fellowes’)

Copy of a version headed ‘Epit on a Bellowes maker’ and beginning ‘Here lyes John Goddard a maker of Bellowes’.

This MS recorded in Osborn.

A version, ascribed to John Hoskyns, first published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1605). Krueger, p. 303. Edited in The Life, Letters, and Writings of John Hoskyns 1566-1638, ed. Louise Brown Osborn (New Haven & London, 1937), p. 170.

f. 9r

HoJ 158: John Hoskyns, An Epitaphe on Mr Sandes (‘Who wo'ld live in other's breath’)

Copy, headed ‘Epit on Mr Sandes’.

f. 9v

RaW 211: Sir Walter Ralegh, On the Cardes, and Dice (‘Beefore the sixt day of the next new year’)

Copy, headed ‘A Prophesie to come to pase the next yeare’.

This MS recorded in Latham, p. 139.

First published as ‘A Prognostication upon Cards and Dice’ in Poems of Lord Pembroke and Sir Benjamin Ruddier (London, 1660). Latham, p. 48. Rudick, Nos 50A and 50B, pp. 123-4 (two versions, as ‘Sir Walter Rawleighs prophecy of cards, and Dice at Christmas’ and ‘On the Cardes and dice’ respectively).

f. 11r

HoJ 104.5: John Hoskyns, A Dreame (‘Me thought I walked in a dreame’)

Copy of the shortened version of lines 43-68, headed ‘Mr. Hoskins to the king sent by his wife’.

Tis MS recorded in Osborn.

Osborn, No. XXXIV (pp. 206-8). Whitlock, pp. 480-2.

A shortened version of the poem, of lines 43-68, beginning ‘the worst is tolld, the best is hidd’ and ending ‘he errd but once, once king forgiue’, was widely circulated.

ff. 12r-14r

CoR 64: Richard Corbett, The Distracted Puritane (‘Am I madd, o noble Festus’)

First published in Poëtica Stromata ([no place], 1648). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 56-9.

f. 15r

DkT 15: Thomas Dekker, Vpon her bringing by water to White Hall (‘The Queene was brought by water to White Hall’)

Copy, headed ‘On the Remoue of Queene Elizabeths body from Richmond (where she dyed) to white hall’.

First published in The Wonderfull yeare (London, 1603). Reprinted in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1614), and in Thomas Heywood, The Life and Death of Queene Elizabeth (London, 1639). Grosart, I, 93-4. Tentatively (but probably wrongly) attributed to Camden in George Burke Johnston, ‘Poems by William Camden’, SP, 72 (December 1975), 112.

f. 16r

DaJ 183: Sir John Davies, On the Deputy of Ireland his child (‘As carefull mothers doe to sleeping lay’)

Copy, headed ‘Epitaph on a child dying very younge’.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1637), p. 411. Krueger, p. 303.

f. 17r

WoH 141: Sir Henry Wotton, A Poem written by Sir Henry Wotton in his Youth (‘O faithless world, and thy most faithless part’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Francis Davison, Poetical Rapsody (London, 1602), p. 157. As ‘A poem written by Sir Henry Wotton, in his youth’, in Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 517. Hannah (1845), pp. 3-5. Edited and texts discussed in Ted-Larry Pebworth, ‘Sir Henry Wotton's “O Faithless World”: The Transmission of a Coterie Poem and a Critical Old-Spelling Edition’, Analytical & Enumerative Bibliography, 5/4 (1981), 205-31.

ff. 17v-18r

StW 1021: William Strode, A Sonnet (‘My Love and I for kisses played’)

Copy, untitled and here beginning ‘I and my loue for kisses playd’.

First published in A Banquet of Jests (London, 1633). Dobell, p. 47. Forey, p. 211. The poem also discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Notes on some Poems attributed to William Strode’, PQ, 34 (1955), 444-8 (p. 446-7).

f. 18v

ElQ 9: Queen Elizabeth I, On Monsieur's Departure, circa 1582 (‘I grieve and dare not show my discontent’)

Copy, headed ‘Sonnet by Queene Elizabeth’.

Collected Works, Poem 9, pp. 302-3. Selected Works, Poem 6, pp. 12-13. Bradner, p. 5.

ff. 19r-20r

JnB 383: Ben Jonson, An Ode. to himselfe (‘Where do'st thou carelesse lie’)

Copy, headed ‘Ode’.

This MS collated in Herford & Simpson.

First published in The Vnder-wood (xxiii) in Workes (London, 1640). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 174-5.

f. 20r-v

DnJ 643: John Donne, Change (‘Although thy hand and faith, and good workes too’)

Copy, headed ‘Inconstances Encomiu’.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published, as ‘Elegie III’, in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 82-3 (as ‘Elegie III’). Gardner, Elegies, pp. 19-20. Shawcross, No. 16. Variorum, 2 (2000), p. 198.

ff. 22v-3v

JnB 636: Ben Jonson, The Gypsies Metamorphosed, Song (‘Cock-Lorell would needes haue the Diuell his guest’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Herford & Simpson, X, 634.

Herford & Simpson, lines 1061-1125. Greg, Burley version, lines 821-84. Windsor version, lines 876-939.

f. 26r

CwT 275: Thomas Carew, A flye that flew into my Mistris her eye (‘When this Flye liv'd, she us'd to play’)

Copy, headed ‘Mr Carew on the Fly’ and here beginning ‘While this fly liu'd it vs'd to play’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 37-9. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in The Treasury of Musick, Book 2 (London, 1669).

f. 27r-v

DaW 64: Sir William Davenant, To the King on New-yeares day 1630. Ode (‘The joyes of eager Youth, of Wine, and Wealth’)

Copy headed ‘Dauenats newyeares guift to K Charles 1631’.

This MS collated in Gibbs.

First published in Madagascar (London, 1638). Gibbs, pp. 31-2.

ff. 30r-1r

DrW 117.22: William Drummond of Hawthornden, For the Kinge (‘From such a face quois excellence’)

Copy.

Often headed in MSS ‘The [Five] Senses’, a parody of Patrico's blessing of the King's senses in Jonson's Gypsies Metamorphosed (JnB 654-70). A MS copy owned by Drummond: see The Library of Drummond of Hawthornden, ed. Robert H. Macdonald (Edinburgh, 1971), No. 1357. Kastner printed the poem among his ‘Poems of Doubtful Authenticity’ (II, 296-9), but its sentiments are alien to those of Drummond: see C.F. Main, ‘Ben Jonson and an Unknown Poet on the King's Senses’, MLN, 74 (1959), 389-93, and MacDonald, SSL, 7 (1969), 118. Discussed also in Allan H. Gilbert, ‘Jonson and Drummond or Gil on the King's Senses’, MLN, 62 (January 1947), 35-7. Sometimes also ascribed to James Johnson.

f. 32r

CoR 194: Richard Corbett, An Epitaph on Doctor Donne, Deane of Pauls (‘Hee that would write an Epitaph for thee’)

Copy.

First published in John Donne, Poems (London, 1633). Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, p. 89.

ff. 34v-5r

CwT 669: Thomas Carew, The second Rapture (‘No worldling, no, tis not thy gold’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 103-4.

ff. 35r-7r

EaJ 23: John Earle, Bishop of Worcester and Salisbury, An Elegie, Upon the death of Sir John Burrowes, Slaine at the Isle of Ree (‘Oh wound us not with this sad tale, forbear’)

Copy.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656), pp. 12-16. Extract in Bliss, pp. 225-6. Edited in James Doelman, ‘John Earle's Funeral Elegy on Sir John Burroughs’, English Literary Renaissance, 41/3 (Autumn 2011), 485-502 (pp. 499-502).

ff. 43v-4v

HeR 185: Robert Herrick, Oberons Feast (‘A Little mushroome table spred’)

Copy, headed ‘The fayries feast att his mariage’ and without the preliminary lines.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published complete, with six preliminary lines beginning ‘Shapcot! To thee the Fairy State’, in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 119-20. Patrick, pp. 161-3. An earlier version, entitled ‘A Description of his Dyet’, published in A Description of the King and Queene of Fayries (London, 1634). Martin, pp. 454-5.

f. 44v

RaW 419: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘I cannot bend the bow’

Copy, headed ‘Sr Walter Rawleigh to the Lady Benbow’.

First published in Rudick (1999), No. 37, p. 105. Listed but not printed, in Latham, pp. 173-4 (as an ‘indecorous trifle’).

f. 45r

RnT 385: Thomas Randolph, Upon the losse of his little finger (‘Arithmetique nine digits, and no more’)

Copy, headed ‘Thomas Randalgh vpon the losse of his finger’.

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 56-7.

ff. 47r-8r

RnT 223: Thomas Randolph, On the Fall of the Mitre Tavern in Cambridge (‘Lament, lament, ye Scholars all’)

Copy, subscribed in another hand ‘Tho: Randalgh’.

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Wit & Drollery (London, 1656), p. 68. Thorn-Drury, pp. 160-2.

f. 52r

HrJ 139: Sir John Harington, Of a Lady that left open her Cabbinett (‘A vertuose Lady sitting in a muse’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon a Lady’.

First published in ‘Epigrammes’ appended to J[ohn] C[lapham], Alcilia, Philoparthens Louing Folly (London, 1613). McClure No. 404, p. 312. Kilroy, Book IV, No. 57, p. 231.

ff. 53r-4r

RnT 210: Thomas Randolph, On six maids bathing themselves in a River (‘When bashfull day-light now was gone’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon 6 maides bathinge themselue[s] in Cambridge riuer’.

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury and in Davis.

First published in Poems, 2nd edition (1640). Thorn-Drury, pp. 138-40. Davis, pp. 56-62.

ff. 54v-5v

RnT 347: Thomas Randolph, Upon a very deformed Gentlewoman, but of a voice incomparably sweet (‘I chanc'd sweet Lesbia's voice to heare’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon a mayde that would singe well & had a deformed face’, subscribed ‘Tho: Randolgh’.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 115-17. Davis, pp. 92-105.

f. 56v

TiC 19: Chidiock Tichborne, Tichborne's Lament (‘My prime of youth is but a frost of cares’)

Copy, headed ‘Tillhburnes Elegie’ and here beginning ‘My prime of youth, is but a feast of cares’.

This MS text collated in Hirsch.

First published in the single sheet Verses of Prayse and Joy Written Upon her Maiesties Preseruation Whereunto is annexed Tychbornes lamentation, written in the Towre with his owne hand, and an answer to the same (London, 1586). Hirsch, pp. 309-10. Also ‘The Text of “Tichborne's Lament” Reconsidered’, ELR, 17, No. 3 (Autumn 1987), between pp. 276 and 277. May EV 15464 (recording 37 MS texts). For the ‘answer’ to this poem, see KyT 1-2.

f. 57v

BrW 201: William Browne of Tavistock, On the Countess Dowager of Pembroke (‘Underneath this sable herse’)

Copy.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1623), p. 340. Brydges (1815), p. 5. Goodwin, II, 294. Browne's authorship supported in C.F. Main, ‘Two Items in the Jonson Apocrypha’, N&Q, 199 (June 1954), 243-5.

ff. 59v-60r

PeW 178: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, Of a fair Gentlewoman scarce Marriageable (‘Why should Passion lead thee blind’)

Copy, headed ‘On a mayde manageable’ and here beginning ‘Wold you haue me lead ye blind’.

This MS recorded in Krueger.

First published in [John Gough], Academy of Complements (London, 1646), p. 202. Poems (1660), p. 76, superscribed ‘P.’. Listed in Krueger's Appendix I: ‘Spurious Poems in the 1660 Edition’ as possibly by Walton Poole.

ff. 60v-1r

KiH 58: Henry King, The Boy's answere to the Blackmore (‘Black Mayd, complayne not that I fly’)

Copy, headed ‘The faire boyes answere to the blacke maide’ and here beginning ‘ffaire mayde )plaine not yt I fly’.

First published in The Academy of Complements (London, 1646). Poems (1657). Crum, p. 151. The text almost invariably preceded, in both printed and MS versions, by (variously headed) ‘A Blackmore Mayd wooing a faire Boy: sent to the Author by Mr. Hen. Rainolds’ (‘Stay, lovely Boy, why fly'st thou mee’). Musical settings by John Wilson in Henry Lawes, Select Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1669).

f. 61v

PoW 23: Walton Poole, ‘If shadows be a picture's excellence’

First published, as ‘In praise of black Women; by T.R.’, in Robert Chamberlain, The Harmony of the Muses (London, 1654), p. 15 [unique exemplum in Huntington, edited in facsimile by Ernest W. Sullivan, II (Aldershot, 1990)]; in Abraham Wright, Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656), pp. 75-7, as ‘On a black Gentlewoman’. Poems (1660), pp. 61-2, as ‘On black Hair and Eyes’ and superscribed ‘R’; in The Poems of John Donne, ed Herbert J.C. Grierson, 2 vols (Oxford, 1912), I, 460-1, as ‘on Black Hayre and Eyes’, among ‘Poems attributed to Donne in MSS’; and in The Poems of William Herbert, Third Earl of Pembroke, ed. Robert Krueger (B.Litt. thesis, Oxford, 1961: Bodleian, MS B. Litt. d. 871), p. 61.

f. 63r

CwT 1263: Thomas Carew, A Louers passion (‘Is shee not wondrous fayre? but oh I see’)

Copy.

First published, as ‘The Rapture, by J.D.’, in Robert Chamberlain, The Harmony of the Muses (London, 1654), pp. 3-4 [unique exemplum in the Huntington edited in facsimile by Ernest W. Sullivan (Aldershot, 1990)]. Cupids Master-Piece (London, [?1656]). Dunlap, p. 192.

f. 65r

BrW 120: William Browne of Tavistock, On Mrs. Anne Prideaux, Daughter of Mr. Doctor Prideaux, Regius Professor (‘Nature in this small volume was about’)

Copy, headed ‘On a Gentlewoman's death’.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1636). Wits Recreations (London, 1640). Facetiæ (London, 1655). Osborn, No. XLIV (p. 213), ascribed to John Hoskyns.

f. 65r-v

PeW 226: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, A Paradox in praise of a painted Woman (‘Not kiss? by Love I must, and make impression’)

Copy of a version headed ‘A Maydes deniall’ and beginning ‘Nay pish, nay pray, & will you fly’.

Poems (1660), pp. 93-5, superscribed ‘P.’. First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656), p. 97. Listed in Krueger's Appendix I: ‘Spurious Poems in the 1660 Edition’ as possibly by William Baker. The Poems of John Donne, ed Herbert J.C. Grierson, 2 vols (Oxford, 1912), I, 456-9, as ‘A Paradox of a Painted Face’, among ‘Poems attributed to Donne in MSS’. Also ascribed to James Shirley.

A shorter version, beginning ‘Nay pish, nay pew, nay faith, and will you, fie’, was first published, as ‘A Maids Denyall’, in Richard Chamberlain, The Harmony of the Muses (London, 1654) [apparently unique exemplum in the Huntington, edited in facsimile by Ernest W. Sullivan, II (Aldershot, 1990), pp. 49-50].

f. 70r

RnT 275: Thomas Randolph, A Pastorall Courtship (‘Behold these woods, and mark my Sweet’)

Copy of the last four lines (here beginning ‘Shall talke my shame, break, break my heart’), imperfect, lacking all the first part.

This MS collated in Davis.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 109-15. Davis, pp. 77-91.

f. 70r-v

RnT 365: Thomas Randolph, Upon his Picture (‘When age hath made me what I am not now’)

Copy.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, p. 79.

f. 70v

BrW 88: William Browne of Tavistock, On an Infant Unborn, and the Mother Dying in Travail (‘Within this grave there is a grave entomb'd’)

Copy, headed ‘On a woman dying in child birth’.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656). Brydges (1815), pp. 90-1. Goodwin, II, 255-6. Also (doubtfully) attributed to Richard Corbett and to Sir William Davenant: see Sir William Davenant, The Shorter Poems, and Songs from the Plays and Masques, ed. A.M. Gibbs (Oxford, 1972), p. lxxxvii.

f. 71r-v

HrJ 195: Sir John Harington, Of a pregnant pure sister (‘I learned a tale more fitt to be forgotten’)

Copy of a variant fourteen-line version, headed ‘On a Puritaine’ and here beginning ‘A st like sister, late turne votary’.

First published (13-line version) in The Epigrams of Sir John Harington, ed. N.E. McClure (Philadelphia, 1926), but see HrJ 197. McClure (1930), No. 413, p. 315. Kilroy, Book IV, No. 80, p. 239.

ff. 73v-4v

SuJ 215: John Suckling, Upon Sir John Suckling's hundred horse (‘I tell thee Jack thou'st given the King’)

Copy, headed ‘A Libel by ye Scots, vpon Sr John Sucklings 1639’.

First published in Wit and Drollery (London, 1656). Clayton, pp. 204-5.

ff. 74v-5v

SuJ 219: John Suckling, Sir John Suckling's Answer (‘I tell thee foole who'ere thou be’)

Copy.

First published in Wit and Drollery (London, 1656). Clayton, pp. 205-6. Sometimes erroneously attributed to Suckling himself.

f. 83r-v

HaW 47: William Habington, The Queene of Arragon. The Song in the fourth Act (‘Fine, young folly, though you were’)

Copy of stanzas 1-4, headed ‘Sonnetto’.

This MS collated in Allott, p. 203.

First published, anonymously, in London, 1640. The song, in a musical setting by William Tompkins, published in John Playford, Select Musicall Ayres, and Dialogues, Book III (London, 1653). Allott, p. 152.

ff. 83v-4r

LoR 16: Richard Lovelace, The Scrutinie. Song (‘Why should you sweare I am forsworn’)

Copy, headed ‘A Song by R: Louelace’ and here beginning ‘Why shouldst thou say I am forsworne’.

First published in Lucasta (London, 1649). Wilkinson (1925), II, 24. (1930), pp. 26-7. A musical setting by Thomas Charles published in Select Musicall Ayres, and Dialogues (London, 1652).

f. 84r

DaW 70: Sir William Davenant, To The Queene, entertain'd at night by the Countesse of Anglesey (‘Faire as unshaded Light. or as the Day’)

Copy, headed ‘Comendacons of a Lady’.

This MS collated in Gibbs.

First published in Madagascar (London, 1638). Gibbs, p. 28.

f. 84v

SuJ 29: John Suckling, The constant Lover (‘Out upon it, I have lov'd’)

Copy, headed ‘Sonnetto’.

This MS collated in Clayton.

First published, untitled, in Wit and Drollery (London, 1656). Last Remains (London, 1659). Clayton, pp. 55-6.

f. 85r

SuJ 11: John Suckling, The Answer (‘Say, but did you love so long?’)

This MS collated in Clayton.

See SuJ 11-15.

f. 85v

SuJ 59: John Suckling, Song (‘Why so pale and wan fond Lover?’)

Copy, headed ‘A Song by Sr Jo: Suckling’.

First published in Aglaura (London, 1638), Act IV, scene ii, lines 14-28. Fragmenta Aurea (London, 1646). Beaurline, Plays, p. 72. Clayton, p. 64.

f. 86r-v

ClJ 136: John Cleveland, Upon an Hermophrodite (‘Sir, or Madame, chuse you whether’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon an Hermaphrodite By John Cleaueland’.

First published in Character (1647). Morris & Withington, pp. 10-11.

Egerton MS 944

Entirely autograph presentation copy, on 74 quarto vellum leaves (each c.200 x 133mm.). Dedicated and presented to Queen Elizabeth, the edges of the leaves gilt and gauffered, the semi-calligraphic text ruled in red and with running heads in gilt; the dedication to the Queen (f. 1r) elaborately decorated in blue, red and gold; an illuminated portrait of the Queen seated on the throne with a book on her lap on f. 1v; and an elaborate formal title-page in red and gold on f. 2r. c.1576.

*HoH 93: Henry Howard, Earl of Northampton, Regina Fortunata

The volume labelled ‘Ex legato Caroli Baronis Farnborough’: i.e. from the library of Charles Long (c.1760-1838), Baron Farnborough, of Bromley Hill Place, the vellum boards bearing his arms in gilt (see Cyril Davenport, English Heraldic Book-Stamps (London, 1909), pp. 273-4). Purchased from H. Farrer 23 July 1842.

This MS recorded in Woudhuysen, p. 100. The portrait of Elizabeth is reproduced in Roy Strong, Portraits of Queen Elizabeth I (Oxford, 1963), pp. 100-2.

Unpublished Latin prose treatise, beginning ‘Cogitanti mihi sapius de Maiesta eis tua laudibus (Regina serenissima, qua paruis Britannorum finibus latebrisque non contentae transcenderunt Alpes...’.

Egerton MS 985

A folio volume of accounts of state and ceremonial events in the reigns of Henry VII and Henry VIII, in a single professional secretary hand up to f. 76r, a second hand thereafter, including an index, 126 leaves (including remains of excised leaves), in 19th-century calf gilt. Late 16th century.

Bookplate of Horace Walpole (1717-97), fourth Earl of Orford, of Strawberry Hill, author, politician and patron of the arts. Bought from Thomas Thorpe, 14 October 1843.

f. 32v

SkJ 22.8: John Skelton, Verses Presented to King Henry VII (‘O moste famous noble king! thy fame doth spring and spreade’)

Copy, with introductory lines beginning ‘Englande now reioyse, for ioyous may thow be’.

Canon, D 57, p. 18. First published in Elias Ashmole, The Institutional Laws and Ceremonies of the Most Noble Order of the Garter (London, 1672). Dyce, II, 387-8. Discussed and Skelton's authorship rejected in Richard Firth Green, ‘The Verses Presented to King Henry VII: A Poem in the Skelton Apocrypha’, ELN, 16 (1978), 5-8.

Egerton MS 1160

A collection of epitaphs, principally from churches in and about London, at least up to f. 193 in a single large rounded hand, an epitaph on f. 309 dated 1760, 244 folio leaves. Late 18th century.

Owned in 1785 by Mary Windsor of Tottenham High Cross, Owned in 1821 by one John Marris [i.e. Morris?]. Bookplate of James Walsh, FSA, FRAS. Purchased from J. R. Smith 9 December 1848.

f. 72v

DaJ 183.5: Sir John Davies, On the Deputy of Ireland his child (‘As carefull mothers doe to sleeping lay’)

Copy of a version headed ‘On a Monument this Inscription’ and beginning ‘As Nurses strive their Babes in Bed to lie’.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1637), p. 411. Krueger, p. 303.

f. 78r

HeR 249.8: Robert Herrick, Upon his kinswoman Mistris Elizabeth Herrick (‘Sweet virgin, that I do not set’)

Copy, headed ‘An Epitaph in memory of ye late deceas'd virgin, Mrs: Elizabeth Hereicke’.

First published in John Stow, Survey of London (London, 1633), p. 812. Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 145-6. Patrick, pp. 197-8. The memorial tablet of c.1630 bearing this epitaph at St Margaret's Church, Westminster, was restored there in 1955: see Charles Smyth, ‘A Herrick Epitaph’, TLS (13 May 1955), p. 253.

f. 89v

MoG 16: George Morley, An Epitaph upon King James (‘All that have eyes now wake and weep’)

Copy, headed ‘On King James the ffirst’ and here beginning ‘He that hath Eyes, now wake and weep’.

A version of lines 1-22, headed ‘Epitaph on King James’ and beginning ‘He that hath eyes now wake and weep’, published in William Camden's Remaines (London, 1637), p. 398.

Attributed to Edward Fairfax in The Fairfax Correspondence, ed. George Johnson (1848), I, 2-3 (see MoG 54). Edited from that publication in Godfrey of Bulloigne: A critical edition of Edward Fairfax's translation of Tasso's Gerusalemme Liberata, together with Fairfax's Original Poems, ed. Kathleen M. Lea and T.M. Gang (Oxford, 1981), pp. 690-1. The poem is generally ascribed to George Morley.

f. 135r

StW 307.5: William Strode, On a Butcher marrying a Tanners daughter (‘A fitter Match hath never bin’)

Copy.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1636). Dobell, p. 119. Forey, p. 18.

f. 136r

DaJ 140.5: Sir John Davies, An Epitaph (‘Here lieth Kitt Craker, the kinge of good fellowes’)

Copy of a version headed ‘On a Bellows Mender. Epi:’ and beginning ‘Here lies John Cucker. Mender of Bellows’.

A version, ascribed to John Hoskyns, first published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1605). Krueger, p. 303. Edited in The Life, Letters, and Writings of John Hoskyns 1566-1638, ed. Louise Brown Osborn (New Haven & London, 1937), p. 170.

f. 143r

RaW 364.8: Sir Walter Ralegh, Epitaph on the Earl of Salisbury (‘Here lies Hobinall, our Pastor while ere’)

Copy, headed ‘Another’ [i.e. on the Earl of Somerset].

First published in Francis Osborne, Traditionall Memoyres on the raigne of King Iames (London, 1658). Works (1829), VIII, 735-6. Latham, p. 53.

Of doubtful authorship according to Latham, p. 146, and Lefranc (1968), p. 84.

f. 143v

BrW 201.5: William Browne of Tavistock, On the Countess Dowager of Pembroke (‘Underneath this sable herse’)

Copy, headed ‘On the Lady Pembrook’.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1623), p. 340. Brydges (1815), p. 5. Goodwin, II, 294. Browne's authorship supported in C.F. Main, ‘Two Items in the Jonson Apocrypha’, N&Q, 199 (June 1954), 243-5.

ff. 153v-4r

BrW 159.5: William Browne of Tavistock, On One Drowned in the Snow (‘Within a fleece of silent waters drown'd’)

Copy, headed ‘Epit. On a man drown'd in the Snow’.

First published in Wits Recreations (London, 1640). Brydges (1815), p. 76. Goodwin, II, 290.

f. 200v

PoW 87: Walton Poole, On the death of King James (‘Can Christendoms great champion sink away’)

Copy of lines 1-18.

First published in Oxford Drollery (1671), p. 170. A version of lines 1-18, on the death of Gustavus Adolphus, was published in The Swedish Intelligencer, 3rd Part (1633). Also ascribed to William Strode.

Egerton MS 1220

A small square album, or liber amicorum, of miscellaneous autograph inscriptions and coloured coats of arms, belonging to Johannes Opsimathes, of Moravia, 223 leaves, in contemporary vellum.

f. 223r

AndL 84: Lancelot Andrewes, Document(s)

Autograph verse inscription, several lines, signed by Andrewes as Bishop of Ely, dated July 1616. 1616.

Egerton MS 1324

The liber amicorum of Christoph Arnold, Professor of History at Nuremberg, an oblong duodecimo.

f. 85v

*MnJ 99: John Milton, Document(s)

Autograph signature (‘Joannes Miltonius’), after a quotation from the Greek New Testament (2 Cor. xii, 9: meaning ‘in weakness my strength is made perfect’) in another hand, 19/29 November 1651. 1651.

Facsimiles in Sotheby, Ramblings, after p. 112 (Plate XVI, No. iv); in John Milton 1608-1674 Facsimiles of Autographs and Documents in the British Museum (London, 1908); in Milton Tercentenary: The Portraits, Prints and Writings of John Milton Exhibited at Christ's College, Cambridge, 1908 (Cambridge, 1908), after p. 110; in Greg, English Literary Autographs, Plate LIII(b); in Don M. Wolfe, Milton and His England (Princeton, 1971), p. 92; and in Hilton Kelliher and Sally Brown, English Literary Manuscripts (London, 1986), No. 18, p. 29. Recorded in Columbia XVIII, 271, and in LR, II, 104-5.

Egerton MS 1527

A duodecimo notebook apparently ‘found in the D[uke] of Monmouths pocket when he was taken [after the Battle of Sedgemoor] and is most of his owne hand writing’. c.1683-5.

ff. 56r-v

PsK 313: Katherine Philips, A Retir'd friendship, to Ardelia. 23d Augo 1651 (‘Come, my Ardelia, to this bowre’)

Copy of a completely recast eighteen-line version, headed ‘Song’ and beginning ‘With joie we do leave thee’, together with some music.

Edited from this MS in Charles Chenevix Trench, The Western Rising (London, 1969), pp. 83-4. Edited from this MS, and discussed, with facsimiles, in Hageman & Sununu, EMS, 4 (1993), pp. 209-14.

First published in Poems (1664), pp. 56-9. Poems (1667), pp. 28-9. Saintsbury, p. 524. Hageman (1987), pp. 592-3. Thomas, I, 97-8, poem 22.

f. 56v

PsK 45: Katherine Philips, A Countrey life (‘How sacred and how innocent’)

Copy of a completely recast twelve-line version, headed ‘Song’ and beginning ‘O how blest and how inocent’ (with music possibly belonging to this song on f. 58r).

This MS recorded in Thomas, pp. 363-4; discussed, with facsimiles, in Hageman & Sununu, EMS, 4 (1993).

First published in Poems (1664), pp. 177-82. Poems (1667), pp. 88-91. Saintsbury, pp. 588. Thomas, I, 159-62, poem 61. Anonymous musical setting published in The Banquet of Musick (London, 1691).

passim

TaJ 123: Jeremy Taylor, Extracts

Extracts from prayers.

Egerton MS 1533

f. 57r

ClE 137: Edward Hyde, First Earl of Clarendon, Letters to the Duke of York and the Duchess of York

Copy.

Letters by Clarendon to his daughter Anne (who died on 31 March 1671 before the letter arrived) and to her husband, the Duke of York (later James II), on the occasion of her conversion to Roman Catholicism. The original letters, which received particular attention by his contemporaries because of their subject matter, are not known to survive.

These were first published in Two Letters written by…Edward Earl of Clarendon…one to His Royal Highness the Duke of York, the other to the Dutchess, occasioned by her Embracing the Roman Catholic Religion (London, [1680?]) and were reprinted in State Tracts (1689), in An Appendix to the History of the Grand Rebellion (Oxford, 1724), pp. 313-24, and elsewhere.

Egerton MS 1625

Copy on 83 quarto leaves. Mid-late 17th century.

ClE 29: Edward Hyde, First Earl of Clarendon, A shorte view of the State and condicon of the kingdome of Ireland from the year 1640 to this tyme

Microfilm of this MS in the National Library of Ireland, n. 782, p. 508.

First published in Dublin, 1719-20. Published in London, 1720. Incorporated into the 1816, 1826 and 1849 editions of The History of the Rebellion. Reprinted as Vol. II of A Collection of Several Valuable Pieces of Clarendon (2 vols, London, 1727).

Egerton MS 1787

Shakespeare's signature on the mortgage of the Blackfriars Gate-House, on a membrane of vellum, 11 March 1612/13. 1613.

*ShW 127: William Shakespeare, Document(s)

Unfolding facsimile in S. Schoenbaum, William Shakespeare: A Documentary Life (New York, 1975), pp. 225-6. Facsimile also in William Shakespeare: A Documentary Volume, ed. Catherine Loomis, DLB, 263 (Detroit, 2002), p. 218. Discussed in R.C. Bald, ‘The Booke of Sir Thomas Moore and its problems’, Shakespeare Survey, 2 (1949), 44-65; and elsewhere.

Egerton MS 1910

A formal copy, without dedication, in the professional and of the ‘Parisian scribe’, with Hobbes's autograph corrections and marginal annotations (particularly on ff. 16, 38v-40, 41, 44v, 53, 58v, 235v-9), on 248 quarto vellum pages. Traditionally believed to be the author's presentation copy to Charles II. 1650-1.

*HbT 32: Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan

Later owners: Philip Carteret Webb (1700-70), antiquary and politician. S. Baker and G. Leigh, 25 February 1771 (Webb sale), lot 2826. William Henry Pratt, of Lissanoure, Antrim (according to a letter by him of 30 June 1802). George, Earl Macartney (d.1806). Acquired from George Macartney Esq., 13 April 1861.

This MS discussed in Keith Brown, ‘The Artist of the Leviathan Title-Page’, BLJ, 4 (1978), 24-36, where the drawing on the title-page is attributed to the Bohemian artist and engraver Wenzel Hollar (1607-77). Facsimile of p. 144 in Noel Malcolm, ‘Hobbes, the Latin Optical Manuscript, and the Parisian Scribe’, EMS, 12 (2005). 210-32 (p. 213).

First published in London, 1651. Molesworth, English, III. Edited by Karl Schuhmann and G.A.J. Rogers, 2 vols (Bristol, 2003-5) [and see Noel Malcolm's review in TLS, 3 December 2004, pp. 3-4].

Egerton MS 1994

A folio composite volume of plays. c.1620s-1640s.

From the library of Lord Charlemont.

ff. 2r-29r

B&F 43: Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher, The Elder Brother

This MS partly collated in Greg; described in Greg, Dramatic Documents, I, 334-7.

First published in London, 1637. Dyce, X, 197-292. Bullen, II, 1-100, ed. W. W. Greg. Bowers, IX, 469-545, ed. Fredson Bowers.

ff. 30r-51r

HyT 5: Thomas Heywood, Dick of Devonshire

Copy of a play probably written or revised by Heywood, in the secretary hand of a professional scribe also responsible for ChG 12.5, MiT 6, and a verse miscellany in the British Library, Add. MS 33998. [1626?].

Edited from this MS by editors. Discussed in Greg, Dramatic Documents, I, 329-32; in Bentley, V, 1318-20; and in James G. McManaway, ‘Latin Title-Page Mottoes as a Clue to Dramatic Authorship’, The Library, 4th Ser. 26 (1945-6), 28-36, reedited in McManaway, Studies in Shakespeare, Bibliography and Theater (New York, 1969), 55-66. Facsimile pages in the Malone Society edition and in McManaway article.

First published in A Collection of Old English Plays, ed. A.H. Bullen, II (London, 1883), 1-99. Edited by James G. and Mary R. McManaway, Malone Society (Oxford, 1955).

ff. 52r-73r

*HyT 4: Thomas Heywood, The Captives, or The Lost Recovered

Autograph, with revisions, untitled, prepared for use as a prompt-book by another hand. [1624].

Edited from this MS by editors. Discussed in Greg, Dramatic Documents, I, 284-8, with a facsimile example, II, plate 7; in Bentley, IV, 560-2; in Grace Ioppolo, ‘“The foule sheet and ye fayr”: Henslowe, Daborne, Heywood and the Nature of Foul-Paper and Fair-Copy Dramatic Manuscripts’, EMS, 11 (2002), 132-53, with a facsimile of f. 52r; and in Grace Ioppolo, Dramatists and their Manuscripts in the Age of Shakespeare, Jonson, Middleton and Heywood (London & New York), pp. 94-9, 115, with facsimile examples. Facsimile pages also in the Malone Society edition; in Greg, English Literary Autographs, plate XXII(a); in Petti, English Literary Hands, No. 55; and in DLB, vol. 62, Elizabethan Dramatists, ed. Fredson Bowers (Detroit, 1987), p. 121.

First published in A Collection of Old English Plays, ed. A.H. Bullen, IV (London, 1885), 99-127. Edited by Arthur Brown, Malone Society (Oxford, 1953).

ff. 74r-95r

*HyT 6: Thomas Heywood, The Escapes of Jupiter

Autograph, the first act entitled ‘Calisto’; the play entitled at the end in another hand ‘The Escapes of Iupiter’; c. 1625?.

Facsimile example of the first page in DLB, vol. 62, Elizabethan Dramatists, ed. Fredson Bowers (Detroit, 1987), p. 119. Facsimile of f. 79r in Henry D. Janzen, ‘Preparing a Diplomatic Edition: Heywood's The Escapes of Jupiter’, in Play-Texts in Old Spelling, ed. G. B. Shand with Raymond C. Shady (AMS Press, 1984), pp. 73-9.

This play is made up of scenes from The Golden Age (London, 1611. Dramatic Works, III, 1-79) and The Silver Age (London, 1613. Dramatic Works, III, 81-164). Not published as a separate play but discussed in W.W. Greg, ‘The Escapes of Jupiter’, Palaestra, 148 (1925), reprinted in Greg, Collected Papers (Oxford, 1966), pp. 156-83. Also discussed in Greg, Dramatic Documents, I, 318-21; in Bentley, III, 567; and in Henry D. Janzen, ‘A Note on the Authorship of The Escapes of Jupiter’, ELN, 10 (1972-3), 270-3.

ff. 293-316

SiP 168.3: Sir Philip Sidney, Arcadia related

Copy of an anonymous dramatic adaptation of Arcadia, entitled Loves Changelinges change.

The complete play has been edited by Felicina Rota in L'Arcadia di Sidney e il teatro (Bari, 1966) and by John P. Cutts (Fennimore, 1974).

f. 298r

SiP 111: Sir Philip Sidney, Old Arcadia. Book I, No. 2 (‘Transformed in shew, but more transformed in minde’)

Copy, in the play Loves Changelinges change.

Edited from this MS in John P. Cutts, ‘More Manuscript Versions of Poems by Sidney’, ELN, 9 (1971-2), 3-12 (pp. 4-5).

Ringler, pp. 11-12. Robertson, pp. 28-9.

f. 300

SiP 117: Sir Philip Sidney, Old Arcadia. Book I, No. 4 (‘Come shepheard's weedes, become your master's minde’)

Copy of an abridged version beginning ‘These weedes will beecome my mind’, in the play Loves Changelinges change.

Edited from this MS in John P. Cutts, ‘More Manuscript Versions of Poems by Sidney’, ELN, 9 (1971-2), 3-12 (p. 5).

Ringler, p. 13. Robertson, p. 40.

f. 300v

SiP 120: Sir Philip Sidney, Old Arcadia. First Eclogues no. 6 (‘We love, and have our loves rewarded’)

Copy of a two-stanza version beginning ‘wee loue and are beelovd againe’, in the play Loves Changelinges change.

Edited from this MS in John P. Cutts, ‘More Manuscript Versions of Poems by Sidney’, ELN, 9 (1971-2), 3-12 (pp. 5-6).

Ringler, p. 14. Robertson, pp. 57-8.

Egerton MS 2005

Copy, in a professional hand, on 166 folio leaves. c.1640s.

HbT 23: Thomas Hobbes, The Elements of Law, Natural and Politic

Later in the library of the Porte family, of Islam. Bought by W. Ford in 1807. Acquired by the British Museum from Boone in 1866.

This MS recorded in Tönnies.

First published, dedicated to William Cavendish, Earl of Newcastle, in two parts, as Humane Nature: Or, The fundamental Elements of Policie, (London, [1649]-1650), and as De Corpore Politico: or The Elements of Law, Moral and Politick (London, 1650). Molesworth, English, IV, 1-76, 77-228. Edited by Ferdinand Tönnies (London, 1889). 2nd edition, with an introduction by M.M. Goldsmith, (London, 1969).

Egerton MS 2026

A folio volume of of tracts and papers chiefly on state matters, largely in one hand, 72 leaves (plus blanks). c.1635.

Inscribed (f. 10r) with names of Stephen Foster of Wrexham, Buckinghamshire (possibly the principal compiler) and Robert Drake of Topsham, Devon. Bookplate (f. 11r) of Berkeley Seymour of Queens's College, Cambridge. Purchased from the Rev. John C. Jackson 8 December 1866.

f. 11v

WoH 22: Sir Henry Wotton, The Character of a Happy Life (‘How happy is he born and taught’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Sir Thomas Overbury, A Wife, 5th impression (London, 1614). Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), pp. 522-3. Hannah (1845), pp. 28-31. Some texts of this poem discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Wotton's “The Character of a Happy Life”’, The Library, 5th Ser. 10 (1955), 270-4, and in Ted-Larry Pebworth, ‘New Light on Sir Henry Wotton's “The Character of a Happy Life”’, The Library, 5th Ser. 33 (1978), 223-6 (plus plates).

f. 12r

CaE 16: Elizabeth Cary, Viscountess Falkland, An Epitaph upon the death of the Duke of Buckingham (‘Reader stand still and see, loe, how I am’)

Copy of the six-line epitaph, headed ‘Another’.

This MS recorded in Akkerman.

A six-line (epitaph) version is ascribed to ‘the Countesse of Faukland’ in two MS copies. In some sources it is followed by a further 44 lines (elegy) beginning ‘Yet were bidentalls sacred and the place’. The latter also appears, anonymously, as a separate poem in a number of other sources. The authorship remains uncertain. For an argument for Lady Falkland's authorship of all 50 lines, see Akkerman.

Both sets of verse were first published, as separate but sequential poems, in Poems or Epigrams, Satyrs (London, 1658), pp. 101-2. All 50 lines are edited in Akkerman, pp. 195-6.

f. 65v

RaW 462.5: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Say not you love, unless you do’

Copy, untitled and subscribed ‘J.D.’.

First published in Inedited Poetical Miscellanies, 1584-1700, ed. W.C. Hazlitt ([London], 1870), p. [179]. Listed but not printed in Latham, p. 174. Rudick, No. 38, p. 106.

f. 66v

DaW 88: Sir William Davenant, Love and Honour, Act IV, scene i. Song (‘No morning red, and blushing faire’)

Copy, headed ‘Songe’.

First published in London, 1649. Dramatic Works, III, 91-192 (pp. 155-6). Gibbs, pp. 208-9.

f. 67r

BmF 122: Francis Beaumont, On Madam Fowler desiring a sonnet to be writ on her (‘Good Madam Fowler, do not trouble me’)

Copy, untitled and subscribed ‘F. Beo:’.

First published in Alexander B. Grosart, ‘Literary Finds in Trinity College, Dublin, and Elsewhere’, ES, 26 (1899), 1-19 (p. 8).

f. 67v

JnB 362: Ben Jonson, A Nymphs Passion (‘I love, and he loves me again’)

Copy, headed ‘A Nymphes Passion in a Pastorall’.

This MS collated in Herford & Simpson.

First published in The Vnder-wood (vii) in Workes (London, 1640). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 147-8.

Egerton MS 2128

A formal copy, in a neat italic hand, i + 48 duodecimo leaves, in 19th-century half-morocco marbled boards. With a title-page ‘Divine Appearances Or A very Wonderful Account of the Dealings of God with Mrs. Agnes Beamount, Who was afterwards Married to Mr. Story, a Merchant at High-Gate, Taken from a Coppy Transcribed from a MS.S. in the hands of Mrs. Kenwrick at Bavant in Hampshire’, the first page of text decorated with a pen-and-ink vignette of a landscape scene, including paragraphs at the end not in the earlier MS. Early 18th century.

BmA 1: Agnes Beaumont, Divine appearances, or a very wonderful account of the dealings of God with Mrs. Agnes Beaumont

Acquired in November 1871 from William Carew Hazlitt (1834-1913), bibliographer and writer.

Facsimiles of the title-page and first page of text in Camden, pp. 10-11, 34, and the concluding paragraphs edited on p. 84. Facsimile, with transcription, of the title-page also in Reading Early Modern Women, ed. Helen Ostovich and Elizabeth Sauer (New York & London, 2004), pp. 286-7.

First published, as The Singular Experiences and Great Sufferings of Mrs. Agnes Beaumont, who was born at Edworth, in the County of Bedford, incorporated in Samuel James, An Abstract of the Gracious Dealings of God (1760). Edited, as The Narrative of the Persecution(s) of Agnes Beaumont, by G. B. Harrison (London, 1929), by Vera J. Camden (East Lansing, Michigan, 1992), and in John Bunyan, Grace Abounding with other Spiritual Autobiographies, ed. John Stachniewski and Anita Pacheco (Oxford, 1998), pp. 191-224.

Egerton MS 2222

A folio volume of proceedings and speeches in the House of Commons in 1601-2, principally from Hayward Townshend's journal, in a single professional hand, 279 leaves. Late 17th century.

Inscribed (f. 2r) ‘Stamford 1693’. Inscribed in pencil (f. 1r) by Alfred John Kempe, 4 June 1836. Purchased from Sotheby's, January/February 1873.

ff. 126r-8r

ElQ 262: Queen Elizabeth I, Elizabeth's Golden Speech, November 30, 1601

Copy of Version I, introduced ‘The Queen answered her selfe’.

First published (Version III), as Her maiesties most princelie answere, deliuered by her selfe at White-hall, on the last day of November 1601 (London, 1601: STC 7578).

Version I. Beginning ‘Mr. Speaker, we have heard your declaration and perceive your care of our estate...’. Hartley, III, 412-14. Hartley, III, 495-6. Collected Works, Speech 23, pp. 337-40 (Version 1). Selected Works, Speech 11, pp. 84-92.

Version II. Beginning ‘Mr. Speaker, we perceive your coming is to present thanks unto me...’. Hartley, III, 294-7 (third version). Collected Works, Speech 23, pp. 340-2 (Version 2).

Version III. Beginning ‘Mr. Speaker, we perceive by you, whom we did constitute the mouth of our Lower House, how with even consent...’. Hartley, III, 292-3 (second version). Collected Works, Speech 23, pp. 342-4 (Version 3). STC 7578.

Version IV. Beginning ‘Mr Speaker, I well understand by that you have delivered, that you with these gentlemen of the Lower House come to give us thankes for benefitts receyved...’. Hartley, III, 289-91 (first version).

ff. 250r-3r

ElQ 263: Queen Elizabeth I, Elizabeth's Golden Speech, November 30, 1601

Copy of Version I, with introduction (‘...And her Majestie beganne thus to answer her Selfe: vizt./’.

This MS cited in Hartley.

First published (Version III), as Her maiesties most princelie answere, deliuered by her selfe at White-hall, on the last day of November 1601 (London, 1601: STC 7578).

Version I. Beginning ‘Mr. Speaker, we have heard your declaration and perceive your care of our estate...’. Hartley, III, 412-14. Hartley, III, 495-6. Collected Works, Speech 23, pp. 337-40 (Version 1). Selected Works, Speech 11, pp. 84-92.

Version II. Beginning ‘Mr. Speaker, we perceive your coming is to present thanks unto me...’. Hartley, III, 294-7 (third version). Collected Works, Speech 23, pp. 340-2 (Version 2).

Version III. Beginning ‘Mr. Speaker, we perceive by you, whom we did constitute the mouth of our Lower House, how with even consent...’. Hartley, III, 292-3 (second version). Collected Works, Speech 23, pp. 342-4 (Version 3). STC 7578.

Version IV. Beginning ‘Mr Speaker, I well understand by that you have delivered, that you with these gentlemen of the Lower House come to give us thankes for benefitts receyved...’. Hartley, III, 289-91 (first version).

Egerton MS 2230

A quarto verse miscellany, including 18 poems by Donne, in several hands over a period (the predominant secretary hand on ff. 1r-35v, 45v-63r), written from both ends, 91 leaves, in later green morocco. c.1630s [-1777].

Inscribed (f. 1r) ‘E Libris Richardo Glovero pharmacopol. Londinense pertinantibus’, the date ‘1638’ possibly added in a different hand. The name ‘William Allen’ on f. 77v among scribbling. Inscribed (f. 1v) by a later owner, apparently for ‘Mr Thorpe’, ‘I was informed by the bookseller of whom I bought this book; that it belonged formerly to a literary gentleman who lived in Burton Crescent and who died about six months ago. 3rd Augt. 1835’.

Cited in IELM, I.i (1980), as the ‘Glover MS’: DnJ Δ 42.

f. 3r-v

DnJ 3739: John Donne, A Valediction: forbidding mourning (‘As virtuous men passe mildly away’)

Copy, with a sideheading ‘Elegie BKR[?]’.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 49-51. Gardner, Elegies, pp. 62-4. Shawcross, No. 31.

ff. 3v-4v

BmF 64: Francis Beaumont, An Elegy on the Lady Markham (‘As unthrifts groan in straw for their pawn'd beds’)

First published in Poems (London, 1640). Dyce, XI, 503-5.

ff. 4v-6v

BmF 35: Francis Beaumont, An Elegy on the Death of the Virtuous Lady, Elizabeth Countess of Rutland (‘I may forget to eat, to drink, to sleep’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Sir Thomas Overbury, A Wife, 11th impression (London, 1622). Dyce, XI, 507-11.

f. 7v

RaW 249: Sir Walter Ralegh, On the Life of Man (‘What is our life? a play of passion’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Latham, p. 144.

First published, in a musical setting, in Orlando Gibbons, The First Set of Madrigals and Mottets (London, 1612). Latham, pp. 51-2. Rudick, Nos 29A, 29B and 29C (three versions, pp. 69-70). MS texts also discussed in Michael Rudick, ‘The Text of Ralegh's Lyric “What is our life?”’, SP, 83 (1986), 76-87.

ff. 8v-9v

BmF 6: Francis Beaumont, Ad Comitissam Rutlandiae (‘Madam, so may my verses pleasing be’)

Copy, untitled.

First published, as ‘An Elegie by F. B.’, in Certain Elegies, Done by Sundrie Excellent Wits (London, 1618). Dyce XI, 505-7.

f. 11r

DnJ 1368: John Donne, The Flea (‘Marke but this flea, and marke in this’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 40-1. Gardner, Elegies, p. 53. Shawcross, No. 60.

f. 11v

DnJ 1542: John Donne, His Picture (‘Here take my picture. though I bid farewell’)

Copy, with sideheading ‘Elegy’.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published as ‘Elegie V’ in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 86-7 (as ‘Elegie V’). Gardner, Elegies, p. 25. Shawcross, No. 19. Variorum, 2 (2000), p. 264.

f. 12r-v

DnJ 3915: John Donne, The Will (‘Before I sigh my last gaspe, let me breath’)

Copy of a five-stanza version, with sideheading ‘ye will / Du:’.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 56-8. Gardner, Elegies, pp. 54-5. Shawcross, No. 66.

f. 12v

CwT 779: Thomas Carew, A Song (‘In her faire cheekes two pits doe lye’)

Copy, untitled and here beginning ‘In youre fayre cheekes two pitts there bee’

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 105.

f. 13r

DnJ 442: John Donne, Breake of day (‘'Tis true, 'tis day. what though it be?’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published in William Corkine, Second Book of Ayres (London, 1612), sig. B1v. Grierson, I, 23. Gardner, Elegies, pp. 35-6. Shawcross, No. 46.

f. 13r

JnB 589: Ben Jonson, Epicoene I, i, 92-102. Song (‘Still to be neat, still to be drest’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in London, 1616. Herford & Simpson, V, 139-272.

f. 13v

HrJ 196: Sir John Harington, Of a pregnant pure sister (‘I learned a tale more fitt to be forgotten’)

Copy of a ten-line version, untitled and here beginning ‘A godlye maide wth one of her societye’.

First published (13-line version) in The Epigrams of Sir John Harington, ed. N.E. McClure (Philadelphia, 1926), but see HrJ 197. McClure (1930), No. 413, p. 315. Kilroy, Book IV, No. 80, p. 239.

f. 14r

DnJ 1459: John Donne, The good-morrow (‘I wonder by my troth, what thou, and I’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 7-8. Gardner, Elegies, pp. 70-1. Shawcross, No. 32.

ff. 14v-15r

DnJ 2249: John Donne, Lovers infinitenesse (‘If yet I have not all thy love’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 17-18. Gardner, Elegies, pp. 77-8. Shawcross, No. 41.

ff. 15r-16v

DnJ 387: John Donne, The Bracelet (‘Not that in colour it was like thy haire’)

Copy, headed ‘The loss of a chaine: Elegie’.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published, as ‘Eleg. XII. The Bracelet’, in Poems (1635). Grierson, I, 96-100 (as ‘Elegie XI’). Gardner, Elegies, pp. 1-4. Shawcross, No. 8. Variorum, 2 (2000), pp. 5-7.

f. 17r

DnJ 674: John Donne, Communitie (‘Good wee must love, and must hate ill’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 32-3. Gardner, Elegies, pp. 33-4. Shawcross, No. 53.

f. 17v

DnJ 1843: John Donne, The Legacie (‘When I dyed last, and, Deare, I dye’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 20. Gardner, Elegies, p. 50. Shawcross, No. 43.

f. 18r-v

DnJ 503: John Donne, The broken heart (‘He is starke mad, who ever sayes’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

Lines 1-16 first published in A Helpe to Memory and Discourse (London, 1630), pp. 45-6. Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 48-9. Gardner, Elegies, pp. 51-2. Shawcross, No. 29.

f. 20r

DnJ 1976: John Donne, Loves Alchymie (‘Some that have deeper digg'd loves Myne then I’)

Copy, untitled, superscribed ‘Du:’.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 39-40. Gardner, Elegies, p. 81. Shawcross, No. 59.

f. 20v

WoH 23: Sir Henry Wotton, The Character of a Happy Life (‘How happy is he born and taught’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Sir Thomas Overbury, A Wife, 5th impression (London, 1614). Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), pp. 522-3. Hannah (1845), pp. 28-31. Some texts of this poem discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Wotton's “The Character of a Happy Life”’, The Library, 5th Ser. 10 (1955), 270-4, and in Ted-Larry Pebworth, ‘New Light on Sir Henry Wotton's “The Character of a Happy Life”’, The Library, 5th Ser. 33 (1978), 223-6 (plus plates).

ff. 22r-v

DnJ 836: John Donne, The Curse (‘Who ever guesses, thinks, or dreames he knowes’)

Copy, with sideheading ‘Curse’.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 41-2. Gardner, Elegies, pp. 40-1. Shawcross, No. 61.

f. 23r

DnJ 1811: John Donne, A Lecture upon the Shadow (‘Stand still, and I will read to thee’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published, as ‘Song’, in Poems (1635). Grierson, I, 71-2. Gardner, Elegies, pp. 78-9. Shawcross, No. 30.

f. 24r-v

PeW 227: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, A Paradox in praise of a painted Woman (‘Not kiss? by Love I must, and make impression’)

Copy, headed ‘A paradox in prayse of a paynted face’.

This MS recorded in Krueger.

Poems (1660), pp. 93-5, superscribed ‘P.’. First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656), p. 97. Listed in Krueger's Appendix I: ‘Spurious Poems in the 1660 Edition’ as possibly by William Baker. The Poems of John Donne, ed Herbert J.C. Grierson, 2 vols (Oxford, 1912), I, 456-9, as ‘A Paradox of a Painted Face’, among ‘Poems attributed to Donne in MSS’. Also ascribed to James Shirley.

A shorter version, beginning ‘Nay pish, nay pew, nay faith, and will you, fie’, was first published, as ‘A Maids Denyall’, in Richard Chamberlain, The Harmony of the Muses (London, 1654) [apparently unique exemplum in the Huntington, edited in facsimile by Ernest W. Sullivan, II (Aldershot, 1990), pp. 49-50].

ff. 25r-6v

HoJ 61: John Hoskyns, The Censure of a Parliament Fart (‘Downe came graue auncient Sr John Crooke’)

Copy, headed ‘Le Pet:’.

Attributed to Hoskyns by John Aubrey. Cited, but unprinted, as No. III of ‘Doubtful Verses’ in Osborn, p. 300. Early Stuart Libels website.

f. 28v

StW 1377: William Strode, Upon the blush of a faire Ladie (‘Stay, lustie bloud, where canst thou seeke’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Forey.

First published in Wit Restor'd (London, 1658). Dobell, pp. 39-40. Listed, without text, in Forey, p. 339.

ff. 29r-28v

BrN 33: Nicholas Breton, ‘Goe muse vnto the bower, whereas the mistress dwelles’

Copy of lines 1-8 (with a version of lines 7-8 repeated on f. 28v).

This MS collated in Rollins, Bowre, p. 75.

First published, as ‘A Poem’, in Brittons Bowre of Delights (London, 1591), <No. 7>. Authorship unknown.

f. 33r

DnJ 1480: John Donne, Hero and Leander (‘Both rob'd of aire, we both lye in one ground’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Milgate and in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 75. Milgate, Satires, p. 50. Shawcross, No. 83. Variorum, 8 (1995), pp. 7 and 10.

f. 34r

RaW 365: Sir Walter Ralegh, Epitaph on the Earl of Salisbury (‘Here lies Hobinall, our Pastor while ere’)

Copy, untitled and here beginning ‘Heere lyes Hobbinoll our shepheard while ere’.

Edited from this MS in online Early Stuart Libels.

First published in Francis Osborne, Traditionall Memoyres on the raigne of King Iames (London, 1658). Works (1829), VIII, 735-6. Latham, p. 53.

Of doubtful authorship according to Latham, p. 146, and Lefranc (1968), p. 84.

f. 35r

DnJ 1889: John Donne, A licentious person (‘Thy sinnes and haires may no man equall call’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Shawcross.

First published in Henry Fitzgeffrey, Satyres and Satyricall Epigram's (London, 1617). Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 77. Milgate, Satires, p. 52. Shawcross, No. 90. Variorum, 8 (1995), pp. 8 and 11.

f. 35v

JnB 108: Ben Jonson, Epitaph [on Cecilia Bulstrode] (‘Stay, view this stone: And, if thou beest not such’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in John A. Harper, ‘Ben Jonson and Mrs. Bulstrode’, N&Q, 3rd Ser. 4 (5 September 1863), 198-9. Herford & Simpson, VIII, 371-2.

f. 48r

DnJ 1481: John Donne, Hero and Leander (‘Both rob'd of aire, we both lye in one ground’)

Second copy, untitled.

This MS collated in Milgate and in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 75. Milgate, Satires, p. 50. Shawcross, No. 83. Variorum, 8 (1995), pp. 7 and 10.

f. 51v

DnJ 3326: John Donne, To Mr T.W. (‘All haile sweet Poët, more full of more strong fire’)

Copy of lines 1-8, untitled.

This MS recorded in Milgate and in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 203-5. Milgate, Satires, pp. 59-60. Shawcross, No. 114.

f. 57r-v

CmT 132: Thomas Campion, ‘Though your strangenesse frets my hart’

Copy, untitled.

This MS collated in Doughtie, pp. 573-5; recorded in Davis, p. 495.

First published in Robert Jones, A Musical Dreame (London, 1609). Campion, Two Bookes of Ayres (London, [c.1612-13]), Book II, No. xvi. Davis, pp. 106-7. Doughtie, pp. 319-20.

f. 62r

SuH 58: Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, ‘Set me whereas the sonne doth perche the grene’

Copy, untitled.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Padelford, No. 6, p. 58. Jones, p. 2.

ff. 72v-3r

CoR 119: Richard Corbett, An Elegie vpon the Death of Sir Thomas Ouerbury Knight poysoned in the Tower (‘Hadst thou, like other Sirs and Knights of worth’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Sir Thomas Overbury, A Wife, 9th impression (London, 1616). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 18-19.

Egerton MS 2231

A quarto volume of copies of correspondence of John Aubrey, FRS (1626-97), antiquary and biographer, transcribed from originals in the Bodleian Library. Early 19th century.

f. 187r

HaJ 5: James Harrington, Letter(s)

Copy of James Harington's letter to John Aubrey, 16 February 1669[/70] (HaJ 4). 18th-century.

f. 188r

HaJ 1.5: James Harrington, Vpon the state of Nature (‘The state of Nature neuer was so raw’)

Copy, transcribed from HaJ 1.

First published in John Aubrey, Brief Lives, ed. Andrew Clark, 2 vols (Oxford, 1898), I, 294. George Watson, ‘James Harrington: A Last Apology for Poetry’, MLN, 71 (1956), 170-2.

f. 191r-v

HbT 145: Thomas Hobbes, Letter(s)

Copy of Hobbes's letter to John Aubrey, from Chatsworth, 7[/17] September 1663. c.1663.

Recorded in Malcolm, Correspondence, Letter 153.

f. 192r

HbT 150: Thomas Hobbes, Letter(s)

Copy of Hobbes's letter to John Aubrey, from London, 30 July[/10 July] 1664. c.1664.

Recorded in Malcolm, Correspondence, Letter 167.

ff. 193r-4r

HbT 163: Thomas Hobbes, Letter(s)

Copy of Hobbes's letter to John Aubrey, from Hardwick, 24 February[/16 March] 1674/5. c.1675.

Recorded in Malcolm, Correspondence, Letter 198.

f. 204r

HbT 159: Thomas Hobbes, Letter(s)

Copy of Hobbes's letter to Josias Pullen, Vice-President of Magdalen Hall, Oxford, from London, 1[/11] February 1672/3. c.1673.

Recorded in Malcolm, Correspondence, Letter 193.

f. 205r-v

HbT 166: Thomas Hobbes, Letter(s)

Copy of Hobbes's letter to John Aubrey, from Hardwick, 5[/15] March 1677/8. c.1678.

Recorded in Malcolm, Correspondence, Letter 202.

f. 206r

HbT 170: Thomas Hobbes, Letter(s)

Copy of Hobbes's letter to John Aubrey, from Chatsworth, 25 March[/4 April] 1679.

Recorded in Malcolm, Correspondence, Letter 205.

f. 206v

HbT 168: Thomas Hobbes, Letter(s)

Copy of Hobbes's letter to William Crook, from Chatsworth, 25 March[/4 April] 1679. c.1679.

Recorded in Malcolm, Correspondence, Letter 204.

f. 207r

HbT 173: Thomas Hobbes, Letter(s)

Copy of Hobbes's letter to John Aubrey, from Chatsworth, 18[/28] August 1679. c.1679.

Recorded in Malcolm, Correspondence, Letter 209.

Egerton MS 2254

A folio volume of papers relating to the Court of Chancery, in one or more professional secretary hands, 156 leaves, in vellum boards. c.1640.

Presentation inscription (f. 1r) by Wilmot Buxton, counsellor, to his friend William Henry Black, FSA (1808-72), antiquary, Assistant Keeper of the Public Records, with Black's inscription of similar date, 8 May 1860, supposedly identifying the writer as Elias Ashmole and saying he found it in Ashmole's chambers at 77 Chancery Lane.

ff. 116r-27r

BcF 240: Francis Bacon, Ordinances in Chancery

Copy of 101 Ordinances, unnumbered, headed ‘Ordinances for the Chancery made by the Lord Bacon’.

First published as Ordinances made by...Sir Francis Bacon Knight...being then Lord Chancellor For the better and more regular Administration of Iustice in the Chancery (London, 1642), beginning ‘No decree shall be reversed, altered, or explained, being once under the Great Seale...’. Spedding, VII, 755-74 (mentioning, on p. 757, having seen some ‘MSS and editions’ of this work but without specifying them or his copy-text).

Egerton MS 2262

A quarto composite volume of twelve folio and quarto leaves, in three hands, in 19th-century half red morocco gilt. Early-mid-17th centry.

Acquired from M.C. Hamilton 11 November 1873.

ff. 1r-4v

EsR 163: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, First Letter of Advice to the Earl of Rutland

Copy, in a cursive secretary hand, headed ‘To the Right H: ye Erle of Rutland By Henry Savall’, on four quarto leaves, imperfect, lacking the last section. Early 17th century.

The letter, dated from Greenwich, 4 January [1596], beginning ‘My Lord, I hold it for a principle in the course of intelligence of state...’.

First published, as ‘The Late E. of E. his aduice to the E. of R. in his trauels’, in Profitable Instructions; Describing what speciall Obseruations are to be taken by Trauellers in all Nations, States and Countries (London, 1633), pp. 27-73. Francis Bacon, Resuscitatio (London, 1657), pp. 106-10. Spedding, IX, 6-15. W.B. Devereux, Lives and Letters of the Devereux, Earls of Essex (1853), I, No. xciii.

Essex's three letters to Rutland discussed by Paul E.J. Hammer in ‘The Earl of Essex, Fulke Greville, and the Employment of Scholars’, SP. 91/2 (Spring, 1994), 167-80, and in ‘Letters of Travel Advice from the Earl of Essex to the Earl of Rutland: Some Comments’, PQ, 74/3 (Summer 1995), 317-22. It is likely that the first letter was written substantially by Francis Bacon.

ff. 5r-7v

BcF 216.5: Francis Bacon, The History of the reign of K. Henry the Eighth, K. Edward, Q. Mary, and part of the reign of Q. Elizabeth

Copy, untitled.

A brief history beginning ‘The books which are written do in their hands represent the faculties of the mind of man...’. Quoted in John Speed, History of Great Britain (London, 1611). First published complete in Cabala (London 1663). Spedding, VI, 17-22.

Egerton MS 2326

A large collection of Cowley's poems, entitled The most Ingenious & famous Abraham Cowley's Poem's 4°, 205 leaves; large collection of Cowley's poems, entitled (f. 2v) The most Ingenious & famous Abraham Cowley's Poem's [In Manuscript added in different ink]; predominantly in three hands (A: ff. 3-90, 103-15v, 142-205v; B: ff. 91-102v; C: ff. 116-41), with additions in other hands on ff. 2v and 202v. Mid-late 17th century.

CoA 258: Abraham Cowley, Verse collection

f. 59v the childish scribbling ‘Edward Edisbury his my name’; also ‘John Owen’. Later owned (before 15 December 1873) by W. C. Hazlitt (1834-1913)

Egerton MS 2402

Autograph MS volume of works by George Cavendish, 154 small folio leaves in all. c.1556-8.

Owned in the 17th/18th century by Clement Rossington of Dronfield, Derbyshire, possibly acquired from the family of William Burton (1575-1645), Leicestershire antiquary. Later owned by the genealogical collector Thomas Lloyd; by Richard Heber (1774-1833), book collector; and by the Rev. Thomas Corser (1793-1876), book collector. Sotheby's, 13 December 1876 Corser sale), lot 453. Cape's & Co.'s, Manchester, 18 December 1876 (9th part of the Corser sale).

ff. 4r-93r

*CvG 4: George Cavendish, The Life of Cardinal Wolsey

Autograph, lacking the first leaf of the prologue.

Edited from this MS in Singer and, with a facsimile example of f. 88v, in Sylvester. Facsimile example of f. 90r in Petti, English Literary Hands (1977), No. 22.

First published in George Cavendish, The Life of Cardinal Wolsey and Metrical Visions, ed. Samuel W. Singer, 2 vols (Chiswick, 1825). The Life and Death of Cardinal Wolsey by George Cavendish, ed. Richard S. Sylvester, EETS, orig. ser. 243 (London, New York and Toronto, 1959).

ff. 94r-151r

*CvG 1: George Cavendish, Metrical Visions (‘In the monyth of Iune / I lyeng sole alon’)

Autograph, the leaves bound in the wrong sequence (the correct order being ff. 94r-112v, 128r-9v, 134r-47v, 130r-1v, 114r-27v, 132r-3v, 113r-v, 149v-51r, 148v-9r), untitled, recorded in the colophon as finished ‘le xxiiiier jour de Iunii annus regnorum Philippi Rex et Regine Marie / iiiith and vth’ [i.e. 24 June 1558].

Edited from this MS in Singer and in Edwards. Also discussed by A.S.G. Edwards in ‘The Author as Scribe: Cavendish's Metrical Visions and MS Egerton 2402’, The Library, 5th Ser. 29 (1974), 446-9, and in his ‘The Text of George Cavendish's Metrical Visions’, Analytical & Enumerative Bibliography, 2/1. (Winter, 1978), 3-62.

A series of poetical lamentations, comprising 2425 lines, on the deaths (the majority by execution) of Cardinal Wolsey, George, Viscount Rochford, Sir Henry Borris, sir Francis Weston, Sir William Brereton, Mark Smeaton, Anne Boleyn, Thomas Cromwell, Henry Courtenay, Marquess of Exeter, Henry Pole, Baron Montague, Catherine Howard, her lover Culpeper, Viscountess Rochford, Margaret Pole, Countess of Salisbury, Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, Henry VIII, Thomas Seymour, Lord Protector, Edward Seymour, Duke of Somerset, Sir Thomas Arundel, Sir Michael Stanhope, Sir Ralph Vane, Sir Miles Partridge, Edward VI, John Dudley, Duke of Northumberland, Henry Grey, Duke of Suffolk, Lady Jane Grey, and Queen Mary.

First published in George Cavendish, The Life of Cardinal Wolsey and Metrical Visions, ed. Samuel W. Singer, 2 vols (London, 1825). Metrical Visions by George Cavendish, ed. A.S.G. Edwards (Columbia, SC, 1980).

Egerton MS 2403

A small quarto verse miscellany, 51 leaves. c.1601.

Owned in 1601 by one Thomas Wenman. Later by W. Stonehouse and by the Rev. Thomas Corser, FSA (1793-1876), book collector.

ff. 38-48

BrN 51: Nicholas Breton, The Passion of a Discontented Minde (‘From silent night, true register of mones’)

Copy.

This MS discussed in Mary Shakeshaft, ‘Nicholas Breton's The Passion of a Discontented Mind: Some New Problems’, SEL, 5 (1965), 165-74; partly collated in Doughtie. Collated in May, pp. 125-7.

First published in London, 1601. Attributed to Breton in Robertson, pp. xcii-xcviii, but see also Doughtie, Lyrics from English Airs, pp. 613-15. Printed and firmly attributed to Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, in The Poems of Edward De Vere, Seventeenth Earl of Oxford, and of Robert Devereux, Second Earl of Essex, ed. Steven W. May, Studies in Philology, 77, No. 5 (Early Winter 1980), pp. 49-59 (No. 11) and pp. 94-106.

Egerton MS 2404

Fair copy of an early version. The title-page reading ‘Psalmes of Kinge David, paraphras'd for our English Lire (accordinge the the [sic] Translation allowed in the Church of England) and fitted vnto such Tunes as were heretofore in vse by George Wither’, and a prose epistle ‘To the Reader’ (ff. 4-7), the text in the hand of a professional scribe, the formal title-page (f. 3) and some textual corrections and revisions elsewhere in Wither's autograph and the epistle also signed by him, on 112 small folio leaves. c.1625-32.

*WiG 26: George Wither, The Psalmes of David (‘The man is blest, who neither straies’)

Later owned in 1801 by Henry White of Lichfield. This MS was later in the library of Richard Heber (1773-1833), sold at Sotheby's (Heber sale, Part XI, 10 February 1836, lot 1688); afterwards owned by John Matthew Gutch (sold at Sotheby's, 16 March 1858, lot 2668, to Boone) and then by the Rev. Thomas Corser (sold by Capes, Dunn & Pilcher, Manchester, 14 December 1876, lot 459).

This MS substantially different from the later version published in 1632. It has occasionally, and erroneously, been described as entirely autograph. Discussed in Allan Pritchard, ‘A Manuscript of George Wither's Psalms’, HLQ, 27 (1963-4), 73-7. A ‘fine proof impression’ of a later edition of these Psalmes, apparently containing a ‘Summary transcript, and facsimile title-page, and other parts’ of this ‘Original Manuscript’, was offered in Joseph Lilly's book catalogue of 1861 (pp. 71-2).

First published in Amsterdam, 1632. Spenser Society Nos. 31-2 (1881). For an account of the reasons why Wither's Psalms were prevented from publication in England, see James Doelman, ‘George Wither, the Stationers Company and the English Psalter’, Studies in Philology, 90 (1993), 74-82.

Egerton MS 2405

Quarto volume of 25 leaves written throughout in a single accomplished hand, evidently prepared by or for Christopher Brooke (c.1570-1628), politician and poet, for the licensers of the press. c.1625.

Later owned by the Rev. Thomas Corser, FSA (1793-1876), book collector. Capes, Dunn & Pilcher, Manchester, 14 December 1876, lot 462.

ff. 4r-5r

WiG 28: George Wither, To his ingenious and (wch is more worthy) his truely honest Frend, Mr Christ: Brooke (‘I have surveid the Structure thow hast here’)

Copy of a commendatory poem ascribed to ‘Geor: Wyther’ prefixed to a fair copy of Christopher Brooke's A Funerall Poem Consecrated to the Memorie of … Sr Arthure Chichester.

Edited from this MS in Grosart.

First published in The Complete Poems of Christopher Brooke, ed. the Rev. Alexander B. Grosart (privately printed, 1872), pp. 201-2.

Egerton MS 2414

Copy, in a non-professional cursive hand, untitled, on 21 quarto leaves. With a later inscription (f. 1r) ‘Written by one Agnes (Beaumont) of Edworth, Beds, intimately acquainted with John Bunyan, & to whose meetings she went contrary to her father's wishes, he objecting to his daughter attending such. She mentions his name in several parts of the MS’, and also with notes on her and Bunyan at the end (f. 21v). Late 17th century.

BmA 2: Agnes Beaumont, Divine appearances, or a very wonderful account of the dealings of God with Mrs. Agnes Beaumont

Inscribed (f. 2r) ‘Jacob’. Purchased from J. Harvey 24 March 1877.

Edited from this MS in Harrison and in Camden. A facsimile of the first page is in Camden, p. 8

First published, as The Singular Experiences and Great Sufferings of Mrs. Agnes Beaumont, who was born at Edworth, in the County of Bedford, incorporated in Samuel James, An Abstract of the Gracious Dealings of God (1760). Edited, as The Narrative of the Persecution(s) of Agnes Beaumont, by G. B. Harrison (London, 1929), by Vera J. Camden (East Lansing, Michigan, 1992), and in John Bunyan, Grace Abounding with other Spiritual Autobiographies, ed. John Stachniewski and Anita Pacheco (Oxford, 1998), pp. 191-224.

Egerton MS 2421

A duodecimo verse miscellany in several hands, written from both ends, 46 leaves, in contemporary calf. Mid-17th century.

Inscribed names (on front paste-down and f. 1r) of ‘Fra: Norreys’ (? Sir Francis Norris (1609-69)) and ‘Hen. Balle’. Purchased from J. Harvey 8 December 1877.

ff. 1v-2r

RnT 508: Thomas Randolph, On the Goodwife's Ale (‘When shall we meet again and have a taste’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Johns.’.

First published, anonymously, in Witts Recreations Augmented (London, 1641), sig. Y5v. Francis Beaumont, Poems (London, 1653), sig. M8v. Moore Smith (1925), pp. 252-4, and in Moore Smith (1927), pp. 92-3. Edited, discussed, and the possible attribution to Randolph supported, in Ben Jonson, ed. C.H. Herford and Percy & Evelyn Simpson, VIII (Oxford, 1947), 448-9.

The poem is most commonly attributed to Ben Jonson. Also sometimes ascribed to Sir Thomas Jay, JP, and to Randolph.

f. 2v

BrW 121: William Browne of Tavistock, On Mrs. Anne Prideaux, Daughter of Mr. Doctor Prideaux, Regius Professor (‘Nature in this small volume was about’)

Copy, headed ‘On ye Death of a young gentlewoman’.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1636). Wits Recreations (London, 1640). Facetiæ (London, 1655). Osborn, No. XLIV (p. 213), ascribed to John Hoskyns.

f. 2v

HoJ 125: John Hoskyns, Epitaph of the parliament fart (‘Reader I was born and cried’)

Copy, headed ‘On a fart in ye Parliament house’ and here beginning ‘Reader I was borne & cri'de’.

f. 2v

HoJ 7: John Hoskyns, ‘A zealous Lock-Smith dy'd of late’

Copy, headed ‘On a locksmith’.

Whitlock, p. 108.

f. 3v

StW 795: William Strode, Song (‘I saw faire Cloris walke alone’)

Copy, headed ‘On his Mris walking in ye snowe’.

First published in Walter Porter, Madrigales and Ayres (London, 1632). Dobell, p. 41. Forey, pp. 76-7. The poem also discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Notes on some Poems attributed to William Strode’, PQ, 34 (1955), 444-8 (pp. 445-6), and see Mary Hobbs, ‘Early Seventeenth-Century Verse Miscellanies and Their Value for Textual Editors’, EMS, 1 (1989), 182-210 (pp. 199, 209).

f. 3v

StW 327: William Strode, On a Butcher marrying a Tanners daughter (‘A fitter Match hath never bin’)

Copy.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1636). Dobell, p. 119. Forey, p. 18.

f. 4r

CwT 223: Thomas Carew, An Excuse of absence (‘You'le aske perhaps wherefore I stay’)

Copy, headed ‘Excuse for absence’.

This MS collated in Dunlap.

First published in Hazlitt (1870), p. 28. Dunlap. p. 131.

f. 4r

RnT 487: Thomas Randolph, On Feild and Day standing for the Procteourshippe (‘Fortune contended whether she should yeeld’)

First published in A Crew of Kind London Gossips (London, 1663).

ff. 4r-6r, 10v-11v

RnT 276: Thomas Randolph, A Pastorall Courtship (‘Behold these woods, and mark my Sweet’)

Copy, divided into two parts, the first headed ‘The pastorall courtshippe’, the second headed ‘The continuation of the Pastorall courtshippe where wee left oft’ and subscribed ‘Incerti Authori’.

This MS collated in Davis.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 109-15. Davis, pp. 77-91.

f. 6v

ShW 92: William Shakespeare, The Tempest, I, ii, 400-9. Song (‘Full fathom five thy father lies’)

Copy of the song, under a general heading ‘songes [out of added] Shakespeare / The Tempest’.

This MS recorded in The Shakespeare Allusion-Book (London, 1932), I, 425-6.

f. 6v

ShW 95: William Shakespeare, The Tempest, II, ii, 48-56. Song (‘The master, the swabber, the bos'n, and I’)

Copy of Stephano's song, headed ‘Ibid’.

This MS recorded in The Shakespeare Allusion-Book (London, 1932), I, 425-6.

f. 6v

ShW 96: William Shakespeare, The Tempest, II, ii, 185-90. Song (‘No more dams I'll make for fish’)

Copy of Caliban's song, headed ‘Ib.’

This MS recorded in The Shakespeare Allusion-Book (London, 1932), I, 425-6.

f. 7r

ShW 97: William Shakespeare, The Tempest, IV, i, 106-17. Song (‘Honour, riches, marriage-blessing’)

Copy of the song sung by Juno and Ceres, headed ‘Ibid’.

This MS recorded in The Shakespeare Allusion-Book (London, 1932), I, 425-6.

f. 7r

ShW 101: William Shakespeare, The Tempest, V, i, 88-94. Song (‘Where the bee sucks, there suck I’)

Copy of the song, headed ‘Ibid’.

This MS recorded in The Shakespeare Allusion-Book (London, 1932), I, 425-6.

ff. 8r-9r

CwT 647: Thomas Carew, A Rapture (‘I will enjoy thee now my Celia, come’)

Copy of lines 1-96, in two hands, subscribed ‘R.B. Inuenit’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 49-53.

f. 9r-v

CwT 748: Thomas Carew, A Song (‘Aske me no more whether doth stray’)

Copy of a six-stanza version.

This MS recorded and the additional stanza edited in Dunlap, p. 264.

First published in a five-stanza version beginning ‘Aske me no more where Iove bestowes’ in Poems (1640) and in Poems: by Wil. Shake-speare, Gent. (London, 1640), and edited in this version in Dunlap, pp. 102-3. Musical setting by John Wilson published in Cheerful Ayres or Ballads (Oxford, 1659). All MS versions recorded in CELM, except where otherwise stated, begin with the second stanza of the published version (viz. ‘Aske me no more whether doth stray’).

For a plausible argument that this poem was actually written by William Strode, see Margaret Forey, ‘Manuscript Evidence and the Author of “Aske me no more”: William Strode, not Thomas Carew’, EMS, 12 (2005), 180-200. See also Scott Nixon, ‘“Aske me no more” and the Manuscript Verse Miscellany’, ELR, 29/1 (Winter 1999), 97-130, which edits and discusses MSS of this poem and also suggests that it may have been written by Strode.

ff. 9v-10r

PeW 179: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, Of a fair Gentlewoman scarce Marriageable (‘Why should Passion lead thee blind’)

Copy, headed ‘On a faire gentlewoman scorch [?scarce] marrigeable’ and here beginning ‘Why should passion lead the blind’.

This MS recorded in Krueger.

First published in [John Gough], Academy of Complements (London, 1646), p. 202. Poems (1660), p. 76, superscribed ‘P.’. Listed in Krueger's Appendix I: ‘Spurious Poems in the 1660 Edition’ as possibly by Walton Poole.

ff. 11v-12r

CoR 740: Richard Corbett, Nonsence (‘Like to the thund'ring tone of unspoke speeches’)

Copy, headed ‘Pure Nonsence’ and here beginning ‘Like to the silent tone of unspoke speeches’.

First published in Witts' Recreations Augmented (London, 1641). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 95-6.

ff. 12v-13r

PoW 105: Walton Poole, To a Ladie which desired him to make her a copy of verses (‘Faire Madam, cast these diamonds away’)

Copy, headed ‘On a faire Lady wearing Jewells’.

First published, as anonymous, in Henry Huth, Inedited Poetical Miscellanies (1870).

ff. 13v-14r

StW 288: William Strode, On a blisterd Lippe (‘Chide not thy sprowting lippe, nor kill’)

Copy.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656). Dobell, pp. 28-9. Forey, pp. 92-3.

f. 14v

CoR 379: Richard Corbett, Little Lute (‘Little lute, when I am gone’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon one comminge to visit his Mrs and shee being absent hee wrote upon her lute thus’, deleted.

Edited from this MS in Bennett & Trevor-Roper.

First published in Bennett & Trevor-Roper (1955), p. 8.

Some texts followed by an answer beginning ‘Little booke, when I am gone’.

f. 15r

HrJ 140: Sir John Harington, Of a Lady that left open her Cabbinett (‘A vertuose Lady sitting in a muse’)

Copy, headed ‘On a lady and her Knight’.

First published in ‘Epigrammes’ appended to J[ohn] C[lapham], Alcilia, Philoparthens Louing Folly (London, 1613). McClure No. 404, p. 312. Kilroy, Book IV, No. 57, p. 231.

f. 16r-v

CoR 486: Richard Corbett, On John Dawson, Butler at Christ-Church. 1622 (‘Dawson the Butler's dead. although I thinke’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 72, 144.

First published (omitting lines 7-10) in Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 72-3.

f. 16v

JnB 68: Ben Jonson, An Epigram on the Princes birth (‘And art thou borne, brave Babe? Blest be thy birth’)

Copy, headed ‘Ben Johnson on the princes birth’.

This MS collated in Herford & Simpson.

First published in John Benson's 4to edition of Jonson's poems (1640) and in The Vnder-wood (lxv) in Workes (London, 1640). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 237-8.

ff. 16v-17r

CoR 522: Richard Corbett, On the Birth of the Young Prince Charles (‘When private men get sonnes they gette a spoone’)

Copy, headed ‘On the same [i.e. the Prince's birth] R: C’.

First published in Poëtica Stromata ([no place], 1648). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, p. 86.

ff. 17v-18r

CwT 139: Thomas Carew, A cruel Mistris (‘Wee read of Kings and Gods that kindly tooke’)

Copy, headed ‘To his cruel Mrs’ and here beginning ‘Wee read of gods and kinges that kindly tooke’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 8.

f. 19r

HrJ 38: Sir John Harington, Against Swearing (‘In elder times an ancient custome was’)

Copy, headed ‘Against Dr Patton who preached against swearing by the crosse and masse made by a Papist’.

First published in Henry Fitzsimon, S.J., The Justification and Exposition of the Divine Sacrifice of the Masse (Douai, 1611). 1615. 1618, Book IV, No. 9. McClure No. 263, p. 256. Kilroy, Book IV, No. 30, p. 220.

f. 19r

CoR 443: Richard Corbett, On Great Tom of Christ-Church (‘Bee dum, you infant chimes. thump not the mettle’)

Copy, headed ‘Tom: christchurch great bell new fownded: To young Tom’.

First published (omitting lines 25-48) in Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 79-82. Ithuriel, ‘Great Tom of Oxford’, N&Q, 2nd Ser. 10 (15 December 1860), 465-6 (printing ‘(from a MS collection) which bears the signature of Jerom Terrent’).

f. 19v

RnT 551: Thomas Randolph, Upon the Burning of a School (‘What heat of learning kindled your desire’)

Copy.

Published in Wit and Drollery (London, 1661), ascribed to ‘T. R.’. Usually anonymous in MS copies and the school variously identified as being in Castlethorpe or in Batley, Yorkshire, or in Lewes, Sussex, or elsewhere.

f. 21r

PeW 228: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, A Paradox in praise of a painted Woman (‘Not kiss? by Love I must, and make impression’)

Copy of a version headed ‘A Venerous discourse’ and beginning ‘Nay, pish; nay phew; In faith but will you? fie’, deleted.

Poems (1660), pp. 93-5, superscribed ‘P.’. First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656), p. 97. Listed in Krueger's Appendix I: ‘Spurious Poems in the 1660 Edition’ as possibly by William Baker. The Poems of John Donne, ed Herbert J.C. Grierson, 2 vols (Oxford, 1912), I, 456-9, as ‘A Paradox of a Painted Face’, among ‘Poems attributed to Donne in MSS’. Also ascribed to James Shirley.

A shorter version, beginning ‘Nay pish, nay pew, nay faith, and will you, fie’, was first published, as ‘A Maids Denyall’, in Richard Chamberlain, The Harmony of the Muses (London, 1654) [apparently unique exemplum in the Huntington, edited in facsimile by Ernest W. Sullivan, II (Aldershot, 1990), pp. 49-50].

f. 22v

HeR 79: Robert Herrick, The Curse. A Song (‘Goe perjur'd man. and if thou ere return’)

Copy, headed ‘A forsaken Lady that died for loue’.

This MS collated (and four additional lines edited) in Martin, pp. 467-8.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, p. 49. Patrick, p. 69. Musical setting by John Blow published in John Playford, Choice Ayres and Songs (London, 1683).

ff. 22v-3r

StW 1105: William Strode, To a Gentlewoman with Black Eyes, for a Frinde (‘Noe marvaile, if the Suns bright Eye’)

Copy, headed ‘Black eyes’, lacking the last two lines.

Lines 15-20 (beginning ‘Oft when I looke I may descrie’) first published in Thomas Carew, Poems (London, 1640). Published complete in Dobell (1907), pp. 29-30. Forey, pp. 37-9.

ff. 23v-4r

StW 49: William Strode, The commendation of gray Eies (‘Looke how the russet Morne exceedes the Night’)

Copy, headed ‘Gray eyes’.

First published in Dobell (1907), pp. 35-6. Forey pp. 40-1.

f. 24r

CwT 1179: Thomas Carew, Truce in Love entreated (‘No more, blind God, for see my heart’)

Copy, headed ‘A louer to Cupid’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 41.

f. 24r

StW 1378: William Strode, Upon the blush of a faire Ladie (‘Stay, lustie bloud, where canst thou seeke’)

Copy, headed ‘A Blush’.

This MS recorded in Forey.

First published in Wit Restor'd (London, 1658). Dobell, pp. 39-40. Listed, without text, in Forey, p. 339.

f. 25r

DnJ 2315: John Donne, The Message (‘Send home my long strayd eyes to mee’)

Copy, headed ‘To a dissembling Lady’.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 43. Gardner, Elegies, pp. 30-1. Shawcross, No. 25.

f. 25v

GrJ 51: John Grange, ‘Not that I wish my Mistris’

Copy.

This MS recorded in Krueger.

First published in Wits Recreations Augmented (London, 1641), sig. V7v. John Playford, Select Ayres and Dialogues (1652), Part II, p. 28. Poems (1660), pp. 79-81, unattributed. Prince d'Amour (1660), p. 123, ascribed to ‘J.G.’. Listed in Krueger's Appendix I: ‘Spurious Poems in the 1660 Edition’ as by John Grange.

f. 25v

GrJ 11.5: John Grange, ‘Be not proud, 'cause fair and trim’

Copy.

This MS recorded in Krueger.

First published, in a musical setting, in Henry Lawes, Second Book of Ayres and Dialogues (1655), p. 10, ascribed to John Grange. Poems (1660), pp. 59-60, where the stanzas by ‘Man’ are superscribed ‘P.’ and those by ‘Woman’ superscribed ‘R.’. Listed in Krueger's Appendix I: ‘Spurious Poems in the 1660 Edition’ as probably by John Grange.

ff. 26v-7r

DaW 89: Sir William Davenant, Love and Honour, Act IV, scene i. Song (‘No morning red, and blushing faire’)

Copy, headed ‘A Song’.

First published in London, 1649. Dramatic Works, III, 91-192 (pp. 155-6). Gibbs, pp. 208-9.

f. 27r-v

BmF 103: Francis Beaumont, Master Francis Beaumont's Letter to Ben Jonson (‘The sun which doth the greatest comfort bring’)

Copy of a 31-line version, headed ‘A Letter from Sr francis Beamont to Dr Donne’.

This MS collated in Herford & Simpson.

First published in ‘An addition of some excellent Poems...By other Gentlemen’ in Poems: Written by Wil. Shake-speare Gent. (London, 1640). Dyce, XI, 500-3. Ben Jonson, ed. C.H. Herford and Percy and Evelyn Simpson, XI (Oxford, 1952), 374-7.

Nearly all recorded MS texts of this poem are discussed and collated, with an edited text (pp. 170-4), in Mark Bland, ‘Francis Beaumont's Verse Letters to Ben Jonson and “The Mermaid Club”’, EMS, 12 (2005), 139-79.

f. 28r-v

ShJ 9: James Shirley, The Common-wealth of Birds (‘Let other Poets write of dogs’)

Copy of a 36-line version beginning ‘List all people to my words’.

First published in Poems (London, 1646). Armstrong, p. 9.

ff. 32v-3v

StW 498: William Strode, On Faireford windores (‘I know noe paint of Poetry’)

Copy.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656). Dobell, pp. 25-7. Forey, pp. 7-10.

f. 34r

StW 183: William Strode, In commendation of Musique (‘When whispering straines do softly steale’)

Copy, headed ‘A Song in comendacon of Music’.

This MS recorded in Forey, p. 329.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656). Dobell, pp. 2-3. Four Poems by William Strode (Flansham, Bognor Regis, 1934), pp. 1-2. Forey, pp. 196-7. The poem also discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Notes on some Poems attributed to William Strode’, PQ, 34 (1955), 444-8 (p. 445).

f. 34v

CoR 611: Richard Corbett, To the Ladyes of the New Dresse (‘Ladyes that weare black cypresse vailes’)

Copy, ascribed to Dr Corbet.

First published in Witts Recreations (London, 1640). Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, p. 90.

This poem is usually followed in MSS by ‘The Ladyes Answer’ (‘Blacke Cypresse vailes are shrouds of night’): see GrJ 14.

f. 35r-v

DnJ 82: John Donne, The Anagram (‘Marry, and love thy Flavia, for, shee’)

Copy, headed ‘An apology for an vgly woman’.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published as ‘Elegie II’ in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 80-2 (as ‘Elegie II’). Gardner, Elegies, pp. 21-2. Shawcross, No. 17. Variorum, 2 (2000), pp. 217-18.

ff. 35v-6v

RnT 348: Thomas Randolph, Upon a very deformed Gentlewoman, but of a voice incomparably sweet (‘I chanc'd sweet Lesbia's voice to heare’)

Copy, headed ‘On a ffrench woman, one of the Qeenes Chapple vgly in face but, incomparable in voice’.

This MS recorded in Thorn-Drury; collated in Davis.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 115-17. Davis, pp. 92-105.

f. 37r

PoW 24: Walton Poole, ‘If shadows be a picture's excellence’

Copy.

First published, as ‘In praise of black Women; by T.R.’, in Robert Chamberlain, The Harmony of the Muses (London, 1654), p. 15 [unique exemplum in Huntington, edited in facsimile by Ernest W. Sullivan, II (Aldershot, 1990)]; in Abraham Wright, Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656), pp. 75-7, as ‘On a black Gentlewoman’. Poems (1660), pp. 61-2, as ‘On black Hair and Eyes’ and superscribed ‘R’; in The Poems of John Donne, ed Herbert J.C. Grierson, 2 vols (Oxford, 1912), I, 460-1, as ‘on Black Hayre and Eyes’, among ‘Poems attributed to Donne in MSS’; and in The Poems of William Herbert, Third Earl of Pembroke, ed. Robert Krueger (B.Litt. thesis, Oxford, 1961: Bodleian, MS B. Litt. d. 871), p. 61.

f. 38r

CwT 826: Thomas Carew, Song. Celia singing (‘Harke how my Celia, with the choyce’)

Copy, headed ‘On his Mris singing in Yorke-house Gallery’, ascribed to ‘T: Cary’.

This MS recorded in Dunlap, p. 231.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 38.

f. 38v

ClJ 185: John Cleveland, Epitaph on the Earl of Strafford (‘Here lies Wise and Valiant Dust’)

Copy, headed ‘An epitaph on my Lo: Staford beheaded on tower hill ye 12: of may. 1641’.

First published in Character (1647). Edited in CSPD, 1640-1641 (1882), p. 574. Berdan, p. 184, as ‘Internally unlike his manner’. Morris & Withington, p. 66, among ‘Poems probably by Cleveland’. The attribution to Cleveland is dubious. The epitaph is also attributed to Clement Paman: see Poetry and Revolution: An Anthology of British and Irish Verse 1625-1660, ed. Peter Davidson (Oxford, 1998), notes to No. 275 (p. 363).

f. 39r rev.

DeJ 69: Sir John Denham, On the Earl of Strafford's Tryal and Death (‘Great Strafford! worthy of that Name, though all’)

Copy of a twenty-line version, headed ‘vpon my Lo Straford’.

Edited from this MS in Banks, p. 153 (footnote).

First published in Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 153-4.

ff. 39v-40r

DeJ 30: Sir John Denham, Elegy on the Death of Judge Crooke (‘This was the Man! the Glory of the Gown’)

Copy, headed ‘vpon Judge Crooke’.

This MS collated in Banks.

First published in The Topographer for the year 1790 (London, 1790), II, 177. Banks, pp. 156-8.

ff. 41r-40v rev.

RnT 224: Thomas Randolph, On the Fall of the Mitre Tavern in Cambridge (‘Lament, lament, ye Scholars all’)

Copy, headed ‘On the burning of the Signe of the Mitre in Cambridge’.

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Wit & Drollery (London, 1656), p. 68. Thorn-Drury, pp. 160-2.

f. 42v rev.

WoH 230: Sir Henry Wotton, A Farewell to the Vanities of the World (‘Farewell, ye gilded follies, pleasing troubles!’)

Copy of lines 1-25, headed ‘Dr. Donne his farewell to the world’.

First published, as ‘a farewell to the vanities of the world, and some say written by Dr. D[onne], but let them bee writ by whom they will’, in Izaak Walton, The Complete Angler (London, 1653), pp. 243-5. Hannah (1845), pp. 109-13. The Poems of John Donne, ed. Herbert J.C. Grierson, 2 vols (Oxford, 1912), I, 465-7.

ff. 43r-42v rev.

BrW 89: William Browne of Tavistock, On an Infant Unborn, and the Mother Dying in Travail (‘Within this grave there is a grave entomb'd’)

Copy, headed ‘On an Gentlewoman dying in Trauell and her childe unborne’, subscribed ‘W: Diuvenit’ [i.e. Davenant].

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656). Brydges (1815), pp. 90-1. Goodwin, II, 255-6. Also (doubtfully) attributed to Richard Corbett and to Sir William Davenant: see Sir William Davenant, The Shorter Poems, and Songs from the Plays and Masques, ed. A.M. Gibbs (Oxford, 1972), p. lxxxvii.

f. 43v-r rev.

BrW 160: William Browne of Tavistock, On One Drowned in the Snow (‘Within a fleece of silent waters drown'd’)

Copy, subscribed ‘G:D.’ [i.e. William Davenant].

First published in Wits Recreations (London, 1640). Brydges (1815), p. 76. Goodwin, II, 290.

ff. 45r-43v rev.

MyJ 18: Jasper Mayne, On Mris Anne King's Tablebook of Pictures (‘Mine eyes were once blessed with the sight’)

Copy, headed ‘On Mrs Anne Kinges table booke of pictures’, subscribed ‘J M’.

Unpublished?

f. 45v rev.

DaJ 184: Sir John Davies, On the Deputy of Ireland his child (‘As carefull mothers doe to sleeping lay’)

Copy, headed ‘Epitaph: on a younge man’ and here beginning ‘As carefull nurses doe their infants laye’.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1637), p. 411. Krueger, p. 303.

f. 45v rev.

DkT 16: Thomas Dekker, Vpon her bringing by water to White Hall (‘The Queene was brought by water to White Hall’)

Copy, headed ‘On Qu. Elizabeth careide by water to white Hall’.

First published in The Wonderfull yeare (London, 1603). Reprinted in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1614), and in Thomas Heywood, The Life and Death of Queene Elizabeth (London, 1639). Grosart, I, 93-4. Tentatively (but probably wrongly) attributed to Camden in George Burke Johnston, ‘Poems by William Camden’, SP, 72 (December 1975), 112.

ff. 46r-45v rev.

BrW 201.8: William Browne of Tavistock, On the Countess Dowager of Pembroke (‘Underneath this sable herse’)

Copy, headed ‘Epitaph on ye Countesse Dowager of Pembroke’ and here beginning ‘Vnder this harde marble hearse’.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1623), p. 340. Brydges (1815), p. 5. Goodwin, II, 294. Browne's authorship supported in C.F. Main, ‘Two Items in the Jonson Apocrypha’, N&Q, 199 (June 1954), 243-5.

f. 46v rev.

SiP 163: Sir Philip Sidney, Old Arcadia. Book III, No. 62 (‘What toong can her perfections tell’)

Copy of lines 143-6, beginning ‘The inke immortall fame dooth lende’.

This MS collated in Ringler and in Robertson.

Ringler, pp. 85-90. Robertson, pp. 238-42.

f. 46v rev.

DnJ 1761: John Donne, A lame begger (‘I am unable, yonder begger cries’)

Copy, headed ‘On a cripple’ and here beginning ‘I cannot goe, stand, sitte, this cripple cries’.

This MS recorded in Milgate and in Shawcross.

First published in Thomas Deloney, Strange Histories (London, 1607), sig. E6. Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 76. Milgate, Satires, p. 51. Shawcross, No. 88. Variorum, 8 (1995), pp. 7 (as ‘Zoppo’) and 10.

f. 46v rev.

HrJ 264: Sir John Harington, Of Treason (‘Treason doth neuer prosper, what's the reason?’)

First published in 1615. 1618, Book IV, No. 5. McClure No. 259, p. 255. This epigram also quoted in a letter to Prince Henry, 1609 (McClure, p. 136). Kilroy, Book III, No. 43, p. 185.

Egerton MS 2446

A folio composite volume of historical papers, in various hands, 31 leaves, in 19th-century blue morocco gilt.

Bought from J. Harvey, 9 February 1878.

f. 13r

ShW 49: William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part I

Copy of Prince Hal's speech beginning ‘I know you all, and will awhile uphold’ (I, ii, 187-209), headed ‘The Prince of Walles his speech. 165’, written out as prose in an italic hand, on one side of a single quarto leaf, dated in the margin ‘April 14 / Anno / Domi 1620’.

Edited from this MS in The Shakespeare Allusion-Book (London, 1932), I, 336.

Egerton MS 2533

A folio composite volume of correspondence of Sir Edward Nicholas (1593-1669), Secretary of State, in various hands, c.450 leaves.

f. 256r-7v

*HlJ 129: Joseph Hall, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to Sir Edward Nicholas, from Westminster, 10 December 1641. 1641.

Egerton MS 2541

A folio composite volume of state papers belonging to Sir Edward Nicholas (1593-1669), Secretary of State. c.1630.

f. 118

CoR 7: Richard Corbett, Against the Opposing the Duke in Parliament, 1628 (‘The wisest King did wonder when hee spy'd’)

Copy in the hand of Sir Edward Nicholas, appended to a copy of Charles I's speech on 10 March 1628/9, on one of two conjugate folio leaves.

First published in Poems and Songs relating to George Duke of Buckingham, Percy Society (London, 1850), p. 31. Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 82-3.

Most MS texts followed by an anonymous ‘Answer’ beginning ‘The warlike king was troubl'd when hee spi'd’. Texts of these two poems discussed in V.L. Pearl and M.L. Pearl, ‘Richard Corbett's “Against the Opposing of the Duke in Parliament, 1628” and the Anonymous Rejoinder, “An Answere to the Same, Lyne for Lyne”: The Earliest Dated Manuscript Copies’, RES, NS 42 (1991), 32-9, and related correspondence in RES, NS 43 (1992), 248-9.

Egerton MS 2539

A folio composite volume of correspondence and other papers of Sir Edward Nicholas (1593-1669), Secretary of State, in various hands, 342 leaves.

Volume VII of the Nicholas Papers.

f. 9r

*EaJ 109: John Earle, Bishop of Worcester and Salisbury, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Earles, to Sir Edward Nicholas, from Sarum, 4 September 1665. 1665.

Quoted in Darwin, pp. 234-5.

Egerton MS 2543

A composite volume of papers chiefly of Sir Edward Nicholas (1593-1669), Secretary of State, 430 leaves.

Volume III of the Nicholas Papers.

ff. 190r-204r

ClE 106: Edward Hyde, First Earl of Clarendon, Impeachment Proceedings against Clarendon in 1667

Copy.

Articles of Treason exhibited in Parliament against Clarendon, 14 November 1667 published in London, 1667. The Proceedings in the House of Commons touching the Impeachment of Clarendon 1667 published in London, 1700.

Egerton MS 2547

A folio composite volume of papers relating to Eikon Basilike, 27 leaves. c.1649.

Among the papers of Sir Edward Nicholas (1593-1669), Secretary of State.

ff. 1r-3v

EaJ 70: John Earle, Bishop of Worcester and Salisbury, Eikon Basilike

Copy of the original English version of Earles's dedicatory epistle to Charles II, on two pairs of conjugate quarto leaves.

Edited from this MS in Scott and in Almack.

First published in The Hague, 1649. London, 1649. The English version of Earles's dedication first published in Eikon Basilike, ed. Edward J. L. Scott (London, 1880), pp. xxxiv-xxxvii. Reprinted in Edward Almack, A Bibliography of The King's Book or Eikon Basilike (London, 1896), pp. 138-40. The Latin version of the dedication is in Bliss, pp. 233-6.

Egerton MS 2560

A folio composite volume of political and ecclesiastical verse and prose, 123 leaves.

Among the papers of Sir Edward Nicholas (1593-1669), Secretary of State.

ff. 82r-3v

MaA 403: Andrew Marvell, The Fourth Advice to a Painter (‘Draw England ruin'd by what was giv'n before’)

Copy, inscribed ‘Finis 20° Aug: 67’, on two conjugate folio leaves. Late 17th century.

This MS recorded in Osborne.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 140-6, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 33-5, as anonymous. Regarded as anonymous in Margoliouth, I, 348-50.

f. 114

RaW 516: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Wrong not, deare Empresse of my Heart’

Copy of stanzas 1, 3, 4, 6-8.

This MS recorded in Latham, p. 116, and in Gullans.

First published in Wits Interpreter (London, 1655), printed twice, the first version prefixed by ‘Our Passions are most like to Floods and streames’ (see RaW 320-38) and headed ‘To his Mistresse by Sir Walter Raleigh’. Edited with the prefixed stanza in Latham, pp. 18-19. Edited in The English and Latin Poems of Sir Robert Ayton, ed. Charles B. Gullans, STS, 4th Ser. 1 (Edinburgh & London, 1963), pp. 197-8. Rudick, Nos 39A and 39B (two versions, pp. 106-9).

This poem was probably written by Sir Robert Ayton. For a discussion of the authorship and the different texts see Gullans, pp. 318-26 (also printed in SB, 13 (1960), 191-8).

Egerton MS 2603

A double-folio guardbook of miscellaneous historical documents, in various hands, 70 leaves of various sizes.

Later owned by Frederic Ouvry (1814-81), antiquary and lawyer.

f. 8r

*LeJ 99: John Leland, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Leland, to Cardinal Wolsey, 19 January [c.1522]. c.1522.

f. 62r

ToA 73: Aurelian Townshend, Verse Epistle to Charles I: ‘Tis but a while’ (‘Tis but a while, since in a vestall flame’)

Copy, in a professional mixed hand, untitled, on a single folio leaf, subscribed ‘A. Tounshend’.

Edited from this MS in Brown. Facsimile in Gabriel Heaton, ‘“His Acts Transmit to After Days”: Two Unpublished Poems by Aurelian Townshend’, EMS, 13 (2007), 165-86 (p. 172).

First published in Chambers (1912), pp. 36-7. Brown, pp. 50-1.

f. 63r-v

WoH 231: Sir Henry Wotton, A Farewell to the Vanities of the World (‘Farewell, ye gilded follies, pleasing troubles!’)

Copy, headed ‘A ffarewell to the world by Sr. Kenelme Digby’, on two pages of two conjugate folio leaves.

This MS collated in Grierson.

First published, as ‘a farewell to the vanities of the world, and some say written by Dr. D[onne], but let them bee writ by whom they will’, in Izaak Walton, The Complete Angler (London, 1653), pp. 243-5. Hannah (1845), pp. 109-13. The Poems of John Donne, ed. Herbert J.C. Grierson, 2 vols (Oxford, 1912), I, 465-7.

Egerton MS 2614

A diary, covering the period from 9 August 1599 to 21 July 1605, in a single somewhat ungainly, largely italic hand, presumably autograph. 118 small quarto leaves, imperfect at the beginning and end. 1599-1605.

*HoM 1: Margaret, Lady Hoby, Diary

Acquired from the Rev. C.St.B. Sydenham 10 November 1883.

Edited from this MS in Meads's edition (1930), with a facsimile of f. 16r facing p. 85. Facsimile of f. 16r also in English Women's Voices 1540-1700, ed. Charlotte F. Otten (Miami, 1992), p. 187.

First published as Diary of Lady Margaret Hoby 1599-1605, ed. Dorothy M. Meads (London, 1930).

Egerton MS 2623

A folio guard book of miscellaneous MSS, 95 leaves, in 19th-century black morocco gilt. Collected by John Payne Collier (1789-1883).

Sotheby's, 16-28 November 1885 (Ellis sale).

f. 43r

DrJ 127: John Dryden, Prologue [to Secret-Love] Spoken by Mrs. Boutell to the Maiden Queen, in mans Cloathes (‘Women like us (passing for men) you'l cry’)

Copy on the first of two conjugate folio leaves.

This MS collated in California; recorded in Kinsley.

First published in Covent Garden Drolery (London, 1672). Miscellany Poems (London, 1684). Kinsley, I, 138. California, IX, 121-2. Hammond, I, 258-9.

f. 44r

DrJ 31: John Dryden, Epilogue [to Secret-Love] Spoken by Mrs. Reeves to the Maiden Queen, in mans Cloathes (‘What think you Sirs, was't not all well enough’)

Copy on the second of two conjugate folio leaves.

This MS collated in Kinsley and in California.

First published in Covent Garden Drolery (London, 1672). Miscellany Poems (London, 1684). Kinsley, I, 139. California, IX, 202-3. Hammond, I, 259-61.

f. 54r-v

SdT 16: Thomas Shadwell, Prologue to ‘The Tempest’ (‘Wee, as the ffathers of the stage have said’)

Copy on the first (pp. [1-2]) of two conjugate folio leaves.

Edited from this MS in Lawrence, in Summers, and in Danchin.

First published, and attributed to Shadwell, in William J. Lawrence, ‘Did Thomas Shadwell Write an Opera on “The Tempest?”’, Anglia, 27 (1904), 205-17 (pp. 212-13). Summers, II, 196. Danchin, II, 593-4.

Authorship uncertain.

ff. 54v-5

SdT 1: Thomas Shadwell, Epilogue [to ‘The Tempest’] (‘When feeble Lovers Appetites decay’)

Copy on pp. [2-3] of two conjugate folio leaves.

Edited from this MS in Lawrence, in Summers, and in Danchin.

First published, and attributed to Shadwell, in William J. Lawrence, ‘Did Thomas Shadwell Write an Opera on “The Tempest”?’, Anglia, 27 (1904) 205-17 (pp. 213-14). Summers, II, 269. Danchin, II, 595-6.

Authorship uncertain.

f. 61r

CoA 144: Abraham Cowley, Prologue to the Guardian (‘Who says the Times do Learning disallow?’)

Copy on the first page of the remains of two conjugate folio leaves.

This MS (erroneously cited as ‘Egerton 2326’) recorded in Wiley.

First published, under the pseudonym ‘Francis Cole’, in The Prologue and Epilogue to a Comedie, presented, at the Entertainment of the Prince His Highnesse, by the Schollers of Trinity Colledge in Cambridge, in March last, 1641 (London, 1642). Waller, I, 31-2 (and II, 161). Autrey Nell Wiley, ‘The Prologue and Epilogue to the Guardian’, RES, 10 (1934), 443-7 (pp. 444-5).

See also CoA 68-81.

f. 61r-v

CoA 74: Abraham Cowley, The Epilogue [to the Guardian] (‘The Play, great Sir, is done. yet needs must fear’)

Copy on the first of the remains of two conjugate folio leaves.

First published, under the pseudonym ‘Francis Cole’, in The Prologue and Epilogue to a Comedie, presented, at the Entertainment of the Prince His Highnesse, by the Schollers of Trinity Colledge in Cambridge, in March last, 1641 (London, 1642).Printed (with the first line: ‘The Play is done, great Prince, which needs must fear’) in The Guardian (London, 1650). Waller, I, 32 (and II, 242). Autrey Nell Wiley, ‘The Prologue and Epilogue to the Guardian’, RES, 10 (1934), 443-7 (pp. 444-5).

See also CoA 137-52.

f. 63r

SeC 31: Sir Charles Sedley, Prologue to the Stroulers (‘Beauty and Wit so barely you requite’)

Copy, here ascribed to ‘Sr C.S. Bart’ on the first page of two conjugate folio leaves.

This MS collated in Sola Pinto.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1698). Sola Pinto, I, 49.

f. 78r-v

EtG 4: Sir George Etherege, Ephelia to Bajazet (‘How far are they deceived who hope in vain’)

Copy in a small quarto verse miscellany (ff. 78r-82v).

This MS collated in Thorpe.

First published in Female Poems On several Occasions: Written by Ephelia (London, 1679). Thorpe, pp. 9-10. Harold Love's edition of Rochester (1999), pp. 94-5.

f. 79r-v

RoJ 614: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, A Very Heroical Epistle in Answer to Ephelia (‘Madam. / If you're deceived, it is not by my cheat’)

Copy in a small quarto verse miscellany (ff. 78r-82v).

This MS recorded in Vieth; collated in Walker.

First published in the broadside A Very Heroical Epistle from My Lord All-Pride to Dol-Common (London, 1679). Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 113-15. Walker, pp. 112-14. Love, pp. 95-7.

f. 80r

RoJ 213: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, On Poet Ninny (‘Crushed by that just contempt his follies bring’)

Copy in a small quarto verse miscellany (ff. 78r-82v).

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution; collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 141-2. Walker, pp. 115-16. Love, pp. 107-8.

ff. 80v-1r

RoJ 197: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, My Lord All-Pride (‘Bursting with pride, the loathed impostume swells’)

Copy in a small quarto verse miscellany (ff. 78r-82v).

This MS recorded in Vieth; collated in Walker.

First published, as ‘Epigram upon my Lord All-pride’, in the broadside A Very Heroical Epistle from My Lord All-Pride to Dol-Common (London, 1679). Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 142-3. Walker, pp. 116-17. Love, pp. 93-4.

ff. 83r-6v

SdT 17: Thomas Shadwell, The Protestant Satire (‘How wise and happy are we grown of late’)

Copy of a version of lines 1-188 in two hands in a small quarto verse miscellany.

Lines 1-188 edited from this MS in POAS.

First published in A Collection of Poems on Several Occasions, Written in the Last Century (London, 1747). Poems on Affairs of State: Augustan Satirical Verse, 1660-1714, Vol. III: 1682-1685, ed. H.W. Schless (New Haven, 1968), pp. 511-40, where the poem is attributed to Shadwell.

f. 89r

DrJ 179: John Dryden, A Song (‘Farewell, fair Armeda, my Joy and my Grief’)

Copy, untitled, on a folio leaf; the text followed by an ‘Answear’ (‘Blame not your Armida, nor call her your Greife’).

This MS recorded in Day, p. 155.

First published in New Court-Songs, and Poems. By R[obert] V[eel] Gent. (London, 1672). Covent Garden Drolery (London, 1672). Westminster-Drollery (London, 1672). Windsor-Drollery (London, 1672). Kinsley, I, 136-7. Hammond, I, 255.

Egerton MS 2642

A folio miscellany chiefly of heraldic and historical collections, in a single secretary hand, with rubrication, 418 leaves. Compiled by Robert Commaundre (d.1613), rector of Tarporley, Cheshire, and chaplain to Sir Henry Sydney, Lord President of the Marches of Wales. Late 16th-early 17th century.

f. 232v

RaW 488: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘The state of Fraunce as nowe it standes’

Copy, headed ‘The State of france translated oute of frenche into Englishe Anno Domini 1585’.

This MS collated in May.

First published in A Catalogue of the Harleian Manuscripts in the British Museum (London, 1808), III, 78. Listed but not printed in Latham, p. 172. Rudick, No. 30, p. 71. EV 24294.

f. 237v

ElQ 17: Queen Elizabeth I, ‘The doubt of future foes’

Copy, headed ‘Certen verses made by the Queenes moste excellent Matie against the Rebells in the North ptes of England and in Norfolke & other places of the Realme, Ao dni 1569 et 1570’.

This MS cited in Selected Works.

A version first published in George Puttenham, The Arte of English Poesie (London, 1589), sig. 2E2v (p. 208). Bradner, p. 4. Collected Works, Poem 5, pp. 133-4. Selected Works, Poem 4, pp. 7-9.

f. 250v

SkJ 14: John Skelton, How euery thing must haue a tyme (‘Tyme is a thing that no man may resyst’)

Copy of a five-stanza version (plus a two-line burden).

This MS recorded in Canon.

Canon, D52, p. 16. First published in Certaine bokes copyled by mayster Skelto (London, c.1545). Dyce, I, 137-8.

f. 250v

SkJ 38: John Skelton, Non meministi

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Gordon.

Canon, R67, pp. 21-2. Edited by Ian A. Gordon in TLS (20 September 1934), p. 636.

ff. 324v-5

RaW 488.5: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘The state of Fraunce as nowe it standes’

Copy of an eleven-stanza version, headed ‘The frenche Prymero. 1585’.

First published in A Catalogue of the Harleian Manuscripts in the British Museum (London, 1808), III, 78. Listed but not printed in Latham, p. 172. Rudick, No. 30, p. 71. EV 24294.

Egerton MS 2651

A folio composite volume of state papers and correspondence, in various hands, 240 leaves, in 19th-century half-morocco.

ff. 27r-8r

BcF 456: Francis Bacon, Bacon's Humble Submissions and Supplications

Copy of Bacon's submission on 22 April 1621, in a professional secretary hand, on two folio leaves once folded as a letter or packet.

The Humble Submissions and Supplications Bacon sent to the House of Lords, on 19 March 1620/1 (beginning ‘I humbly pray your Lordships all to make a favourable and true construction of my absence...’); 22 April 1621 (beginning ‘It may please your Lordships, I shall humbly crave at your Lordships' hands a benign interpretation...’); and 30 April 1621 (beginning ‘Upon advised consideration of the charge, descending into mine own conscience...’), written at the time of his indictment for corruption. Spedding, XIV, 215-16, 242-5, 252-62.

Egerton MS 2711

A large quarto-shaped folio volume of Tudor verse almost entirely by Wyatt, 120 leaves (including blanks, several original leaves excised), in modern calf gilt. In several hands: poems on ff. 50r, 54v, 66r, 67r-9v, 86r-98v, 100r-1r, and a couplet at the top of f. 70r in Wyatt's own hand, with his autograph corrections and revisions occurring intermittently between ff. 29v and 66v; otherwise written, emended or annotated in various scribal hands, including Nicholas Grimald (1519-62) and John Brereton, one anonymous hand pre dominating on ff. 4r-49r, 50v-4r, 55r-62r. c.1530s.

Later in the possession of the Harington family, including entries (ff. 104r-7r) by Sir John Harington (HrJ 2, HrJ 342), later members of his family until the mid-17th century using it as a rough notebook, for exercises, calculations, and religious discourses, filling the margins and writing over many of the earlier poems. Subsequently owned in 1792, and occasionally annotated in pencil, by Thomas Percy (1729-1811), Bishop of Dromore, writer. Sotheby's, 14 January 1889.

Generally cited by editors, and in IELM, as the ‘Egerton MS’. The principal text for all Wyatt's modern editors. The text of ff. 3r-101r is edited verbatim in Harrier. Discussed in Joost Daalder, ‘Are Wyatt's Poems in Egerton MS 2711 in Chronological Order?’, English Studies, 69/3 (June 1988), 205-23; and in Jason Powell's articles ‘Thomas Wyatt's Poetry in Embassy: Egerton 2711 and the Production of Literary Manuscripts Abroad’, HLQ, 67/2 (2004), 261-82, with facsimile examples and where the hand of John Brereton is identified, and ‘Marginalia, Authorship, and Editing in the Manuscripts of Thomas Wyatt's Verse’, EMS, 15 (1009), 1-40, with facsimile examples.

*HrJ 344: Sir John Harington, Miscellany

Copy.

f. 4r

WyT 46: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Behold, love, thy power how she dispiseth!’

Copy, with later alterations in the hand of Nicholas Grimald.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 97. Facsimiles in Foxwell, I, after p. 2, and in Powell, p. 18.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 1.

f. 4r

WyT 389: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘What vaileth trouth? or, by it, to take payn?’

Copy, with later alterations in the hand of Nicholas Grimald.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 98. Facsimile in Powell, p. 18.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 1-2.

ff. 4v-5r

WyT 56: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Caesar, when that the traytour of Egipt’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 99-100.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 2.

f. 5r-v

WyT 318: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘The Longe love, that in my thought doeth harbar’

Copy, with later alterations in the hand of Nicholas Grimald.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 101.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 3. Harrier, p. 3.

ff. 5v-6r

WyT 27: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Alas the greiff, and dedly wofull smert’

Copy, with later alterations in the hand of Nicholas Grimald.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 102-3.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 3-4.

f. 7r

WyT 54: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘But sethens you it asaye to kyll’

Copy, with later alterations in the hand of Nicholas Grimald; imperfect, lacking the beginning; c. 1537-8.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 103-4.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, p. 4.

f. 7v

WyT 400: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Who so list to hounte I know where is an hynde’

Copy, with later alterations in the hand of Nicholas Grimald.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 104. Facsimiles in Ruth Hughey, ‘The Harington Manuscript at Arundel Castle and Related Documents’, The Library, 4th Ser. 15 (1934-5), 388-444 (after p. 414), and in Powell, p. 24.

Not published in 16th century. Muir & Thomson, p. 5.

f. 7v

WyT 325: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘The restfull place, Revyver of my smarte’

Copy of lines 1-7 in a variant version, including an extra line between lines 5 and 6, in the hand of Nicholas Grimald, headed ‘To hiz bedde’ and here beginning ‘O restfull place: reneewer of my smart’.

Edited from this MS in Harrier, p. 105. Collated in Muir & Thomson. Facsimiles in Ruth Hughey, ‘The Harington Manuscript at Arundel Castle and Related Documents’, The Library, 4th Ser. 15 (1934-5), 388-444 (after p. 414), and in Powell, p. 24.

First published (in a three 7-line stanza version) in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 197-8.

ff. 8r-10v

WyT 213: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Myne olde dere En'mye, my froward master’

Copy of lines 22-147, beginning ‘O small hony, much aloes & gall’, with later alterations in the hand of Nicholas Grimald, heavily written over by later hands.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson (and see WyT 214), and in Harrier, pp. 105-8.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 5-10.

f. 11r

WyT 374: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Was I never, yet, of your love greeved’

Copy, with subsequent alterations in the hand of Nicholas Grimald, later written over by later hands.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 111.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 10-11.

f. 11v

WyT 77: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Eche man me telleth I chaunge moost my devise’

Copy, written over by later hands.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 112.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 11.

f. 12r

WyT 87: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘ffarewell, the rayn of crueltie!’

Copy, written over by later hands.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 113.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 11-12.

f. 12v

WyT 411: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Yf amours faith, an hert vnfayned’

Copy, written over by later hands.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 113-14.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 12.

f. 13r

WyT 84: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Ffarewell, Love, and all thy lawes for ever’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 114.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 12-13.

f. 13v

WyT 194: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘My hert I gave the not to do it payn’

Copy, written over by later hands.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 115.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 13.

f. 14r

WyT 88: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘ffor to love her for her lokes lovely’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 115-16.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, p. 14.

f. 14v

WyT 330: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘There was never ffile half so well filed’

Copy, with alterations in another hand (that responsible for the ‘Aunswer’ to WyT 183).

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 116.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 14.

f. 15r

WyT 111: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Helpe me to seke for I lost it there’

Copy, heavily written over by later hands.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 117.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, p. 15.

f. 15v

WyT 416: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Yf it be so that I forsake the’

Copy, with an alteration in another hand (that responsible for the ‘Aunswer’ to WyT 183).

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 117-18.

Not published in 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 15-16.

f. 16r

WyT 343: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Thou hast no faith of him that hath none’

Copy, with an alteration in another hand (that responsible for the ‘Aunswer’ to WyT 183).

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 118.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, p. 16.

f. 16v

WyT 97: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Goo burnyng sighes Vnto the frosen hert!’

Copy, with an alteration in another hand (that responsible for the ‘Aunswer’ to WyT 183).

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 119.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 16-17.

f. 17r

WyT 156: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘It may be good, like it who list’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 119-20.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 17-18.

f. 17v

WyT 263: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Resound my voyse, ye woodes that here me plain’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 120-1.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 18.

f. 19r

WyT 154: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘In faith I wot not well what to say’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 121-2.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 19.

f. 19v

WyT 277: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Som fowles there be that have so perfaict sight’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 122.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 19-20.

f. 20

WyT 49: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Bicause I have the still kept fro lyes and blame’

Copy, with an alteration in another hand (that responsible for the ‘Aunswer’ to WyT 183).

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 123.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 20.

f. 20v

WyT 126: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘I fynde no peace and all my warr is done’

Copy, headed ‘Petrarke’ in another hand (that responsible for the ‘Aunswer’ to WyT 183).

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 123-4.

First published in Songes and Sonnettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 20-1.

f. 21r

WyT 346: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Though I my self be bridilled of my mynde’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 124.

Not published in the the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, p. 21.

f. 21v

WyT 192: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘My galy charged with forgetfulnes’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 125.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 21-2.

f. 22r

WyT 44: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Auysing the bright bemes of these fayer Iyes’

Copy, written over by later hands.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 125.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 22.

f. 22v

WyT 80: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Ever myn happe is slack and slo in commyng’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 126.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 23.

f. 23r

WyT 172: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Love and fortune and my mynde, remembre’

Copy, with an alteration in another hand (that responsible for the ‘Aunswer’ to WyT 183).

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 126-7.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 23-4.

f. 23v

WyT 116: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘How oft have I, my dere and cruell foo’

Copy, heavily written over by later hands.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 127.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 24.

f. 24r

WyT 165: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Like to these vnmesurable montayns’

Copy, with geometrical diagrams drawn over it by later hands.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 128.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 24-5.

f. 24v

WyT 183: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Madame, withouten many wordes’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 128-9. The text followed by a 12-line ‘Aunswer’ in a later hand responsible for alterations to eleven other poems in this MS (this ‘Aunswer’ edited in Muir & Thomson, p. 298, and in Harrier, p. 129). Facsimile in Helen Baron, ‘The “Blage” Manuscript: The Original Compiler Identified’, EMS, 1 (1989), 85-119 (p. 105).

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 25.

f. 25r

WyT 410: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Ye old mule that thinck your self so fayre’

Copy, heavily written over by later hands.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 130.

Not published in 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 25-6.

ff. 25v-6r

WyT 287: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Such happe as I ame happed in’

Copy, heavily written over by later hands.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 130-1.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 26-7.

f. 26v

WyT 336: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘They fle from me that sometyme did me seke’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson (with a facsimile facing p. 68), and in Harrier, pp. 131-2. Facsimile also in Flower & Munby, English Poetical Autographs, Plate 1.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 27.

f. 27r-v

WyT 335: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘There was never nothing more me payned’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 132-3.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, p. 28.

f. 28r

WyT 241: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Patience, though I have not’

Copy, with an alteration in an italic hand (that responsible for WyT 372).

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 133-4.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, p. 29. The text discussed in Joost Daalder, ‘Wyatt's “Patience” Poems’, Neophilologische Mitteilungen, 91 (1990), 75-85.

f. 28v

WyT 246: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Patiens for my devise’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 134-5.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 29-30. The text discussed in Joost Daalder, ‘Wyatt's “Patience” Poems’, Neophilologische Mitteilungen, 91 (1990), 75-85.

f. 29r

WyT 408: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Ye know my herte, my ladye dere’

Copy of lines 24-39, beginning ‘all to my harme’, with an alteration in another hand (that responsible for the ‘Aunswer’ to WyT 183), imperfect, lacking the beginning of the poem.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson (and see WyT 409), and in Harrier, p. 135.

Not published in 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 30-1.

f. 29v

*WyT 396: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Who hath herd of suche crueltye before?’

Copy, with autograph corrections.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 136.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 32.

f. 30r-v

WyT 146: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘If fancy would favour’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 136-7.

First published in The Court of Venus [c.1538]. Muir & Thomson, pp. 32-3.

f. 31r

*WyT 23: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Alas madame for stelyng of a kysse’

Copy, with autograph revisions and with alterations in another hand.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 138. Facsimile in Foxwell, I, after p. 44.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 33-4.

f. 31v

WyT 383: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘What no, perdy, ye may be sure!’

Copy, with a correction and line 15 written in an italic hand (that responsible for WyT 372).

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 138-9.

Not published in 16th century. Muir & Thomson, p. 34.

f. 32r

*WyT 327: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘The wandering gadlyng in the sommer tyde’

Copy, with autograph corrections.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 139.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 34.

f. 32v

WyT 321: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘The lyvely sperkes that issue from those Iyes’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 140.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 35.

f. 33r

WyT 265: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Ryght true it is, and said full yore agoo’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 141.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 35-6.

f. 33v

WyT 381: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘What nedeth these thretning wordes and wasted wynde?’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 141.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 35.

f. 33v

WyT 392: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘What wourde is that that chaungeth not’

Copy, headed in a later hand ‘Anna’.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 141-2.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 36.

f. 34r-v

*WyT 41: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘At moost myschief’

Copy of lines 1-41, with autograph corrections (line 30 inserted).

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 142-3.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 36-7.

f. 35r-v

WyT 185: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Marvaill no more, all tho’

Copy, with an alteration in another hand (that responsible for the ‘Aunswer’ to WyT 183).

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 143-4.

First published in The Court of Venus, [c.1538]. Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 38-9.

f. 36r-v

WyT 394: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Where shall I have at myn owne will’

Copy, with alterations in another hand (that responsible for the ‘Aunswer’ to WyT 183).

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 145-6. Facsimile of f. 36r in Powell, p. 19.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 39-40.

f. 37r

*WyT 269: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘She sat and sowde that hath done me the wrong’

Copy, with autograph corrections.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 146-7.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 40.

f. 37v

WyT 7: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘A Robyn’

Copy of lines 1-16, 21-8, including speech-prefixes.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson (and see WyT 9), and in Harrier, pp. 147-8.

Not published (in this form) in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 41-2.

f. 38r

*WyT 288: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Suche vayn thought as wonted to myslede me’

Copy, with an autograph alteration.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 148-9.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 42.

f. 38v

*WyT 338: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Tho I cannot your crueltie constrain’

Copy, with autograph corrections.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 149.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 42-3.

f. 39r-v

WyT 361: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘To wisshe and want and not obtain’

Copy, with two alterations in another hand (that responsible for the ‘Aunswer’ to WyT 183), written over by later hands.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 150-1.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 43-4.

f. 40r

*WyT 279: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Some tyme I fled the fyre that me brent’

Copy, with autograph corrections.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 151.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 44.

f. 40r

*WyT 108: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘He is not ded that somtyme hath a fall’

Copy, with autograph corrections.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 152.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 45.

f. 40v

*WyT 311: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘The furyous gonne in his rajing yre’

Copy, with autograph revisions.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 152-3.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 45.

f. 41r-v

WyT 198: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘My hope, Alas, hath me abused’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 153-4.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 45-6.

f. 42r

*WyT 377: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘What deth is worse then this’

Copy, with autograph revisions, written over by later hands.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 154-5.

Not published in 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 46-7.

f. 42v

*WyT 308: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Th'enmy of liff, decayer of all kynde’

Copy, with autograph corrections.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 155.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 47.

ff. 42v-3r

WyT 235: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Ons as me thought fortune me kyst’

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 156.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 47-8.

ff. 43v-4r

WyT 202: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘My lute, awake! perfourme the last’

Copy, with a correction in an italic hand (that responsible for WyT 372).

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 157-8.

First published in The Court of Venus, [c.1538]. Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 48-50.

ff. 44v-5r

WyT 143: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘If chaunce assynd’

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 158-9.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 50-1.

f. 45r

*WyT 221: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Nature, that gave the bee so feet a grace’

Copy, with autograph corrections.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 160.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 51.

f. 45v

WyT 131: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘I have sought long with stedfastnes’

Copy, with an alteration in an italic hand (that responsible for WyT 372).

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 160-1.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 51-2.

f. 46r

WyT 177: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Lyke as the Swanne towardis her dethe’

Copy, imperfect, most of the leaf torn away.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 161-2.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 52-3.

f. 46v

WyT 152: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘In eternum I was ons determed’

Copy, imperfect, most of the leaf torn away.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 162-3.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 53-4.

f. 47r-v

WyT 298: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Syns ye delite to knowe’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 163-4.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 54-5.

ff. 47v-8r

WyT 112: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Hevyn and erth and all that here me plain’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 165.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 55-6.

f. 48v

WyT 59: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Comfort thy self my wofull hert’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 166.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 56-7.

f. 49r-v

WyT 215: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Myne owne John Poyntz, sins ye delight to know’

Copy of lines 52-103, beginning ‘Praise him for counceill that is droncke of ale’; imperfect.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson (and see WyT 216), and in Harrier, pp. 167-8.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 88-91.

f. 50r

*WyT 64: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Desire, alas, my master and my foo’

Autograph fair copy, with revisions.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 173.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 57.

f. 50r

*WyT 366: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Venemus thornes that ar so sharp and kene’

Autograph.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 173.

First pub in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 57-8.

ff. 50v-2v

WyT 205: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘My mothers maydes when they did sowe and spynne’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 174-7.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 91-5.

f. 53r

WyT 351: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘To cause accord or to aggre’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 178.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, p. 58.

f. 53v-4

WyT 348: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Though this thy port and I thy seruaunt true’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 179.

Not published in the the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, p. 59.

f. 54r

WyT 364: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Vnstable dreme according to the place’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 180.

f. 54v

*WyT 151: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘In dowtfull brest, whilst moderly pitie’

Autograph fair copy, with revisions.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 180-1.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 60.

f. 54v

*WyT 233: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Off Cartage he that worthie warrier’

Autograph, fair copy, with one revision.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 181.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 61.

f. 55r

WyT 257: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Processe of tyme worketh such wounder’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 181-2.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, p. 61.

f. 55v

WyT 17: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘After great stormes the cawme retornis’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier. pp. 182-3.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 61-2.

ff. 56r-7v

WyT 12: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘A spending hand that alway powreth owte’

Copy, the second page heavily written over.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 183-5.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 95-7.

f. 58r-v

WyT 30: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘All hevy myndes’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 185-8.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 62-4.

f. 59r

WyT 358: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘To seke eche where, where man doth lyve’

Copy, with a revision in another hand.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 188-9.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 64-5.

f. 59v

WyT 229: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘O goodely hand’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 189-90.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 65-6.

ff. 60r-2r

*WyT 168: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Lo what it is to love!’

Copy of a sequence of three poems, with an autograph alteration.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 190-4 (edited as separate poems).

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 66-9.

f. 62r

WyT 134: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘I lede a liff vnpleasant, nothing glad’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 194. Edited and discussed in Joost Daalder, ‘Wyatt's “I Lead a Life Unpleasant”: Text and Interpretation’, N&Q, 233 (March 1988), 29-33.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, p. 70.

f. 62v

WyT 35: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘And if an Iye may save or sleye’

Copy of a 28-line version (not in the same hand as WyT 34), later deleted.

Edited from this MS in Harrier, pp. 194-5. Collated in Muir & Thomson.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 73-4.

ff. 62v-3

WyT 414: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Yf in the world ther be more woo’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 195.

Not published in 16th century. Muir & Thomson, p. 70.

f. 63r-v

WyT 307: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Th'answere that ye made to me, my dere’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 196.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 70-1.

ff. 63v-4v

WyT 191: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Most wretchid hart most myserable’

Copy in two hands, including John Brereton.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 197-8. Facsimiles of f. 64r in Powell, HLQ (2004), p. 272.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 171-3.

f. 64v

WyT 418: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘You that in love finde lucke and habundance’

Copy, in the hand of John Brereton, headed ‘Sonet’ in another hand.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 199.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 73.

f. 65r

WyT 34: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘And if an Iye may save or sleye’

Copy of a 42-line version, in the hand of John Brereton.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 199-200. Facsimiles of f. 65r in Powell, HLQ (2004), p. 273.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 73-4.

f. 65v

*WyT 260: Sir Thomas Wyatt, Psalm 37. Noli emulare in maligna (‘Altho thow se th'owtragius clime aloft’)

Copy of lines 1-36, in the hand of John Brereton, with an autograph addition.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson (and see WyT 261), and in Harrier, pp. 201-2. Facsimiles of f. 65v in Powell, HLQ (2004), p. 274.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 75-7.

f. 66r

*WyT 94: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘fful well yt maye be sene’

Autograph copy, with extensive revisions.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 203-4. Facsimile of f. 66r in Chris Fletcher et al., 1000 Years of English Literature: A Treasury of Literary Manuscripts (British Library, 2003), p. 46.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, pp. 207-8.

f. 66r

*WyT 259: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Prove wythr I do chainge, my dere’

Autograph unfinished draft, heavily written over by later hands.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 204. Facsimile of f. 66r in Chris Fletcher et al., 1000 Years of English Literature: A Treasury of Literary Manuscripts (British Library, 2003), p. 46.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, p. 78.

f. 66v

*WyT 149: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘If waker care if sodayne pale Coulour’

Copy, in the hand of John Brereton, with autograph corrections.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 204-5. Facsimile in Henry VIII Man and Monarch, ed. Susan Doran (British Library, London, 2009), p. 179.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 78.

ff. 67v-8v

*WyT 273: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘So feble is the threde that doth the burden stay’

Autograph copy, with extensive revisions, headed ‘In Spayne’ in an italic hand (that responsible for WyT 372).

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 205-9.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 79-82.

f. 69r

*WyT 302: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Tagus, fare well, that westward with thy stremes’

Autograph, with minor revisions.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 211. Facsimiles in Croft, Autograph Poetry, I, 9; in Petti, English Literary Hands, No. 19; in Hilton Kelliher and Sally Brown, English Literary Manuscripts (British Library, 1986), No. 10, p. 22; and in DLB, vol. 132, Sixteenth-Century British Non-Dramatic Writers. First Series, ed. David A. Richardson (Detroit, 1993), p. 351.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 82.

f. 69r

*WyT 234: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Off purpos Love chase first for to be blynd’

Autograph, with revisions.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 211. Facsimiles in Croft, Autograph Poetry, I, 9, and in DLB, vol. 132, Sixteenth-Century British Non-Dramatic Writers. First Series, ed. David A. Richardson (Detroit, 1993), p. 351.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 83.

f. 69v

*WyT 385: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘What rage is this? What furour of what kynd?’

Autograph draft, with copious revisions.

Edited from this MS (with a facsimile) in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 212-13. Discussed, with a facsimile, in Helen V. Baron ‘Wyatt's “What rage”’, The Library, 5th Ser. 31 (September 1976), 188-204. Facsimile also in Chris Fletcher et al., 1000 Years of English Literature: A Treasury of Literary Manuscripts (British Library, 2003), p. 47.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 83-4.

f. 70r

*WyT 96: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘From thowght to thowgt from hill to hill love doth me lede’

Autograph.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, p. 213.

Not published in the 16th century. Muir & Thomson, p. 84.

f. 70r

WyT 372: Sir Thomas Wyatt, ‘Vulcane bygat me. Mynerua me taught’

Copy, in an italic hand.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 213. Discussed in Wayne H. Siek, ‘A Note on Some Handwriting in Wyatt's Holograph Poetic Manuscript’, N&Q, 222 (December 1977), 496-7, where it is argued that the poem is not in Wyatt's own hand.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, p. 84.

ff. 71r-2r

WyT 423: Sir Thomas Wyatt, Sir Thomas Wyatt to his son (15 April 1537)

Copy, in the hand of Sir Thomas Wyatt the younger (c.1521-54), headed ‘ffrom him out of Spayne to his son then Xmo yeres old’.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson. Facsimiles of f. 71r in Powell, p. 26, and of f. 72r in Jason Powell, ‘Line Omission in Prose Manuscripts, 1500-1700’, PBSA, 104 (December 2010), 433-61 (p. 439).

Letter beginning ‘In as mitch as now ye ar come to sume yeres of vnderstanding...’, dated from Paris 15 April. Muir, Life & Letters, pp. 38-41.

ff. 72v-3r

WyT 432: Sir Thomas Wyatt, Sir Thomas Wyatt to his son (Autumn 1537)

Copy, in the hand of Sir Thomas Wyatt the younger (c.1521-54), headed ‘Again unto his Son out of Spayne about the same time’.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson.

Letter beginning ‘I doubt not but long ere this time my lettres are come to you...’, subscribed ‘From Valedolide the xxiiith of June’. Muir, Life & Letters, pp. 41-4.

f. 85v

SuH 65: Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, ‘The greate Macedon, that out of Persy chased’

Copy.

This MS collated in Padelford.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Padelford, No. 38, p. 93. Jones, p. 29.

ff. 86-98v

*WyT 251: Sir Thomas Wyatt, Penitential Psalms (‘Love to gyve law vnto his subiect hertes’)

Autograph of Wyatt's seven Penitential Psalms and their prologues, with extensive revisions; imperfect, lacking lines 100-51 (lines 26-80 in Psalm 6).

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, with a facsimile of one page facing p. 100, and in Harrier, pp. 214-49.

First published in Certayne psalmes (London, 1549). Muir & Thomson, pp. 98-125.

ff. 100r-1r

*WyT 160: Sir Thomas Wyatt, Jopas' Song (‘When Dido festid first the wandryng Troian knyght’)

Autograph, with extensive revisions.

Edited from this MS in Muir & Thomson, and in Harrier, pp. 250-2.

First published in Songes and Sonettes (London, 1557). Muir & Thomson, pp. 84-7.

ff. 104r-7r

*HrJ 2: Sir John Harington, Metrical Paraphrases of the Psalms (‘Right happie hee that neither walked hath’)

Copy of Harington's translation of the Seven Penitential Psalms (Nos. 6, 32, 38, 51, 102, 130, 143), partly autograph, partly in the hand of an amanuensis with autograph revisions. c.1609.

Psalms 38, 102, and 130 edited from this MS in Karl E. Schmutzler, ‘Harington's Metrical Paraphrases of the Seven Penitential Psalms: Three manuscript Versions’, PBSA, 53 (1959), 240-51. Facsimile of part of f. 104 (Psalm 6) in Petti, English Literary Hands (1977), No. 31 (where it is mistakenly described as entirely autograph, but see P.J. Croft's review in TLS (24 February 1978), p. 241).

Harington's complete Psalter, intended for publication just before his death, but unpublished.

Egerton MS 2721

A folio composite volume of correspondence for 1708-51, in various hands, 506 leaves. Volume IX of the correspondence of the Gawdy family, baronets, of West Harling, Norfolk.

f. 462r-v

*VaJ 313: Sir John Vanbrugh, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Vanbrugh, to [Piers] Mauduit, [Windsor Herald], 24 November 1720. 1720.

Edited in Works, IV, 127 (No. 118).

Egerton MS 2725

A quarto miscellany of verse and some prose, predominantly in a single secretary hand, written from both ends, 179 leaves, in 19th-century half blue morocco gilt. c.1640s.

Inscribed (f. 179r) ‘This is Sr. Thomas Meres [or ? Maiors] Book’: i.e. probably Sir Thomas Meres (1634-1715), of Kirton, Lincolnshire. Later bookplate of the Rev. John Curtis. Purchased from Mrs Ann Austin Curtis 12 October 1889.

ff. 4r-5r

ClJ 137: John Cleveland, Upon an Hermophrodite (‘Sir, or Madame, chuse you whether’)

Copy, subscribed ‘J. C.’

First published in Character (1647). Morris & Withington, pp. 10-11.

ff. 5r-6r

ClJ 12: John Cleveland, The Authour to his Hermophrodite, made after M. Randolphs death, yet inserted into his Poems (‘Probleme of Sexes; must thou likewise bee’)

Copy, subscribed ‘J. C.’

First published in Character (1647). Morris & Withington, pp. 12-13.

f. 6r-v

ClJ 119: John Cleveland, To Mrs. K. T. who askt him why hee was dumb (‘Stay, should I answer (Lady) then’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Stay Lady, should I answere, then’ and subscribed ‘J. C.’

First published in Character (1647). Morris & Withington, pp. 20-1.

f. 7r-v

ClJ 78: John Cleveland, On the Archbishop of Canterbury (‘I need no Muse to give my passion vent’)

Copy, subscribed ‘J. C.’

First published in Character (1647). Morris & Withington, pp. 38-9.

f. 8r-9v

ClJ 85: John Cleveland, The Rebell Scot (‘How? Providence? and yet a Scottish crew?’)

Copy, subscribed ‘J. C.’

First published in Character (1647). Morris & Withington, pp. 29-32.

f. 10r

LoR 35: Richard Lovelace, To Althea, From Prison. Song (‘When Love with unconfined wings’)

Copy, headed ‘A coppy of verses of captaine Lovelace his making when he was in prison’.

Edited from this MS in Wilkinson, I, 50; collated in Clayton.

First published in Lucasta (London, 1649). Wilkinson (1925), II, 70-1. (1930), pp. 78-9. Thomas Clayton, ‘Some Versions, Texts, and Readings of “To Althea, from Prison”’, PBSA, 68 (1974), 225-35. A musical setting by John Wilson published in Select Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1659).

f. 10v

WaE 510: Edmund Waller, To a Lady Singing a Song of his Composing (‘Chloris! yourself you so excel’)

Copy, headed ‘Heareing a Lady singing some verses of his makeing’.

First published in Workes (1645). Thorn-Drury, I, 105. A musical setting by Henry Lawes published, as ‘To the same Lady singing the former Song’, in Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1653).

f. 10v

ClJ 159: John Cleveland, <Greek> -- Anacreon (‘The fruitfull earth carouses, and’)

Morris & Withington, p. 74.

ff. 17v-20r

ClJ 122: John Cleveland, To P. Rupert (‘O that I could but vote my selfe a Poet!’)

Copy, subscribed ‘J. C.’

First published in Character (1647). Morris & Withington, pp. 33-8.

ff. 20r-1v

DeJ 89: Sir John Denham, A Speech against Peace at the Close Committee (‘But will you now to Peace incline’)

Copy, headed ‘Hampdens Ghost’.

First published as a broadside entitled Mr. Hampdens speech occasioned upon the Londoners Petition for Peace [Lonon, 1643]. Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 122-7.

ff. 27v-30v

CoA 158: Abraham Cowley, A Satyre against Seperatists (‘I have beene where so many Round-heads dwell’)

Copy, headed ‘The Puritans Lecture’ and here beginning ‘I have beene (Sr) where soe many Puritans dwell’.

First published, as by ‘A. C. Generosus’, in London, 1642. Collected Works, I, pp. 94-101, as The Puritans Lecture. Cowley's authorship uncertain but probable: see Perkin, pp. 25-9.

f. 31r

CoA 145: Abraham Cowley, Prologue to the Guardian (‘Who says the Times do Learning disallow?’)

Copy, headed ‘Prologue by A:C: March 22th before Prince Charles’.

This MS collated in Wiley; recorded in Moore Smith.

First published, under the pseudonym ‘Francis Cole’, in The Prologue and Epilogue to a Comedie, presented, at the Entertainment of the Prince His Highnesse, by the Schollers of Trinity Colledge in Cambridge, in March last, 1641 (London, 1642). Waller, I, 31-2 (and II, 161). Autrey Nell Wiley, ‘The Prologue and Epilogue to the Guardian’, RES, 10 (1934), 443-7 (pp. 444-5).

See also CoA 68-81.

f. 35r

JnB 69: Ben Jonson, An Epigram on the Princes birth (‘And art thou borne, brave Babe? Blest be thy birth’)

Copy, headed ‘An Epigram Vpon the Prince his birth May 19o 1630’ and subscribed ‘Benjamin Johnson’.

This MS collated in Herford & Simpson.

First published in John Benson's 4to edition of Jonson's poems (1640) and in The Vnder-wood (lxv) in Workes (London, 1640). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 237-8.

ff. 45v-7r

HoJ 62: John Hoskyns, The Censure of a Parliament Fart (‘Downe came graue auncient Sr John Crooke’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon a Fart let in the Parliament House’ and here beginning ‘Downe came Ancient Sr John Crooke’.

Attributed to Hoskyns by John Aubrey. Cited, but unprinted, as No. III of ‘Doubtful Verses’ in Osborn, p. 300. Early Stuart Libels website.

ff. 47v-54r

CoR 299: Richard Corbett, Iter Boreale (‘Foure Clerkes of Oxford, Doctours two, and two’)

Copy, headed ‘Doctour Corbetts iter boreale to Newarke’.

First published in Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 31-49.

ff. 55r-6v

KiH 337: Henry King, An Exequy To his Matchlesse never to be forgotten Freind (‘Accept, thou Shrine of my Dead Saint!’)

Copy, headed ‘An Elegy by Doctour H: King upon the death of his wife’.

This MS collated in Crum.

First published in Poems (1657). Crum, pp. 68-72.

f. 59v

DaJ 185: Sir John Davies, On the Deputy of Ireland his child (‘As carefull mothers doe to sleeping lay’)

Copy, headed ‘An Epitaph upon the Death of a Child’.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1637), p. 411. Krueger, p. 303.

f. 60r

CaE 17: Elizabeth Cary, Viscountess Falkland, An Epitaph upon the death of the Duke of Buckingham (‘Reader stand still and see, loe, how I am’)

Copy of the six-line epitaph, as ‘by the Countesse of Faukland’.

Edited from this MS in Akkerman, p. 197. Recorded in Wolfe, p. 494.

A six-line (epitaph) version is ascribed to ‘the Countesse of Faukland’ in two MS copies. In some sources it is followed by a further 44 lines (elegy) beginning ‘Yet were bidentalls sacred and the place’. The latter also appears, anonymously, as a separate poem in a number of other sources. The authorship remains uncertain. For an argument for Lady Falkland's authorship of all 50 lines, see Akkerman.

Both sets of verse were first published, as separate but sequential poems, in Poems or Epigrams, Satyrs (London, 1658), pp. 101-2. All 50 lines are edited in Akkerman, pp. 195-6.

f. 60r-v

BcF 17: Francis Bacon, ‘The world's a bubble, and the life of man’

Copy, headed ‘De ambiguitate [brevitate deleted] vitæ’.

First published in Thomas Farnaby, Florilegium epigrammatum Graecorum (London, 1629). Poems by Sir Henry Wotton, Sir Walter Raleigh and others, ed. John Hannah (London, 1845), pp. 76-80. Spedding, VII, 271-2. H.J.C. Grierson, ‘Bacon's Poem, “The World”: Its Date and Relation to certain other Poems’, Modern Language Review, 6 (1911), 145-56.

f. 60v

RaW 250: Sir Walter Ralegh, On the Life of Man (‘What is our life? a play of passion’)

Copy, headed ‘De brevitate vitae’.

First published, in a musical setting, in Orlando Gibbons, The First Set of Madrigals and Mottets (London, 1612). Latham, pp. 51-2. Rudick, Nos 29A, 29B and 29C (three versions, pp. 69-70). MS texts also discussed in Michael Rudick, ‘The Text of Ralegh's Lyric “What is our life?”’, SP, 83 (1986), 76-87.

f. 61r-v

WoH 232: Sir Henry Wotton, A Farewell to the Vanities of the World (‘Farewell, ye gilded follies, pleasing troubles!’)

Copy, headed ‘Doctor King his Farewell to the World’.

First published, as ‘a farewell to the vanities of the world, and some say written by Dr. D[onne], but let them bee writ by whom they will’, in Izaak Walton, The Complete Angler (London, 1653), pp. 243-5. Hannah (1845), pp. 109-13. The Poems of John Donne, ed. Herbert J.C. Grierson, 2 vols (Oxford, 1912), I, 465-7.

ff. 61v-2r

KiH 59: Henry King, The Boy's answere to the Blackmore (‘Black Mayd, complayne not that I fly’)

Copy, headed ‘Her answere’.

This MS recorded in Crum.

First published in The Academy of Complements (London, 1646). Poems (1657). Crum, p. 151. The text almost invariably preceded, in both printed and MS versions, by (variously headed) ‘A Blackmore Mayd wooing a faire Boy: sent to the Author by Mr. Hen. Rainolds’ (‘Stay, lovely Boy, why fly'st thou mee’). Musical settings by John Wilson in Henry Lawes, Select Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1669).

f. 62r

SuJ 105: John Suckling, The guiltless Inconstant (‘My first Love whom all beauty did adorn’)

Copy, headed ‘The Sparke T.C.’, subscribed ‘W.P.’.

This MS collated in Clayton.

First published in Thomas Carew, Poems (London, 1640). Last Remains (London, 1659). Clayton, pp. 90-1.

Probably written by Walton Poole.

f. 62v

CwT 224: Thomas Carew, An Excuse of absence (‘You'le aske perhaps wherefore I stay’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon Absence’.

This MS recorded in Powell, p. 289.

First published in Hazlitt (1870), p. 28. Dunlap. p. 131.

ff. 63v-4r

DnJ 282: John Donne, The Autumnall (‘No Spring, nor Summer Beauty hath such grace’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon an Autumnall face’.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published, as ‘Elegie. The Autumnall’, in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 92-4 (as ‘Elegie IX’). Gardner, Elegies, pp. 27-8. Shawcross, No. 50. Variorum, 2 (2000), pp. 277-8.

ff. 64r-5r

ToA 32: Aurelian Townshend, A Paradox (‘There is no Lover, hee or shee’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Chambers (1912), pp. 33-5. Brown, pp. 30-1.

f. 65r

HrE 67: Edward, Lord Herbert of Cherbury, To Mrs. Diana Cecyll (‘Diana Cecyll, that rare beauty thou dost show’)

Copy, omitting the first two words.

This MS collated in Smith, p. 129.

First published in Occasional Verses (1665). Moore Smith, pp. 34-5.

f. 65r-v

CwT 1281: Thomas Carew, Of his Mistresse (‘I will not Saint my Coelia, for shee’)

Copy, untitled.

First published, as ‘To Clarinda: On Her Perfection’, in Thomas Jordan, Claraphil and Clarinda: In a Forrest of Fancies (1650?), sig. B1r-v. Dunlap (1949), p. 193.

ff. 65v-6r

ToA 56: Aurelian Townshend, To the Countess of Salisbury (‘Victorious beauty, though your eyes’)

Copy, untitled.

First published, in a musical setting by William Webb, in John Playford, Select Musical Ayres (London, 1652), p. 22. Chambers, pp. 4-5. Brown, pp. 19-21.

ff. 66v-7r

ShJ 83: James Shirley, To his Mistris confined (‘Think not my Phebe, cause a cloud’)

Copy, here beginning ‘O thinke not Phoebe cause a cloud’ and ascribed to ‘T.C.’.

This MS collated in Armstrong.

First published in Samuel Pick, Festum Voluptatis (London, 1639). Thomas Carew, Poems (London, 1640). Shirley, Poems (London, 1646). Armstrong, p. 2.

f. 67r

GrJ 51.5: John Grange, ‘Not that I wish my Mistris’

Copy.

This MS recorded in Krueger.

First published in Wits Recreations Augmented (London, 1641), sig. V7v. John Playford, Select Ayres and Dialogues (1652), Part II, p. 28. Poems (1660), pp. 79-81, unattributed. Prince d'Amour (1660), p. 123, ascribed to ‘J.G.’. Listed in Krueger's Appendix I: ‘Spurious Poems in the 1660 Edition’ as by John Grange.

f. 67v

StW 719: William Strode, A Sigh (‘O tell mee, tell, thou God of winde’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Wit Restor'd (London, 1658). Dobell, pp. 6-8. Forey, pp. 194-6.

ff. 68v-9r

HeR 388: Robert Herrick, To his false Mistris (‘Whither are all her false oathes blowne’)

Copy, headed ‘On a periured Mris’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Martin (1956), p. 420. Patrick, pp. 68-9.

f. 69r

HeR 80: Robert Herrick, The Curse. A Song (‘Goe perjur'd man. and if thou ere return’)

Copy, headed ‘On her periured servant’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, p. 49. Patrick, p. 69. Musical setting by John Blow published in John Playford, Choice Ayres and Songs (London, 1683).

f. 69r

FeO 29: Owen Felltham, A Farewell (‘When by sad fate from hence I summon'd am’)

Copy.

First published in Lusoria (London, 1661). Pebworth & Summers, p. 18.

f. 69r-v

CwT 326: Thomas Carew, Good counsell to a young Maid (‘When you the Sun-burnt Pilgrim see’)

Copy, headed ‘Good counsell to a Maide’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 25.

f. 69v-70r

RnT 482: Thomas Randolph, Love refused for Conscience Sake (‘If Conscience had not so cruel bin’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Moore Smith (1927).

Edited and attributed to Randolph in Moore Smith (1927), pp. 120-1.

ff. 70v-1r

DaW 17: Sir William Davenant, For the Lady, Olivia Porter. A present, upon a New-yeares day (‘Goe! hunt the whiter Ermine! and present’)

Copy, headed ‘For Mris. Porter on New=yeares day’.

First published in Madagascar (London, 1638). Gibbs, p. 43.

ff. 72v-4v

HeR 133: Robert Herrick, His age, dedicated to his peculiar friend, Master John Wickes, under the name of Posthumus (‘Ah Posthumus! Our yeares hence flye’)

Copy, headed ‘Mr Herrickes old age to Mr. Weekes’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 132-6. Patrick, pp. 179-83.

f. 75r

RnT 260: Thomas Randolph, On the Passion of Christ (‘What rends the temples vail, where is day gone?’)

Copy, headed ‘Englished’, preceded (f. 74v) by the Latin versions headed ‘In diem passionis’, and subscribed ‘Tho. Ran.’

The Latin verses edited from this MS in Thorn-Drury, pp. 178-9.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, p. 57. This poem is the ‘Englished’ version of Latin verses beginning ‘Quid templum abscindit? quo luxque diesque recessit’, printed in Thorn-Drury, pp. 178-9.

f. 75r

CwT 140: Thomas Carew, A cruel Mistris (‘Wee read of Kings and Gods that kindly tooke’)

Copy, here beginning ‘We read of gods and kings that kindly tooke’, ascribed to ‘T. Carey’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 8.

f. 76r

StW 1320: William Strode, A Lover to his Mistress (‘Ile tell you how the Rose did first grow redde’)

Copy, headed ‘To his Mistris’ and here beginning ‘I wonder how the rose came red’.

First published, in Wits Recreations (London, 1640). Dobell, p. 48. Listed, without text, in Forey, p. 339.

ff. 76v-7v

RnT 456: Thomas Randolph, The Combat of the Cocks (‘Go, you tame gallants, you that have the name’)

Copy.

(Sometimes called A terible true Tragicall relacon of a duell fought at Wisbich June the 17th: 1637.) Published, and attributed to Randolph, in Hazlitt, I, xviii. II, 667-70. By Robert Wild.

f. 78r

ClJ 186: John Cleveland, Epitaph on the Earl of Strafford (‘Here lies Wise and Valiant Dust’)

Copy of a version headed ‘An Epitaph upon the Earle of Strafford’ and beginning ‘Here lyes wisdome, Courage, witt’.

First published in Character (1647). Edited in CSPD, 1640-1641 (1882), p. 574. Berdan, p. 184, as ‘Internally unlike his manner’. Morris & Withington, p. 66, among ‘Poems probably by Cleveland’. The attribution to Cleveland is dubious. The epitaph is also attributed to Clement Paman: see Poetry and Revolution: An Anthology of British and Irish Verse 1625-1660, ed. Peter Davidson (Oxford, 1998), notes to No. 275 (p. 363).

f. 78r-v

DeJ 70: Sir John Denham, On the Earl of Strafford's Tryal and Death (‘Great Strafford! worthy of that Name, though all’)

Copy, headed ‘May 1641 An offering to the sacred memory of the never sufficiently admired E. of Strafford’.

First published in Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 153-4.

f. 78v

CaE 18: Elizabeth Cary, Viscountess Falkland, An Epitaph upon the death of the Duke of Buckingham (‘Reader stand still and see, loe, how I am’)

Copy of the 44-line elegy beginning ‘Yet were bidentalls sacred and the place’.

This MS recorded in Akkerman.

A six-line (epitaph) version is ascribed to ‘the Countesse of Faukland’ in two MS copies. In some sources it is followed by a further 44 lines (elegy) beginning ‘Yet were bidentalls sacred and the place’. The latter also appears, anonymously, as a separate poem in a number of other sources. The authorship remains uncertain. For an argument for Lady Falkland's authorship of all 50 lines, see Akkerman.

Both sets of verse were first published, as separate but sequential poems, in Poems or Epigrams, Satyrs (London, 1658), pp. 101-2. All 50 lines are edited in Akkerman, pp. 195-6.

ff. 79r-80v

DaW 10: Sir William Davenant, An Elegy on the Duke of Buckingham's Death (‘No Poetts triviall rage, that must aspire’)

Copy.

First published in Gibbs (1972), pp. 272-4.

ff. 82v-6r

DaW 31: Sir William Davenant, Jeffereidos, Or the Captivitie of Jeffery (‘A Sayle! a sayle! cry'd they, who did consent’)

First published in Madagascar (London, 1638). Gibbs, pp. 37-43.

ff. 87r-8r

DaW 3: Sir William Davenant, Elegie on B. Haselrick, slaine in's youth, in a Duell (‘Now in the blinde and quiet age of Night’)

Copy, headed ‘An Elegye on Captaine Bartin Haslerigge slaine in Duell’.

First published in Madagascar (London, 1638). Gibbs, pp. 59-61.

f. 88v

DaW 11: Sir William Davenant, Epitaph On the Daughter of Mr. Richard Turpin (‘Stript from her Silks and Lawnes here lies’)

Copy.

First published in Works (London, 1673). Gibbs, p. 167.

f. 89v

DaW 35: Sir William Davenant, On his mistris Singing (‘Singe gentle Lady till you move’)

Copy, headed ‘To a Lady singing’.

First published in Herbert Berry, ‘Three New Poems by Davenant’, PQ, 31 (1952), 70-4. Gibbs, pp. 275-6. A variant version, beginning ‘Sing fair Clorinda’, published, in a musical setting, in Henry Lawes, Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1653). Gibbs, pp. 303-8.

ff. 90v-1r

DaW 53: Sir William Davenant, Song. The Souldier going to the Field (‘Preserve thy sighs, unthrifty Girle!’)

Copy, headed ‘A song takeing leave of my Mistresse for a voyage’.

First published in The Academy of Complements (London, 1650). Works (London, 1673). Gibbs, pp. 175-6.

f. 91v

PeW 5: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, ‘Disdain me still, that I may ever love’

Copy, headed ‘Coynesse importuned. A Song’.

This MS recorded in Krueger.

ff. 91v-2r

PeW 37: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, ‘If her disdain least change in you can move’

Copy, headed ‘To his friend disdained by his Mris. A Song’.

This MS recorded in Krueger.

First published in 1635. Poems (1660), pp. 3-5, superscribed ‘P.’. Krueger, p. 2, among ‘Poems by Pembroke and Rudyerd’.

ff. 93v-4r

KiH 363: Henry King, The Farwell (‘Farwell fond Love, under whose childish whipp’)

Copy, headed ‘Cupids Renegado’ and here beginning ‘ffarewell fond Boy, under whose churlish whippe’.

This MS recorded in Crum.

First published in Poems (1657). Crum, p. 150.

See also B&F 121-2.

f. 97v

StW 398: William Strode, On a Gentlewoman that sung, and playd upon a Lute (‘Bee silent, you still Musicke of the sphears’)

Copy, headed ‘To his Mris singing’.

This MS recorded in Forey, p. 332.

First published in Wits Interpreter (London, 1655), Part II, p. 278. Dobell, p. 39. Forey, p. 208.

f. 98r

HeR 297: Robert Herrick, Advice to a Maid (‘Love in thy youth fayre Mayde bee wise’)

Copy, headed ‘Perswasion to Loue. A song’.

First published, in a musical setting, in Walter Porter, Madrigales and Airs (London, 1632). Martin, p. 443 (in his section ‘Not attributed to Herrick hitherto’). Not included in Patrick.

f. 101

PeW 285: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, Sonnet (‘Fye that men should so complain’)

This MS recorded in Krueger.

Poems (1660), pp. 72-3, unattributed. Listed in Krueger's Appendix I: ‘Spurious Poems in the 1660 Edition’.

f. 101r

StW 1379: William Strode, Upon the blush of a faire Ladie (‘Stay, lustie bloud, where canst thou seeke’)

First published in Wit Restor'd (London, 1658). Dobell, pp. 39-40. Listed, without text, in Forey, p. 339.

f. 102r-v

WoH 142: Sir Henry Wotton, A Poem written by Sir Henry Wotton in his Youth (‘O faithless world, and thy most faithless part’)

Copy, headed ‘On his loues unconstancy’, subscribed in a later hand ‘sr. H. W.’

First published in Francis Davison, Poetical Rapsody (London, 1602), p. 157. As ‘A poem written by Sir Henry Wotton, in his youth’, in Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 517. Hannah (1845), pp. 3-5. Edited and texts discussed in Ted-Larry Pebworth, ‘Sir Henry Wotton's “O Faithless World”: The Transmission of a Coterie Poem and a Critical Old-Spelling Edition’, Analytical & Enumerative Bibliography, 5/4 (1981), 205-31.

f. 104r

KiH 551: Henry King, Sonnet (‘Dry those faire, those Christall Eyes’)

Copy, headed ‘To a faire Lady weeping’.

This MS recorded in Crum.

First published in Poems (1657). Crum, pp. 147-8.

ff. 104v-5r

DnJ 3928: John Donne, The Will (‘Before I sigh my last gaspe, let me breath’)

Copy of a five-stanza version, headed ‘A Lovers Will’, subscribed ‘J. D.’

This MS recorded in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 56-8. Gardner, Elegies, pp. 54-5. Shawcross, No. 66.

f. 105v

JnB 590: Ben Jonson, Epicoene I, i, 92-102. Song (‘Still to be neat, still to be drest’)

Copy, headed ‘A song’, subscribed ‘Ben. Johnson’.

First published in London, 1616. Herford & Simpson, V, 139-272.

f. 105v

StW 796: William Strode, Song (‘I saw faire Cloris walke alone’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon his Mris walkinge in the snow’.

First published in Walter Porter, Madrigales and Ayres (London, 1632). Dobell, p. 41. Forey, pp. 76-7. The poem also discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Notes on some Poems attributed to William Strode’, PQ, 34 (1955), 444-8 (pp. 445-6), and see Mary Hobbs, ‘Early Seventeenth-Century Verse Miscellanies and Their Value for Textual Editors’, EMS, 1 (1989), 182-210 (pp. 199, 209).

f. 108

PeW 296: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, A stragling Lover reclaim'd (‘Till now I never did believe’)

This MS recorded in Krueger.

First published, in a musical setting, in Henry Lawes, Ayres and Dialogues (1653), Part I, p. 16. John Cotgrave, Wits Interpreter (London, 1655), p. 45. Poems (1660), pp. 90-1, superscribed ‘P.’ Listed in Krueger's Appendix I: ‘Spurious Poems in the 1660 Edition’ as probably by Sir Thomas Neville.

ff. 108v-9r

CoR 612: Richard Corbett, To the Ladyes of the New Dresse (‘Ladyes that weare black cypresse vailes’)

Copy, ascribed to ‘Bishop Corbett’.

First published in Witts Recreations (London, 1640). Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, p. 90.

This poem is usually followed in MSS by ‘The Ladyes Answer’ (‘Blacke Cypresse vailes are shrouds of night’): see GrJ 14.

f. 110r

CoR 195: Richard Corbett, An Epitaph on Doctor Donne, Deane of Pauls (‘Hee that would write an Epitaph for thee’)

Copy, headed ‘Dr Corbett upon the death of Dr Donne. Print.’

First published in John Donne, Poems (London, 1633). Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, p. 89.

f. 112v

JnB 283: Ben Jonson, The Houre-glasse (‘Doe but consider this small dust’)

Copy, headed ‘A lovers ashes put into an houre glasse by his Mris’.

First published in John Benson's 4to edition of Jonson's poems (1640) and in The Vnder-wood (viii) in Workes (London, 1640). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 148-9.

ff. 113v-14r

KiH 677: Henry King, The Surrender (‘My once Deare Love. Happlesse that I no more’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Crum.

First published in Poems (1657). Crum, pp. 146-7.

f. 115r

CaW 119: William Cartwright, The Royal Slave. The Prologve to The King and Qveene (‘From my Devotions yonder am I come’)

Copy, headed ‘The Prologue to the Royall Slaue prsented to his Matie at Xts Church at Oxford’.

This MS collated in Evans.

Evans, p. 195.

f. 115r-v

CaW 111: William Cartwright, The Royal Slave. The Epilogve to the King & Qveene (‘Those glorious Triumphs of the Persian Court’)

Copy, headed ‘The Epilogue spoke by the slave’ and here beginning ‘Those solemn triumphs...’.

This MS collated in Evans.

Evans, p. 251.

ff. 115v-16v

CaW 121: William Cartwright, The Royal Slave. The Prologve to the Vniversity (‘After our Rites done to the King, we doe’)

Copy, headed ‘The Prologue of the same presented to the Vniversity’.

This MS collated in Evans.

Evans, p. 196.

f. 116v

CaW 98: William Cartwright, The Royal Slave, Act I, scene ii, lines 167-79. The Priest's song (‘Come from a Dungeon to the Throne’)

Copy of the first stanza, headed ‘Corus posterior’.

This MS recorded in Evans, p. 589.

Henry Lawes's musical setting of the forst six lines first published in his Select Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1659), p. 26. Evans, p. 205.

ff. 116v-17r

CaW 114: William Cartwright, The Royal Slave. The Epilogve to the Vniversity (‘Thus cited to a second night, wee've here’)

Copy, headed ‘The Epilogue to the Vniversity’.

This MS collated in Evans.

Evans, p. 252.

f. 117r

ToA 91: Aurelian Townshend, A Bacchanall in a maske before their Majestys, 1636 (‘Bacchus, I-acchus, fill our braines’)

Copy, headed ‘Chorus’.

First published, in a musical setting by Lawes, in Henry Lawes, Ayres and Dialogues, Book I (London, 1653), p. 9. Chambers, pp. 7-8. Brown, pp. 115-16.

ff. 117v-23r

SpE 74: Edmund Spenser, Sir Kenelm Digby's Observations on the 22 Stanza in the 9th. Canto of the 2d. book of Spensers Faery Queen

Copy.

One of the earliest commentaries on The Faerie Queene, including quotations, dated 13 June 1628, addressed to Sir Edward Stradling, and beginning ‘My much honored freind, I am too well acquainted with the weaknes of my abillities...’. First published in London, 1643. Variorum, II, 472-8.

ff. 127v-8r

WaE 300: Edmund Waller, Of the Misreport of her being Painted (‘As when a sort of wolves infest the night’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Workes (1645). Thorn-Drury, I, 50.

f. 128r

WaE 276: Edmund Waller, Of the Lady who can Sleep when she Pleases (‘No wonder sleep from careful lovers flies’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Workes (1645). Thorn-Drury, I, 49.

ff. 134v-5r

FoJ 1: John Ford, A Contract of Love and Truth (‘Soe gold is priz'd, and being chastly pure’)

Copy of a poem subscribed ‘J. Foord’.

Edited from this MS in Lloyd and in Nondramatic Works (1991), where is is also discussed with a complete facsimile on p. 361.

First published in Bertram Lloyd, ‘An Unprinted Poem by John Ford(?)’, RES, 1 (1925), 217-19. Nondramatic Works (1991), pp. 359-62.

ff. 135v-6r

RnT 177: Thomas Randolph, A Maske for Lydia (‘Sweet Lydia take this maske, and shroud’)

Copy, untitled and subscribed ‘Tho. Randolph’.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 126-7.

ff. 136v-7r

HeR 323.5: Robert Herrick, ‘Hide not thy love and mine shall be’

Copy of the second part, here beginning ‘Though hand and eyes may proue’.

This MS collated in Brown.

First published in Aurelian Townshend's poems and Masks, ed. E. K. Chambers (Oxford, 1912), pp. 28-32. The Poems and Masques of Aurelian Townshend, ed. Cedric R. Brown (Reading, 1983), pp. 34-41 (Version One, First Part, pp. 35-7; Second Part pp. 35-7; Version Two, pp. 38-41). Ascribed to Herrick in several MSS.

f. 141r-v

ClJ 243: John Cleveland, The Answer [to a letter by W. E.]

Copy, headed ‘Mr Cleaueland to Chandler’.

First published in Poems By J. C. ([London], 1651), pp. 84-5.

ff. 144r-5r

HeR 348: Robert Herrick, King Oberon his Cloathing (‘When the monethly horned Queene’)

Copy, untitled.

First published, as ‘A Description of the King of Fayries Clothes’ and attributed to Sir Simeon Steward, in A Description of the King and Queene of Fayries (London, 1634). Musarum Deliciae (London, 1656), p. 32. Attributed to Herrick in Hazlitt, II, 473-7, and in Norman K. Farmer, Jr., ‘Robert Herrick and “King Oberon's Clothing”: New Evidence for Attribution’, Yearbook of English Studies 1 (1971), 68-77. Not included in Martin or in Patrick. See also T.G.S. Cain, ‘Robert Herrick, Mildmay Fane, and Sir Simeon Steward’, ELR, 15 (1985), 312-17.

ff. 146v-7r

BmF 86: Francis Beaumont, The Examination of his Mistress's Perfections (‘Stand still, my happiness. and swelling heart’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Poems (London, 1653). Dyce, XI, 495-6.

f. 148r

CwT 76: Thomas Carew, The Comparison (‘Dearest thy tresses are not threads of gold’)

Copy, headed ‘On a faire Mris:’.

This MS recorded in Powell, p. 287.

First published in Poems (1640), and lines 1-10 also in Wits Recreations (London, 1640). Dunlap, pp. 98-9.

ff. 149v-50r

KiH 390: Henry King, The Legacy (‘My dearest Love! When Thou and I must part’)

This MS recorded in Crum.

First published in Poems (1657). Crum, pp. 170-2.

f. 151r

ShJ 124: James Shirley, ‘Would you know what's soft?’

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Armstrong.

First published, as a ‘Song’, in Thomas Carew, Poems (London, 1640). Shirley, Poems (London, 1646). Armstrong, p. 3.

f. 151v

HeR 12: Robert Herrick, The admonition (‘Seest thou those Diamonds which she weares’)

Copy, untitled and here beginning ‘Seest thou those Jewells which shee weares’

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 130-1. Patrick, p. 177.

f. 154r-v

ClJ 164: John Cleveland, Mr Cleauelands reply from Belvoir to the 3 Newarke Poets (‘All haile to the Poeticke Gleeke’)

Copy, subscribed ‘J. Cleauland’.

Edited from this MS in Morris & Withington.

First published in Berdan (1903). Morris & Withington, p. 70.

ff. 154r-6r

ClJ 69: John Cleveland, The Mixt Assembly (‘Fleabitten Synod: an Assembly brew'd’)

Copy, subscribed ‘J. C.’

First published in Character (1647). Morris & Withington, pp. 26-8.

ff. 156r-7v

ClJ 99: John Cleveland, Smectymnuus, or the Club-Divines (‘Smectymnuus? The Goblin makes me start’)

Copy, subscribed ‘J. C.’

First published in Character (1647). Morris & Withington, pp. 23-6.

ff. 157v-8v

ClJ 23: John Cleveland, A Dialogue between two Zealots, upon the &c. in the Oath (‘Sir Roger, from a zealous piece of Freeze’)

Copy.

First published in Character (1647). Morris & Withington, pp. 4-5.

f. 158v

StW 1276: William Strode, Jack on both Sides (‘I holde as fayth What Englandes Church Allowes’)

Copy, untitled, in two columns.

First published, as ‘The Church Papist’, in Wits Recreations (London, 1640). Reprinted as ‘The Jesuit's Double-faced Creed’ by Henry Care in The Popish Courant (16 May 1679): see August A. Imholtz, Jr, ‘The Jesuits' Double-Faced Creed: A Seventeenth-Century Cross-Reading’, N&Q, 222 (December 1977), 553-4. Dobell, p. 111. Listed, without text, in Forey, p. 339.

f. 160r-v

SuJ 150: John Suckling, An Answer to a Gentleman in Norfolk that sent to enquire after the Scotish business

Copy, headed ‘Sr. John Sucklings letter to a friend of his. Anno: Dom: 1640’.

This MS collated in Clayton.

First published in Last Remains (London, 1659). Clayton, pp. 142-4.

ff. 161v-2r

ClJ 142: John Cleveland, Upon Phillis walking in a morning before Sun-rising (‘The sluggish morne, as yet undrest’)

Copy.

First published in Character (1647). Morris & Withington, pp. 14-15.

ff. 169r-168r rev.

CoR 741: Richard Corbett, Nonsence (‘Like to the thund'ring tone of unspoke speeches’)

Copy, headed ‘Pure noncence’, here beginning ‘Like to the silent tone...’, and subscribed in another hand ‘Fra: Qarles. in print’.

First published in Witts' Recreations Augmented (London, 1641). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 95-6.

f. 170r rev.

DrM 17: Michael Drayton, The Cryer (‘Good Folke, for Gold or Hyre’)

Copy, headed ‘Cupids inquisition’.

This MS recorded in Hebel, V, 147.

First published, among Odes with Other Lyrick Poesies, in Poems (London, 1619). Hebel, II, 371.

f. 170r rev.

BrW 7.5: William Browne of Tavistock, Britannia's Pastorals, Books I and II

Copy of Book I, Song 3, lines 477-8, headed ‘A Ring sent’ and here beginning ‘Nature framd a Jemme without compare’.

Book I first published London, 1613. Book II first published London, 1616. Goodwin, Vol. I.

ff. 171r-170v rev.

ShJ 110: James Shirley, Vpon the Princes Birth (‘Fair fall their Muses that in well-chim'd verse’)

Copy, headed ‘In natalem Caroli Principis Cantilena’.

This MS recorded in Armstrong.

First published in Poems (London, 1646). Armstrong, pp. 7-8.

f. 172r rev.

StW 1022: William Strode, A Sonnet (‘My Love and I for kisses played’)

Copy, headed ‘Of his Mistris’.

First published in A Banquet of Jests (London, 1633). Dobell, p. 47. Forey, p. 211. The poem also discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Notes on some Poems attributed to William Strode’, PQ, 34 (1955), 444-8 (p. 446-7).

Egerton MS 2828

Autograph fair copy, with revisions made by Edward Knight, book-keeper and prompter of the King's Company, and some further corrections in another hand; prepared for use in the theatre; 29 leaves; licensed and slightly emended by Sir Henry Herbert, Master of the Revels. 6 May 1631.

*MsP 14: Philip Massinger, Believe as You List

Edited from this MS in Croker & Fairholt and in Edwards & Gibson. Reproduced in facsimile in Tudor Facsimile Texts (London, 1907).

Facsimile examples in Greg, English Literary Autographs, plate XIV (b); in Greg, Dramatic Documents, Vol. II; in A. H. Cruickshank, Philip Massinger (Oxford, 1920), after p. 176; in Flower & Munby, English Poetical Autographs, p. 9; in Edwards & Gibson, III, after p. 302; in Petti, English Literary Hands, No. 56; in DLB, vol. 58, Jacobean and Caroline Dramatists, ed. Fredson Bowers (Detroit, 1987), p. 182; in DLB, vol. 62, Elizabethan Dramatists, ed. Fredson Bowers (Detroit, 1987), p. 408; in Chris Fletcher et al., 1000 Years of English Literature: A Treasury of Literary Manuscripts (British Library, 2003), p. 67; and in Grace Ioppolo, Dramatists and their Manuscripts in the Age of Shakespeare, Jonson, Middleton and Heywood (London & New York, 2006), p. 137.

First published in London, 1849, ed. T.C. Croker and F.W. Fairholt, Percy Society. Edwards & Gibson, III, 303-90.

Egerton MS 2869

A composite quarto volume of original letters by Dryden, Pope and Byron, 12 leaves.

ff. 1r-2v

*DrJ 313: John Dryden, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Dryden, to Jacob Tonson, from Northamptonshire, [c.August 1684]. 1684.

Ward, Letter 11.

ff. 3r-4v

*DrJ 340: John Dryden, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Dryden, to Jacob Tonson, [December 1697]. 1697.

Ward, Letter 50.

Egerton MS 2875

A small octavo volume comprising two independent works (the first a theological treatise in two hands, c.1636), ii + 179 leaves, in old vellum.

The second item, by Phineas Fletcher, inscribed on f. 179v ‘E libris J. Meriton. Meus est hic liber’ [i.e. probably John Meriton, of St John's College, Cambridge, rector of St Mary Bothaw, Londin, in 1666-96]. The whole volume later owned by the Rev. Alexander Balloch Grosart (1827-99), literary scholar and theologian, and afterwards by Bertram Dobell (1842-1914), literary scholar and bookseller.

ff. 153r-79r

*FlP 5: Phineas Fletcher, Locustae, vel pietas Jesuitica (‘Panditur Inferni limen, patet intima Ditis’)

Autograph MS, with a dedicatory epistle to Prince Henry. [1611-12].

Discussed in Boas, I, x-xvi and collated I, 279-87. Facsimile of the third leaf in Boas I, following p. 96.

First published in Cambridge, 1627. Boas, I, 97-123.

Egerton MS 2877

A large folio miscellaneous compilation of verse and prose, chiefly in a single neat hand, written from both ends, 189 leaves, in contemporary vellum (rebound). Associated with the Freville family and probably assembled by Gilbert Frevile, of Bishop Middleham, Co. Durham, whose name appears on the cover with the date 1591. A pen-and-ink ornamental drawing at the end inscribed ‘Finis quoth G. W.’ c.1620s.

f. 15v

ElQ 264: Queen Elizabeth I, Elizabeth's Golden Speech, November 30, 1601

Copy of Version 2, headed ‘Quene Elizabeths speeche to her last parliament. the .30. of november i60i’.

This MS cited (as ‘third version’) in Hartley.

First published (Version III), as Her maiesties most princelie answere, deliuered by her selfe at White-hall, on the last day of November 1601 (London, 1601: STC 7578).

Version I. Beginning ‘Mr. Speaker, we have heard your declaration and perceive your care of our estate...’. Hartley, III, 412-14. Hartley, III, 495-6. Collected Works, Speech 23, pp. 337-40 (Version 1). Selected Works, Speech 11, pp. 84-92.

Version II. Beginning ‘Mr. Speaker, we perceive your coming is to present thanks unto me...’. Hartley, III, 294-7 (third version). Collected Works, Speech 23, pp. 340-2 (Version 2).

Version III. Beginning ‘Mr. Speaker, we perceive by you, whom we did constitute the mouth of our Lower House, how with even consent...’. Hartley, III, 292-3 (second version). Collected Works, Speech 23, pp. 342-4 (Version 3). STC 7578.

Version IV. Beginning ‘Mr Speaker, I well understand by that you have delivered, that you with these gentlemen of the Lower House come to give us thankes for benefitts receyved...’. Hartley, III, 289-91 (first version).

f. 16r

ElQ 246: Queen Elizabeth I, Queen Elizabeth's Latin Rebuke to the Polish Ambassador, Paul de Jaline, July 25, 1597

Copy, headed A copie of Queene Elizabeth her Answer to ye kinge of Polandes Embassador in the prsence Chamber at Greenewich the .25th. of July. 1597. openly & ex tempore

Beginning ‘Oh quam decepta fui: Expectaui Legationem tu vero querelam, mihi adduxisti...’, in Autograph Compositions, pp. 168-9. An English version, beginning ‘O how I have been deceived! I expected an embassage, but you have brought to me a complaint...’, in Collected Works, Speech 22, pp. 332-4.

f. 16r

DaJ 74: Sir John Davies, Nosce Teipsum (‘Why did my parents send me to the schooles’)

Copy of the dedication, headed ‘A copy of an Epistle dedicatory to Queene Elizabeth, written by Mr. Davies in his Booke called Nosce Teipsum’.

A philosophical poem, with dedication to Queen Elizabeth beginning ‘To that clear Majesty, which in the North’. First published in London, 1599. Krueger, pp. 1-67.

f. 16v

DkT 39: Thomas Dekker, Vpon the Queenes last Remoue being dead (‘The Queene's remou'de in solemne sort’)

Copy, headed ‘Verses made vppon her Remooue being dead’.

First published in The Wonderfull yeare (London, 1603). Grosart, I, 93.

f. 16v

DkT 17: Thomas Dekker, Vpon her bringing by water to White Hall (‘The Queene was brought by water to White Hall’)

Copy, headed ‘vpon the bringing of her Corpse by water from Richmount to Whitehall’.

First published in The Wonderfull yeare (London, 1603). Reprinted in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1614), and in Thomas Heywood, The Life and Death of Queene Elizabeth (London, 1639). Grosart, I, 93-4. Tentatively (but probably wrongly) attributed to Camden in George Burke Johnston, ‘Poems by William Camden’, SP, 72 (December 1975), 112.

f. 16v

DkT 37: Thomas Dekker, Vpon her lying dead at White Hall (‘The Queene lyes now at White Hall dead’)

Copy.

First published in The Wonderfull yeare (London, 1603). Grosart, I, 94.

ff. 103v-4r

CwT 618: Thomas Carew, Psalme 104 (‘My soule the great Gods prayses sings’)

Copy, headed ‘psal: 104. of a new translation.’

This MS collated in Dunlap.

First published, in a musical setting by Henry Lawes, in his Select Psalmes of a New Translation (London, 1655), pp. 4-6 [unique exemplum in the Huntington]. Hazlitt (1870), pp. 181-4. Dunlap. pp. 139-42. Edited from Lawes in Scott Nixon, ‘Henry Lawes's Hand in the Bridgewater Collection: New Light on Composer and Patron’, HLQ, 62 (1999), 233-72 (pp. 265-6).

f. 105r

SiP 168: Sir Philip Sidney, Old Arcadia. Book V, No. 77 (‘Since nature's works be good, and death doth serve’)

Copy, headed ‘Verses agt feare of Death: made by Sir ph: sidney’, transcribed from a priited source.

This MS recorded in Ringler, p. 556, and in Robertson, p. 480.

Ringler, p. 131. Robertson, pp. 373-4.

f. 162v rev.

JnB 581: Ben Jonson, The Entertainment of the Two Kings at Theobalds. 24 July 1606

Copy of the opening speech ‘by Ewmone by Dice and Irene the 3 houres which do represent Time’ (lines 8-15), here beginning ‘Enter (o lord), for princes blesse these bowers’.

First published in Workes (London, 1616). Herford & Simpson, VII, 145-50.

ff. 171r-170v rev.

EsR 277: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Essex's speech at his execution

Copy of an account, headed ‘The execution of Robt Devereux late Earle of Essex the 25th of feb: 1600 wthin ye tower of London’.

Generally incorporated in accounts of Essex's execution and sometimes also of his behaviour the night before.

f. 177v et seq.

RaW 728.128: Sir Walter Ralegh, Ralegh's Arraignment(s)

Notes on Ralegh's arraignment in 1603.

Accounts of the arraignments of Ralegh at Winchester Castle, 17 November 1603, and before the Privy Council on 22 October 1618. The arraignment of 1603 published in London, 1648. For documentary evidence about this arraignment, see Rosalind Davies, ‘“The Great Day of Mart”: Returning to Texts at the Trial of Sir Walter Ralegh in 1603’, Renaissance Forum, 4/1 (1999), 1-12.

Egerton MS 2884

A folio composite volume of state papers, in various hands, 54 leaves.

f. 12r

RaW 881: Sir Walter Ralegh, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Ralegh, to Sir Robert Carr, 1609. c.1620.

Egerton MS 2975

A large folio volume of antiquarian, parliamentary and naval tracts, a formal compilation in professional hand(s), iii + 97 leaves, in contemporary panelled calf. Early 17th century.

Lot 389 in an unidentified sale and two unidentified armorial bookplates. Bought from Davis & Orioli, 10 November 1917.

ff. 24r-6v

CmW 75: William Camden, Of the Antiquity of Parliaments in England

Copy.

A tract beginning ‘That there were such like assemblies as parliaments now are, before the Romans arrival here...’. First published in Sir John Doddridge et al., The Several Opinions of Sundry Learned Antiquaries...touching...the High Court of Parliament in England (London, 1658). Hearne (1771), I, 303-6.

ff. 28v-9v

CtR 70: Sir Robert Cotton, The Antiquitie of Parliaments

Copy, subscribed ‘Sr Robert Cotton, Kt’.

A tract beginning ‘As touching the nature of the Right Courte of Parliament, It is nothing else but the Kinges greate councell...’. Ascribed to Cotton in MS sources.

ff. 30r-2v

CtR 337: Sir Robert Cotton, Other Descriptions and occurrences of the Parliament

Copy, with running heading ‘Cotton’.

A tract beginning ‘That we nowe agreeinge wth the Scottes doe name a Parliament...’. Ascribed to Cotton in MS sources.

Egerton MS 2982

A tall folio composite volume of state and miscellaneous papers, in various hands, 292 leaves, in 19th-century half-morocco gilt.

Among the papers of Sir Robert Heath (1575-1649), Chief Justice, and his sons, and of the Greville and Verney families, Barons Willoughby de Broke.

ff. 255v-65v

BcF 584: Francis Bacon, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Bacon to George Villiers, ‘late Earl of Buckingham’, in a small predominantly italic hand, on eleven quarto leaves. c.1630.

Egerton MS 2986

A folio composite volume of miscellaneous official papers relating to Rutland, in various hands, 404 leaves. Volume IX of the Heath & Verney Papers, of Sir Robert Heath (1575-1649), Chief Justice, and his eldest sons, Sir Edward and Sir John Heath, among the papers of the Greville and Verney families, Barons Willoughby de Broke.

f. 131r

*TaJ 105: Jeremy Taylor, Document(s)

A certificate signed by Taylor witnessing to the church attendance of John Hunt of Barrowden, Uppingham, 6 May 1641. 1641.

Egerton MS 3054

A long narrow ledger (45.5 x 19 cm.) autograph financial account book, entitled ‘A New Booke of Receights of Rents Anueties and Interest moneys begining at St Mary day 1638 written at Heryford, at John Fletchers howse’, signed by Jefferies several times, with occasional annotations probably by her nephew and executor William Jefferies (including, on f. 23r, ‘May 3d 1651. An abstracte out of my Aunte Jeffreyes hir book of receipts, of moneyes and moneyes due to hir for consideracions in arreare from severall persons’), ii + 73 leaves (plus numerous blanks), in later half-vellum marbled boards. 1638-49.

*JeJ 1: Joyce Jefferies, A New Booke of Receights

Bookplate of Sir Thomas Edward Winnington, MP, fourth Baronet (1811-72), of Stanford Court, Worcestershire, 1858. Hodgson's, 26 May 1932, lot 467.

Recorded in HMC, 1st Report (1970), Appendix, p. 53. Discussed in Robert Tittler, ‘Money-Lending in the West Midlands: the Activities of Joyce Jefferies, 1638-49’, Historical Research, 67 (1994), 249-63. Facsimiles, with transcriptions, of ff. 1r and 32r in Reading Early Modern Women, ed. Helen Ostovich and Elizabeth Sauer (New York & London, 2004), pp. 266-70.

Unpublished in full. Extracts in various articles from 1857 onwards.

Egerton MS 3165

An octavo volume of poems by Sir Arthur Gorges, 115 leaves in all. Written over a long period, principally in the accomplished italic hand of an amanuensis, with additions and revisions in Gorges's hand, the last eleven poems added in or after 1614 in another scribal hand, the volume entitled in Gorges's hand The Vanytyes of Sir Arthur Gorges Youthe (and again as Sir Arthur Gorges his vannetyes and toyes of yowth). c.1586-1625.

Inscribed in 1631 by one John Kayll.

f. 2r-v

GgA 87: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘The gentell Season of the yeare’

Copy.

First pub in The Phoenix Nest (London, 1593), p. 87. Sandison, No. [1], pp. 3-4.

f. 3r

GgA 60: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Some will commend and prayse their mistres crsped hayre’

Sandison, No. [2], pp. 4-5.

f. 3v

GgA 24: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘From your fayr eyes the kendlynge sparks were sent’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [3], p. 5.

f. 4r

GgA 56: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Sence course of kinde ordaynes itt to be so.’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [4], p. 6.

f. 4v

GgA 91: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘The lytle droppes off raine that fall from hye’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [5], pp. 6-7.

f. 5r

GgA 38: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘My harte I have oftymes bydd the beware’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [6], pp. 7-8.

ff. 5v-6r

GgA 55: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Retire from me yow pensive thoughts awhile’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [7], pp. 8-9.

f. 6v

GgA 6: Sir Arthur Gorges, Carnation, whit and watchede (‘I saue of late a Ladie weare a shoo’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [8], pp. 9-10.

f. 7r

GgA 17: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Downe came desire from heaven this other daye’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [9], pp. 10-11.

ff. 7v-8r

GgA 58: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘She whome I holde so deare’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [10], pp. 11-12.

f. 8v

GgA 33: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Lett those that lyve in love, lament the lovers fitts’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [11], pp. 12-13.

ff. 9r-11r

GgA 114: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Who so desires to vewe’

Copy.

Sandisin, No. [12], pp. 13-16.

ff. 11v-12r

GgA 50: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Once as I dyd contemplate with myn Eyes’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [13], pp. 16-17.

ff. 12v-13r

GgA 34: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Like as the Adamante by vertue straunge’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [14], pp. 18-19.

f. 13v

GgA 29: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘If mortall men so grevous paynes would taste’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [15], pp. 19-20.

f. 14r

GgA 77: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnett (‘When att your handes of love the sugred fruite’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [16], p. 20.

f. 14v

GgA 57: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘She that holdes me under the lawes of love’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [17], pp. 20-1.

f. 15r

GgA 31: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘If under your fair looks so sweete in shewe’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [18], p. 21.

f. 15v

GgA 85: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Tell me my harte how wilte thow doe’

Copy.

Sandison, No [19], pp. 22-3.

f. 16v

GgA 54: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Restore agayne that colloure to the golde’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [20], p. 23.

f. 17r

GgA 23: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Farewell Crueltye lodged in greate Bewtye’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [21], p. 23.

ff. 17v-18r

GgA 124: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Yf ever I doe tribute yeelde agayne’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [22], pp. 24-5.

f. 18v

GgA 39: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘My mistrs waveringe mynd full well compare I might’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [23], p. 25.

f. 18v

GgA 3: Sir Arthur Gorges, The Answer (‘My trustie servants matchless faith’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [24], p. 25.

f. 19r-v

GgA 4: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘But this and then no more’

Copy.

The incipit first published, in a musical setting, in W. Barley, A new Booke of Tabliture (London, 1596), sig. Dv of the third part. Sandison, No. [25], pp. 26-7. May EV 4157.

ff. 20v-4v

GgA 59: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Since that the date drawes on’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [26], pp. 28-34.

f. 25r

GgA 113: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Who hath released yow myne Eyes from griefe’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [27], pp. 34-5.

f. 25v

GgA 62: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnett (‘As I drawe neere with fearfull stepps to see’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [28], p. 35, and second text, No. [55], p. 61.

f. 26r

GgA 83: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnett D (‘Mistres, thinke nott it is alone the flattringe hue’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [29], p. 36.

f. 26v

GgA 117: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Why were myne eyes so forewarde to my harme’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [30], pp. 36-7.

f. 27r

GgA 44: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘O fayre and cruell hande that me enchaynde’

Copy.

sandison, No. [31], p. 37.

ff. 27v-8v

GgA 104: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘What fier encreaste by rage of wynde’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [32], pp. 38-9.

f. 29r

GgA 93: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘The unrype fruyts of wanton youthes desyre’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [33], p. 40.

ff. 29v-30r

GgA 110: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘When yow shall have a harte fraughhte full of love’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [34], pp. 40-1.

ff. 30v-1r

GgA 109: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘When I complayne I doo butt fayne’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [35], pp. 41-2.

f. 31v

GgA 123: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Yee heavye sighes drawne with my latest breath’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [36], p. 43.

f. 32r

GgA 41: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Myne eyes thinke yow that still myne eyes yow are’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [37], pp. 43-4.

ff. 32v-3r

GgA 22: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘False Cræssyde have yow chaungde your mynde’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [38], pp. 44-5.

ff. 33v-4v

GgA 1: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘A happles man of late’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [39], pp. 45-7.

ff. 35r-6r

GgA 25: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘From whence doth this proceade’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [40], pp. 47-9.

ff. 36v-7r

GgA 106: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘What was is nott: what may shalbee:’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [401], pp. 49-50.

ff. 37v-40r

GgA 45: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Of love fayne woolde I frame my style’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [42], pp. 50-2.

ff. 40v-1r

GgA 105: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘What man on earth doth lyve like me’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [43], p. 53.

ff. 41v-2r

GgA 12: Sir Arthur Gorges, D (‘To shunne the fury off the hoote Sunnebeame’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [44], p. 54.

f. 42v

GgA 125: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Yf teares avayle to ease the gryved mynde’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [405], p. 55.

f. 43r

GgA 119: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Woolde I were changde into that golden Showre’

Copy.

First published in The Phoenix Nest (London, 1593), p. 81. Sandison, No. [46], pp. 55-6. Latham, pp. 81-2. The Poems of Sir Walter Ralegh, ed. Michael Rudick (Tempe, Arizona, 1999)Rudick, No. 8, p. 8.

f. 44r

GgA 48: Sir Arthur Gorges, of the Q. Sonnet (‘Prodigall was nature fruitfull and devyne’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [47], p. 56.

f. 44v

GgA 13: Sir Arthur Gorges, D-- Sonnett (‘My deare, take in good parte this fortune badde’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [48], p. 57.

f. 45r

GgA 53: Sir Arthur Gorges, Q Sonnet (‘In that yow sway the Scepter and the Crowne’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [49], pp. 57-8.

f. 45v

GgA 64: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnett (‘Hadd not Pirythous to hell gone downe’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [50], p. 58.

f. 46r

GgA 116: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Whom love commaundes and holdes as humble thrall’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [51], pp. 58-9.

f. 46v

GgA 12.5: Sir Arthur Gorges, D (‘Yff other love then yours do lodge within my Breste’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [52], p. 59.

f. 47r

GgA 81: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnet. D (‘Harde is the happ wherto my lyfe is Bownde’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [53], p. 60.

f. 47v

GgA 65: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnett (‘How gravelye wise was that Senatours counsaile’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [54], pp. 60-1.

f. 48r

GgA 61: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnett (‘As I drawe neere with fearfull stepps to see’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [28], p. 35, and second text, No. [55], p. 61.

f. 48v

GgA 86: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘That yeelds yow due prayse I am the meanest of manye’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [56], p. 61.

f. 49r

GgA 82: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnett. D (‘He that cann number by his skill or payne’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [57], p. 62.

f. 49v

GgA 75: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnett (‘Vauntinge sometymes how I had bynn a thralle’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [58], pp. 62-3.

f. 50r

GgA 28: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Iff all my thoughtes were open unto yow’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [59], p. 63.

f. 50v

GgA 78: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnett. (‘Whilste all on fyre victorius Rome blazed’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [60], p. 63-4.

f. 51r

GgA 47: Sir Arthur Gorges, of the Q. (‘To the greate Macedon my fayre Queene I compare’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [61], pp. 64-5.

f. 52r

GgA 69: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnet. (‘Myghtye is death and mightie Shee lylewise’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [62], p. 65.

f. 52v

GgA 10: Sir Arthur Gorges, D (‘Full lytle knowes my deare and sweeteste frynde’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [63], pp 65-6.

f. 53r

GgA 80: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnet (‘Your selfe the Sonne, and I the meltinge froste’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [64], p. 66.

f. 53v

GgA 68: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnett. (‘Like to a lampe whose flaming lyghte is deade’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [65]. p. 67.

f. 54r

GgA 11: Sir Arthur Gorges, D (‘That to revive which wronge of tyme might weare’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [66]. pp. 67-8.

f. 54v

GgA 67: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnett. (‘Itt gladdes the harte to see faire Phæbus ryse’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [67], p. 68.

f. 55r

GgA 40: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘My werye ghooste charged with to highe desyre’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [68], p. 69.

f. 55v

GgA 84: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnett D (‘Nott the disdaynes of her prowde youthly mynde’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [69], pp. 69-70.

f. 56r

GgA 79: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnet. (‘With his owne hande dyd love her feature frame’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [70], p. 70.

f. 56v

GgA 72: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnett. (‘O love how my sweete Mistres in bewty all excellethe’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [71], p. 71.

f. 57r

GgA 27: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘How durste a selye Paynter undertake’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [72], pp. 71-2.

f. 57v

GgA 66: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnett. (‘In that faire face of yours where joyes so ryffe doo shyne’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [73], p. 72.

f. 58r

GgA 71: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnet. (‘Neither amongste the Nimphes, in shady woodes’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [74], p. 73.

f. 58v

GgA 63: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnett. (‘Erect thy flighte on hye with Eagles winges’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [75], pp. 73-4.

f. 59r

GgA 30: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Iff this be love, to fyxe the Eyes onn grownde’

Copy. The poem followed (f. 59v) by a copy of Thomas Churchyard's ‘Of Mounsieur’ (‘On worthy Queen on mighty Realme on God above’) which is deleted.

Sandison, No. [76], pp. 74-5.

f. 60r

GgA 36: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Lyke as the Princely faulcon on the fyste feedynge’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [77], p. 76.

f. 60v

GgA 111: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Wher leaste of all I dyd susspecte’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [78], pp. 76-7.

f. 61r

RaW 141: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Hir face, Hir tong, Hir wit’

Copy of a six-stanza version made by an amanuensis of Sir Arthur Gorges.

Edited from this MS in The Poems of Sir Arthur Gorges, ed. H.E. Sandison (Oxford, 1953), No. [79], pp. 77-8. Recorded in Latham, p. 160.

First published in Brittons Bowre of Delights (London, 1591). Latham, p. 80. Rudick, No. 11, pp. 14-15. This poem was perhaps written jointly by Ralegh and Sir Arthur Gorges: see Lefranc (1968), p. 95.

f. 61v

GgA 14: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Decayde I fynde my favor and my fate’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [80], pp. 78-9.

f. 62r

GgA 74: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnett (‘The fayrest scornynge to see my lybertye’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [81], p. 79.

f. 62v

GgA 95: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘To my unspotted fayth I may compare’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [82], pp. 79-80.

f. 63r

GgA 115: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Who woulde more sweete Contentment crave’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [83], p. 80.

f. 63v

GgA 76: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnett (‘Waying the cares that cause me thus to crye’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [84], p. 81.

f. 64r

GgA 52: Sir Arthur Gorges, Philomela. (‘Nothinge on earth remaynes to shew so ryght’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [85], pp. 81-2.

f. 64v

GgA 70: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnett (‘My mynde desyrous off my Bodies wracke’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [86], p. 82.

f. 65r

GgA 92: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘The prisone sweet that Captyve holdes my mynde’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [87], p. 83.

f. 66r

GgA 35: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Love as a Prynce to shew his power and myght’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [858], p. 84.

ff. 67r-8v

GgA 126: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Yf theis my humble lynes thy presence to to boldely wronge’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [89], pp. 84-7.

ff. 69r-92r

GgA 15: Sir Arthur Gorges, Dido to Æneas (‘Lyke as the swann snow white’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [90], pp. 87-106.

ff. 93r-4v

GgA 16: Sir Arthur Gorges, Didos true Complainte (‘Itt was the sylente tyme’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [91], pp. 106-10.

f. 95r-v

GgA 94: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘To frame a sadd discourse of languysshinge desyre’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [92], pp. 110-11.

ff. 96r-7r

GgA 112: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Whilste hope high honnors place to have’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [93], pp. 112-13.

ff. 97v-8r

GgA 26: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Henceforth I will nott sett my love’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [94], pp. 113-14.

ff. 98v-100r

GgA 107: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘What wordes may well suffyse’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [95], pp. 114-17.

f. 100v

GgA 46: Sir Arthur Gorges, Of Syr Phyllypp Sydney (‘Summe for thy sake rych Monuments doo frame’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [96], p. 117.

f. 101r

GgA 37: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Mars and the Muses weare att mortall stryfe’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [97], p. 118.

ff. 101v-4v

GgA 18: Sir Arthur Gorges, An Ecloge betwen a Shephearde and a Heardsman (‘Cumme gentle Heardman sitt with mee’)

Copy.

First published in Francis Davison, A Poetical Rapsody (London, 1602). Sandison, No. [98], pp. 118-23.

f. 105v

*GgA 108: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘wheare hap or harme shall me betyd’

Autograph.

Edited from this MS in Sandison.

Sandison, No. [99], pp. 123-4.

f. 106r-v

*GgA 51: Sir Arthur Gorges, A Pastorall unfynyshed (‘Dianas darlinges in a rownde’)

Autograph.

Edited from this MS in Sandison. Facsimiles of f. 106v in Sandison, facing p. 124, and of ff. 106r-v in P.J. Croft, Autograph Poetry in the English Language, 2 vols (London, 1973), I, Nos 17 and 18.

Sandison, pp. 124-5.

f. 107r

GgA 42: Sir Arthur Gorges, An new Yeares guift to the Kings Majestie alluding to the time that hee Was proclaimed heere in England 24th March (‘When time our styled yeare did end’)

Copy, among the eleven later poems.

Edited from this MS in Sandison.

First published in Restituta, ed. Sir Egerton Brydges (1816), IV, 506-9. Sandison, No. [101], p. 126.

f. 107v

GgA 100: Sir Arthur Gorges, Verses to bee sett over the Rose and Thisle enterlaced together with the Harpe in the middle of the Wreath. And the kings Moat over it which is ... (‘Devynelie did your Royall Moate presage’)

Copy, among the eleven later poems.

Edited from this MS in Sandison.

First published in Restituta, ed. Sir E. Brydges (1816), IV, 506-9. Sandison, No. [102], p. 127.

f. 108r

GgA 97: Sir Arthur Gorges, Verses of the Queenes Armes beinge the three Lyons of Denmarke (‘Perfections Queene, these Lyons three’)

Copy, among the eleven later poems.

Edited from this MS in Sandison.

First published in Restituta, ed. Sir E. Brydges (1816), IV, 506-9. Sandison, No. [103], pp. 127-8.

f. 108v

GgA 102: Sir Arthur Gorges, Verses to bee sett over the three Crownd plumes the Princes Armores (‘Bellona vaunts that this brave Prince to her belongd’)

Copy, among the eleven later poems.

Edited from this MS in Sandison.

First published in Restituta, ed. Sir E. Brydges (1816), IV, 506-9. Sandison, No. [104], p. 128.

f. 108v

GgA 2: Sir Arthur Gorges, Another of the same Armories (‘Whylome this subject Crowne, a soveraigne crowne pursu'd’)

Copy, among the eleven later poems.

Edited from this MS in Sandison.

First published in Restituta, ed. Sir E. Brydges (1816), IV, 506-9. Sandison, No. [105], pp. 128-9.

f. 109r

GgA 8: Sir Arthur Gorges, The Conclusion to the Kings Majestie (‘Of manie now that sound with hopes consort’)

Copy, among the eleven later poems.

Edited from this MS in Sandison.

First published in Restituta, ed. Sir E. Brydges (1816), IV, 506-9. Sandison, No. [106], p. 129.

f. 110r

GgA 122: Sir Arthur Gorges, Written upon the death of the most Noble Prince Henrie (‘Whilst my heart bleeding writes that deadlie wound’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [107], p. 130.

f. 111r

GgA 96: Sir Arthur Gorges, Upon the death of the Young lord Harrington. (‘Sorrow and Honor were at strife’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [105], pp. 130-1.

f. 112r

GgA 99: Sir Arthur Gorges, Verses sung to Queene Elizabeth by a Mairmead as shee past upon the Thames to Sir Arthur Gorges house at Chelsey. (‘O blessed eyes, the lyfe of sights yee see’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [109], pp. 131-2.

f. 113r

GgA 73: Sir Arthur Gorges, Sonnett (‘Our long sweet sommers day of youthfull yeares’)

Copy.

Sandison, No. [110], p. 132.

f. 113v

GgA 32: Sir Arthur Gorges, ‘Let Castyls Phillip gratefully confess’

Copy.

Sandison, No. [111], p. 133.

f. 115

RaW 755: Sir Walter Ralegh, Speech on the Scaffold (29 October 1618)

Fragment of a copy, inserted in the volume.

Transcripts of Ralegh's speech have been printed in his Remains (London, 1657). Works (1829), I, 558-64, 691-6. VIII, 775-80, and elsewhere. Copies range from verbatim transcripts to summaries of the speech, they usually form part of an account of Ralegh's execution, they have various headings, and the texts differ considerably. For a relevant discussion, see Anna Beer, ‘Textual Politics: The Execution of Sir Walter Ralegh’, MP, 94/1 (August 1996), 19-38.

Egerton MS 3345

A folio composite volume of papers chiefly of Sir Thomas Osborne, Earl of Danby and first Duke of Leeds (1632-1712), politician. Constituting Volume XXII of the Leeds Papers. Copy. c.1675.

ff. 21-2

MaA 514: Andrew Marvell, His Majesty's Most Gracious Speech to both Houses of Parliament, 13 April 1675

Copy, untitled, on three pages of two conjugate folio leaves.

This MS recorded in Kelliher.

A mock speech, beginning ‘I told you last meeting the winter was the fittest time for business...’. First published, and ascribed to Marvell, in Poems on Affairs of State, Vol. III (London, 1704). Cooke, II, Carmina Miscellanea, pp. 36-43. Grosart, II, 431-3. Augustine Birrell, Andrew Marvell (London, 1905), pp. 200-2. Discussed in Legouis, p. 470, and in Kelliher, pp. 111-12.

Egerton MS 3351

A composite volume of correspondence and papers of the Osborne family, formerly at Hornby Castle, Yorks, chiefly papers of Thomas Osborne (1632-1712), Earl of Danby and first Duke of Leeds. Volume XXVIII of the Leeds Papers.

f. 100r-v

*KiW 43: Sir William Killigrew, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to Lord Lattimer, 25 April 1674. 1674.

Motten, pp. 346-7.

f. 113r

*KiW 44: Sir William Killigrew, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to Lord Lattimer, 1 June 1674. 1674.

Motten, pp. 347-8.

f. 136r

*KiW 45: Sir William Killigrew, Letter(s)

Killigrew's inscribed copy of his letter to Mr Parsons, from London 30 September 1674. 1674.

Motten, pp. 348-51.

f. 155r

*KiW 46: Sir William Killigrew, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to Peregrine Bertie, 16 December 1675. 1675.

Motten, pp. 351-2.

Egerton MS 3363

Copy, ii + 119 leaves, in contemporary vellum gilt. Volume XL of the papers of the Osborne family, formerly at Hornby Castle, Yorkshire, chiefly papers of Thomas Osborne (1632-1712), Earl of Danby and first Duke of Leeds.

ClE 107: Edward Hyde, First Earl of Clarendon, Impeachment Proceedings against Clarendon in 1667

Articles of Treason exhibited in Parliament against Clarendon, 14 November 1667 published in London, 1667. The Proceedings in the House of Commons touching the Impeachment of Clarendon 1667 published in London, 1700.

Egerton MS 3366

A folio volume of state tracts and papers, i + 68 leaves. Constituting Volume XLIII of the Leeds Papers, chiefly collected by Sir Thomas Osborne, Earl of Danby and first Duke of Leeds (1632-1712), politician

f. 68v

ClJ 187: John Cleveland, Epitaph on the Earl of Strafford (‘Here lies Wise and Valiant Dust’)

Copy.

First published in Character (1647). Edited in CSPD, 1640-1641 (1882), p. 574. Berdan, p. 184, as ‘Internally unlike his manner’. Morris & Withington, p. 66, among ‘Poems probably by Cleveland’. The attribution to Cleveland is dubious. The epitaph is also attributed to Clement Paman: see Poetry and Revolution: An Anthology of British and Irish Verse 1625-1660, ed. Peter Davidson (Oxford, 1998), notes to No. 275 (p. 363).

Egerton MS 3378

A folio volume of state tracts and papers, in a single hand, 80 leaves, in vellum. Constituting Volume LV of the Leeds Papers, chiefly collected by Sir Thomas Osborne (1632-1712), Earl of Danby and first Duke of Leeds, politician. c.1640.

ff. 2r-4r

CtR 346: Sir Robert Cotton, A Relation of the Proceedings against Ambassadors who have miscarried themselves, etc. ...[27 April 1624]

Copy.

Tract, addressed to George, Duke of Buckingham, beginning ‘In humble obedience to your Grace's Command, I am emboldned to present my poor advice...’. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. 1-9.

ff. 5r-9r

CtR 82: Sir Robert Cotton, A Breife Abstract of the Question of Precedencie between England and Spaine: Occasioned by Sir Henry Nevill the Queen of Englands Ambassador, and the Ambassador of Spaine, at Calais Commissioners appointed by the French King...

Copy.

Tract, relating to events in 1599/1600, beginning ‘To seek before the decay of the Roman Empire...’. First published in London, 1642. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [73]-‘79’ [i.e. 89].

ff. 10r-14r

CtR 39: Sir Robert Cotton, An Answer to Certain Arguments raised from Supposed Antiquity, and urged by some Members of the lower House of Parliament, to prove that Ecclesiasticall Lawes ought to be Enacted by Temporall Men

Copy.

Tract beginning ‘What, besides self-regard, or siding faction, hath been...’. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [203]-217.

ff. 15r-17v

CtR 439: Sir Robert Cotton, A Speech Delivered in the Lower House of Parliament Assembled at Oxford: In the first year of the Reign of King Charles [6 August 1625]

Copy.

Speech beginning ‘Mr. Speaker, Although the constant Wisdome of this House of Commons...’. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [271]-281.

ff. 18r-21r

CtR 449: Sir Robert Cotton, A Speech Made by Sir Rob Cotton Knight and Baronet, before the Lords of his Majesties most Honorable Privy Covncel, At the Councel Table being thither called to deliver his Opinion touching the Alteration of Coyne. 2. Sept. [1626]

Copy.

Speech beginning ‘My Lords, Since it hath pleased this Honourable Table to command...’. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [283]-294, with related texts (‘The Answer of the Committees Appointed...2 September 1626’ and ‘Questions to be proposed’, etc.) on pp. 295-307. W.A. Shaw, Writers on English Monetary History, pp. 21-38.

ff. 26r-7r

BcF 702: Francis Bacon, An Essay of a King

Copy.

Essay, beginning ‘A king is a mortal god on earth...’. Spedding, VI, 595-7 (discussed pp. 592-4).

ff. 35r-7v

BcF 135.4: Francis Bacon, Certain Observations made upon a Libel published this present year, 1592

Copy of the letter on the Queen's religious policies.

A tract beginning ‘It were just and honourable for princes being in war together, that howsever they prosecute their quarrels...’. First published in Resuscitatio, ed. W. Rawley (London, 1657). Spedding, VIII, 146-208.

A letter to M. Critoy, Secretary of France, c.1589, ‘A Letter on the Queen's religious policies’, was later incorporated in Certain Observations made upon a Libel, and first published in Cabala, sive scrinia sacra (London, 1654), pp. 38-41.

For the Declaration of the True Causes of the Great Troubles (also known as Cecil's Commonwealth), the ‘Libel’ that Bacon answered, see RaW 383.8.

ff. 42r-7v

BcF 535: Francis Bacon, A Letter of Advice to the Queen (1584)

Copy.

Advice beginning ‘Most Gracious Soveraign and most worthy to be a Soveraign / Care, one of the natural and true-bred children of unfeigned affection...’. First published in The Felicity of Queen Elizabeth (London, 1651), pp. 121-56. Spedding, VIII, 43-56.

Egerton MS 3383

A folio volume of state tracts and papers. Constituting Volume LX of the Leeds Papers, chiefly collected by Sir Thomas Osborne, Earl of Danby and first Duke of Leeds (1632-1712), politician.

f. 56r

ClJ 188: John Cleveland, Epitaph on the Earl of Strafford (‘Here lies Wise and Valiant Dust’)

Copy.

First published in Character (1647). Edited in CSPD, 1640-1641 (1882), p. 574. Berdan, p. 184, as ‘Internally unlike his manner’. Morris & Withington, p. 66, among ‘Poems probably by Cleveland’. The attribution to Cleveland is dubious. The epitaph is also attributed to Clement Paman: see Poetry and Revolution: An Anthology of British and Irish Verse 1625-1660, ed. Peter Davidson (Oxford, 1998), notes to No. 275 (p. 363).

Egerton MS 3794

A small quarto Book of ‘Divers Relations concerning ye affairs of Scotland & England about ye year 1640’, in a single neat cursive italic hand, 54 leaves, in 18th-century calf. c.1640s.

Bookplate of Thomas Philip, Earl de Grey, of Wrest Park, Bedfordshire (MS 49).

ff. 12v-16v

RuB 147: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, ?7 November 1640

Copy, headed ‘Sr: Beniamin Ruddier his speech in the Parliamt: 4 nouem: Ano: Domi: 1640’.

Speech (variously dated 4, 7, 9 and 10 November 1640) beginning ‘We are here assembled to do God's business and the King's...’. First published in The Speeches of Sr. Benjamin Rudyer in the high Court of Parliament (London, 1641), pp. 1-10. Manning, pp. 159-65.

Egerton MS 3801

A quarto navigational notebook, possibly associated with the East India Company, iii + 71 leaves, in contemporary vellum gilt. Early 17th century.

f. [33v]

RaW 720: Sir Walter Ralegh, Chemical and Medical Receipts

Copy of ‘A present Metson for the Agewe’ ascribed to ‘Sr water Raylishe 1616’ (this ascription deleted).

This MS (formerly owned by Boies Penrose) offered for sale at Sotheby's, 24 July 1978, lot 97.

Egerton MS 2875

Egerton MS 3876

An octavo volume of transcripts of state tracts and letters, iii + 227 leaves (including blanks) in all, in calf. Mainly in three hands, with later additions in c.1683-99.

Inscribed names including Anthony, Thomas and John Marshall, Jonas Ramsden, Jenkinson, Thomas Maleverer, and Lawson. Owned c.1670s-90s by the family of Sir Thomas Seyliard, third Baronet (d.1701), of Delawarre, Kent. Later note: ‘Bought this Manuscript at Montague's Book warehouse near Queen Street Lincoln's Inn Fields Tuesday Feb: 12 1739’. Later armorial bookplate apparently of the Appleyard family of either Yorkshire or Norfolk. Phillips, 20 March 1998, lot 467, to Quaritch.

ff. 5r-18r

CtR 393: Sir Robert Cotton, A Short View of the Long Life and Reign of Henry the Third, King of England

Copy, headed ‘A short vewe of the Reigne of K. Hen: the 3’.

Treatise, written c.1614 and ‘Presented to King James’, beginning ‘Wearied with the lingering calamities of Civil Arms...’. First published in London, 1627. Cottoni posthuma (1651), at the end (i + pp. 1-27).

ff. 23r-32r

OvT 43: Sir Thomas Overbury, Observations in his travailes

Copy.

A tract beginning ‘All things concurred for the rising and maintenance of this State...’. First published as Sir Thomas Overbvry his Observations in his Travailes vpon the State of The Xvii. Provinces as they stood Anno Dom. 1609 (London, 1626). Rimbault, pp. 223-30. Authorship uncertain.

ff. 38r-45r

RaW 1088: Sir Walter Ralegh, Observations touching Trade and Commerce with the Hollander

Copy, headed ‘The Originall (where of this is a Copie) was first devised and written by Sr Walter Cope knight deceased, late Master of the Wards’.

A tract addressed to the monarch and beginning ‘According to my duty, I am emboldened to put your majesty in mind, that about fourteen or fifteen years past...’. First published, as by Sir Walter Ralegh, in London, 1653. Works (1829), VIII, 351-76.

Written by John Keymer (fl.1584-1622). See Adolf Buff, ‘Who is the author of the tract intitled “Some observations touching trade with the Hollander”?’, ES, 1 (1877), 187-212, and Lefranc (1968), p. 64.

ff. 45v-110v

NaR 5: Sir Robert Naunton, Fragmenta Regalia

Copy, on versos only.

Fragmenta Regalia (or, Observations on the late Q. Elizabeth, her Times and Favorites), first published in London, 1641. Edited by John S. Cerovski (Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington, D.C., etc., 1985).

ff. 163r-90v

BcF 137.5: Francis Bacon, Certain Observations made upon a Libel published this present year, 1592

Copy, headed ‘Certaine notes & observations vpon a most infamous & diffamatory Libell, written by a most notorious & knowne Traitor...’.

A tract beginning ‘It were just and honourable for princes being in war together, that howsever they prosecute their quarrels...’. First published in Resuscitatio, ed. W. Rawley (London, 1657). Spedding, VIII, 146-208.

A letter to M. Critoy, Secretary of France, c.1589, ‘A Letter on the Queen's religious policies’, was later incorporated in Certain Observations made upon a Libel, and first published in Cabala, sive scrinia sacra (London, 1654), pp. 38-41.

For the Declaration of the True Causes of the Great Troubles (also known as Cecil's Commonwealth), the ‘Libel’ that Bacon answered, see RaW 383.8.

ff. 191r-3v

SiP 180.5: Sir Philip Sidney, A Letter of Advice to Robert Sidney

Copy, headed ‘Sr. Philip Sidney to his Brother’, under a general heading ‘Three lres concerninge Travaile & Travailors’.

A letter beginning ‘My most deere Brother. You have thought unkindness in me, I have not written oftner unto you...’. First published in Profitable Instructions. Describing what speciall Obseruations are to be taken by Trauellers in all Nations, States and Countries (London, 1633), pp. 74-103. Feuillerat (as Correspondence No. XXXVIII), III, 124-7.

ff. 194r-201r

EsR 164: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, First Letter of Advice to the Earl of Rutland

Copy, in two coloured inks, headed ‘Robart Earle of Essex to the late Earle of Rutland’, the letter here dated from Greenwich 4 January ‘1594’, under a general heading (on f. 191r) ‘Three lres concerninge Travaile & Travailors’.

The letter, dated from Greenwich, 4 January [1596], beginning ‘My Lord, I hold it for a principle in the course of intelligence of state...’.

First published, as ‘The Late E. of E. his aduice to the E. of R. in his trauels’, in Profitable Instructions; Describing what speciall Obseruations are to be taken by Trauellers in all Nations, States and Countries (London, 1633), pp. 27-73. Francis Bacon, Resuscitatio (London, 1657), pp. 106-10. Spedding, IX, 6-15. W.B. Devereux, Lives and Letters of the Devereux, Earls of Essex (1853), I, No. xciii.

Essex's three letters to Rutland discussed by Paul E.J. Hammer in ‘The Earl of Essex, Fulke Greville, and the Employment of Scholars’, SP. 91/2 (Spring, 1994), 167-80, and in ‘Letters of Travel Advice from the Earl of Essex to the Earl of Rutland: Some Comments’, PQ, 74/3 (Summer 1995), 317-22. It is likely that the first letter was written substantially by Francis Bacon.

ff. 202r-4v

GrF 16.5: Fulke Greville, Letter to Grevill Varney on his Travels

Copy, headed ‘Sr Fulke Greville to his Cosen Grevill Varney residinge in France’, under a general heading (on f. 191r) ‘Three lres concerninge Travaile & Travailors’.

20 Nov 1609

An epistolary essay beginning ‘My good Cousin, according to the request of your letter, dated the 19. of October, at Orleance...’, dated from Hackney, 20 November 1609. First published in Certaine Learned and Elegant Workes (London, 1633). Grosart, IV, 301-6. This essay perhaps originally written by Thomas Bodley and possibly also used by Francis Bacon and/or the Earl of Essex. Also perhaps sent by Greville to John Harris rather than Greville Varney: see Norman K. Farmer, Jr., ‘Fulke Greville's Letter to a Cousin in France and the Problem of Authorship in Cases of Formula Writing’, RQ, 22 (1969), 140-7.

Egerton MS 3878

Copy, in a neat predominantly secretary hand, on 90 quarto leaves (plus blanks), in contemporary limp vellum with ties. Late 16th century.

LeC 13: Anon, Leicester's Commonwealth

Inscribed at the end in the late 17th century notes of debts ‘due to me R. Richardson’. Later owned by James P.R. Lyell (1871-1948), book collector, and then by W.A. Foyle (1885-1963), bookseller, of Beeleigh Abbey, Essex. Christie's, 12 July 2000 (W.A. Foyle sale, Part III), lot 311, with facsimiles of two pages in the sale catalogue.

First published as The Copie of a Leter, Wryten by a Master of Arte of Cambrige, to his Friend in London, Concerning some talke past of late betwen two worshipful and graue men, about the present state, and some procedinges of the Erle of Leycester and his friendes in England ([? Rouen], 1584). Soon banned. Reprinted as Leycesters common-wealth (London, 1641). Edited, as Leicester's Commonwealth, by D.C. Peck (Athens, OH, & London, 1985). Although various attributions have been suggested by Peck and others, the most likely author remains Robert Persons (1546-1610), Jesuit conspirator.

Egerton MS 3879

Copy, on 355 octavo pages. Inscribed on the last page ‘Haec meminisse juvat Apr. 23 163[ ]’. c.1630s.

SiP 76.5: Sir Philip Sidney, The Psalms of David

Owned in 1820 by Henry Cotton (1789-1879), sub-librarian of the Bodleian Library; later by John Alexander Fuller-Maitland, and by Sir Hugh Walpole (1884-1941). Christie's, 2 April 1940/8[?], lot 18, and 12 June 2000 (William Foyle sale, Part III), lot 312.

This MS discussed in Gavin Alexander, ‘A New Manuscript of the Sidney Psalms: A Preliminary Report’, Sidney Journal, 18/1 (Summer 2000), 43-56.

Psalms 1-43 translated by Sidney. Psalms 44-150 translated by his sister, the Countess of Pembroke. First published complete in London, 1823, ed. S.W. Singer. Psalms 1-43, without the Countess of Pembroke's revisions, edited in Ringler, pp. 265-337. Psalms 1-150 in her revised form edited in The Psalms of Sir Philip Sidney and the Countess of Pembroke, ed. J.C.A. Rathmell (New York, 1963). Psalms 44-150 also edited in The Collected Works of Mary Sidney Herbert Countess of Pembroke (1988), Vol. II.