The British Library: Additional MSS, numbers 20000 through 24999

Add. MS 20059

A 14th century MS Registrum brevium cancellariae, with colour and gold decoration, ff. 96v-7r occupied by later notes dated 1654-5, and ff. 97v-100r with verses in a formal 16th-century hand, 101 small octavo vellum leaves, in modern red morocco.

Inscribed (f. 97r) ‘Gabriell Wettenhall’ and ‘Thomas Wetenhall’. Later owned by William Pickering (1796-1854), publisher. Bookplate of William Falconer, Chester. Sotheby's, 12 December 1854 (Pickering sale), lot 156.

ff. 100v-1r

SkJ 19: John Skelton, [Prayers]

Copy of three prayers, here untitled, namely ‘to the father of Heauen’ (beginning ‘O Radiant Luminary of lyght intermynable’), ‘To the Seconde Parson’ (beginning ‘O Benygne Jesu, my souerayne Lord and Kynge’), and ‘To the Holy Gooste’ (beginning ‘O Firy feruence, inflamed wyth all grace’).written on the end-papers. Late 15th-early 16th century.

This MS recorded in Canon.

Canon, D54, p. 17, First published in Certaine bokes copyled by mayster Skelto (London, c.1545). Dyce, I, 139-40.

Add. MS 20723

A folio guardbook of original letters, in varius hands, 65 leaves, in 19th-century half-morocco gilt.

ff. 20r-1v

*DaW 125: Sir William Davenant, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Davenant, to Prince Rupert, from Haleford, 13 June 1644. 1644.

Facsimiles in Garnett & Gosse (1903), III, 79; in Greg, English Literary Autographs, Plate XXVI; and in DLB 126: Seventeenth-Century British Nondramatic Poets, Second Series, ed. M. Thomas Hester (Detroit, 1993), p. 92. Ciited in Nethercot, p. 213.

Add. MS 21070

A duodecimo notebook of miscellaneous extracts and of memoranda relating to Pembroke College, Cambridge, compiled probably by Nathaniel Gibson. c.1650s.

f. 37r et seq.

FxJ 1.5: John Foxe, Actes and Monuments

Extracts.

First published (complete) in London, 1563. Edited by Josiah Pratt, 8 vols (London, 1853-70).

ff. 37r et seq.

FuT 4.5: Thomas Fuller, The Church History of Britain

Extracts.

First published in London, 1655.

Add. MS 21094

A tall folio formal miscellany of poems and prose on affairs of state, in several rounded hands, with (ff. ivr-vr) a ‘Catalogue’ of titles, 186 leaves, in contemporary blind-stamped calf within modern half-morocco. c.1700s.

Bookplate of Basil Feilding (1668-1717), fourth Earl of Denbigh, dated 1703. Sold in 1834 by Thomas Thorpe. Owned by the Rev. Dr Martin Joseph Routh (1755-1854), scholar, President of Magdalen College, Oxford. Sotheby's, 5 July 1855 (Routh sale), lot 178.

f. 54r

DrM 39.1: Michael Drayton, King John to Matilda (‘When these my Letters come into thy view’)

Copy of the later version of lines 149-52.

First published inEnglands Heroicall Epistles (London, 1599). Hebel, II, 147-52.

Lines 149-52 (beginning ‘Th' Arabian Bird, that never is but one’) later published in a version beginning ‘'Tis the Arabian bird alone’, attributed to John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester, in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1703), p. 191.

ff. 12v-13r

DoC 66: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, The Duel (‘Of Clineas' and Dametas' sharper fight’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Of Chineas & Dametis’.

This MS collated in Harris.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State…Part III (London, 1698). Harris, pp. 21-4. This poem is part of a series by William Wharton and Robert Wolseley.

f. 42v

EtG 116: Sir George Etherege, Song (‘Since Death on all lays his impartial hand’)

Copy, headed ‘Song. By Cha: Blount Esqr 1691’.

First published in Examen Miscellaneum (London, 1702). Thorpe, pp. 59-60.

ff. 48r-9r

HaG 29.5: George Savile, First Marquess of Halifax, Maxims of the Great Almansor

Copy of 33 Maxims, headed ‘The following maxims were found by A Jew Amongst the papers of the Great Almazor...’.

First published, anonymously, under the heading The following Maxims were found amongst the Papers of the Great Almanzor…[&c] (London, 1693). Foxcroft, II, 447-53. Brown, I, 292-5.

f. 55v

DoC 198: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On the Countess of Dorchester (IV) (‘Tell me, Dorinda, why so gay’)

Copy, headed ‘On the Countess of Dorchester. 1696 by E: Dorset’.

This MS collated in POAS and in Harris.

First published in A Collection of Miscellany Poems, by Mr. Brown (London, 1699). POAS, V (1971), 385. Harris, pp. 45-6.

ff. 68r-9r

MaA 177: Andrew Marvell, The Kings Vowes (‘When the Plate was at pawne, and the fobb att low Ebb’)

Copy, headed ‘Royal Resolutions’.

This MS collated in POAS, I.

First published as A Prophetick Lampoon, Made Anno 1659. By his Grace George Duke of Buckingham: Relating to what would happen to the Government under King Charles II [London, 1688/9]. Margoliouth, I, 173-5. POAS, I, 159-62. Lord, pp. 186-8, as ‘The Vows’. Discussed in Chernaik, pp. 212-14, where it is argued that it is of ‘unknown’ authorship, ‘possibly Marvell's’, and that the poem grew by accretions by different authors.

f. 90v

DrJ 226: John Dryden, Upon the Death of the Viscount Dundee (‘O Last and best of Scots! who didst maintain’)

Copy, the poem dated 1689.

This MS collated in California.

First published in Poetical Miscellanies: The Fifth Part (London, 1704). Poems on Affairs of State…Part III (London, 1704). Kinsley, IV, 1777. California, III, 222. Hammond, III, 219.

ff. 96v-7r

DoC 10: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Advice to Lovers (‘Damon, if thou wilt believe me’)

Copy, headed ‘Answer By Lord Dors-t’.

This MS collated in Harris.

First published in Banquet of Musick…The Fifth Book (London, 1691). Harris, pp. 83-4. Some texts are preceded by John Howe's song ‘Dy wretched Damon, Dy quickly to ease her’.

ff. 108v-9v

DrJ 138: John Dryden, Prologue To The Prophetess. Spoken by Mr. Betterton (‘What Nostradame, with all his Art can guess’)

Copy, as ‘By Mr Dryden (1690)’.

This MS collated in California.

First published in Thomas Betterton, The Prophetess: or, The History of Dioclesian (London, 1690). Poems on Affairs of State, Part III (London, 1698). Kinsley, II, 556-7. California, III, 255-6. Hammond, III, 231-4.

ff. 120v-1r

DoC 116: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Madam Maintenon's Advice to the French King. Paraphrase on the French (‘In gray-hair'd Celia's wither'd arms’)

Copy, headed ‘On the French K- by Lord Dorsett (1692)’.

This MS collated in Harris.

First published in Examen Poeticum (London, 1693). Harris, pp. 171-5.

f. 122r

DoC 165: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On the Countess Dowager of Manchester (‘Courage, dear Moll, and drive away despair’)

Copy, headed ‘A Madam, Madam B Beaute Sexagenaire, Lady Manchaster By Lord Dorset. 1693’.

Edited from this MS in Harris. Collated in POAS.

First published (among poems of Charles Montagu, Earl of Halifax) in Poems on Affairs of State…Part III (London, 1698). POAS, V (1971), 378-81. Harris, pp. 37-40.

Add. MS 21107

A folio miscellany of extracts, in a single cursive hand, 351 leaves, in modern half brown morocco on marbled boards. c.1685-1700s.

Sotheby's, 13 July 1855, lot 1364.

ff. 3r-v

CaW 126: William Cartwright, Extracts

Extracts, inscribed ‘Cartwright's poems’.

ff. 6r-14r

FuT 5.2: Thomas Fuller, The History of the Holy War

Extracts, inscribed ‘Fuller's holy War. Enfeild Feb: 17th - 85’.

First published in Cambridge, 1639.

ff. 14v-23v

FuT 6: Thomas Fuller, The Holy State

Extracts, inscribed ‘Fuller's holy state’.

First published in London, 1642. Edited by M.G. Walten, 2 vols (New York, 1938).

ff. 34r-5v

FeO 101: Owen Felltham, Resolves

Extracts, inscribed ‘Feltham's Resolves’.

ff. 36r-42r

MaA 519.8: Andrew Marvell, The Rehearsal Transpros'd

Extracts from ‘Marvels Rehearsall, 1st part’ and ‘2d part’.

First published (the first part) in London, 1672. The Second Part in London, 1673. Edited by Martin Dzelzainis and Annabel Patterson in The Prose Works of Andrew Marvell, 2 vols (Yale University, 2003), I, 41-203, 221-438.

ff. 41r-2r

FuT 4.4: Thomas Fuller, Andronicus, or the Unfortunate Politician

Extracts, inscribed ‘Fuller's Andronicus or the unfortunate Politician’.

First published in London, 1646.

f. 52r-v

BeA 36: Aphra Behn, A Discovery of New Worlds

Extracts.

First published, as ‘From the French [of B. Le Bovier de Fontenelle] Made English by Mrs. A. Behn’, in London, 1688.

ff. 52v-3v

HaG 23.5: George Savile, First Marquess of Halifax, The Lady's New Year's Gift: or, Advice to a Daughter

Extracts, inscribed ‘Advice to a Daughter, by ye ld hallifax’.

First published, anonymously, in London, 1688. Foxcroft, II, 379-424. Brown, II, 363-406.

See also Introduction.

ff. 70r-2r

TaJ 24: Jeremy Taylor, The Rule and Exercises of Holy Living

Extracts, inscribed ‘Taylor's holy living and dying’.

First published in London, 1650.

ff. 70v-2r

TaJ 23: Jeremy Taylor, The Rule and Exercises of Holy Dying

Extracts, inscribed Taylor's holy living and dying.

First published in London, 1651.

f. 133r

SuJ 190: John Suckling, Extracts

Verse extracts, inscribed ‘Sr John Suckling’.

f. 159r-v

EtG 123.6: Sir George Etherege, The Man of Mode. or Sir Fopling Flutter, Act IV, scene 1, lines 413-34. Song (‘The pleasures of love and the joys of good wine’)

Extracts, inscribed ‘Sr Fopling’.

The drinking song. Thorpe, p. 28. Brett-Smith, II, 256-7.

f. 162v et seq.

WyW 8: William Wycherley, The Plain-Dealer

Extracts.

First published in London, 1677.

ff. 168r-9r

HbT 13.2: Thomas Hobbes, Behemoth or The Long Parliament

Extracts, inscribed ‘Hobs's Behemoth’.

First published, as The History of the Civil Wars of England, ([in London], 1679). Molesworth, English, VI, 161-418. Edited by Ferdinand Tönnies (London, 1889). 2nd edition, with introduction by M.M. Goldsmith, (London, 1969), and reprinted with an introduction by Stephen Holmes (Chicago & London, 1990).

ff. 174r-5v

EvJ 24.5: John Evelyn, Sylva, or A Discourse of Forest-Trees

Extracts, inscribed ‘Mr Evelyn's Sylva’.

First published in London, 1663.

See also EvJ 135.

ff. 208r-9r

DrM 71: Michael Drayton, To the Reader (‘The word LEGEND...’)

Extracts, inscribed ‘Drayton's Epistles’.

First published in Poems (London, 1619). Hebel, II, 382.

f. 211r-v

DrJ 259.3: John Dryden, Don Sebastian, King of Portugal

Extracts, inscribed ‘Dryden's Sebastian’.

First published in London, 1690. California, XV (1976), pp. 57-219.

f. 279 et seq.

HaG 22.8: George Savile, First Marquess of Halifax, The Character of a Trimmer

Extracts.

First published, ascribed to ‘the Honourable Sir W[illiam] C[oventry]’, in London, 1688. Foxcroft, II, 273-342. Brown, I, 178-243.

ff. 290r-7r

BrT 5.2: Sir Thomas Browne, Pseudodoxia Epidemica: or, Enquiries into very many received Tenents, and commonly presumed Truths

Extracts, inscribed ‘Sr Tho: Brownes vulgar Errors’.

First published in London, 1646. Wilkin, vols II and III, 1-374. Keynes, Vol. II. Robbins (2 vols).

See BrT 29, BrT 32, and BrT 43.

ff. 297r-300v

BrT 14.5: Sir Thomas Browne, Religio Medici

Extracts.

First published (unauthorised edition) [in London], 1642. Authorised edition published [in London], 1643. Wilkin, II, 1-158. Keynes, I, 1-93. Edited by Jean-Jacques Denonain (Cambridge, 1953). Martin, pp. 1-80. Endicott, pp. 1-89.

ff. 301r-2v

BrT 4.3: Sir Thomas Browne, Certain Miscellany Tracts

Extracts, inscribed ‘urn-burial’.

First published (viz. 13 tracts, edited by Archbishop Tenison) in London, 1683. Wilkin, IV, 115-250. Keynes, III, 1-120.

Add. MS 21422

A folio volume of correspondence of Captain Adam Baynes, MP, Parliamentary Commissioner for the Northern Army.

f. 40r

*KiW 25: Sir William Killigrew, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to Captain Baynes, 19 April 1653.

Motten, p. 333.

f. 80r

*KiW 26: Sir William Killigrew, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to Captain Baynes, 23 May 1653. 1653.

Motten, pp. 333-4.

f. 106r

*KiW 27: Sir William Killigrew, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to [Captain Baynes], from Kempton Park, 15 June 1653. 1653.

Motten, p. 334.

f. 125r

*KiW 29: Sir William Killigrew, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to [Captain Baynes], from Kempton Park, 25 June 1653. 1653.

Motten, p. 336.

f. 146r

*KiW 30: Sir William Killigrew, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to [Captain Baynes], 15 July 1653. 1653.

Motten, pp. 336-7.

Add. MS 21423

A folio volume of correspondence of Captain Adam Baynes, MP, Parliamentary Commissioner for the Northern Army.

f. 80r

*KiW 31: Sir William Killigrew, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to [Captain Baynes], 29 March 1655. 1655.

f. 85r

*KiW 32: Sir William Killigrew, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to Captain Baynes, 7 April 1655. 1655.

Motten, pp. 337-8.

f. 139r

*KiW 33: Sir William Killigrew, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to [Captain Baynes], 16 September 1655. 1655.

Motten, p. 338.

f. 193r

*KiW 34: Sir William Killigrew, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to [Captain Baynes], 15 November 1655. 1655.

Motten, pp. 338-9.

Add. MS 21425

A folio volume of correspondence of Captain Adam Baynes, MP, Parliamentary Commissioner for the Northern Army.

f. 173r

*KiW 37: Sir William Killigrew, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to [Captain Baynes], from Sterry, 1 November 1659. 1659.

Motten, 340-1.

Add. MS 21426

A folio volume of correspondence of Captain Adam Baynes, MP, Parliamentary Commissioner for the Northern Army.

f. 166r

*KiW 36: Sir William Killigrew, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to [Captain Baynes], October [1659?]. 1659?

Motten, pp. 339-40.

f. 167r

*KiW 28.5: Sir William Killigrew, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to Captain Baynes, 23 June [1653?]. 1653?

Motten, p. 335

f. 168r

*KiW 28: Sir William Killigrew, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to Captain Baynes, 23 June [1653?]. 1653?.

Motten, pp. 334-5.

Add. MS 21432

Autograph quarto MS, imperfect (damaged in the 19th century by a corrosive substance). 1595.

*PlG 1: George Peele, Anglorum Feriae (‘Descende ye sacred daughters of King Jove’)

Edited from this MS in Fitch and by D.H. Horne in Prouty, I, 265-76.

Facsimile of f. 10v in Croft, Autograph Poetry, I, 16. Facsimile examples of f. 9r in DLB, vol. 62, Elizabethan Dramatists, ed. Fredson Bowers (Detroit, 1987), p. 245, and in DLB, vol. 167, Sixteenth-Century British Non-Dramatic Writers. Third Series, ed. David A. Richardson (Detroit, 1996), p. 167. Facsimile page also in Chris Fletcher et al., 1000 Years of English Literature: A Treasury of Literary Manuscripts (British Library, 2003), p. 53.

No contemporary publication known. First published by W. Stevenson Fitch, of Ipswich [privately printed, c.1830].

Add. MS 21433

A quarto verse miscellany, largely in a single predominantly secretary hand, with some later additions and annotations, 188 leaves, in quarter-morocco. Transcribed from British Library Add. MS 25303 and perhaps associated likewise with the Inns of Court. Including 23 poems by Carew and three of doubtful authorship. c.1620s-30s.

Later owned by William Pickering (1796-1854), publisher. Sotheby's, 13 May 1856 (Pickering sale), lot 258.

Cited in IELM, II.i (1987), as the ‘Pickering MS’: CwT Δ 11.

ff. 80r-2r

CwT 613: Thomas Carew, Psalme 104 (‘My soule the great Gods prayses sings’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Dunlap.

First published, in a musical setting by Henry Lawes, in his Select Psalmes of a New Translation (London, 1655), pp. 4-6 [unique exemplum in the Huntington]. Hazlitt (1870), pp. 181-4. Dunlap. pp. 139-42. Edited from Lawes in Scott Nixon, ‘Henry Lawes's Hand in the Bridgewater Collection: New Light on Composer and Patron’, HLQ, 62 (1999), 233-72 (pp. 265-6).

ff. 82r-3r

RaW 442: Sir Walter Ralegh, The passionate mans Pilgrimage (‘Giue me my Scallop shell of quiet’)

Copy, headed ‘Sr Walter Rawleighs Pilgrimage’, transcribed from RaW 443, subscribed ‘W: R:’.

This MS the Pickering MS collated in Hannah (1845), pp. 105-8. Recorded in Latham, pp. 141-3.

First published with Daiphantvs or The Passions of Loue (London, 1604). Latham, pp. 49-51. Rudick, Nos 54A, 54B and 54C (three versions, pp. 126-33).

This poem rejected from the canon and attributed to an anonymous Catholic poet in Philip Edwards, ‘Who Wrote The Passionate Man's Pilgrimage?’, ELR, 4 (1974), 83-97.

ff. 84v-5r

KiH 437: Henry King, My Midd-night Meditation (‘Ill busy'd Man! why should'st thou take such care’)

Copy, here ascribed to ‘J:K:’, transcribed from KiH 440.

This MS recorded in Crum.

First published, as ‘Man's Miserie, by Dr. K’, in Richard Chamberlain, The Harmony of the Muses (London, 1654) [apparently unique exemplum in the Huntington, edited in facsimile by Ernest W. Sullivan (Aldershot, 1990), pp. 5-6]. Poems (1657). Crum, pp. 157-8.

f. 85r-v

BrW 86: William Browne of Tavistock, On an Infant Unborn, and the Mother Dying in Travail (‘Within this grave there is a grave entomb'd’)

Copy, transcribed from BrW 87.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656). Brydges (1815), pp. 90-1. Goodwin, II, 255-6. Also (doubtfully) attributed to Richard Corbett and to Sir William Davenant: see Sir William Davenant, The Shorter Poems, and Songs from the Plays and Masques, ed. A.M. Gibbs (Oxford, 1972), p. lxxxvii.

ff. 87r-8r

BcF 15: Francis Bacon, ‘The world's a bubble, and the life of man’

Copy headed ‘Vppon ye miserie of Man Ld verulam viscoun St Albans’, but subscribed ‘Henry Harrington’; transcribed from BcF 16.

This MS the Pickering MS collated in Hannah.

First published in Thomas Farnaby, Florilegium epigrammatum Graecorum (London, 1629). Poems by Sir Henry Wotton, Sir Walter Raleigh and others, ed. John Hannah (London, 1845), pp. 76-80. Spedding, VII, 271-2. H.J.C. Grierson, ‘Bacon's Poem, “The World”: Its Date and Relation to certain other Poems’, Modern Language Review, 6 (1911), 145-56.

f. 88r-v

CwT 954: Thomas Carew, Song. To one that desired to know my Mistris (‘Seeke not to know my love, for shee’)

Copy, subscribed ‘T.C.’

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 39-40. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in The Treasury of Musick, Book 2 (London, 1669).

ff. 89v-90r

CwT 118: Thomas Carew, A cruel Mistris (‘Wee read of Kings and Gods that kindly tooke’)

Copy.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 8.

ff. 90r-1r

CwT 51: Thomas Carew, The Comparison (‘Dearest thy tresses are not threads of gold’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Poems (1640), and lines 1-10 also in Wits Recreations (London, 1640). Dunlap, pp. 98-9.

ff. 91v-3v

BeJ 5: Sir John Beaumont, Against the desire of greatnesse, thoughte Mr John Beaumonts (‘Thou woldst be greate and to that heighte wouldst rise’)

This MS collated in Sell.

copied from add 25303 and same j beaumont poems. check out.

First published in Sell (1974), pp. 178-80.

f. 95r-v

RaW 460: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Say not you love, unless you do’

Copy, headed ‘A Lady to her Louer’, transcribed from RaW 461.

First published in Inedited Poetical Miscellanies, 1584-1700, ed. W.C. Hazlitt ([London], 1870), p. [179]. Listed but not printed in Latham, p. 174. Rudick, No. 38, p. 106.

f. 95v

BeJ 53: Sir John Beaumont, To my Lorde Marques of Buckingham (‘To say to you my good Lord, I might refraine’)

Copy, here beginning ‘To say to hym good Lorde I might refraine’, subscribed ‘J Beamont’.

This MS collated in Sell.

First published (?) in Sell (1974), pp. 180-1.

ff. 96v-7r

HrE 65: Edward, Lord Herbert of Cherbury, To Mrs. Diana Cecyll (‘Diana Cecyll, that rare beauty thou dost show’)

Copy, the first two words centred as a heading, transcribed from HrE 66.

This MS collated in Smith, p. 129.

First published in Occasional Verses (1665). Moore Smith, pp. 34-5.

ff. 97r-102v

JnB 235: Ben Jonson, An Execration upon Vulcan (‘Any why to me this, thou lame Lord of fire’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Ben Jonson’, transcribed from JnB 236.

This MS collated in Herford & Simpson.

First published in John Benson's 4to edition of Jonson's poems (1640) and in The Vnder-wood (xliii) in Workes (London, 1640). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 202-12.

ff. 102v-3r

CwT 767: Thomas Carew, A Song (‘In her faire cheekes two pits doe lye’)

Copy, headed ‘Peregrine’ and here beginning ‘In your faire cheekes two pits their lye’.

This MS recorded in Dunlap, p. 266.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 105.

ff. 103r-4v

CoR 329: Richard Corbett, A letter sent from Doctor Corbet to Master Ailesbury, Decem. 9. 1618 (‘My Brother and much more had'st thou bin mine’)

Copy, headed ‘To my Lord Admirall Mr Alisbury vppon ye Comett R Corbett’, transcribed from CoR 331.

First published in Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 63-5.

ff. 109v-10v

PoW 18: Walton Poole, ‘If shadows be a picture's excellence’

Copy, headed ‘Black haire’, subscribed ‘Ben Jonson’.

First published, as ‘In praise of black Women; by T.R.’, in Robert Chamberlain, The Harmony of the Muses (London, 1654), p. 15 [unique exemplum in Huntington, edited in facsimile by Ernest W. Sullivan, II (Aldershot, 1990)]; in Abraham Wright, Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656), pp. 75-7, as ‘On a black Gentlewoman’. Poems (1660), pp. 61-2, as ‘On black Hair and Eyes’ and superscribed ‘R’; in The Poems of John Donne, ed Herbert J.C. Grierson, 2 vols (Oxford, 1912), I, 460-1, as ‘on Black Hayre and Eyes’, among ‘Poems attributed to Donne in MSS’; and in The Poems of William Herbert, Third Earl of Pembroke, ed. Robert Krueger (B.Litt. thesis, Oxford, 1961: Bodleian, MS B. Litt. d. 871), p. 61.

f. 112r

StW 396: William Strode, On a Gentlewoman that sung, and playd upon a Lute (‘Bee silent, you still Musicke of the sphears’)

Copy, headed On a Gentlewoman [playing on ye Lute added in another hand], transcribed from StW 397.

This MS recorded in Forey, p. 332.

First published in Wits Interpreter (London, 1655), Part II, p. 278. Dobell, p. 39. Forey, p. 208.

f. 112v

RaW 326: Sir Walter Ralegh, Sir Walter Ralegh to the Queen (‘Our Passions are most like to Floods and streames’)

Copy, untitled, here beginning ‘Passions are likened best to flouds and streames’, prefixed to “Wrong not, deare Empresse of my Heart” which is subscribed ‘Sr W. R:’ (see RaW 510), transcribed from RaW 328.

This MS the Pickering MS printed in Hannah (1845), pp. 132-4; recorded in Latham, p. 115, and in Gullans.

First published, prefixed to “Wrong not, deare Empresse of my Heart” (see RaW 500-42) and headed ‘To his Mistresse by Sir Walter Raleigh’, in Wits Interpreter (London, 1655). Edited in this form in Latham, p. 18. Rudick, No 39A, p. 106.

For a discussion of the authorship and different texts of this poem, see Charles B. Gullans, ‘Raleigh and Ayton: the disputed authorship of “Wrong not sweete empresse of my heart”’, SB, 13 (1960), 191-8, reprinted in The English and Latin Poems of Sir Robert Ayton, ed. Gullans, STS, 4th Ser. 1 (Edinburgh & London, 1963), pp. 318-26.

ff. 112v-13v

RaW 510: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Wrong not, deare Empresse of my Heart’

Copy, prefixed by ‘Passions are likened best to flouds and streames’ (RaW 326) and subscribed ‘Sr W: R:’, transcribed from RaW 513.

This MS collated in Gullans; recorded in Latham, p. 115.

First published in Wits Interpreter (London, 1655), printed twice, the first version prefixed by ‘Our Passions are most like to Floods and streames’ (see RaW 320-38) and headed ‘To his Mistresse by Sir Walter Raleigh’. Edited with the prefixed stanza in Latham, pp. 18-19. Edited in The English and Latin Poems of Sir Robert Ayton, ed. Charles B. Gullans, STS, 4th Ser. 1 (Edinburgh & London, 1963), pp. 197-8. Rudick, Nos 39A and 39B (two versions, pp. 106-9).

This poem was probably written by Sir Robert Ayton. For a discussion of the authorship and the different texts see Gullans, pp. 318-26 (also printed in SB, 13 (1960), 191-8).

f. 113v

RaW 244: Sir Walter Ralegh, On the Life of Man (‘What is our life? a play of passion’)

Copy, untitled, subscribed ‘Sr. W: R:’, transcribed from RaW 245.

Edited from this MS in Hannah (1845), pp. 81-2, and in Rudick, No. 29C, p. 70. Recorded in Latham, p. 144.

First published, in a musical setting, in Orlando Gibbons, The First Set of Madrigals and Mottets (London, 1612). Latham, pp. 51-2. Rudick, Nos 29A, 29B and 29C (three versions, pp. 69-70). MS texts also discussed in Michael Rudick, ‘The Text of Ralegh's Lyric “What is our life?”’, SP, 83 (1986), 76-87.

ff. 113v-14r

CwT 993: Thomas Carew, To A.L. Perswasions to love (‘Thinke not cause men flatt'ring say’)

Copy of lines 1-26, untitled.

This MS recorded in Dunlap, p. 216.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 4-6.

f. 114v

ShW 9: William Shakespeare, Sonnet 2 (‘When forty winters shall besiege thy brow’)

Copy, headed ‘Spes Altera’, transcribed from ShW 10.

This MS recorded in Tucker Brooke, p. 66.

Edited and most manuscript copies collated in Gary Taylor, ‘Some Manuscripts of Shakespeare's Sonnets’, Bulletin of the John Rylands University Library of Manchester, 68/1 (Autumn 1985), 210-46.

ff. 114v-15v

CwT 429: Thomas Carew, Loves Courtship (‘Kisse lovely Celia and be kind’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 107-8.

ff. 115v-16r

WoH 17: Sir Henry Wotton, The Character of a Happy Life (‘How happy is he born and taught’)

Copy of a five-stanza version, untitled, transcribed from WoH 18, with a marginal note in a later hand after line 6 saying ‘4 lines omitted here’.

This MS the Pickering MS collated in Hannah.

First published in Sir Thomas Overbury, A Wife, 5th impression (London, 1614). Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), pp. 522-3. Hannah (1845), pp. 28-31. Some texts of this poem discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Wotton's “The Character of a Happy Life”’, The Library, 5th Ser. 10 (1955), 270-4, and in Ted-Larry Pebworth, ‘New Light on Sir Henry Wotton's “The Character of a Happy Life”’, The Library, 5th Ser. 33 (1978), 223-6 (plus plates).

f. 119r-v

ToA 53: Aurelian Townshend, To the Countess of Salisbury (‘Victorious beauty, though your eyes’)

Copy, as by ‘Earle of Pe:’.

This MS text collated in Brown.

First published, in a musical setting by William Webb, in John Playford, Select Musical Ayres (London, 1652), p. 22. Chambers, pp. 4-5. Brown, pp. 19-21.

ff. 119v-20r

PeW 18: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, ‘Had I loved but at that rate’

Copy, superscribed ‘E: P:’.

This MS collated in Krueger and in The Poems of Lady Mary Wroth, ed. Josephine A. Roberts ([revised paperback edition], Baton Rouge and London, 1983), pp. 217, 231.

Krueger, pp. 53-4, among ‘Poems Attributed to Pembroke in Manuscripts’. Edited, as a ‘Poem Possibly by William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke’, in The Poems of Lady Mary Wroth, ed. Josephine A. Roberts ([revised paperback edition], Baton Rouge and London, 1983).

ff. 122r-v

RnT 34: Thomas Randolph, Ausonii Epigram 38 (‘Shee which would not I would choose’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS transcribed from RnT 35.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 92-3.

f. 123r-v

CwT 146: Thomas Carew, A deposition from Love (‘I was foretold, your rebell sex’)

Copy, subscribed ‘T C:’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 16-17. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in The Treasury of Musick, Book 2 (London, 1669).

ff. 123v-4

CwT 368: Thomas Carew, Ingratefull beauty threatned (‘Know Celia, (since thou art so proud,)’)

Copy, subscribed ‘T C:’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 17-18. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in The Second Book of Ayres, and Dialogues (London, 1655).

ff. 124r-5r

CwT 1225: Thomas Carew, Vpon the sicknesse of (E.S.) (‘Mvst she then languish, and we sorrow thus’)

Copy, subscribed ‘T C:’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 31-2.

f. 125r-v

CwT 1189: Thomas Carew, Vpon a Ribband (‘This silken wreath, which circles in mine arme’)

Copy, subscribed ‘T. C:’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 29.

ff. 126r-31v

HeR 168: Robert Herrick, A Nuptiall Song, or Epithalamie, on Sir Clipseby Crew and his Lady (‘What's that we see from far?’)

Copy of a twenty-three-stanza version, headed ‘Epithalamie’, subscribed ‘R. Her’, transcribed from HeR 169.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 112-16. Patrick, pp. 154-8.

ff. 131v-2r

CwT 1216: Thomas Carew, Vpon some alterations in my Mistresse, after my departure into France (‘Oh gentle Love, doe not forsake the guide’)

Copy, subscribed ‘T. C:’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 24-5.

ff. 132v-6r

CwT 630: Thomas Carew, A Rapture (‘I will enjoy thee now my Celia, come’)

Copy, subscribed ‘T: C:’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 49-53.

f. 136v

CwT 803: Thomas Carew, Song. Celia singing (‘Harke how my Celia, with the choyce’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 38.

f. 137r-v

CwT 1086: Thomas Carew, To my Mistresse in absence (‘Though I must live here, and by force’)

Copy, subscribed ‘T. C:’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 22.

ff. 137v-8r

CwT 1043: Thomas Carew, To her in absence. A Ship (‘Tost in a troubled sea of griefes, I floate’)

Copy, headed ‘To his Mrs in Absence A shipp’, subscribed ‘T: C:’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 23.

f. 138r-v

CwT 397: Thomas Carew, Lips and Eyes (‘In Celia's face a question did arise’)

Copy, untitled, subscribed ‘T: C:’.

First published in Poems (1640) and in Wits Recreations (London, 1640). Dunlap, p. 6.

ff. 138v-40v

CwT 462: Thomas Carew, My mistris commanding me to returne her letters (‘So grieves th'adventrous Merchant, when he throwes’)

Copy, subscribed ‘T. C:’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 9-11.

ff. 140v-1r

CwT 678: Thomas Carew, Secresie protested (‘Feare not (deare Love) that I'le reveale’)

Copy, subscribed ‘T: C:’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 11. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in The Second Book of Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1655).

See also Introduction.

f. 141r-v

CwT 553: Thomas Carew, A prayer to the Wind (‘Goe thou gentle whispering wind’)

Copy, subscribed ‘T C’.

First published in Poems (1640) and in Poems: written by Wil. Shake-speare, Gent. (London, 1640). Dunlap, pp. 11-12.

ff. 142r-3v

ToA 29: Aurelian Townshend, A Paradox (‘There is no Lover, hee or shee’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Aurelean Townsend’.

First published in Chambers (1912), pp. 33-5. Brown, pp. 30-1.

f. 144v

CwT 876: Thomas Carew, Song. Murdring beautie (‘Ile gaze no more on her bewitching face’)

Copy, headed ‘A Charming Beautie’.

First published in Poems (1640) and in Wits Recreations (London, 1640). Dunlap, p. 8.

ff. 144v-5r

CwT 492: Thomas Carew, On his Mistres lookeinge in a glasse (‘This flatteringe glasse whose smooth face weares’)

Copy, subscribed ‘T. C:’.

This MS collated in Dunlap.

First published in Hazlitt (1870), pp. 23-4. Dunlap. p. 132.

ff. 145v-7r

HoJ 103: John Hoskyns, A Dreame (‘Me thought I walked in a dreame’)

Copy, headed Mr‘John Hoskins bewailing his owne his wifes his Mothers and his Childrens woefull case, ye one borne ye other yet vnborne’.

This MS recorded in Osborn.

Osborn, No. XXXIV (pp. 206-8). Whitlock, pp. 480-2.

A shortened version of the poem, of lines 43-68, beginning ‘the worst is tolld, the best is hidd’ and ending ‘he errd but once, once king forgiue’, was widely circulated.

f. 147r

HoJ 239: John Hoskyns, To his Son Benedict Hoskins (‘Sweet Benedict whilst thou art younge’)

Copy, headed ‘Ad filiolum Suum Beniamin’, the English preceded by the Latin version beginning ‘Dum pueres vant ne seiq incomoda vocis’.

This MS cited in Osborn.

Osborn, No. XXXI (p. 203).

ff. 147v-8r

DnJ 1706: John Donne, A Jeat Ring sent (‘Thou art not so black, as my heart’)

Copy, transcribed from DnJ 1707.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 65-6. Gardner, Elegies, p. 38. Shawcross, No. 73.

f. 149r-v

CwT 1284: Thomas Carew, To a Strumpett (‘Hayle thou true modell of a cursed whore’)

Copy, untitled, subscribed ‘T: C:’.

This MS collated in Dunlap.

First published as ‘On one Grace C. an Insatiate Whore’ in a 24-line version beginning ‘Go shamefull Model of a Cursed Whore!’ in Latine Songs, With their English: and Poems. By Henry Bold (London, 1685). A 36-line version published in Minor Poems of the Seventeenth Century, ed. R.G. Haworth (Everyman Library, 1931). Dunlap. p. 191.

ff. 149v-51v

KiH 714: Henry King, To his unconstant Freind (‘But say, thou very Woman, why to mee’)

Copy, transcribed from KiH 717.

This MS recorded in Crum.

First published in Poems (1657). Crum, pp. 142-4.

ff. 151v-2v

KiH 674: Henry King, The Surrender (‘My once Deare Love. Happlesse that I no more’)

Copy, headed ‘The mournefull parting of 2 Louers being caused by ye disproportion of Estates’, transcribed from KiH 678.

This MS recorded in Crum.

First published in Poems (1657). Crum, pp. 146-7.

ff. 152v-3r

KiH 615: Henry King, Sonnet (‘Tell mee you Starrs that our affections move’)

Copy, transcribed from KiH 618.

This MS recorded in Crum.

First published in Walter Porter, Madrigales & Ayres (London, 1632). Poems (1657). Crum, p. 149.

ff. 153r-4r

MoG 83: George Morley, To his Mrs (‘Read fayre Mayd, & know ye heate’)

Copy, headed ‘On his Mrs being maskt’ and here beginning ‘Read sweete Maid and know the heate’, subscribed ‘George Morley’.

ff. 155v-6r

CwT 1239: Thomas Carew, A Health to a Mistris (‘To her whose beautie doth excell’)

Copy, subscribed ‘R:C:’.

This MS collated in Dunlap.

First published in The Academy of Complements (London, 1650). Dunlap. p. 192. Possibly by Richard Clerke.

ff. 157v-8r

PeW 164: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, A Lover to his Mistris (‘The purest piece of Nature is my choice’)

Copy, untitled, subscribed ‘R: Cl:’.

This MS recorded in Krueger.

First published in Samuel Pick, Festum Voluptatis (1639), p. 16. John Cotgrave, Wits Interpreter (London, 1655), p. 49. Poems (1660), p. 78, superscribed ‘P.’. Listed in Krueger's Appendix I: ‘Spurious Poems in the 1660 Edition’ as probably by Richard Cleark.

f. 158r

StW 886: William Strode, Song (‘O when will Cupid shew such Art’)

Copy, subscribed ‘W S.’, with a later note ‘Qre W. Shakespeare’.

This MS transcribed from StW 887.

First published in Dobell (1907), p. 6. Forey, p. 76.

ff. 158v-9r

CwT 966.8: Thomas Carew, The Spring (‘Now that the winter's gone, the earth hath lost’)

Copy, headed ‘On a Lady of exquisite Beautie but most execrable of disposition’, here beginning ‘Now is ye winter gone & the earth hath loste’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 3.

f. 161v

KiH 638: Henry King, Sonnet (‘When I entreat, either thou wilt not heare’)

Copy, headed ‘To a Discouraged Sutor’ transcribed from KiH 641.

First published in Poems (1657). Crum, p. 148.

ff. 161v-2v

DnJ 3263: John Donne, To Mr R.W. (‘If, as mine is, thy life a slumber be’)

Copy, transcribed from DnJ 3264.

This MS recorded in Milgate and in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 209-10. Milgate, Satires, pp. 64-5. Shawcross, No. 122.

ff. 162v-3r

CwT 1271: Thomas Carew, The mistake (‘When on faire Celia I did spie’)

Copy, headed ‘On a fair Lady yt woare in her Brest a wounded Heart carued in a Pretious stone’ and subscribed ‘Hen: Blunt’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 187-8. Possibly by Henry Blount.

ff. 163r-5r

CwT 98: Thomas Carew, The Complement (‘O my deerest I shall grieve thee’)

Copy, headed ‘Loues Complement’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 99-101.

ff. 167r-8v

BeJ 44: Sir John Beaumont, Upon the death of the most noble Lord Henry, Earle of Southampton, 1624 (‘When now the life of great Southampton ends’)

This MS collated in Sell.

First published in Bosworth-field (1629). Sell, pp. 156-8.

ff. 169r-70v

HrE 14: Edward, Lord Herbert of Cherbury, Elegy for the Prince (‘Must he be ever dead? Cannot we add’)

Copy, headed ‘SCH his Eligie’, transcribed from HrE 15.

This MS collated in Smith, pp. 127-8.

First published among ‘Sundry Funeral Elegies’ appended to Joshua Sylvester, Lachrymae Lachrymarum, 3rd edition (London, 1613). Occasional Verses (1665). Moore Smith, pp. 22-4.

ff. 172v-4v

CoR 142: Richard Corbett, An Elegie Upon the death of the Lady Haddington who dyed of the small Pox (‘Deare Losse, to tell the world I greiue were true’)

Copy, headed ‘An Elegie on ye Lady Haddington’, subscribed ‘Ric Corbett’, transcribed from CoR 143.

First published in Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 59-62. The last 42 lines, beginning ‘O thou deformed unwomanlike disease’, in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656), p. 48.

f. 175r-v

BmF 88: Francis Beaumont, A Funeral Elegy on the Death of the Lady Penelope Clifton (‘Since thou art dead, Clifton, the world may see’)

Copy of lines 1-38, headed ‘An Elegie on ye death of ye faire & verteous Lady Clyfton’,transcribed from BmF 89.

First published in Poems (London, 1653). Dyce, XI, 511-13.

ff. 177v-8r

CoR 415: Richard Corbett, On Francis Beaumont's death (‘He that hath Youth, and Friends, and so much Wit’)

Copy, headed ‘On Mr Beaumont's death’, here beginning ‘He that hath such greatness & such wit’.

First published in Francis Beaumont, Poems (London, 1640). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, p. 23.

f. 185r-v

FeO 17: Owen Felltham, Elegie on Henry Earl of Oxford (‘When thou didst live and shine, thy Name was then’)

Copy, headed ‘An Elegie of John Earle of Oxford who dyed in the Netherlands’, subscribed ‘Owen ffeltham’.

This MS cited in Pebworth & Summers.

First published in Lusoria (London, 1661). Pebworth & Summers, pp. 9-10.

Add. MS 21544

A tall folio composite volume of verse and miscellaneous papers, in various hands, mounted on guards, 185 leaves, in modern half morocco.

Purchased at H. B. Rays sale, 26 July 1856, lot 1033.

ff. 15r-16r

CgW 26: William Congreve, Letter to Viscount Cobham (‘Sincerest Critick of my Prose, or Rhime’)

Copy, in a neat probably professional hand, headed ‘Albi nostrorum Sesmonum Candide Judex &c’, subscribed in a different hand ‘Augst ye 24th 1728’, on three pages of two conjugate folio leaves, endorsed ‘S:B: Augt: 24th:-1728’. c.1728.

First published, as ‘Of Improving the Present Time’, London, 1729. Summers, IV, 177-8. Dobrée, pp. 400-2. McKenzie, II, 486-8.

See also CgW 30.

f. 103r-v

ShJ 148.5: James Shirley, The Contention of Ajax and Ulysses for the Armour of Achilles, Act III, Song (‘The glories of our blood and state’)

Copy.

Gifford & Dyce, VI, 396-7. Armstrong, p. 54. Musical setting by Edward Coleman published in John Playford, The Musical Companion (London, 1667).

Add. MS 21621

A quarto volume of poems by Jane Barker, entitled (f. 3r) ‘A Collection of Poems Refering to the times; since the King's accession to the Crown. Occasionally writ according to the circumstance of time and place’, 55 leaves, in contemporary calf (rebacked). In the hand of Barker's cousin Colonel William Connock, with a few minor autograph corrections by her, with (ff. 4r-6r) a prose dedication ‘To his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales’, (f. 7r-v) a dedication ‘To the Reader’, and (ff. 8r-9v) a table of contents; the volume evidently prepared (if not actually used) as a presentation MS to James Francis Edward Stuart, the Jacobite Prince of Wales (later the ‘Old Pretender’). c.1700-1.

Bookplate (engraved by Antoine Aveline (1691-1743)) of Anne-Charlotte de Crussol-Florensac, Duchesse d'Aiguillon, after her marriage on 12 August 1718 to Armand-Louis du Plessis-Richelieu (1683-1750). Sotheby's, 21 November 1856, lot 215.

The MS discussed in King, Poems, passim. Also described in the online Perdita Project.

ff. 10r-12v

BarJ 14: Jane Barker, Fidelia alone lamenting her parents lately dead, and her relations gone into the west against Monmoth (‘How my poor heart's with grief and fear oppres'd’)

Copy.

This MS collated in King, Poems.

King, Poems, pp. 28-30.

f. 13r-v

BarJ 59: Jane Barker, On the Victory at Sedgemore (‘This night they say a battell has been fought’)

Copy.

f. 14r-v

BarJ 8: Jane Barker, England's good Genius (‘What mighty joy this victory has given’)

Copy.

f. 15r-v

BarJ 50: Jane Barker, On Sedge-more victory by Lucifer and his Fiends (‘Oh! what a loss, have we this night sustained’)

Copy.

ff. 16r-18v

BarJ 22: Jane Barker, Fidelia arguing with her self on the difficulty of finding the true Religion (‘Oh wretched World, but wretched above all’)

Copy.

First published, in a 37-line version headed ‘On the Difficulties of Religion’, in Patch-Work Screen (1723) [Wilson, pp. 163-5]. Full 79-line version in Kissing the Rod, pp. 355-7.

ff. 19r-20r

BarJ 24: Jane Barker, Fidelia having seen the Convent at St: James's (‘If there be a terrestial Paradice’)

Copy.

ff. 21r-4v

BarJ 5: Jane Barker, A discourse between Englands ill Genius and his companion (‘O miserable wretch! what shall I do,?’)

Copy.

ff. 25r-7v

BarJ 18: Jane Barker, Fidelia and her friend on her becoming a Catholick first dialogue (‘met how cou'd you thus leave in distres’)

Copy, headed ‘A Dispute between Fidelia and her Friend on her becoming a Catholick First Dialogue’.

ff. 28r-30r

BarJ 64: Jane Barker, Second Dialogue (‘Well have you thought on the advice I gave’)

Copy, headed ‘Second Dialogue between Fidelia and her Friend’.

ff. 31r-3r

BarJ 20: Jane Barker, Fidelia and her friend the third dialogue (‘Well met Fidelia let me hear you rail’)

Copy, headed ‘The third Dialogue between Fidelia & her friend’.

ff. 34r-5r

BarJ 35: Jane Barker, Fidelia weeping for the Kings departure at the Revolution (‘Unhappy I, to live to see this day’)

Copy, headed ‘Fidelia lamenting the King's departure at the Revolution’.

This MS collated in King, Poems.

King, Poems, p. 31.

ff. 36r-8v

BarJ 6: Jane Barker, A discourse between England's ill Genius and his Companion on the jubelee in Hell (‘This night we have a jubile in Hell’)

Copy, headed ‘A discourse between Englands ill Genius and his Companion. on the Revolution’.

f. 39r

BarJ 16: Jane Barker, Fidelia and her friend (‘Well met Fidelia, how have you done of late’)

Copy, headed ‘Fidelia & her friend’, with ‘on the Revolution’ added in Barker's hand.

ff. 40r-1v

BarJ 28: Jane Barker, Fidelia in France meets one of Portsmoth officers (‘How little did I think to meet you here’)

Copy, headed ‘Fidelia in France meets one of the Portsmouth officers’.

f. 42r-v

BarJ 31: Jane Barker, Fidelia meets her neighbour reading a letter (‘Why are you sad, what news have you receiv'd’)

Copy.

ff. 43r-6v

BarJ 26: Jane Barker, Fidelia in a Convent garden the Abess comes to her (‘I from my cell behelld you thoughtfull set’)

Copy.

ff. 47r-9v

BarJ 12: Jane Barker, Englands ill Genius and his companion after the Battell of the Boyn (‘Sure, sure, th' Almighty Tyrant of the skys’)

Copy.

ff. 50r-1v

BarJ 10: Jane Barker, Englands good Genius and Philanthrophel his companion (‘If I had in my nature any dross’)

Copy.

ff. 52r-3v

BarJ 33: Jane Barker, Fidelia walking the Lady Abess comes to her (‘The news is come, that Irland is quite lost’)

Copy.

ff. 54r-5v

BarJ 39: Jane Barker, Hells Regret, for the peace & unity like to ensue the Duke of Anjou's accession to the Crown of Spain. spoken as by Lucifer (‘What shall we do? we'r ruin'd lost undone’)

Copy.

Add. MS 21924

Copy, in a predominantly italic hand, 12 folio leaves, in modern half-calf on marbled boards. Early 17th century.

EsR 207: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Essex's Arraignment, 19 February 1600/1

Purchased from Boone, 14 March 1857.

Add. MS 21947

A folio composite volume of letters sent to Charles Stuart (1639-72), third Duke of Richmond and sixth Duke of Lennox, in various hands and paper sizes, 356 leaves, in modern half-morocco.

ff. 14r-15r

*DeE 2: Lady Elizabeth Delaval, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed (‘E Levingstone’), to the Duke of Richmond and Lennox, on two conjugate quarto leaves, endorsed by the recipient, from Nocton, Lincolnshire, 25 April 1665. 1665.

ff. 31r-2r

*DeE 3: Lady Elizabeth Delaval, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed (‘E Levingstone’), to the Duke of Richmond and Lennox, on two conjugate quarto leaves, endorsed by the recipient, from Nocton, Lincolnshire, 11 May 1666. 1666.

Add. MS 21948

A folio composite volume of letters sent to Charles Stuart (1639-72), third Duke of Richmond and sixth Duke of Lennox, in various hands and paper sizes, 478 leaves.

ff. 5r-6v

*DeE 4: Lady Elizabeth Delaval, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed (‘E De-La-val’), to the Duke of Richmond and Lennox, on all four pages of two conjugate quarto leaves, 28 January 1670[/1]. 1671.

f. 22r-v

*DeE 5: Lady Elizabeth Delaval, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed (‘E Delaval’), to the Duke of Richmond and Lennox, on both sides of a single folio leaf, 10 February 1670/1. 1671.

ff. 60r-1r

*DeE 6: Lady Elizabeth Delaval, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed (‘E Delaual’), to the Duke of Richmond and Lennox, on three pages of two conjugate quarto leaves, from Seaton Delaval, 25 April 1671. 1671.

ff. 71r, 70v, 70r

*DeE 7: Lady Elizabeth Delaval, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed (‘E Delaval’), to the Duke of Richmond and Lennox, written in different directions on a folded broadsheet, 7 June 1671. 1671.

ff. 75r, 74v, 74r

*DeE 8: Lady Elizabeth Delaval, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed (‘E De-La-Val’), to the Duke of Richmond and Lennox, written in different directions on a folded broadsheet, from Scarborough, 13 July 1671. 1671.

ff. 101r-2v

*DeE 9: Lady Elizabeth Delaval, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed (‘E Delaval’), to the Duke of Richmond and Lennox, on all four pages of two conjugate folio leaves, 1 October 1671. 1671.

ff. 136r-7r

*DeE 10: Lady Elizabeth Delaval, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed (‘E Delaval’), to the Duke of Richmond and Lennox, on three pages of two conjugate quarto leaves, 23 November 1671, endorsed as received on 16 December. 1671.

Add. MS 21993

A folio volume of state tracts, papers and pariamentary proceedings, in professional hands, 295 leaves, in contemporary calf.

Signed (f. 1r) by Elias Ashmole (1617-92), astrologer and antiquary. Purchased at Payne & Foss's sale, 30 April 1857, lot 130.

ff. 222v-30r

CtR 388.5: Sir Robert Cotton, A Short View of the Long Life and Reign of Henry the Third, King of England

Copy, in a professional mixed hand. c.1640.

Treatise, written c.1614 and ‘Presented to King James’, beginning ‘Wearied with the lingering calamities of Civil Arms...’. First published in London, 1627. Cottoni posthuma (1651), at the end (i + pp. 1-27).

Add. MS 22022

Copy, in a professional secretary hand, 94 leaves, slightly imperfect, in leather gilt. c.1596-early 17th century.

SpE 48: Edmund Spenser, A View of the Present State of Ireland

Signature (f. 1r) of Sir Arthur Chichester (1563-1625), Lord-Deputy of Ireland in 1604-13. Payne & Foss's sale catalogues in 1843, item 219; 1845, item 154; and, 1 May 1857, item 349.

This MS collated in Variorum.

First published in Sir James Ware, The Historie of Ireland (Dublin, 1633). Variorum, Prose Works (ed. Rudolf Gottfried), pp. 39-231.

Spenser's authorship of this ‘View’ is generally accepted, especially in light of the comparable views about Ireland in The Faerie Queene. A cautionary note about authorship is sounded, however, in Jean R. Brink, ‘Constructing the View of the Present State of Ireland’, Spenser Studies, 11 (1994), 203-28; in her ‘Appropriating the Author of The Faerie Queene: The Attribution of the View of the Present State of Ireland and A Brief Note of Ireland to Edmund Spenser’, in Soundings of Things Done: Essays in Early Modern Literature in Honor of S.K. Heninger, Jr., ed. Peter E. Medine and Joseph Wittreich (Newark, Delaware, 1997), 93-136. See also, inter alia, Andrew Hadfield, ‘Certainties and Uncertainties: By Way of Response to Jean Brink’, Spenser Studies, 12 (1998), 197-202, and Jean R. Brink, ‘Spenser and the Irish Question: Reply to Andrew Hadfield’, Spenser Studies, 13 (1999), 265-6.

Add. MS 22118

An octavo verse miscellany, in a single predominantly italic hand, 49 leaves, outer leaves imperfect, in modern calf gilt. Including twenty poems by Carew, eleven poems by Crashaw on ff. 10-30 passim, and fifteen poems by Strode. c.1630s.

Thomas Thorpe, sale catalogue (1834), item 728. Acquired from C. Booth, October 1857.

Cited in IELM, II.i-ii (1987-93), as the ‘Thorpe MS’: CwT Δ 12, CrR Δ 3, StW Δ 9.

f. 1r-v

HeR 344: Robert Herrick, King Oberon his Cloathing (‘When the monethly horned Queene’)

Copy, headed ‘The apparrelling of Oberon king of ye Fayries’.

This MS collated in Farmer.

First published, as ‘A Description of the King of Fayries Clothes’ and attributed to Sir Simeon Steward, in A Description of the King and Queene of Fayries (London, 1634). Musarum Deliciae (London, 1656), p. 32. Attributed to Herrick in Hazlitt, II, 473-7, and in Norman K. Farmer, Jr., ‘Robert Herrick and “King Oberon's Clothing”: New Evidence for Attribution’, Yearbook of English Studies 1 (1971), 68-77. Not included in Martin or in Patrick. See also T.G.S. Cain, ‘Robert Herrick, Mildmay Fane, and Sir Simeon Steward’, ELR, 15 (1985), 312-17.

ff. 1v-2v

HeR 183: Robert Herrick, Oberons Feast (‘A Little mushroome table spred’)

Copy, imperfect, lacking a heading and the first four lines.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published complete, with six preliminary lines beginning ‘Shapcot! To thee the Fairy State’, in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 119-20. Patrick, pp. 161-3. An earlier version, entitled ‘A Description of his Dyet’, published in A Description of the King and Queene of Fayries (London, 1634). Martin, pp. 454-5.

f. 3v

StW 413: William Strode, On a Gentlewoman who escapd the marks of the Pox (‘A Beauty smoother then an Ivory plaine’)

Copy, headed ‘On a Gentlewoman iniurd by ye Pox’.

First published in Wits Interpreter (London, 1655), Part II, p. 272. Dobell, p. 49. Forey, p. 15.

f. 4r-v

RnT 549: Thomas Randolph, Upon the Burning of a School (‘What heat of learning kindled your desire’)

Copy, headed A lamentation vpon ye coflagration of ye muses habitation, or ye description of ye lamentable burning of a petty-schoole in ye parish of Bartley in westriding in Yorkshire.

Published in Wit and Drollery (London, 1661), ascribed to ‘T. R.’. Usually anonymous in MS copies and the school variously identified as being in Castlethorpe or in Batley, Yorkshire, or in Lewes, Sussex, or elsewhere.

f. 4v

StW 530: William Strode, On Sir Thomas Savil dying of the smal Pox (‘Take, greedy Death, a Body here intoomd’)

Copy, headed ‘On a Gentleman dying of ye small Pox’.

First published in Dobell (1907), pp. 86-7. Forey, p. 124.

f. 5r

CwT 52: Thomas Carew, The Comparison (‘Dearest thy tresses are not threads of gold’)

Copy, headed ‘Ad Amicam’.

This MS recorded in Powell, p. 287.

First published in Poems (1640), and lines 1-10 also in Wits Recreations (London, 1640). Dunlap, pp. 98-9.

f. 6r

PoW 19: Walton Poole, ‘If shadows be a picture's excellence’

Copy, headed ‘In ye prayse of a blacke Ladye’.

First published, as ‘In praise of black Women; by T.R.’, in Robert Chamberlain, The Harmony of the Muses (London, 1654), p. 15 [unique exemplum in Huntington, edited in facsimile by Ernest W. Sullivan, II (Aldershot, 1990)]; in Abraham Wright, Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656), pp. 75-7, as ‘On a black Gentlewoman’. Poems (1660), pp. 61-2, as ‘On black Hair and Eyes’ and superscribed ‘R’; in The Poems of John Donne, ed Herbert J.C. Grierson, 2 vols (Oxford, 1912), I, 460-1, as ‘on Black Hayre and Eyes’, among ‘Poems attributed to Donne in MSS’; and in The Poems of William Herbert, Third Earl of Pembroke, ed. Robert Krueger (B.Litt. thesis, Oxford, 1961: Bodleian, MS B. Litt. d. 871), p. 61.

ff. 6v-7r

RnT 208: Thomas Randolph, On six maids bathing themselves in a River (‘When bashfull day-light now was gone’)

Copy, headed ‘On 6 Cambridge Mayds, wch a Schollar saw washing ym selues by Q: Colledge’.

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury and in Davis.

First published in Poems, 2nd edition (1640). Thorn-Drury, pp. 138-40. Davis, pp. 56-62.

f. 7v

StW 1068: William Strode, To a frinde (‘Like as the hande which hath bin usd to play’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Dunlap.

First published in Wit Restor'd (London, 1658). Dobell, pp. 99-100. The Poems of Thomas Carew, ed. Rhodes Dunlap (Oxford, 1949), p. 130. Forey, p. 31.

f. 7v

DnJ 81: John Donne, The Anagram (‘Marry, and love thy Flavia, for, shee’)

Copy, headed ‘D. D. A Paradoxe on a foule woman’.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published as ‘Elegie II’ in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 80-2 (as ‘Elegie II’). Gardner, Elegies, pp. 21-2. Shawcross, No. 17. Variorum, 2 (2000), pp. 217-18.

ff. 8v-9r

RnT 128: Thomas Randolph, A gratulatory to Mr. Ben. Johnson for his adopting of him to be his Son (‘I was not borne to Helicon, nor dare’)

Copy.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 40-2.

f. 10r-v

CrR 250: Richard Crashaw, To the Morning. Satisfaction for sleepe (‘What succour can I hope the Muse will send’)

Copy, headed ‘Crosh: To ye Deane on occasion of sleeping chappell’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 183-5.

ff. 10v-12r

CrR 294: Richard Crashaw, Vpon the Duke of Yorke his Birth A Panegyricke (‘Brittaine, the mighty Oceans lovely Bride’)

Copy, headed ‘Crosh: On ye new borne Prince a Panegyricke’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Voces votivae ab academicis Cantabrigiensibus (Cambridge, 1640). Among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 176-81.

f. 12r-v

CrR 139: Richard Crashaw, On a foule Morning, being then to take a journey (‘Where art thou Sol, while thus the blind-fold Day’)

Copy, headed ‘Crosh: on ye morning yt was Clowdye when he was to take a iourney’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 181-2.

f. 12v

CrR 271: Richard Crashaw, Vpon our Saviours Tombe wherein never man was laid (‘How life and Death in Thee Agree?’)

Copy, headed ‘Crosh: In sepulchru domini’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 93.

ff. 12v-13v

RnT 220: Thomas Randolph, On the Fall of the Mitre Tavern in Cambridge (‘Lament, lament, ye Scholars all’)

Copy, headed ‘T.R. on ye fall of ye Miter’.

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Wit & Drollery (London, 1656), p. 68. Thorn-Drury, pp. 160-2.

f. 14r

BrW 53: William Browne of Tavistock, An Epitaph on Sir John Prowde (‘After a march of twenty years and more’)

Copy, headed ‘On ye death of a souldier’.

First published in Brydges (1815), p. 74.

ff. 15r-17r

CrR 129: Richard Crashaw, Musicks Duell (‘Now Westward Sol had spent the richest Beames’)

Copy, headed ‘Fidicinis et Philomelae bellu musicum’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 149-53.

f. 18r

StW 1039: William Strode, A Souldier to Penelope (‘Penelope the faire and chast’)

Copy.

Unpublished. Forey, p. 33.

f. 18v

StW 251: William Strode, A Necklace (‘These Vaines are Natures Nett’)

Copy, headed ‘On a Necklace’.

First stanza first published in Wits Interpreter (London, 1655), Part II, p. 386. Second stanza (‘Loe on my necke…’) first published in Poems…by William Earl of Pembroke…[and] Sr Benjamin Ruddier, [ed. John Donne the Younger] (London, 1660), p. 100. Complete in Dobell, p. 45. Forey, p. 35.

f. 18v

StW 625: William Strode, On Twins divided by death (‘Where are you now, Astrologers, that looke’)

Copy, headed ‘On ye death of a Twin’.

This MS collated in Forey.

First published in Dobell (1907), p. 66. Forey, pp. 115-16.

f. 18v

CrR 150: Richard Crashaw, On Marriage (‘I would be married, but I'de have no Wife’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 183.

f. 19r

StW 577: William Strode, On the death of Sir Thomas Pelham (‘Meerely for death to greive and mourne’)

Copy, headed ‘On ye death of an old Gentleman’.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656). Dobell, pp. 64-5. Forey, pp. 114-15.

ff. 19v-20r

StW 593: William Strode, On the death of Lady Caesar (‘Though death to good men be the greatest boone’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Dobell, p. 82.

First published in Dobell (1907), pp. 80-2. Forey, pp. 116-18.

f. 20r-v

RnT 344: Thomas Randolph, Upon a very deformed Gentlewoman, but of a voice incomparably sweet (‘I chanc'd sweet Lesbia's voice to heare’)

Copy, headed ‘Randolphe, when he heard one singe extemporanea, made these verses’.

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury and in Davis.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 115-17. Davis, pp. 92-105.

f. 21r

StW 439: William Strode, On a Glasse falling on the stones without breaking (‘How can the Embleme of Mortality’)

Copy of an abridged version.

This MS collated in Forey.

Unpublished. Forey, pp. 35-7.

ff. 21v-2r

StW 125: William Strode, For a Gentleman who kissing his frinde, at his departure out of England, left a Signe of blood upon her (‘What Mystery was this, that I should finde’)

Copy, headed ‘A Gentleman kissing his Mrs at his departure fro England, left some bloud on her lippe’.

This MS collated in Forey.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656). Dobell, pp. 32-3. Forey, pp. 22-3.

f. 22r

StW 969: William Strode, Song of Death and the Resurrection (‘Like to the casting of an Eye’)

Copy.

First published in Poems and Psalms by Henry King, ed. John Hannah (Oxford & London, 1843), p. cxxii. Dobell, pp. 50-1. Forey, pp. 107-8.

MS texts usually begin ‘Like to the rolling of an eye’.

f. 22r-v

StW 196: William Strode, Justification (‘See how the rainbow in the skie’)

Copy.

First published in Dobell (1907), p. 55. Forey, p. 109.

f. 22v

CoR 608: Richard Corbett, To the Ladyes of the New Dresse (‘Ladyes that weare black cypresse vailes’)

Copy, headed ‘Dr Corbitts uerses on ye Ladyes of [sic]’.

First published in Witts Recreations (London, 1640). Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, p. 90.

This poem is usually followed in MSS by ‘The Ladyes Answer’ (‘Blacke Cypresse vailes are shrouds of night’): see GrJ 14.

ff. 22v-3r

GrJ 24: John Grange, ‘Black cypress veils are shrouds of night’

Copy, headed ‘The Ladyes Answer’.

An ‘Answer’ to Corbett's ‘To the Ladyes of the New Dresse’ (CoR 595-629), first published in Witts Recreations (London, 1640). The Poems of Richard Corbett, ed. J.A.W. Bennett and H.R. Trevor-Roper (Oxford, 1955), p. 91. Listed as by John Grange in Krueger.

f. 23r

StW 243: William Strode, A Musical Contemplation (‘O lett me learne to be a Saint on earth’)

Copy, headed ‘The Diuines Comendacions of a good Voyce’.

This MS collated in Forey.

First published in Welbeck Miscellany No. 2: A Collection of Poems by Several Hands, never before published, ed. Francis Needham (Bungay, Suffolk, 1934), pp. 40-1. Forey, pp. 109-10.

ff. 23v-4r

StW 1087: William Strode, To a Gentlewoman with Black Eyes, for a Frinde (‘Noe marvaile, if the Suns bright Eye’)

Copy, headed ‘To a Gentlewoman’.

This MS recorded in Dunlap, p. 283.

Lines 15-20 (beginning ‘Oft when I looke I may descrie’) first published in Thomas Carew, Poems (London, 1640). Published complete in Dobell (1907), pp. 29-30. Forey, pp. 37-9.

f. 24r

CrR 72: Richard Crashaw, In praise of Lessius his rule of health (‘Goe now with some dareing drugg’)

Copy of lines 1-14, headed ‘On taking Physicke’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published (lines 15-46 only) in Leonard Leys, Hygiasticon…done into English, 2nd edition (Cambridge, 1634). Published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Reprinted, as ‘Temperance, Or the Cheap Physitian Vpon the Translation of Lessivs’, in Carmen Deo Nostro (Paris, 1652). Martin, pp. 156-8 (and later version pp. 342-4).

f. 27v

KiH 54: Henry King, The Boy's answere to the Blackmore (‘Black Mayd, complayne not that I fly’)

Copy, headed ‘Her answer to ye blacke boye’ and here beginning ‘Blacke youth complayne not yt I flye’.

First published in The Academy of Complements (London, 1646). Poems (1657). Crum, p. 151. The text almost invariably preceded, in both printed and MS versions, by (variously headed) ‘A Blackmore Mayd wooing a faire Boy: sent to the Author by Mr. Hen. Rainolds’ (‘Stay, lovely Boy, why fly'st thou mee’). Musical settings by John Wilson in Henry Lawes, Select Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1669).

f. 27v

CrR 260: Richard Crashaw, Vpon Bishop Andrewes his Picture before his Sermons (‘This reverend shadow cast that setting Sun’)

Copy, headed ‘Crosh: on ye Picture of Bishoppe Andrewes before his booke’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Lancelot Andrewes, XCVI Sermons, 2nd edition (London, 1641). Among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 163-4.

ff. 27v-8r

CrR 52: Richard Crashaw, ‘High mounted on an Ant Nanus the tall’

Copy, headed ‘On Nanus’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 161.

f. 36r-v

BcF 54.7: Francis Bacon, Upon the Death of the Duke of Richmond and Lennox (‘Are all diseases dead? or will death say’)

Copy, headed ‘An Elegye vpon ye Duke of Lenox who dyed ye same day hee should haue gone to Parliament’.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1637), p. 400. For a contemporary attribution to Bacon see BcF 54.117.

ff. 28r-9r

CrR 215: Richard Crashaw, Psalme 23 (‘Happy me! ô happy sheepe!’)

Copy, headed ‘Psalme. 23. a Periphrastique’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 102-4.

f. 29r

CwT 244: Thomas Carew, A flye that flew into my Mistris her eye (‘When this Flye liv'd, she us'd to play’)

Copy, headed ‘An Epitaph on a flye’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 37-9. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in The Treasury of Musick, Book 2 (London, 1669).

ff. 29v-30r

CrR 363: Richard Crashaw, Epitaphium in Dominum Herrisium (‘Siste te paulum (viator) ubi Longum Sisti’)

Copy of lines 1-38, headed ‘Epitaphium Gulielmi Herisij socij Aulae Pemb: Crosh’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 164-6.

f. 30v

StW 995: William Strode, A Sonnet (‘My Love and I for kisses played’)

Copy, headed ‘On 2 Gamsters’.

This MS recorded in Forey, p. 334.

First published in A Banquet of Jests (London, 1633). Dobell, p. 47. Forey, p. 211. The poem also discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Notes on some Poems attributed to William Strode’, PQ, 34 (1955), 444-8 (p. 446-7).

f. 31r

RaW 485: Sir Walter Ralegh, A songe made by Sir Water Rawley (‘What teares (Deare Prince) can serue to water all’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Latham snd in Rudick, No. 51, p. 124.

First published in Latham (1929). Latham (1951), p. 52. Rudick, No 51, p. 124.

Of doubtful authorship according to Latham, pp. 145-6, and Lefranc (1968), p. 84.

f. 34r

RaW 140: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Hir face, Hir tong, Hir wit’

Copy of a two-stanza version, headed ‘To his Mistresse’ and here beginning ‘Yr Face, yr Tongue, yr witt’.

This MS collated in Rollins, pp. 174-5; recorded in Latham, p. 160.

First published in Brittons Bowre of Delights (London, 1591). Latham, p. 80. Rudick, No. 11, pp. 14-15. This poem was perhaps written jointly by Ralegh and Sir Arthur Gorges: see Lefranc (1968), p. 95.

f. 34v

HrJ 138: Sir John Harington, Of a Lady that left open her Cabbinett (‘A vertuose Lady sitting in a muse’)

Copy, headed ‘A Ladyes answer to her husband’.

First published in ‘Epigrammes’ appended to J[ohn] C[lapham], Alcilia, Philoparthens Louing Folly (London, 1613). McClure No. 404, p. 312. Kilroy, Book IV, No. 57, p. 231.

ff. 35v-6r

CwT 614: Thomas Carew, Psalme 104 (‘My soule the great Gods prayses sings’)

Copy, headed ‘A Version on ye 104 Psalme’, subscribed ‘mr Tho: Carew’.

This MS collated in Dunlap.

First published, in a musical setting by Henry Lawes, in his Select Psalmes of a New Translation (London, 1655), pp. 4-6 [unique exemplum in the Huntington]. Hazlitt (1870), pp. 181-4. Dunlap. pp. 139-42. Edited from Lawes in Scott Nixon, ‘Henry Lawes's Hand in the Bridgewater Collection: New Light on Composer and Patron’, HLQ, 62 (1999), 233-72 (pp. 265-6).

f. 36v

CoR 6: Richard Corbett, Against the Opposing the Duke in Parliament, 1628 (‘The wisest King did wonder when hee spy'd’)

Copy, headed ‘On ye Parleament 1627’.

First published in Poems and Songs relating to George Duke of Buckingham, Percy Society (London, 1850), p. 31. Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 82-3.

Most MS texts followed by an anonymous ‘Answer’ beginning ‘The warlike king was troubl'd when hee spi'd’. Texts of these two poems discussed in V.L. Pearl and M.L. Pearl, ‘Richard Corbett's “Against the Opposing of the Duke in Parliament, 1628” and the Anonymous Rejoinder, “An Answere to the Same, Lyne for Lyne”: The Earliest Dated Manuscript Copies’, RES, NS 42 (1991), 32-9, and related correspondence in RES, NS 43 (1992), 248-9.

f. 37r

WoH 83: Sir Henry Wotton, On his Mistress, the Queen of Bohemia (‘You meaner beauties of the night’)

Copy of a six-stanza version, headed ‘On ye Queene of Bohemia’, subscribed ‘Sr Henry wootton’.

This MS recorded in Leishman.

First published (in a musical setting) in Michael East, Sixt Set of Bookes (London, 1624). Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 518. Hannah (1845), pp. 12-15. Some texts of this poem discussed in J.B. Leishman, ‘“You Meaner Beauties of the Night” A Study in Transmission and Transmogrification’, The Library, 4th Ser. 26 (1945-6), 99-121. Some musical versions edited in English Songs 1625-1660, ed. Ian Spink, Musica Britannica XXXIII (London, 1971), Nos. 66, 122.

ff. 37v-8r

HeR 9: Robert Herrick, The admonition (‘Seest thou those Diamonds which she weares’)

Copy, headed ‘On a dresse of hayre wth Jewells in it’ and here beginning ‘Seeest thou those rubies wch shee weares’.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 130-1. Patrick, p. 177.

f. 38r

CwT 554: Thomas Carew, A prayer to the Wind (‘Goe thou gentle whispering wind’)

Copy, headed ‘A Sigh’, subscribed ‘Tho: Carew’.

This MS recorded in Hazlitt, p. 13.

First published in Poems (1640) and in Poems: written by Wil. Shake-speare, Gent. (London, 1640). Dunlap, pp. 11-12.

ff. 39r-40r

CwT 994: Thomas Carew, To A.L. Perswasions to love (‘Thinke not cause men flatt'ring say’)

Copy, headed ‘His Counsaile to his Mistresse’, subscribed ‘Tho: Carew’.

This MS collated in Hazlitt, pp. 2-5

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 4-6.

f. 40r

CwT 1067: Thomas Carew, To his mistresse retiring in affection (‘Fly not from him whose silent miserie’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Tho Carew’.

This MS collated in Dunlap.

First published in Hazlitt (1870), p. 5. Dunlap. pp. 129-30.

f. 40r-v

CwT 179: Thomas Carew, A divine Mistris (‘In natures peeces still I see’)

Copy, headed ‘His Mistresse her perfection’, subscribed ‘Tho: Carew’.

This MS recorded in Hazlitt, p. 6.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 6-7.

f. 40v

CwT 335: Thomas Carew, Griefe ingrost (‘Wherefore doe thy sad numbers flow’)

Copy of an eight-line version, headed ‘His perplexed loue’ and here beginning ‘If shee must still denye’.

This MS recorded in Hazlitt, p. 7, and in Dunlap, p. 234.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 44-5. The eight-lline version first published in Hazlitt (1870), p. 7, and reprinted in Dunlap. p. 234.

ff. 40v-1r

CwT 119: Thomas Carew, A cruel Mistris (‘Wee read of Kings and Gods that kindly tooke’)

Copy, headed ‘His loue neglected’ and here beginning ‘Wee reade of Gods & Kings…’, subscribed ‘Tho: Carew’.

This MS recorded in Hazlitt, p. 8.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 8.

f. 41r

CwT 932: Thomas Carew, Song. To my inconstant Mistris (‘When thou, poore excommunicate’)

Copy of the second and third stanzas, headed ‘To his false Mistresse’ and here beginning ‘A fayrest hand yn thyne shall Cure’, subscribed ‘Tho: Carew’.

This MS recorded in Hazlitt, p. 18.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 15-16. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1653).

f. 41r

CwT 856: Thomas Carew, Song. Eternitie of love protested (‘How ill doth he deserve a lovers name’)

Copy, headed ‘The Qualitye of his loue’, subscribed ‘Tho: Carew’.

This MS recorded in Hazlitt, p. 30.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 23-4.

ff. 41v-2v

CwT 463: Thomas Carew, My mistris commanding me to returne her letters (‘So grieves th'adventrous Merchant, when he throwes’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Tho: Carew’.

This MS recorded in Hazlitt, p. 9.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 9-11.

f. 42v

CwT 804: Thomas Carew, Song. Celia singing (‘Harke how my Celia, with the choyce’)

Copy, headed ‘On a Ladye singing to her Lute in Arundel Garden’, subscribed ‘Tho: Carew’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 38.

f. 43r

CwT 1074: Thomas Carew, To Mris Katherine Nevill on her greene sicknesse (‘White innocence that now lies spread’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Tho: Carew’.

This MS collated in Dunlap.

First published in Musarum Deliciae (London, 1655). Dunlap. p. 129.

f. 43r

CwT 398: Thomas Carew, Lips and Eyes (‘In Celia's face a question did arise’)

Copy, headed ‘A pleasinge strife’, subscribed ‘Tho: Carew’.

This MS recorded in Hazlitt, p. 6.

First published in Poems (1640) and in Wits Recreations (London, 1640). Dunlap, p. 6.

f. 43r-v

CwT 1135: Thomas Carew, To T.H. a Lady resembling my Mistresse (‘Fayre copie of my Celia's face’)

Copy, headed ‘To a gentlewoman like his Caelia’, subscribed ‘Tho: Carew’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 26-7.

f. 44r

CwT 504: Thomas Carew, On Mistris N. to the greene sicknesse (‘Stay coward blood, and doe not yield’)

Copy, headed ‘The retyred bloud exhorted to returne into ye cheekes of ye pale Sisters Mrs Katherine & Mrs Marye Neuile’, subscribed ‘Tho: Carew’.

This MS recorded in Dunlap, p. 269.

First published in Poems (1642). Dunlap, p. 113.

f. 44r-v

CwT 1190: Thomas Carew, Vpon a Ribband (‘This silken wreath, which circles in mine arme’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Tho: Carew’.

This MS recorded in Hazlitt, p. 36.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 29.

f. 44v

CwT 317: Thomas Carew, Good counsell to a young Maid (‘When you the Sun-burnt Pilgrim see’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Tho: Carew’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 25.

ff. 44v-5v

CwT 1115: Thomas Carew, To Saxham (‘Though frost, and snow, lockt from mine eyes’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Tho: Carew’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 27-9.

ff. 45v-8r

RnT 273: Thomas Randolph, A Pastorall Courtship (‘Behold these woods, and mark my Sweet’)

Copy, imperfect.

This MS recorded in Thorn-Drury; collated in Davis.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 109-15. Davis, pp. 77-91.

f. 48v

RnT 289: Thomas Randolph, A Pastoral Ode (‘Coy Coelia dost thou see’)

Copy, headed ‘A Madrigall’.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 86-7.

ff. 48v-9r

RnT 120: Thomas Randolph, An Epithalamium (‘Bliss court thee sweetest soule, and fall soe thicke’)

Copy, imperfect.

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Hazlitt (1875), II, 661. Thorn-Drury, pp. 156-7 (erroneously citing on p. 187, as his copy-text the Harflete MS (Bodleian MS Firth e. 4: Δ 2), p. 120, evidently confusing his reference with that for RnT 18 since the ‘Epithalamium’ does not appear in that MS).

Add. MS 22147

A small octavo volume, comprising three Cambridge academic orations, in a single italic hand, 12 leaves (plus numerous blanks), all now on guards. Mid-17th century.

Puttick & Simpson, 9 December 1857, lot 433.

ff. 1r-6r

ClJ 239: John Cleveland, Oratio gratulatoria Johannis Clevelandi, Prælectoris Rhetorici, ad Magistros

Copy.

Oration, beginning ‘Quanta & quam divina, sit vestra benefaciendi Indoles...’. Published in J. Cleaveland Revived (London, 1660), pp. 155-64.

Add. MS 22263

A folio volume of parliamentary proceedings.

Among papers of the related families of Wentworth, Earls of Strafford, and Johnson.

ff. 4r-23r

ClE 99: Edward Hyde, First Earl of Clarendon, Impeachment Proceedings against Clarendon in 1667

Copy.

Articles of Treason exhibited in Parliament against Clarendon, 14 November 1667 published in London, 1667. The Proceedings in the House of Commons touching the Impeachment of Clarendon 1667 published in London, 1700.

Add. MS 22467

A folio miscellany, including a parliamentary journal for 1670-73, in two hands, 136 leaves, in modern brown leather gilt. Late 17th century.

Puttick & Simpson's, 12 June 1858, lot 1630.

ff. 5r-14v

BrT 5.3: Sir Thomas Browne, Pseudodoxia Epidemica: or, Enquiries into very many received Tenents, and commonly presumed Truths

Extracts, headed ‘Pseudoxia Epidemica: Enquirye into Vulgar Errours: Dr Browne’.

First published in London, 1646. Wilkin, vols II and III, 1-374. Keynes, Vol. II. Robbins (2 vols).

See BrT 29, BrT 32, and BrT 43.

Add. MS 22473

A tall folio volume of state papers, in probably a single professional rounded hand, 84 leaves, in modern half-calf on marbled boards. Mid-17th century.

Purchased from Messrs Waller, 7 July 1858.

ff. 79v-82r

CoR 35: Richard Corbett, A Certaine Poeme As it was presented in Latine by Divines and Others, before his Maiestye in Cambridge (‘It is not yet a fortnight, since’)

Copy, headed ‘A graue Parod as it was presented in Latin by certaine Diuines by way of Interlude before his Maiestie in Cambridge...’.

First published in Poëtica Stromata ([no place], 1648). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 12-18.

Some texts accompanied by an ‘Answer’ (‘A ballad late was made’).

Add. MS 22563

A square-shaped folio volume of state letters, in a single hand, 52 leaves. A transcript, according to Malone, ‘taken from one made by Robert Sterne Tighe Esq from the originals [at Longleat] by the permission of Thomas, the 2nd Marquis of Bath’. Mid-18th century.

With (f. 2r) a lengthy note by ‘Mr Malone’ [presumably Edmund Malone (1741-1812), literary scholar, biographer and book collector], and (f. 1r) a copy of it by Samuel Weller Singer, FSA (1783-1858), literary scholar, dated 1833. Purchased at the Singer sale, 3 August 1858, lot 219.

f. 39r-v

BcF 578: Francis Bacon, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Bacon, to Lord Henry Howard, [3 December 1599].

Add. MS 22582

A quarto miscellany of verse and medical and household prescriptions, in several cursive secretary hands, one predominating, written from both ends, 117 leaves, in modern half-morocco. Compiled in part by Brian Fairfax (1633-1711), scholar and courtier. Mid-late 17th century.

Later owned by the Rev. Philip Bliss (1787-1857), antiquary and book collector. Bliss sale, 21 August 1858, lot 117. Item 667 in an unidentified sale catalogue.

f. 2r-v

JnB 162: Ben Jonson, Eupheme. or, The Faire Fame Left to Posteritie Of that truly noble Lady, the Lady Venetia Digby. 3. The Picture of the Body (‘Sitting, and ready to be drawne’)

Copy, headed ‘On a Gentlewoman Sittinge to hav hir Picktur Drawne’.

This MS collated in Herford & Simpson.

First published (Nos. 3 and 4) in John Benson's 4to edition of Jonson's poems (1640) and (all poems) in The Vnder-wood (lxxxiv) in Workes (London, 1640). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 272-89 (pp. 275-7).

ff. 4v-5r

StW 182: William Strode, In commendation of Musique (‘When whispering straines do softly steale’)

Copy, headed ‘On ye Comendation of Musicke’, imperfect.

This MS recorded in Forey, p. 329.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656). Dobell, pp. 2-3. Four Poems by William Strode (Flansham, Bognor Regis, 1934), pp. 1-2. Forey, pp. 196-7. The poem also discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Notes on some Poems attributed to William Strode’, PQ, 34 (1955), 444-8 (p. 445).

f. 12r

CoR 760: Richard Corbett, To a Lady whose Husband was jealous of her cares of his Visits (‘When too much zeale doth fire devotion’)

Copy, subscribed ‘R Clark’.

This MS recorded in Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 97, 164.

First published in Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, p. 97.

f. 19r

ShJ 63: James Shirley, Presenting his Mistris with a Bird (‘Walking to taste the welcome Spring’)

This MS collated in Armstrong.

First published in Poems (London, 1646). Armstrong, p. 6.

ff. 19v-20v

ShJ 89: James Shirley, To the Painter preparing to draw M.M.H. (‘Be not too forward, Painter: 'tis’)

Copy, headed ‘To A Limner preparinge to Draw Mris WC.’, subscribed ‘James Shirley’.

First published in Poems (London, 1646). Armstrong, pp. 3-4.

f. 25r

CwT 778: Thomas Carew, A Song (‘In her faire cheekes two pits doe lye’)

Copy, headed ‘To A Lady’ and here beginning ‘In yor fair cheeks two pits doe lye’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 105.

f. 41r

StW 287: William Strode, On a blisterd Lippe (‘Chide not thy sprowting lippe, nor kill’)

Copy.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656). Dobell, pp. 28-9. Forey, pp. 92-3.

f. 41v-2v

MyJ 14: Jasper Mayne, On Mris Anne King's Tablebook of Pictures (‘Mine eyes were once blessed with the sight’)

Copy, headed ‘On Thee Most Vartious & Ingeios Lady Mis: Anne Fitz:’.

Unpublished?

f. 43v-4r

PeW 223: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, A Paradox in praise of a painted Woman (‘Not kiss? by Love I must, and make impression’)

Copy of a short version, headed ‘A Denyall’ and here beginning ‘Nay phew, nay pish, begon & will you fye’.

Poems (1660), pp. 93-5, superscribed ‘P.’. First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656), p. 97. Listed in Krueger's Appendix I: ‘Spurious Poems in the 1660 Edition’ as possibly by William Baker. The Poems of John Donne, ed Herbert J.C. Grierson, 2 vols (Oxford, 1912), I, 456-9, as ‘A Paradox of a Painted Face’, among ‘Poems attributed to Donne in MSS’. Also ascribed to James Shirley.

A shorter version, beginning ‘Nay pish, nay pew, nay faith, and will you, fie’, was first published, as ‘A Maids Denyall’, in Richard Chamberlain, The Harmony of the Muses (London, 1654) [apparently unique exemplum in the Huntington, edited in facsimile by Ernest W. Sullivan, II (Aldershot, 1990), pp. 49-50].

f. 44r-v

CwT 270: Thomas Carew, A flye that flew into my Mistris her eye (‘When this Flye liv'd, she us'd to play’)

Copy, headed ‘On a Flye in his Mis: her Eye’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 37-9. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in The Treasury of Musick, Book 2 (London, 1669).

ff. 56v-7r

KiH 55: Henry King, The Boy's answere to the Blackmore (‘Black Mayd, complayne not that I fly’)

Copy, headed ‘His Ansur’.

This MS recorded in Crum.

First published in The Academy of Complements (London, 1646). Poems (1657). Crum, p. 151. The text almost invariably preceded, in both printed and MS versions, by (variously headed) ‘A Blackmore Mayd wooing a faire Boy: sent to the Author by Mr. Hen. Rainolds’ (‘Stay, lovely Boy, why fly'st thou mee’). Musical settings by John Wilson in Henry Lawes, Select Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1669).

Add. MS 22583

A quarto volume of verse and dramatic works, in Latin and English, in three hands, one italic hand predominating, 102 leaves, in old calf (rebacked). Inscribed in pencil as poems by William Gager, of Christ Church, Oxford, and Chancellor of Ely. c.1590-early 17th century.

Later owned by The Rev. Philip Bliss (1787-1857), antiquary and book collector. Sotheby's, 21 August 1858 (Bliss sale), lot 122.

f. 95v

OxE 12: Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford, ‘Weare I a kinge I coulde commande content’

Copy, in a mixed hand, untitled.

Edited from this MS in May, Courtier Poets.

First published in John Mundy, Songs and Psalmes composed into 3. 4. and 5. parts (London, 1595). May, Poems, No. 16 (p. 37). May, Courtier Poets, p. 281. EV 28428.

Add. MS 22587

A quarto volume of state papers, in several hands, one small secretary hand predominating, 73 leaves, all now mounted on guards, in modern red half-morocco. c.1630.

f. 3r-v

RaW 860: Sir Walter Ralegh, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Ralegh to James I.

ff. 5r-7r

RaW 710.7: Sir Walter Ralegh, Short Apology for his last Actions at Guiana

Copy, headed ‘Sr walter Rawleighes short Apologye’.

Ralegh's letter of 1618 to his cousin George, Lord Carew of Clopton (beginning ‘Because I know not whether I shall live...’). First published in Judicious and Select Essays (London, 1650). Edwards, II, 375 et seq. Youings, No. 222, pp. 364-8.

ff. 8r-10v

RaW 861: Sir Walter Ralegh, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Ralegh, to Winwood.

ff. 11r-16r

RaW 680: Sir Walter Ralegh, Instructions to his Son and to Posterity

Copy of chapters I-IX, headed ‘Sir Walter Rawleigh to his sonne’.

This MS discussed and the accompanying letter edited in Agnes Latham, ‘Sir Walter Ralegh's Instructions to his Son’, in Elizabethan and Jacobean Studies Presented to Frank Percy Wilson (Oxford, 1969), pp. 199-218 (pp. 206-8). However, the letter is probably independent of the Instructions: see Fred B. Tromly, ‘Sir Walter Ralegh Instructs his Son, Twice’, N&Q, 254 (December 2009), 616-19.

A treatise in ten chapters, beginning ‘There is nothing more becoming any wise man than to make choice of friends...’. First published in London, 1632. Works (1829), VIII, 557-70. Edited by Louis B. Wright in Advice to a Son (Ithaca, 1962), pp. 15-32.

ff. 16v-17v

RaW 862: Sir Walter Ralegh, Letter(s)

Copy of two letters by Ralegh, to his son and to his wife, 1603.

f. 37r-v

RaW 863: Sir Walter Ralegh, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Ralegh, to Sir Robert Carr.

ff. 41r-4v

BcF 204.2: Francis Bacon, Essays or Counsels Civil and Moral

Extracts.

Ten Essayes first published in London, 1597. 38 Essaies published in London, 1612. 58 Essayes or Counsels, Civill and Morall published in London, 1625. Spedding, VI, 365-591. Edited by Michael Kiernan, The Oxford Francis Bacon, Vol. XV (Oxford, 2000).

Add. MS 22591

A square-shaped folio volume of antiquarian and state tracts, with a table of contents (ff. 374r-7v) and occasional engraved borders by John Sudbury and George Humble, 377 leaves, in modern half-morocco. In a single calligraphic hand, employing various scripts, a scribe identified or associated with one Henry Feilde. c.1640s.

Later owned by the Rev. Philip Bliss (1787-1857), antiquary and book collector. Sotheby's, 21 August 1858 (Bliss sale), lot 140.

This MS discussed in Van Strien.

ff. 30r-v

BcF 725: Francis Bacon, An explanation what manner of persons those should be, that are to execute the power or Ordinance of the King's Prerogative

Spedding, VI, 597-600; discussed 592-4

An essay beginning ‘That absolute prerogative according to the king's pleasure revealed by his laws...’. Spedding, VI, 597-600 (discussed pp. 592-4). Probably by Thomas Egerton, Lord Ellesmere.

ff. 115r-16r

CmW 73: William Camden, Of the Antiquity of Parliaments in England

Copy, headed in the margin ‘The Antiquity of parlyamts writte by Mr W: Camden’.

A tract beginning ‘That there were such like assemblies as parliaments now are, before the Romans arrival here...’. First published in Sir John Doddridge et al., The Several Opinions of Sundry Learned Antiquaries...touching...the High Court of Parliament in England (London, 1658). Hearne (1771), I, 303-6.

f. 217r

BcF 263: Francis Bacon, A Preparation for the Union of Laws

Copy of ‘Pleas of the Crowne Offices of Sh[e]riffs Escheators...written by ye right honoble ffrauncis lo: Verulam viscount st Albon at ye request of the Earle of northa:) when he was Sollicitor Ano Dom: 1608’, inscribed in the margin ‘cases of Highe Treason’.

A discourse beginning ‘Your Majesty's desire of proceeding towards the union of this whole island...’. First published in Cases of Treason (London, 1641). Spedding, VII, 731-43 (and see p. 775 et seq.).

ff. 220v-1v

BcF 729.5: Francis Bacon, Of the jurisdiction of Justices itinerant in the principality of Wales

Copy.

Spedding, VII, 778-81 (discussed pp. 773-4). An adaptation of part of Sir John Doddridge, History of the Principality of Wales, possibly used by Bacon and printed with works by him in Cases of Treason (London, 1641).

ff. 256r-7v

BcF 78: Francis Bacon, Answers to Questions touching the Office of Constables

Copy.

First published in Cases of Treason (London 1641). Spedding, VII, 745-54.

ff. 258r-65r, 268r-71r, 274r-9v

BcF 335: Francis Bacon, Speech(es)

Copies of nine speeches by Bacon, chiefly 1612-17, including his inaugural speech as Lord Chancellor, 7 May 1617.

ff. 265v-7r

BcF 75.1: Francis Bacon, Advice to the King touching Sutton's Estate

Copy.

Written c.January 1611/12. First published in Resuscitatio (London, 1657), pp. 265-70. Spedding, XI, 249-54.

ff. 290r-305v

NaR 3: Sir Robert Naunton, Fragmenta Regalia

Copy, with a title-page.

This MS recorded in Cerovski, p. 87.

Fragmenta Regalia (or, Observations on the late Q. Elizabeth, her Times and Favorites), first published in London, 1641. Edited by John S. Cerovski (Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington, D.C., etc., 1985).

ff. 306r-11r

WoH 268: Sir Henry Wotton, A Parallel between Robert Earl of Essex and George Duke of Buckingham

Copy.

First published in London, 1641. Edited by Sir Robert Egerton Brydges (Lee Priory Press, Ickham, 1814).

f. 315r-v

MrJ 32: John Marston, The Duke Return'd Againe. 1627 (‘And art returned again with all thy faults’)

Copy, quoted in a brief tract about Buckingham and the disastrous Isle de Rhé expedition.

ff. 320r-3v

FeO 76: Owen Felltham, A Brief Character of the Low-Countries

Copy, headed ‘Three Monthes Obseruations of ye lowe countryes especialy Holland’.

First published as Three Monethes observation of the low Countries especially Holland by a traveller whose name I know not more then by the two letters of J:S: at the bottome of the letter. Egipt this 22th of Jannuary (London, 1648). Expanded text printed as A brief Character of the Low-Countries under the States. Being three weeks observation of the Vices and Vertues of the Inhabitants... (for Henry Seile: London, 1652).

ff. 338r-45r

CtR 501: Sir Robert Cotton, Twenty-four Argvments, Whether it be more expedient to suppress Popish Practises against the due Allegeance of His Majesty, by the Strict Execution touching Jesuits and Seminary Preists? Or, to restraine them to Close Prisons, during life, if no Reformation follow?

Copy, headed ‘Consideracons ffor the Repressing of ye increase off preists Jesuites and Recusants without drawing of Bloode. Written by Sr Robt Cotton, Knight and Barronett’.

Tract beginning ‘I am not ignorant, that this latter age hath brought forth a swarm of busie heads...’, dated 11 August 1613. First published in two editions, as respectively Seriovs Considerations for Repressing of the Increase of Iesvites and A Treatise against Recusants (both London, 1641). Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [109]-159.

Add. MS 22601

A duodecimo miscellany of verse and some prose, in one or possibly two hands, in varying secretary and italic scripts, 107 leaves, in modern half-morocco. Compiled by someone probably connected with the Royal Court. c.1605.

Owned in 1845 by James Orchard Halliwell[-Phillipps] (1820-89), with his inscription ‘of Andrews Bristol 1845 at the enormous Price of 6.6.0’. Later owned by the Rev. Philip Bliss (1787-1857), antiquary and book collector. Bliss sale, 21 August 1858, lot 189.

f. 17v

RaW 864: Sir Walter Ralegh, Letter(s)

Copy of one or more letters by Ralegh.

ff. 40r-3r

DaJ 113: Sir John Davies, Verses given to the Lord Treasuer upon Newyeares Day upon a Dosen of Trenchers, by Mr. Davis (‘Longe have I servd in Court, yet learned not all this while’)

Copy of a series of twelve poems, no general heading.

Edited from this MS in Krueger. Collated in Doughtie, pp. 597-601.

First published as ‘Yet other 12. Wonders of the World never yet published’ in Francis Davison, A Poetical Rhapsody (London, 1608). Doughtie, Lyrics from English Airs, pp. 381-4. Krueger, pp. 225-8.

ff. 49r-51r

DaJ 292: Sir John Davies, An Entertainment at Harefield

Copy of 38 lots, headed ‘A lottery proposed before supper at ye Lo: Chief Justice his house in ye First Entrance: to hir Matie, Ladies, Gentlewomen & Straugers’, dated in the margin ‘1602’.

Edited from this MS in James Orchard Halliwell, ‘Poetical Miscellanies from a Manuscript Collection of the time of James I’, Percy Society (London, 1845), (pp. 5-10). Collated and lots 35-9 edited in Krueger, pp. 207-14.

The fullest text of what are taken to be the extant portions of the Entertainment at Harefield, 31 July-2 August 1602, is edited in The Complete Works of John Lyly, ed. R. Warwick Bond (Oxford, 1902), I, 491-504, where it is suggested that probably the prose and the Mariner's song were written by Lyly and the rest chiefly by Davies (see I, 534-5). Krueger, following Grosart, accepts the prose too as Davies's (see Krueger, pp. 409-11). It is argued that ‘Davies probably wrote all of the Harefield entertainment’ in Gabriel Heaton, Writing and Reading Royal Entertainments (Oxford, 2010), pp. 100-16.

f. 60v

HrJ 80: Sir John Harington, How England may be reformed (‘Men say that England late is bankrout grown’)

Copy, untitled and here beginning ‘England, men say of late, is bankrupte growne’.

Printed from this MS in James Orchard Halliwell, ‘Poetical Miscellanies from a Manuscript Collection of the time of James I’, Percy Society (London, 1845), p. 37.

Not published before the 19th century (?). Quoted at the end of the Tract on the Succession to the Crown (see HrJ 333-5). McClure No. 375, p. 301. Kilroy, Book I, No. 1, p. 186.

ff. 60v-1r

HrJ 306: Sir John Harington, A Tragicall Epigram (‘When doome of Peeres & Iudges fore-appointed’)

Copy, untitled and here beginning ‘When doome of death by iudgmts force appointed’.

Printed from this MS in James Orchard Halliwell, Poetical Miscellanies from a Manuscript Collection of the time of James I, Percy Society (London, 1845), p. 38.

First published in 1615. 1618, Book IV, No. 82. McClure No. 336, pp. 280-1. Kilroy, Book III, No. 44, p. 185. This epigram is also quoted in the Tract on the Succession to the Crown (see HrJ 333-5).

f. 63v

RaW 497.8: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Water thy plants with grace devine, and hope to live for aye’

Copy of the 20-line version.

Edited from this MS in Halliwell and in Rudick, p. 187.

A version first published as the first two stanzas in a twenty-line poem edited in Poetical Miscellanies from a Manuscript Collection of the Time of James I, ed. James Orchard Halliwell, Percty Society 15 (1845). The long version in Rudick, p. 187. The two-stanza version (conflated to four lines) in Rudick, No. 58, p. 137.

ff. 66r-70v

DaJ 285: Sir John Davies, A Contention betwen a Wife, a Widowe and a Maide for Precedence at an Offringe (‘Widow well met, whether goe you to daye?’)

Copy of an early version, irregularly arranged, headed ‘A Dialogue betwene the Mayde, the Wife, & the Widow for the defence of their Estates’.

This MS collated in Krueger.

First published in Francis Davison, A Poetical Rhapsody (London, 1608). Krueger, pp. 216-24.

f. 71r

RaW 3: Sir Walter Ralegh, The Advice (‘Many desire, but few or none deserve’)

Copy, headed ‘To A. Vaua’.

This MS recorded in Latham, p. 110.

First published in Le Prince d'Amour (London, 1660). Latham, pp. 14-15. Rudick, No. 18, pp. 27-8.

f. 71v

SoR 212: Robert Southwell, S.J., Catholic Saint, Scorne not the least (‘Where wards are weake, and foes encountring strong’)

Copy of lines 1-18.

This MS recorded in Brown, p. 152. See also SoR 241.

First published in Saint Peters Complaint, 1st edition (London, 1595). Brown, pp. 69-70.

f. 71v

SoR 241: Robert Southwell, S.J., Catholic Saint, Time goe by turnes (‘The lopped tree in time may grow againe’)

Copy of lines 7-12, untitled, beginning ‘The sea of fortune doth not ever flowe’, added as the concluding stanza to a copy of the first three stanzas of Scorne not the least (SoR 212).

This MS recorded in Brown, p. 146.

First published in Saint Peters Complaint, 1st edition (London, 1595). Brown, pp. 57-8.

ff. 104r-6r

RaW 434: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Now what is Loue, I praie thee tell’

Copy of a version in 19 stanzas.

This MS collated, and the additional stanzas printed, in Doughtie, pp. 504-10; recorded in Latham.

First published in The Phoenix Nest (London, 1593). The first and last stanzas were a song in Thomas Heywood, The Rape of Lucrece (London, 1608). Listed but not printed in Latham, p. 171. Edited in Doughtie, Lyrics from English Airs, pp. 156-7. Ralegh's possible authorship also discussed and largely supported in Walter Oakeshott, The Queen and the Poet (London, 1960), p. 161; in Lefranc (1968), pp. 78-9, 83; and in Michael West, ‘Raleigh's disputed Authorship of “A Description of Loue”’, ELN, 10 (1972-3), 92-9.

ff. 106r-7v

HoJ 322: John Hoskyns, John Hoskins to the Lady Jacob (‘Oh loue whose powre & might non euer yet wthstood’)

Copy, headed ‘Exprience & examples dailie proue that my man can be well aduised & loue’.

This MS cited in Osborn.

Osborn, p. 301.

Add. MS 22602

A duodecimo verse miscellany, in generally small mixed hands, ii + 40 leaves, in 19th-century embossed black leather. c.1640s.

Later owned by Thomas Rodd (1796-1849), bookseller; by Richard Heber (1774-1833), book collector; and by the Rev. Philip Bliss (1787-1857), antiquary and book collector. Sotheby's, 21 August 1858 (Bliss sale), lot 190.

ff. 1r-2v

EaJ 39: John Earle, Bishop of Worcester and Salisbury, In Cladem Rhenensem (‘Thus sick men feare their Cure, and startle move’)

Copy, subscribed ‘mr Earles. Merton’.

Unpublished. Discussed, and Earles's authorship rejected, in James Doelman, ‘John Earle's Funeral Elegy on Sir John Burroughs’, English Literary Renaissance, 41/3 (Autumn 2011), 485-502 (pp. 496-7).

f. 2v

JnB 453: Ben Jonson, Song. To Celia (‘Drinke to me, onely, with thine eyes’)

This MS collated in Herford & Simpson.

First published in The Forrest (ix) in Workes (London, 1616). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 106.

ff. 3r-5v

RnT 47: Thomas Randolph, A complaint against Cupid that he never made him in Love (‘How many of thy Captives (Love) complaine’)

Copy, headed ‘A Complaint of Cupid’.

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 35-40.

f. 6r-v

RnT 73: Thomas Randolph, A Dialogue. Thirsis. Lalage (‘My Lalage when I behold’)

Copy, headed ‘A Dialogue betweene Thyrsis & Lalage’, subscribed ‘T. Randolph’.

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 84-5.

f. 7r-v

RnT 91: Thomas Randolph, An Elegie (‘Heav'n knowes my Love to thee, fed on desires’)

Copy, headed ‘To his Mrs incensed vpon a Mistake’, subscribed ‘T. Randolph’.

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 95-6.

f. 7v

RnT 117: Thomas Randolph, An Epitaph upon his honour'd freind Mr. Warre (‘Here lyes the knowing head, the honest heart’)

Copy, headed ‘On Mr. Warre’, subscribed ‘Idem’ [i.e. T. Randolph].

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, p. 56.

f. 8r

KiH 118: Henry King, The Defence (‘Why slightest thou what I approve?’)

Copy, headed ‘A Louer to one dispraising his mistresse’.

This MS recorded in Crum.

First published in The Academy of Complements (London, 1646). Poems (1657). Crum, pp. 145-6.

f. 8v

StW 221: William Strode, A Letter impos'd (‘Goe, happy paper, by commande’)

Copy, headed ‘A letter to his Mistresse’, subscribed ‘T. Randall’.

Edited from this MS in Parry.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656). Dobell, pp. 100-1. The Poems and Amyntas of Thomas Randolph, ed. John Jay Parry (New Haven & London, 1917), pp. 219-20. Forey, pp. 32-3.

f. 9r-v

CoR 330: Richard Corbett, A letter sent from Doctor Corbet to Master Ailesbury, Decem. 9. 1618 (‘My Brother and much more had'st thou bin mine’)

First published in Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 63-5.

f. 10r

CoR 264: Richard Corbett, In Quendam Anniversariorum Scriptorem (‘Even soe dead Hector thrice was triumph'd on’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon Dr Price his Anniursary’, subscribed ‘Dr Corbett’.

First published in Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 8-9.

The poem is usually followed in MSS by Dr Daniel Price's ‘Answer’ (‘So to dead Hector boyes may doe disgrace’), and see also CoR 227-46.

f. 10v

CoR 609: Richard Corbett, To the Ladyes of the New Dresse (‘Ladyes that weare black cypresse vailes’)

Copy, headed ‘On Ladies Veiles’, subscried ‘Dr Corbet’.

First published in Witts Recreations (London, 1640). Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, p. 90.

This poem is usually followed in MSS by ‘The Ladyes Answer’ (‘Blacke Cypresse vailes are shrouds of night’): see GrJ 14.

ff. 10v-11r

GrJ 25: John Grange, ‘Black cypress veils are shrouds of night’

Copy, headed ‘The Answer’.

An ‘Answer’ to Corbett's ‘To the Ladyes of the New Dresse’ (CoR 595-629), first published in Witts Recreations (London, 1640). The Poems of Richard Corbett, ed. J.A.W. Bennett and H.R. Trevor-Roper (Oxford, 1955), p. 91. Listed as by John Grange in Krueger.

f. 11r

StW 659: William Strode, An Opposite to Melancholy (‘Returne my joyes, and hither bring’)

Copy, subscribed ‘W Stroad’.

First published in Wit Restor'd (London, 1658). Dobell, p. 15. Forey, pp. 103-5.

ff. 11v-12r

RnT 98: Thomas Randolph, An Elegie (‘Love, give me leave to serve thee, and be wise’)

Copy, headed ‘On his Chast Mistresse’, subscribed ‘T. Randall’.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 66-7.

ff. 12v-13r

RnT 129: Thomas Randolph, A gratulatory to Mr. Ben. Johnson for his adopting of him to be his Son (‘I was not borne to Helicon, nor dare’)

Copy, headed ‘T. Randall to his Adopted father Ben. Johnson’.

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury, pp. 177-8.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 40-2.

f. 13v

StW 138: William Strode, For a Gentleman who kissing his frinde, at his departure out of England, left a Signe of blood upon her (‘What Mystery was this, that I should finde’)

Copy, headed ‘On a Gentleman yt kissing his Mrs at his departure from England, left blood vpon her’.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656). Dobell, pp. 32-3. Forey, pp. 22-3.

ff. 14v-15r

CaW 24: William Cartwright, On a Gentlewomans Silk-hood (‘Is there a Sanctity in Love begun’)

Copy, headed ‘On Gentlewomeans black hoods’, subscribed ‘T. Cartwright’.

This MS collated in Evans.

First published in Works (1651), pp. 232-4. Evans, pp. 483-4.

f. 15v

WaE 92: Edmund Waller, ‘Go, lovely Rose’

Copy, headed ‘To a Gentlewoman with a Rose’, subscribed ‘Ed. Waller’.

First published, as ‘On the Rose’, in Wits Recreations (London, 1645). Workes (1645). Thorn-Drury, I, 128. Setting by Henry Lawes published in The Second Book of Ayres, and Dialogues (London, 1655).

f. 16r

WaE 369: Edmund Waller, On the Head of a Stag (‘So we some antique hero's strength’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon a Staggs Horns’, subscribed ‘Ed Waller’.

First published in Workes (1645). Thorn-Drury, I, 110.

f. 16v

StW 1137: William Strode, To his Sister (‘Lovinge Sister, every line’)

Copy, as by ‘W. Stroad’.

This MS recorded in Forey, p. 330.

First published in Wit Restor'd (London, 1658). Dobell, p. 88. Forey, p. 198.

f. 17r

CwT 1203: Thomas Carew, Vpon a Ribband (‘This silken wreath, which circles in mine arme’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon a Ribbond giuen him by his Mistresse’.

This MS recorded in Powell, p. 293.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 29.

f. 17v

PoW 104: Walton Poole, To a Ladie which desired him to make her a copy of verses (‘Faire Madam, cast these diamonds away’)

Copy, headed ‘To a lady upon ye Jewells in her Eare’.

First published, as anonymous, in Henry Huth, Inedited Poetical Miscellanies (1870).

f. 19r

DyE 79: Sir Edward Dyer, ‘The lowest trees haue topps, the ante her gall’

Copy, headed ‘A Louer’.

This MS text collated in Sargent.

First published in A Poetical Rapsody (London, 1602). Sargent, No. XII, p. 197. May, Courtier Poets, p. 307. EV 23336.

f. 19v

PeW 224: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, A Paradox in praise of a painted Woman (‘Not kiss? by Love I must, and make impression’)

Copy of a short version, headed ‘A Gentlewoman, while a Gentleman Courted her’ and here beginning ‘Nay pish, nay pew, in faith but will you? fye’.

Poems (1660), pp. 93-5, superscribed ‘P.’. First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656), p. 97. Listed in Krueger's Appendix I: ‘Spurious Poems in the 1660 Edition’ as possibly by William Baker. The Poems of John Donne, ed Herbert J.C. Grierson, 2 vols (Oxford, 1912), I, 456-9, as ‘A Paradox of a Painted Face’, among ‘Poems attributed to Donne in MSS’. Also ascribed to James Shirley.

A shorter version, beginning ‘Nay pish, nay pew, nay faith, and will you, fie’, was first published, as ‘A Maids Denyall’, in Richard Chamberlain, The Harmony of the Muses (London, 1654) [apparently unique exemplum in the Huntington, edited in facsimile by Ernest W. Sullivan, II (Aldershot, 1990), pp. 49-50].

ff. 20v-1v

EaJ 49: John Earle, Bishop of Worcester and Salisbury, On the Earle of Pembroke's Death (‘Did not my sorrows sighd into a verse’)

Copy, headed ‘On ye death of Will: Earle of Pembroke Ann. 1630’, subscribed ‘J. Earles’.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656), pp. 40-2. Extract in Bliss, pp. 227-8. Possibly written by Jasper Mayne (1604-72).

ff. 21v-2r

MoG 89: George Morley, Upon the drinking in a Crown of a Hatt (‘Well fare those three that where there was a dearth’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon drinking in ye Crowne of a Hatt’.

ff. 22r-4r

RnT 194: Thomas Randolph, On Importunate Dunnes (‘Poxe take you all, from you my sorrowes swell’)

Copy, headed ‘T. Randolph to his Creditors. Or The Cambridge dunn’.

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Poems, 2nd edition (1640). Thorn-Drury, pp. 131-4.

ff. 26v-7r

CaW 39: William Cartwright, On the Imperfections of Christ-Church Buildings (‘Arise thou Sacred Heap, and shew a Frame’)

First published in Works (1651), pp. 188-9. Evans, pp. 445-7.

ff. 27v-8r

CaW 11: William Cartwright, A Continuation of the same to the Prince of Wales (‘But turn we hence to you, as some there be’)

Copy, headed To ye most Hopefull Charles Prince of Wales and here beginning ‘But turne wee now to You, as some there bee’.

This MS collated in Evans.

First published in Works (1651), pp. 190-1. Evans, pp. 447-8.

f. 29r

CwT 1280: Thomas Carew, Of his Mistresse (‘I will not Saint my Coelia, for shee’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Dunlap.

First published, as ‘To Clarinda: On Her Perfection’, in Thomas Jordan, Claraphil and Clarinda: In a Forrest of Fancies (1650?), sig. B1r-v. Dunlap (1949), p. 193.

f. 30v

RaW 327: Sir Walter Ralegh, Sir Walter Ralegh to the Queen (‘Our Passions are most like to Floods and streames’)

Copy, headed ‘Sr. Walter Ralegh to ye Queen’, prefixed to “Wrong not, deare Empresse of my Heart” (see RaW 511).

Edited from this MS in Latham and in Rudick, No. 39A, pp. 106-8. Recorded in Gullans.

First published, prefixed to “Wrong not, deare Empresse of my Heart” (see RaW 500-42) and headed ‘To his Mistresse by Sir Walter Raleigh’, in Wits Interpreter (London, 1655). Edited in this form in Latham, p. 18. Rudick, No 39A, p. 106.

For a discussion of the authorship and different texts of this poem, see Charles B. Gullans, ‘Raleigh and Ayton: the disputed authorship of “Wrong not sweete empresse of my heart”’, SB, 13 (1960), 191-8, reprinted in The English and Latin Poems of Sir Robert Ayton, ed. Gullans, STS, 4th Ser. 1 (Edinburgh & London, 1963), pp. 318-26.

ff. 30v-1r

RaW 511: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Wrong not, deare Empresse of my Heart’

Copy, prefixed by ‘Our Passions are most like to Floods and streames’ (RaW 327).

Printed from this MS in Latham; collated in Gullans.

First published in Wits Interpreter (London, 1655), printed twice, the first version prefixed by ‘Our Passions are most like to Floods and streames’ (see RaW 320-38) and headed ‘To his Mistresse by Sir Walter Raleigh’. Edited with the prefixed stanza in Latham, pp. 18-19. Edited in The English and Latin Poems of Sir Robert Ayton, ed. Charles B. Gullans, STS, 4th Ser. 1 (Edinburgh & London, 1963), pp. 197-8. Rudick, Nos 39A and 39B (two versions, pp. 106-9).

This poem was probably written by Sir Robert Ayton. For a discussion of the authorship and the different texts see Gullans, pp. 318-26 (also printed in SB, 13 (1960), 191-8).

f. 32r

HrG 301: George Herbert, To the Right Hon. the L. Chancellor (Bacon) (‘My Lord. A diamond to mee you sent’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Hutchinson.

First published, ‘from a small quarto volume of MS. Latin poetry’, in J. Fry, Bibliographical Memoranda (Bristol, 1816). Hutchinson, p. 209. The authorship discussed in Fram Dinshaw, ‘A Lost MS. of George Herbert's Occasional Verse and the Authorship of “To the L. Chancellor”’, N&Q, 228 (October 1983), 423-5.

f. 32r

HrG 304: George Herbert, Aethiopissa ambit Cestum Diuersi Coloris Virum (‘Qvid mihi si facies nigra est? hoc, Ceste, colore’)

Copy, subscribed G. Herbert.

This MS collated in Hutchinson.

First published in James Duport, Ecclesiastes Solomonis (Cambridge, 1662). Hutchinson, p. 437. McCloskey & Murphy, with a translation, pp. 170-1.

f. 32v

DaW 14: Sir William Davenant, For the Lady, Olivia Porter. A present, upon a New-yeares day (‘Goe! hunt the whiter Ermine! and present’)

Copy, headed ‘On Newyeeres day for Mrs Porter’, subscribed ‘W. Dauenant’.

This MS collated in Gibbs.

First published in Madagascar (London, 1638). Gibbs, p. 43.

f. 33r-v

CoR 764: Richard Corbett, To the Bell-Founder of Great Tom of Christ-Church in Oxford (‘Thou that by ruine doest repaire’)

Copy, headed ‘To Brontes &c: Bell-Founder’, subscribed ‘D. Corbett’.

This MS recorded in Bennett & Trevor-Roper, p. 165.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 98-100.

f. 34v

WaE 523: Edmund Waller, To Amoret (‘Amoret! the Milky Way’)

Copy.

First published in Workes (1645). Thorn-Drury, I, 83.

f. 35r

WaE 293: Edmund Waller, Of the Marriage of the Dwarfs (‘Design, or chance, makes others wive’)

Copy, here beginning ‘The Signe or Chance makes Others wiue’.

First published, as ‘On the two Dwarfs that were marryed at Court, not long before Shrovetide’, in Wits Recreations (London, 1645). Workes (1645). Thorn-Drury, I, 92.

f. 36r

ClJ 181: John Cleveland, Epitaph on the Earl of Strafford (‘Here lies Wise and Valiant Dust’)

Copy, headed ‘On the Earle of Strafford. 1641’.

First published in Character (1647). Edited in CSPD, 1640-1641 (1882), p. 574. Berdan, p. 184, as ‘Internally unlike his manner’. Morris & Withington, p. 66, among ‘Poems probably by Cleveland’. The attribution to Cleveland is dubious. The epitaph is also attributed to Clement Paman: see Poetry and Revolution: An Anthology of British and Irish Verse 1625-1660, ed. Peter Davidson (Oxford, 1998), notes to No. 275 (p. 363).

f. 36v

DaJ 118: Sir John Davies, Verses given to the Lord Treasuer upon Newyeares Day upon a Dosen of Trenchers, by Mr. Davis (‘Longe have I servd in Court, yet learned not all this while’)

Copy of poem 2 (‘The Divine’), headed ‘A Parson to his diocese heart’ and beginning ‘My calling is divine’.

First published as ‘Yet other 12. Wonders of the World never yet published’ in Francis Davison, A Poetical Rhapsody (London, 1608). Doughtie, Lyrics from English Airs, pp. 381-4. Krueger, pp. 225-8.

ff. 37r-40r

RnT 274: Thomas Randolph, A Pastorall Courtship (‘Behold these woods, and mark my Sweet’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Thorn-Drury. Collated in Davis.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 109-15. Davis, pp. 77-91.

Add. MS 22603

An octavo verse miscellany, in a single neat predominantly italic hand, 72 leaves, in old leather. Probably compiled by one ‘H.S.’, a Cambridge man. c.1640s-50s.

Later owned by the Rev. Philip Bliss (1787-1857), antiquary and book collector, with his bookplate and inscription ‘1806 Purchased of Lansdown of Bristol’. Bliss sale, 21 August 1858, lot 192.

f. 2r

WaE 245: Edmund Waller, Of My Lady Isabella, Playing on the Lute (‘Such moving sounds from such a careless touch!’)

Copy, headed ‘On the Lady Thinne playing on the Lute’.

First published in Workes (1645). Thorn-Drury, I, 90.

ff. 7v-8r

BmF 120: Francis Beaumont, On Madam Fowler desiring a sonnet to be writ on her (‘Good Madam Fowler, do not trouble me’)

Copy, headed ‘On Mrs. Fowler’.

First published in Alexander B. Grosart, ‘Literary Finds in Trinity College, Dublin, and Elsewhere’, ES, 26 (1899), 1-19 (p. 8).

ff. 8v-9r

StW 788: William Strode, Song (‘I saw faire Cloris walke alone’)

Copy, headed ‘On a Gentlewoman walkinge in ye snow’.

First published in Walter Porter, Madrigales and Ayres (London, 1632). Dobell, p. 41. Forey, pp. 76-7. The poem also discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Notes on some Poems attributed to William Strode’, PQ, 34 (1955), 444-8 (pp. 445-6), and see Mary Hobbs, ‘Early Seventeenth-Century Verse Miscellanies and Their Value for Textual Editors’, EMS, 1 (1989), 182-210 (pp. 199, 209).

ff. 9v-10v

RnT 221: Thomas Randolph, On the Fall of the Mitre Tavern in Cambridge (‘Lament, lament, ye Scholars all’)

This MS in the same hand as RnT 220.

This MS recorded in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Wit & Drollery (London, 1656), p. 68. Thorn-Drury, pp. 160-2.

ff. 10v-11r

HoJ 205: John Hoskyns, On Dreames (‘You nimble dreames wth cob webb winges’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Osborn.

Osborn, No. XXI (p. 189).

ff. 11r-12r

CoA 136: Abraham Cowley, A Poeticall Revenge (‘Westminster-Hall a friend and I agree’)

Copy.

First published, in Sylva, in Poeticall Blossomes, 2nd edition (London, 1636). Waller, II, 50-2. Sparrow, pp. 12-13. Collected Works, I, pp. 74-5.

ff. 12r-13r

KiH 418: Henry King, Madam Gabrina, Or the Ill-favourd Choice (‘I have oft wondred, why thou didst elect’)

Copy, headed ‘On one that got him an vgly wife’.

This MS recorded in Crum.

First published in Poems (1657). Crum, pp. 144-5.

ff. 13r-14v

CoA 194: Abraham Cowley, A Vote (‘Lest the misconstring world should chance to say’)

Copy.

First published, in Sylva, in Poeticall Blossomes, 2nd edition (London, 1636). Waller, II, 48-50. Sparrow, pp. 9-12. Stanzas 9-11 (beginning ‘This only grant me, that my means may lye’) reprinted in the essay ‘Of My self’, among Several Discourses by way of Essays, in Verse and Prose, in Works (London, 1668). Waller, II, 456-7. Collected Works, I, pp. 70-1.

ff. 16r-v

LoR 32: Richard Lovelace, To Althea, From Prison. Song (‘When Love with unconfined wings’)

Copy, headed ‘His beinge in Prison’; the text followed (ff. 16v-17r) by ‘The Answer’ (beginning ‘When Cynthia's wrapt within my arms’).

Edited from this MS (with the ‘Answer’) in Wilkinson, I, 51-2. Collated in Clayton.

First published in Lucasta (London, 1649). Wilkinson (1925), II, 70-1. (1930), pp. 78-9. Thomas Clayton, ‘Some Versions, Texts, and Readings of “To Althea, from Prison”’, PBSA, 68 (1974), 225-35. A musical setting by John Wilson published in Select Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1659).

ff. 18r-19r

CoA 124: Abraham Cowley, On his Majesties returne out of Scotland (‘Great Charles: there stop you Trumpeters of Fame’)

Copy.

First published in Sylva in Poeticall Blossomes, 2nd edition (London, 1636). Waller, II, 46-7. Collected Works, I, pp. 68-9.

ff. 19r-20r

CoA 64: Abraham Cowley, An Elegie on the Death of John Littleton Esquire (‘And must these waters smile againe? and play’)

Copy, headed ‘On the death of Jo. Littleton Esqr who was drowned leapinge into ye water to saue his Brother. 1636’.

First published, in Sylva, in Poeticall Blossomes, 2nd edition (London, 1636). Waller, II, 55-6. Collected Works, I, pp. 78-80.

f. 25r-v

LoR 14: Richard Lovelace, The Scrutinie. Song (‘Why should you sweare I am forsworn’)

Copy, headed ‘The Mutable Louer’; this MS in the same hand as LoR 13. The text is followed (ff. 25v-6) by ‘The Reply’ (beginning ‘Yes, yes, I say you are foresworne’).

First published in Lucasta (London, 1649). Wilkinson (1925), II, 24. (1930), pp. 26-7. A musical setting by Thomas Charles published in Select Musicall Ayres, and Dialogues (London, 1652).

ff. 27v-9r

MyJ 15: Jasper Mayne, On Mris Anne King's Tablebook of Pictures (‘Mine eyes were once blessed with the sight’)

Copy, headed ‘On Ms Anne King's Tablebooke of Pictures: by Ja. Mayne’.

Unpublished?

ff. 30v-2r

HeR 362: Robert Herrick, Mr Robert Hericke his farwell vnto Poetrie (‘I have behelde two louers in a night’)

Copy, headed ‘Herickes Farewell to Poetrie’.

This MS collated in Martin and in Patrick.

First published in Hazlitt (1869), II, 439-42. Martin, pp. 410-12. Patrick, pp. 543-5.

f. 32v

HrJ 37: Sir John Harington, Against Swearing (‘In elder times an ancient custome was’)

Copy, headed ‘On Swearinge’.

First published in Henry Fitzsimon, S.J., The Justification and Exposition of the Divine Sacrifice of the Masse (Douai, 1611). 1615. 1618, Book IV, No. 9. McClure No. 263, p. 256. Kilroy, Book IV, No. 30, p. 220.

ff. 37r-8v

HeR 269: Robert Herrick, The Welcome to Sack (‘So soft streams meet, so springs with gladder smiles’)

Copy, headed ‘The time expired, he Welcomes his Mrs (Sacke) as followeth’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 77-9. Patrick, pp. 110-12.

ff. 39v-41r

CoR 355: Richard Corbett, A letter To the Duke of Buckingham, being with the Prince of Spaine (‘I've read of Ilands floating, and remov'd’)

Copy, headed ‘Dr Corbets lr to ye D. of Buck: beinge in Spaine’.

Edited from this MS in online Early Stuart Libels.

First published in Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 76-9.

ff. 41v-3r

HeR 202: Robert Herrick, The parting Verse, or charge to his supposed Wife when he travelled (‘Go hence, and with this parting kisse’)

Copy, headed ‘Mr Herickes Charge to his Wife’ and here beginning ‘Goe and wth this partinge Kisse’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 174-6. Patrick, pp. 233-5.

f. 43r

PeW 273: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, A Song (‘Draw not too near’)

Copy, headed ‘Cloras Epitaph’.

This MS recorded in Krueger.

Poems (1660), pp. 116-17, superscribed ‘P.’. Listed in Krueger's Appendix I: ‘Spurious Poems in the 1660 Edition’ as possibly by Strode. Authorship unknown.

ff. 43v-5v

CoR 36: Richard Corbett, A Certaine Poeme As it was presented in Latine by Divines and Others, before his Maiestye in Cambridge (‘It is not yet a fortnight, since’)

Copy, headed ‘A graue Poeme...’ [&c.].

First published in Poëtica Stromata ([no place], 1648). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 12-18.

Some texts accompanied by an ‘Answer’ (‘A ballad late was made’).

f. 49r-v

JnB 281: Ben Jonson, The Houre-glasse (‘Doe but consider this small dust’)

Copy, headed ‘On an houre-glasse’, subscribed ‘B. J.’

This MS collated in Herford & Simpson.

First published in John Benson's 4to edition of Jonson's poems (1640) and in The Vnder-wood (viii) in Workes (London, 1640). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 148-9.

ff. 49v-50r

KiH 197: Henry King, An Elegy Upon S.W.R. (‘I will not weep. For 'twere as great a Sinne’)

Copy, headed ‘On ye Death of Sr W. Rauley.’

This MS recorded in Crum.

First published in Poems (1657). Crum, p. 66.

f. 50r

HrJ 193.5: Sir John Harington, Of a pregnant pure sister (‘I learned a tale more fitt to be forgotten’)

Copy of a version headed ‘On a Puritan’ and beginning ‘A Puritan of late, and eke a holy Sister’, imperfect.

First published (13-line version) in The Epigrams of Sir John Harington, ed. N.E. McClure (Philadelphia, 1926), but see HrJ 197. McClure (1930), No. 413, p. 315. Kilroy, Book IV, No. 80, p. 239.

f. 50v

PeW 3: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, ‘Disdain me still, that I may ever love’

Copy, headed ‘Loues Constancie’, subscribed ‘J. D.’

This MS recorded in Krueger.

ff. 52v-3r

HrJ 174: Sir John Harington, Of a Precise Tayler (‘A Taylor, thought a man of vpright dealling’)

Copy, headed ‘A reformed Taylor’.

First published in 1618, Book I, No. 20. McClure No. 21, pp. 156-7. Kilroy, Book I, No. 40, pp. 107-8.

ff. 57v-8r

HeR 10: Robert Herrick, The admonition (‘Seest thou those Diamonds which she weares’)

Copy, headed ‘A Songe’ and here beginning ‘Seest thou those Jewells wc she weares’.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 130-1. Patrick, p. 177.

f. 58v

CmT 154: Thomas Campion, ‘When to her lute Corrina sings’

Copy of lines 1-2, 5-6, headed ‘Of Corrina her Lute’.

This MS recorded in Davis, p. 492.

First published in A Booke of Ayres (London, 1601), No. vi. Davis, pp. 28-9.

ff. 59r-61r

HeR 193: Robert Herrick, Oberons Palace (‘Full as a Bee with Thyme, and Red’)

Copy, headed ‘King Oberons his Pallace’ and without the preliminary lines, subscribed ‘Hericke’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, with eight preliminary lines beginning ‘After the Feast (my Shapcot) see’, in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 165-8. Patrick, pp. 222-5.

ff. 61r-2r

HeR 184: Robert Herrick, Oberons Feast (‘A Little mushroome table spred’)

Copy, headed ‘King Oberons his feast’ and without the preliminary lines, subscribed ‘Herricke’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published complete, with six preliminary lines beginning ‘Shapcot! To thee the Fairy State’, in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 119-20. Patrick, pp. 161-3. An earlier version, entitled ‘A Description of his Dyet’, published in A Description of the King and Queene of Fayries (London, 1634). Martin, pp. 454-5.

ff. 62r-3r

HeR 345: Robert Herrick, King Oberon his Cloathing (‘When the monethly horned Queene’)

Copy, headed ‘K. Oberons his Apparrell’, subscribed ‘Sr Edmond Steward’.

This MS collated in Farmer.

First published, as ‘A Description of the King of Fayries Clothes’ and attributed to Sir Simeon Steward, in A Description of the King and Queene of Fayries (London, 1634). Musarum Deliciae (London, 1656), p. 32. Attributed to Herrick in Hazlitt, II, 473-7, and in Norman K. Farmer, Jr., ‘Robert Herrick and “King Oberon's Clothing”: New Evidence for Attribution’, Yearbook of English Studies 1 (1971), 68-77. Not included in Martin or in Patrick. See also T.G.S. Cain, ‘Robert Herrick, Mildmay Fane, and Sir Simeon Steward’, ELR, 15 (1985), 312-17.

f. 64v

WrM 36: Lady Mary Wroth, To Pamphilla from the father-in-law of Seralius (‘Hermophradite in show, in deed a monster’)

Copy.

Twenty-six lines of verse by Lord Denny fiercely attacking Wroth's published romance and prompting her verse retaliation (WrM 4). First published in Josephine A. Roberts, ‘An Unpublished Literary Quarrel concerning the Suppression of Mary Wroth's “Urania” (1621)’, N&Q, 222 (December 1977), 532-5.

f. 69v

BrW 239: William Browne of Tavistock, A Round (‘Now that the Spring hath fill'd our veins’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Brydges (1815), pp. 8-9. Goodwin, II, 213-14.

f. 70v

CrR 282: Richard Crashaw, Vpon the Death of a Gentleman (‘Faithlesse and fond Mortality’)

Copy of lines 1-30, headed ‘An Elegie on a Scholler’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 166-7.

Add. MS 22606

Autograph calligraphic MS, on rectos only, 69 leaves (46 x 72 mm.), in contemporary calf gilt (rebound). A presentation MS to Walter Balcanquall (1586-1645), Master of the Savoy, London, and later Dean of Rochester and of Durham, with a prose Dedication to him in English, in a small Roman script throughout, with some decoration. 27 June 1617.

*InE 53: Esther Inglis, [Quatrains de Pybrac] Les six vingts et six quatrains de Guy de Faur, Sieur de Pybrac, escrits par Esther Inglis ce xxvii de Juin, 1617

Later owned by Archer Ryland (1814); by the Rev. Philip Bliss (1787-1857), antiquary and book collector. Sotheby's, 21 August 1858 (Bliss sale), lot 201.

Scott-Elliot & Yeo, No. 51 (pp. 78-9).

Quatrains in French by Guy du Faur, Sieur de Pybrac (1529-84), first published in 1576.

Add. MS 22608

A quarto miscellany of extracts from plays and historical works, with comments on them, entitled ‘Excerpta quædam per A. W. Adolescentem’, in a single cursive predominantly italic hand, 119 leaves, in modern quarter-morocco. Entirely in the hand of the Rev. Abraham Wright (1611-90), of St John's College, Oxford, author. c.1640.

Inscribed (f. 1r) ‘Ja: Wright’ (Abraham's son) and later ‘of Taylor, Brighton’. Bookplate of William Bromley, of Baginton, Warwickshire, 1703. Later owned by the Rev. Philip Bliss (1787-1857), antiquary and book collector. Sotheby's, 21 August 1858 (Bliss sale), lot 220.

For facsimile examples, see ShW 71 and ShW 44.

ff. 31r-6v

BcF 215.8: Francis Bacon, The History of the Reign of King Henry VII

Extracts.

First published in London, 1622. Spedding, VI, 23-245. Edited by Michael Kiernan, The Oxford Francis Bacon, Vol. VIII (Oxford, 2012), pp. 3-169.

ff. 43r-68v

CmW 6.38: William Camden, Annales rerum Anglicarum et Hibernicarum regnante Elizabetha

Extracts.

Part I (to 1589) first published in London, 1615. Parts I-II (to 1603) published in Leiden, 1625-7.

ff. 69r-70v, 72v

JnB 734: Ben Jonson, The Staple of News

Extracts, with comments on the play.

Wright's comments on f. 72v printed in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (p. 256).

First published in London, 1631. Herford & Simpson, VI, 271-382.

ff. 70v-2v

JnB 556: Ben Jonson, Bartholomew Fair

Extracts, with comments on the play.

Wright's comments printed in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (pp. 256-7).

First published in London, 1631. Herford & Simpson, VI, 1-141.

ff. 72v-4r

ShJ 193: James Shirley, The Traitor

Extracts, with comments on the play.

Wright's comments here (f. 74) printed in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (p. 257).

First published in London, 1635. Gifford & Dyce, II, 95-187. Edited by John Stewart Carter (London, 1965). The play was licensed on 4 May 1631 for performance at the Phoenix Theatre.

ff. 74r-5v

WeJ 3: John Webster, The Devil's Law-Case

Extracts, with comments on the play.

Wright's comments printed in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (p. 257), and in James G. McManaway, ‘Excerpta quaedam per A.W. adolescentem’, Studies in Shakespeare, Bibliography and Theater (New York, 1969), 279-91 (p. 287).

First published in London, 1623. Lucas, II, 229-372. Cambridge edition, II, 75-166.

ff. 75v-6r

ShJ 138: James Shirley, A Contention for Honour and Riches

Extracts, with a comment on the entertainment.

Wright's comment here (f. 75v) printed in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (p. 257).

First published in London, 1633. Gifford & Dyce, VI, 287-314.

ff. 76r-8v

ShJ 179: James Shirley, The Grateful Servant

Extracts, with comments on the play.

Wright's comments here (f. 78v) printed in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (p. 257).

First published in London, 1630. Gifford & Dyce, II, 1-93.

ff. 78v-9v

ShJ 137: James Shirley, Changes, or Love in a Maze

Extracts, with comments on the play.

Wright's comments here (f. 79v) printed in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (p. 257).

First published in London, 1632. Gifford & Dyce, II, 269-364.

See also ShJ 29 and ShJ 98.

f. 80r-v

ShJ 189: James Shirley, The School of Compliment

Extracts, with comments on the play.

Wright's comments here (f. 80v) printed in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (p. 257).

First published in London, 1631. Gifford & Dyce, I, 1-97.

ff. 81r-2r

ShJ 205: James Shirley, The Wedding

Extracts, with comments on the play.

Wright's comments here (f. 82) printed in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (p. 257).

First published in London, 1629. Gifford & Dyce, I, 363-450.

ff. 82r-3r

ShJ 135: James Shirley, The Bird in a Cage

Extracts, with comments on the play.

Wright's comments here (f. 83) edited in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (p. 257).

First published in London, 1633. Gifford & Dyce, II, 365-455.

ff. 83v-4v

ShW 71: William Shakespeare, Othello

Extracts ‘Out of ye Tragedy of Othello by Shakespeare’, with comments on the play.

These extracts and comments edited in James G. McManaway, ‘Excerpta quaedam per A.W. adolescentem’, Studies in Shakespeare, Bibliography and Theater (New York, 1969), 279-91 (pp. 286-9), and in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (p. 257).

Facsimiles of ff. 83v-4v in Parnassus Biceps or Severall Choice Pieces of Poetry by Abraham Wright 1656, ed. Peter Beal (Scolar Press, 1990), pp. 184-9.

First published in London, 1622.

f. 85r-v

ShW 44: William Shakespeare, Hamlet

Extracts ‘Out of ye Tragedie of Hamlet ye Prince of Denmark. by Will: Shakespeare’, with comments on the play.

These extracts and comments printed in James G. McManaway, ‘Excerpta quaedam per A. W. adolescentem’, Studies in Shakespeare, Bibliography and Theater (New York, 1969), 279-91 (pp. 286-9), and in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (pp. 257-8).

Facsimiles of f. 85r-v in Parnassus Biceps or Severall Choice Pieces of Poetry by Abraham Wright 1656, ed. Peter Beal (Scolar Press, 1990), pp. 190-3.

First published in London, 1603.

ff. 85v-86v

B&F 44: Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher, The Elder Brother

Extracts ‘Out of ye Elder brother. A Comedie by John ffletcher. Beaumonts fellow poet’, with comments on the play.

Wright's comments (f. 86r-v.) edited in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, Modern Philology, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (p. 258).

Facsimile of f. 85v in Parnassus Biceps or Severall Choice Pieces of Poetry by Abraham Wright 1656, ed. Peter Beal (Scolar Press, 1990), pp. 192-3.

First published in London, 1637. Dyce, X, 197-292. Bullen, II, 1-100, ed. W. W. Greg. Bowers, IX, 469-545, ed. Fredson Bowers.

ff. 86v-7r

ShJ 180: James Shirley, Hyde Park

Extracts, with comments on the play.

Wright's comments here (f. 87) printed in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (p. 258).

First published in London, 1637. Gifford & Dyce, II, 457-541.

ff. 87r-8v

WeJ 4: John Webster, The Duchess of Malfi

Extracts, with comments on the play.

Wright's comments printed in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (p. 258).

First published in London, 1623. Lucas, II, 1-210. Cambridge edition, I, 467-575.

ff. 88v-9r

WeJ 12: John Webster, The White Devil

Extracts, with comments on the play.

Wright's comments printed in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (p. 258).

First published in London, 1612. Lucas, I. Cambridge edition, I, 139-254.

ff. 89r-90r

ShJ 207: James Shirley, The Young Admiral

Extracts, with comments on the play, headed “ye young Admirall tragicomedie”.

Wright's comments here (f. 90r) printed in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (p. 258).

First published in London, 1637. Gifford & Dyce, III, 93-181.

ff. 90v-1v

DaW 102.6: Sir William Davenant, The Platonick Lovers

Extracts, headed Out of ye Platonick louers Tragicomedy By Will: Dauenant, with comments on the play.

See Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (pp. 258-9).

First published in London, 1636. Dramatic Works, II, 1-105.

ff. 91v-3r

DaW 119: Sir William Davenant, The Wits

Extracts, headed ‘Out of ye witts. A Comedie by Will. Dauenant’, with comments on the play.

First published in London, 1636. Dramatic Works, II, 107-244.

f. 93v

MsP 30: Philip Massinger, A New Way to Pay Old Debts

Brief extract, with comment on the play.

Printed from this MS in Edwards & Gibson, II, 378-9.

First published in London, 1633. Edwards & Gibson, II, 293-377.

ff. 93v-4v

B&F 154: Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher, Philaster

Extracts, headed ‘Out of Philaster, or loue lies bleeding, A Tragicomedie by ffrancis Beaumont, and John ffletcher’, with comments on the play.

Wright's comments (f. 94v) printed in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (p. 259).

First published in London, 1620. Dyce, I, 197-310. Bullen, I, 115-242, ed. P.A. Daniel. Bowers, I, 398-481, ed. Robert K. Turner.

f. 95r-v

B&F 62: Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher, A King and No King

Excerpts, with comments on the play.

Wright's comments (f. 95v) printed in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (p. 259).

First published in London, 1619. Dyce, II, 231-347. Bullen, I, 243-354, ed. R.W. Bond. Bowers, II, 182-281, ed. George Walton Williams.

ff. 95v-6v

B&F 110: Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher, The Maid's Tragedy

Excerpts, with comments on the play.

Wright's comments (f. 96v) printed in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (p. 259).

First published in London, 1619. Dyce, I, 311-424. Bullen, I, 1-114, ed. P.A. Daniel. Bowers, II, 28-124, ed. Robert K. Turner.

ff. 96v-8r

B&F 166: Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher, The Scornful Lady

Excerpts, with comments on the play.

Wright's comments (f. 98) printed in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (p. 259).

First published in London, 1616. Dyce, III, 1-113. Bullen, I, 355-473, ed. R.W. Bond. Bowers, II, 464-545, ed. Cyrus Hoy.

ff. 98r-9v

B&F 46: Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher, The Faithful Shepherdess

Excerpts, with comments on the play.

Wright's comments (f. 99r-v) printed in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (p. 259).

First published in London, 1610. Dyce, II, 1-121. Bullen, III, 1-110, ed. W. W. Greg. Bowers, III, 489-583, ed. Cyrus Hoy.

ff. 99v-101v

ShJ 182: James Shirley, The Lady of Pleasure

Extracts, with comments on the play.

Wright's comments here (f. 101v) printed in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (p. 259).

First published in London, 1637. Gifford & Dyce, IV, 1-100. Edited by Ronald Huebert (Manchester, 1986).

ff. 101v-10v

FuT 5.21: Thomas Fuller, The History of the Holy War

Extracts.

First published in Cambridge, 1639.

ff. 113v-14r

ShJ 188: James Shirley, The Royal Master

Extracts, with comments on the play.

Wright's comments here (f. 114) edited in Arthur C. Kirsch, ‘A Caroline Commentary on the Drama’, MP, 66 (1968-9), 256-61 (p. 259).

First published in London, 1638. Gifford & Dyce, IV, 101-88.

f. 114r

MyJ 32: Jasper Mayne, The Amorous Warre

Extracts.

ff. 115r-16r

JnB 766: Ben Jonson, Extracts

Extracts from various of Jonson's plays, masques and poems.

Add. MS 22629

A double-folio-size album of separate mounted letters, in various hands, 239 leaves, in modern calf gilt. Volume V of the letters belonging to Henrietta Hobart (1681-1767), Countess of Suffolk.

Later owned by John Wilson Croker (1780-1857), politician and writer.

f. 215r

DoC 215: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On the Statue in the Privy Garden (‘When Israel first provoked the living Lord’)

Copy, untitled, on a single quarto leaf.

This MS collated in Harris.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State…Part III (London, 1698). Harris, pp. 57-60.

Add. MS 22640

A folio volume of chiefly poems and prose on affairs of state, in several hands, one predominating, 165 leaves, in old reversed calf. Compiled by John Greene, of King's Lynn, Norfolk (probably the John Greene who was Mayor there in 1709). c.1720.

Sotheby's, 23 December 1958, lot 224.

ff. 47r-8r

LeN 1: Nathaniel Lee, To the Prince and Princess of Orange, upon Their Marriage (‘Hail, happy Warriour! hail! whose Arms have won’)

Copy of the 65-line version, headed ‘On ye Marriage of the Prince & Princess of Orange’ and beginning ‘Hail happy Warrior Whose arms have Won’.

First published, possibly as a broadside, 1677 [no exemplum known]. 85-line version in Examen Poeticum: being the Third Part of Miscellany Poems (London, 1693), pp. 168-74. Stroup & Cooke, II, 553-4. Earlier, 65-line version, headed ‘On the Marriage of the Prince and Princess of Orange’ and beginning ‘Hail happy Warrior! whose Arms have won’, published in Poems on Affairs of State, Vol. III (London, 1704). Stroup & Cooke, II, 555-6.

f. 91r

DoC 225: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On the Young Statesmen (‘Clarendon had law and sense’)

Copy of lines 26-30, headed ‘1715’ and here beginning ‘Protect us Mighty Providence’.

This MS collated in Harris.

First published in A Third Collection of…Poems, Satyrs, Songs (London, 1689). POAS, II (1965), 339-41. Harris, pp. 50-4.

f. 105r

DrW 117.19: William Drummond of Hawthornden, For the Kinge (‘From such a face quois excellence’)

Copy.

Often headed in MSS ‘The [Five] Senses’, a parody of Patrico's blessing of the King's senses in Jonson's Gypsies Metamorphosed (JnB 654-70). A MS copy owned by Drummond: see The Library of Drummond of Hawthornden, ed. Robert H. Macdonald (Edinburgh, 1971), No. 1357. Kastner printed the poem among his ‘Poems of Doubtful Authenticity’ (II, 296-9), but its sentiments are alien to those of Drummond: see C.F. Main, ‘Ben Jonson and an Unknown Poet on the King's Senses’, MLN, 74 (1959), 389-93, and MacDonald, SSL, 7 (1969), 118. Discussed also in Allan H. Gilbert, ‘Jonson and Drummond or Gil on the King's Senses’, MLN, 62 (January 1947), 35-7. Sometimes also ascribed to James Johnson.

f. 113v

DoC 126: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, My Opinion (‘After thinking this fortnight of Whig and of Tory’)

Copy, headed ‘ye E-l of Dors-ts opinion of ye Tories 1716’.

This MS collated in Harris.

First published in Miscellaneous Works, Written by…George, late Duke of Buckingham (London, 1704-5). POAS, II (1965), 391-2. Harris, pp. 55-6.

f. 116v

DrJ 227: John Dryden, Upon the Death of the Viscount Dundee (‘O Last and best of Scots! who didst maintain’)

Copy, headed ‘Verses 1715’.

First published in Poetical Miscellanies: The Fifth Part (London, 1704). Poems on Affairs of State…Part III (London, 1704). Kinsley, IV, 1777. California, III, 222. Hammond, III, 219.

f. 162r

JnB 634.5: Ben Jonson, The Gypsies Metamorphosed, Song (‘Cock-Lorell would needes haue the Diuell his guest’)

Copy, headed ‘An Invitation att ye Devils arse of Peake 1671’.

Herford & Simpson, lines 1061-1125. Greg, Burley version, lines 821-84. Windsor version, lines 876-939.

Add. MS 22919

A folio composite volume of letters to Sir George Downing, first Baronet (1623-84), diplomat.

ff. 14r-15v

*MaA 527: Andrew Marvell, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Marvell, to George Downing, from The Hague, [25 March ‘1659’]. 1659.

Margoliouth, II, 308. Facsimile of the first page in Greg, English Literary Autographs, Plate LVII.

f. 78r

*MaA 526: Andrew Marvell, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Marvell, to George Downing, from Whitehall, 11 February 1658/9.

Later owned by Dawson Turner, FSA (1775-1858), banker, botanist and antiquary. Puttick & Simpson's, 6 June 1859, lot 146. 1659.

Margoliouth, II, 307-8. Facsimiles in Kelliher, p. 75 and back cover, and in Petti, English Literary Hands, No. 60.

Add. MS 22959

A small quarto diary, in a single secretary hand, 89 leaves, bound with a separately acquired continuation or companion MS (ff. 90r-153r, now Add. MS 28640), in modern half-morocco. Compiled by the Rev. John Rous (1584-1644), incumbent of Santon Downham, Suffolk, and relating, retrospectively, chiefly to public events and to literary texts in circulation in 1625-42. c.1625-42.

Later owned by Dawson Turner (1775-1858), banker, botanist and antiquary. Turner sale, 7 June 1859, lot 253. The second MS purchased at Sotheby's, 15-25 March 1871 (library of the bookseller Joseph Lilly).

The first MS edited in full in Diary of John Rous, incumbent of Santon Downham, Suffolk, from 1625 to 1642, ed. Mary Anne Everett Green, Camden Society No. 66 (1856).

ff. 16r-18v

CtR 152: Sir Robert Cotton, The Danger wherein this Kingdome now Standeth, and the Remedy

Copy of a ‘Contracted’ version, as by ‘Robertu Cotton’.

Tract beginning ‘As soon as the house of Austria had incorporated it self into the house of Spaine...’. First published London, 1628. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. 308-20.

ff. 22v-3v

MrJ 33: John Marston, The Duke Return'd Againe. 1627 (‘And art returned again with all thy faults’)

Copy, subscribed ‘These verses came forthe, as I did heare, soon after the returne from Rees; in which, whether any more be sette down then vulgar rumor, which is often lying, I knowe not..’. [c.26 June 1628]. 1628.

f. 25v

MrJ 62: John Marston, Georg IVs DVX BVCkIngaMIae MDCXVVVIII (‘Thy numerous name with this yeare doth agree’)

Copy, docketed ‘Received Sept. 16 [1628], from Will. Crosse’.

Edited from this MS in Diary of John Rous, ed. Mary Ann Everett Green, Camden Society 66 (London, 1856), p. 26. Green, p. 26.

ff. 35v-6r

CoR 15: Richard Corbett, Against the Opposing the Duke in Parliament, 1628 (‘The wisest King did wonder when hee spy'd’)

Copy, headed ‘I had these verses deliuered me’ and subscried ‘Doctr Kerbie B: Ox’, dated 6 August 1629.

Edited from this MS in Diary of John Rous, ed. Mary Ann Everett Green, Camden Society 66 (London, 1856), pp. 42-3. This publication recorded in Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 82, 152.

First published in Poems and Songs relating to George Duke of Buckingham, Percy Society (London, 1850), p. 31. Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 82-3.

Most MS texts followed by an anonymous ‘Answer’ beginning ‘The warlike king was troubl'd when hee spi'd’. Texts of these two poems discussed in V.L. Pearl and M.L. Pearl, ‘Richard Corbett's “Against the Opposing of the Duke in Parliament, 1628” and the Anonymous Rejoinder, “An Answere to the Same, Lyne for Lyne”: The Earliest Dated Manuscript Copies’, RES, NS 42 (1991), 32-9, and related correspondence in RES, NS 43 (1992), 248-9.

f. 41v

CoR 528: Richard Corbett, On the Birth of the Young Prince Charles (‘When private men get sonnes they gette a spoone’)

Copy, untitled, dated 27 June 1630.

Edited from this MS in Diary of John Rous, ed. Mary Ann Everett Green, Camden Society 66 (London, 1856), pp. 54-5. Reprinted from this publication in Bennett & Trevor-Roper.

First published in Poëtica Stromata ([no place], 1648). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, p. 86.

ff. 48v-9r

CoR 629: Richard Corbett, To the Ladyes of the New Dresse (‘Ladyes that weare black cypresse vailes’)

Copy, headed ‘D.C. To the Gentlewomen of the Newe Dresse’, dated 1 April 1633.

Edited from this MS in Diary of John Rous, ed. Mary Ann Everett Green, Camden Society 66 (London, 1856), pp. 71-2. This publication recorded in Bennett & Trevor-Roper, p. 159.

First published in Witts Recreations (London, 1640). Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, p. 90.

This poem is usually followed in MSS by ‘The Ladyes Answer’ (‘Blacke Cypresse vailes are shrouds of night’): see GrJ 14.

f. 49r

GrJ 26: John Grange, ‘Black cypress veils are shrouds of night’

Copy, headed ‘The Ladies and Gentlewns Answer’, dated 1 April 1633.

Green, pp. 71-2.

An ‘Answer’ to Corbett's ‘To the Ladyes of the New Dresse’ (CoR 595-629), first published in Witts Recreations (London, 1640). The Poems of Richard Corbett, ed. J.A.W. Bennett and H.R. Trevor-Roper (Oxford, 1955), p. 91. Listed as by John Grange in Krueger.

f. 54r

StW 1274: William Strode, Jack on both Sides (‘I holde as fayth What Englandes Church Allowes’)

Copy, in double columns, headed ‘These following verses came to men's hands in these times’ [i.e.‘about 1634 & 1635’].

Edited from this MS in Diary of John Rous, ed. Mary Anne Everett Green, Camden Society 66 (London, 1856), p. 80.

First published, as ‘The Church Papist’, in Wits Recreations (London, 1640). Reprinted as ‘The Jesuit's Double-faced Creed’ by Henry Care in The Popish Courant (16 May 1679): see August A. Imholtz, Jr, ‘The Jesuits' Double-Faced Creed: A Seventeenth-Century Cross-Reading’, N&Q, 222 (December 1977), 553-4. Dobell, p. 111. Listed, without text, in Forey, p. 339.

ff. 68v-9v

ClJ 20: John Cleveland, A Dialogue between two Zealots, upon the &c. in the Oath (‘Sir Roger, from a zealous piece of Freeze’)

Copy.

Green, pp. 101-3.

First published in Character (1647). Morris & Withington, pp. 4-5.

ff. 72r-4r

RuB 143: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, ?7 November 1640

Copy, headed ‘Sr Beniamin Ruddierds speech’.

Speech (variously dated 4, 7, 9 and 10 November 1640) beginning ‘We are here assembled to do God's business and the King's...’. First published in The Speeches of Sr. Benjamin Rudyer in the high Court of Parliament (London, 1641), pp. 1-10. Manning, pp. 159-65.

f. 84v

ClJ 182: John Cleveland, Epitaph on the Earl of Strafford (‘Here lies Wise and Valiant Dust’)

Copy, headed ‘On the Earle of Strafford’.

First published in Character (1647). Edited in CSPD, 1640-1641 (1882), p. 574. Berdan, p. 184, as ‘Internally unlike his manner’. Morris & Withington, p. 66, among ‘Poems probably by Cleveland’. The attribution to Cleveland is dubious. The epitaph is also attributed to Clement Paman: see Poetry and Revolution: An Anthology of British and Irish Verse 1625-1660, ed. Peter Davidson (Oxford, 1998), notes to No. 275 (p. 363).

Add. MS 23070

A folio notebook, largely in a single small cursive hand, 93 leaves, in half-calf. Compiled by George Vertue (1684-1756), engraver and antiquary, constituting Volume 3 of his collections. c.1713-54.

Bought from Vertue's widow, 22 August 1758, by Horace Walpole (1717-97), fourth earl of Orford, author, politician and patron, and with his bookplate. Thomas Thorpe's sale catalogue, 1842, in item 524. Afterwards owned by Dawson Turner (1775-1858), banker, botanist and antiquary. Turner sale, 9 June 1859, lot 517.

ff. 29r-30v

JnB 250: Ben Jonson, An Expostulacon wth Inigo Iones (‘Mr Surueyr, you yt first begann’)

Copy, transcribed from a MS source.

This MS collated in Herford & Simpson.

First published in The Works of Ben Jonson, 7 vols, ed. Peter Whalley (London, 1756). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 402-6.

ff. 30v-1r

JnB 490: Ben Jonson, To Inigo Marquess Would be A Corollary (‘But cause thou hearst ye mighty k. of Spaine’)

Copy, transcribed from a MS source.

This MS collated in Herford & Simpson.

First published in The Works of Ben Jonson, ed. Peter Whalley, 7 vols (London, 1756). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 406-7.

f. 31r

JnB 476: Ben Jonson, To a ffreind an Epigram Of him (‘Sr Inigo doth feare it as I heare’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Ben. Jonson’, transcribed from a MS source.

This MS collated in Herford & Simpson.

First published in The Works of Ben Jonson, ed. Peter Whalley, 7 vols (London, 1756). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 407-8.

Add. MS 23123

A large folio composite volume of correspondence for 1665 of the Earl and Duke of Lauderdale, in various hands, 282 leaves, in 19th-century calf.

f. 280r

*HuA 1: Anna Hume, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by ‘Anna Hume’, in her rounded italic hand, to Lord Lauderdale, on one side of a single folio leaf, undated. 1665.

Add. MS 23147

A small folio 12th-century MS on vellum, inscribed (f. 1v) ‘Liber Willi: Browne’. Early 17th century.

*BrW 269: William Browne of Tavistock, William of Malmesbury. De gestis Regum Anglorum

Annotated on f. 42r by John Stow (1524/5-1605), London historian. Owned in 1756 by Alexander Grant and Robert Leith.

Edwards, No. 1. Possibly the MS cited by Browne at the very beginning of Britannia's Pastorals as ‘a manuscript copy of [William of] Malmesbury…belonging to the Abbey of S. Augustine in Canterbury…in the hands of my very learned friend M. Selden’ (Goodwin, I, 17).

Add. MS 23216

A folio composite volume of some 150 autograph letters signed by Henry More, to Anne (née Finch), Lady Conway, as well as five by him to her husband, Edward, Lord Conway, and two to Mrs Elizabeth Foxcroft. 1650-79.

*MoH 4: Henry More, Letter(s)

Edited, with related Conway letters from other sources, in Nicolson, with a facsimile of More's letter of 18 April [1653] after p. 80. Three of More's letters to Lady Anne, on ff. 302r-7v, which were omitted from Nicolson are edited and discussed in Alan Gabbey, ‘Anne Conway et Henry More: Lettres sur Descartes (1650-51)’, Archives de Philosophie, 40 (1977), 379-404.

Add. MS 23229

A folio composite volume of miscellaneous papers in verse and prose, in various hands and paper sizes, 170 leaves, mounted on guards, in modern half-morocco. Including eleven poems by John Donne, three of them (ff. 10r-14v, 55r, 76r-7r) in the italic hand of his friend Sir Henry Goodyer (1571-1627); ff. 95r-8r in the same hand as the Leconfield MS (DnJ Δ 5) and constituting part of what was probably a quarto MS ‘book’ of Donne's satires; f. 132r-v constituting a set of six verse epistles by Donne, the text related to the Westmoreland MS (DnJ Δ 19). Early-mid-17th century.

From the ‘Conway Papers’ belonging chiefly to Sir Edward Conway, Baron Conway of Ragley, later Viscount Killultagh and Viscount Conway of Conway Castle (c.1564-1631), and to his son, Edward, second Viscount Conway (1594-1655). Later owned by John Wilson Croker (1780-1857), politician and writer, and presented 10 January 1860.

Cited in IELM, I.i, as the ‘Conway MS’: DnJ Δ 40. Cited as A23 by editors. Facsimile of f. 62r in Michael Roy Denbo, ‘Editing a Renaissance Commonplace Book: The Holgate Miscellany’, in New Ways of Looking at Old Texts, III, ed. W. Speed Hill (Tempe, AZ, 2004). pp. 65-73 (p. 71).

ff. 10r-14v

DnJ 988: John Donne, Ecclogue. 1613. December 26 (‘Unseasonable man, statue of ice’)

Copy, complete with the 11-poem ‘Epithalamion’, in Goodyer's hand, on ten pages of three pairs of conjugate folio leaves, imperfect. Early 17th century.

This MS collated in Grierson. Recorded in Shawcross and in Milgate.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 131-44. Shawcross, No. 108. Milgate, Epithalamions, pp. 10-19 (as ‘Epithalamion at the Marriage of the Earl of Somerset’). Variorum, 8 (1995), pp. 133-9.

f. 15r-v

HoJ 55.5: John Hoskyns, The Censure of a Parliament Fart (‘Downe came graue auncient Sr John Crooke’)

Copy, untitled, in two italic hands, imperfect, lacking the ending. Early 17th century.

Attributed to Hoskyns by John Aubrey. Cited, but unprinted, as No. III of ‘Doubtful Verses’ in Osborn, p. 300. Early Stuart Libels website.

ff. 16r-17v

HoJ 56: John Hoskyns, The Censure of a Parliament Fart (‘Downe came graue auncient Sr John Crooke’)

Copy, untitled, but inscribed down the central fold ‘The Parliament Libell’ and endorsed on a blank leaf (f. 18v) ‘The farte’. Early 17th century.

This MS cited in Osborn.

Attributed to Hoskyns by John Aubrey. Cited, but unprinted, as No. III of ‘Doubtful Verses’ in Osborn, p. 300. Early Stuart Libels website.

ff. 24r, 25r

SuJ 123: John Suckling, Love and Debt alike troublesom (‘This one request I make to him that sits the clouds above’)

Copy, in a predominantly secretary hand, untitled, with two staves of music, on the first page of two conjugate folio leaves.

This MS collated in Clayton.

First published in Last Remains (London, 1659). Clayton, pp. 88-9.

f. 26r

SuJ 123.5: John Suckling, Love and Debt alike troublesom (‘This one request I make to him that sits the clouds above’)

Copy, headed ‘Song’. 19th century?.

First published in Last Remains (London, 1659). Clayton, pp. 88-9.

f. 34r

CwT 1070: Thomas Carew, To Master W. Mountague (‘Sir, I arest you at your Countreyes suit’)

Copy, in a predominantly italic hand, subscribed ‘Tho: Carewe’, on the first page of two conjugate folio leaves. Mid-17th century.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 78-9.

f. 36r

CwT 746: Thomas Carew, A Song (‘Aske me no more whether doth stray’)

Copy of a four-stanza version, in a cursive rounded hand, untitled and here beginning ‘Ask me no more where Jove bestowes’, on one side of a folio leaf. Mid-17th century.

Edited from this MS in Dunlap, p. 263, and in Poetry and Revolution: An Anthology of British and Irish Verse 1625-1660, ed. Peter Davidson (Oxford, 1998), pp. 522-3.

First published in a five-stanza version beginning ‘Aske me no more where Iove bestowes’ in Poems (1640) and in Poems: by Wil. Shake-speare, Gent. (London, 1640), and edited in this version in Dunlap, pp. 102-3. Musical setting by John Wilson published in Cheerful Ayres or Ballads (Oxford, 1659). All MS versions recorded in CELM, except where otherwise stated, begin with the second stanza of the published version (viz. ‘Aske me no more whether doth stray’).

For a plausible argument that this poem was actually written by William Strode, see Margaret Forey, ‘Manuscript Evidence and the Author of “Aske me no more”: William Strode, not Thomas Carew’, EMS, 12 (2005), 180-200. See also Scott Nixon, ‘“Aske me no more” and the Manuscript Verse Miscellany’, ELR, 29/1 (Winter 1999), 97-130, which edits and discusses MSS of this poem and also suggests that it may have been written by Strode.

f. 40r

KiH 652: Henry King, Sonnet. The Double Rock (‘Since Thou hast view'd some Gorgon, and art grow'n’)

Copy, in a mixed hand, headed ‘Sonnett 1’, on the first page of two conjugate folio leaves.

This MS recorded in Crum.

First published in Poems (1657). Crum, pp. 167-8.

f. 40r

KiH 504: Henry King, The Retreit (‘Pursue no more (My Thoughts!) that False Unkind’)

Copy, in a mixed hand, headed ‘Sonnett 2’, on the first page of two conjugate folio leaves.

This MS collated in Crum.

First published in The Academy of Complements (London, 1646). Poems (1657). Crum, p. 168.

f. 40v

KiH 407: Henry King, Love's Harvest (‘Fond Lunatick forbeare. WHy dost thou sue’)

Copy, in a mixed hand, subscribed ‘Doctor Kinge’, headed ‘Sonnett 3’, on the second page of two conjugate folio leaves. Mid-17th century.

This MS collated in Crum.

First published in The Academy of Complements (London, 1646). Poems (1657). Crum, p. 169.

f. 41r

DeJ 53: Sir John Denham, On Gondibert The Preface, being Published before the Booke was Written, Upon the Preface (‘Room Room for the best of Poets heroick’)

Copy, untitled and here beginning ‘Make roome for the best of Poets Heroicke’, on one side of a single quarto leaf. Mid-17th century.

First published, as ‘Vpon the Preface’, in Certain Verses (1653), pp. 3-4. Banks, p. 313.

f. 46r

StW 789: William Strode, Song (‘I saw faire Cloris walke alone’)

Copy, in a mixed hand, on the first page of two conjugate quarto leaves. c.1630.

First published in Walter Porter, Madrigales and Ayres (London, 1632). Dobell, p. 41. Forey, pp. 76-7. The poem also discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Notes on some Poems attributed to William Strode’, PQ, 34 (1955), 444-8 (pp. 445-6), and see Mary Hobbs, ‘Early Seventeenth-Century Verse Miscellanies and Their Value for Textual Editors’, EMS, 1 (1989), 182-210 (pp. 199, 209).

f. 47r

CwT 1148: Thomas Carew, To T.H. a Lady resembling my Mistresse (‘Fayre copie of my Celia's face’)

Copy, in a cursive predominantly italic hand, headed ‘to a lady resembleing my Mrs’ on one side of a single quarto leaf. Mid-17th century.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 26-7.

f. 50r

HoJ 164: John Hoskyns, Epitaph On Sr Walter Pye, Attorney of the Wardes, dying on Christmas Day, in the morning (‘If Any aske, who here doth lye’)

Copy, in a cursive italic hands, on one side of a quarto leaf. Mid-17th century.

Edited from this MS in Osborn.

Osborn, No. XLVI (p. 214).

f. 52r

PeW 4: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, ‘Disdain me still, that I may ever love’

Copy, in a mixed hand, with other verse on a folio leaf. Mid-17th century.

This MS collated in Krueger.

f. 52v

PeW 36: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, ‘If her disdain least change in you can move’

Copy, in a mixed hand, headed ‘Verses Made by the Earle of Pembrooke’, with other verses on a folio leaf. Mid-17th century.

This MS collated in Krueger.

First published in 1635. Poems (1660), pp. 3-5, superscribed ‘P.’. Krueger, p. 2, among ‘Poems by Pembroke and Rudyerd’.

f. 52v

PeW 106: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, ‘'Tis Love breeds Love in me, and cold Disdain’

This MS collated in Krueger.

Poems (1660), pp. 4-5, superscribed ‘R’. Krueger, p. 3, among ‘Poems by Pembroke and Rudyerd’.

f. 53r

CwT 979: Thomas Carew, The Spring (‘Now that the winter's gone, the earth hath lost’)

Copy, in an italic hand, headed ‘Of the springe’, on one page of a pair of once conjugate folio leaves of verse. Mid-17th century.

This MS collated in Dunlap.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 3.

f. 53v

GrJ 93: John Grange, ‘Why do we love these things which we call Women’

Copy, in an italic hand, untitled, on one page of a pair of once conjugate folio leaves of verse. Mid-17th century.

This MS recorded in Krueger.

First published in Poems (1660), pp. 55-6, superscribed ‘R.’. Listed in Krueger's Appendix I: ‘Spurious Poems in the 1660 Edition’ as probably by John Grange.

f. 54r

PeW 57: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, ‘Muse get thee to a Cell; and wont to sing’

Copy, in an italic hand, untitled, on one page of a pair of once conjugate folio leaves of verse. Mid-17th century.

This MS collated in Krueger.

Poems (1660), p. 28, superscribed ‘P.’. Krueger, p. 29, among ‘Pembroke's Poems’.

f. 54r-v

RaW 512: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Wrong not, deare Empresse of my Heart’

Copy, in an italic hand, untitled, on two pages of a pair of conjugate folio leaves of verse. Mid-17th century.

This MS collated in Gullans; recorded in Latham, p. 116.

First published in Wits Interpreter (London, 1655), printed twice, the first version prefixed by ‘Our Passions are most like to Floods and streames’ (see RaW 320-38) and headed ‘To his Mistresse by Sir Walter Raleigh’. Edited with the prefixed stanza in Latham, pp. 18-19. Edited in The English and Latin Poems of Sir Robert Ayton, ed. Charles B. Gullans, STS, 4th Ser. 1 (Edinburgh & London, 1963), pp. 197-8. Rudick, Nos 39A and 39B (two versions, pp. 106-9).

This poem was probably written by Sir Robert Ayton. For a discussion of the authorship and the different texts see Gullans, pp. 318-26 (also printed in SB, 13 (1960), 191-8).

f. 54v

PeW 98: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, That he will still persevere in his Love (‘Nay, I must love thee still’)

Copy, in an italic hand, untitled, on one page of a pair of once conjugate folio leaves of verse, imperfect, lacking the ending. Mid-17th century.

This MS recorded in Krueger.

Poems (1660), pp. 36-7, superscribed ‘P.’ Krueger, pp. 30-1, among ‘Pembroke's Poems’.

f. 55r

DnJ 2248: John Donne, Lovers infinitenesse (‘If yet I have not all thy love’)

Copy of lines 1-22, untitled. Early 17th century.

This MS recorded in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 17-18. Gardner, Elegies, pp. 77-8. Shawcross, No. 41.

f. 56r

DeJ 57: Sir John Denham, On Mr. Tho. Killigrew's Return from his Embassie from Venice, and Mr. William Murray's from Scotland (‘Our Resident Tom, From Venice is come’)

Copy, in a mixed hand, untitled, on the first page of a pair of conjugate folio leaves, addressed pn the fourt page ‘To the right hoble. the Lord Conway’, and folded, sealed and sent as a letter.

First published in Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 111-12.

f. 61r-v

CwT 478: Thomas Carew, My mistris commanding me to returne her letters (‘So grieves th'adventrous Merchant, when he throwes’)

Copy, in a predominantly secretary hand, untitled, on the first two pages of a pair of conjugate folio leaves. Mid-17th century.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 9-11.

f. 62v

WoH 84: Sir Henry Wotton, On his Mistress, the Queen of Bohemia (‘You meaner beauties of the night’)

Copy, in a predominantly italic hand, headed ‘Vpon the Queene of Bohemia’, one one page of three folio leaves of verse. c.1630s.

First published (in a musical setting) in Michael East, Sixt Set of Bookes (London, 1624). Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 518. Hannah (1845), pp. 12-15. Some texts of this poem discussed in J.B. Leishman, ‘“You Meaner Beauties of the Night” A Study in Transmission and Transmogrification’, The Library, 4th Ser. 26 (1945-6), 99-121. Some musical versions edited in English Songs 1625-1660, ed. Ian Spink, Musica Britannica XXXIII (London, 1971), Nos. 66, 122.

ff. 63v, 64v

CwT 1126: Thomas Carew, To Saxham (‘Though frost, and snow, lockt from mine eyes’)

Copy, in a predominantly secretary hand, headed ‘[ ] Entertainement [ ] am written by T:C:’ on two pages of three folio leaves of verse, imperfect at the top. c.1630s.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 27-9.

ff. 65r-6r

BmF 33: Francis Beaumont, An Elegy on the Death of the Virtuous Lady, Elizabeth Countess of Rutland (‘I may forget to eat, to drink, to sleep’)

Copy, in a predominantly italic hand, headed ‘An Elegie on the Death of the Countess of Rutland’, subscribed ‘F. B.’, on two folio leaves, imperfect.

First published in Sir Thomas Overbury, A Wife, 11th impression (London, 1622). Dyce, XI, 507-11.

f. 66v

BmF 61: Francis Beaumont, An Elegy on the Lady Markham (‘As unthrifts groan in straw for their pawn'd beds’)

Copy of lines 1-36, headed ‘An Eligie on the Death of the Lady Marcum’, imperfect, lacking the ending.

First published in Poems (London, 1640). Dyce, XI, 503-5.

ff. 67r-8r

BeJ 40: Sir John Beaumont, To the immortall memory of the fairest and most vertuous Lady, the Lady Clifton (‘Her tongue hath ceast to speake, which might make dumbe’)

Copy, in the italic hand of Sir Henry Goodyer's, subscribed ‘J B’, endorsed ‘An Elegye of my La Clifton’, on three pages of a pair of conjugate folio leaves. c.1620.

This MS collated in Sell.

First published in Bosworth-field (1629). Sell, pp. 154-6.

ff. 76r, 77r

DnJ 1426: John Donne, Goodfriday, 1613. Riding Westward (‘Let mans Soule be a spheare, and then, in this’)

Copy, untitled, on two pages of a pair of conjugate quarto leaves.

This MS collated in Shawcross. Recorded in Gardner.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 336-7. Gardner, Divine Poems, pp. 30-1. Shawcross, No. 185.

f. 87r

*JnB 512: Ben Jonson, To Sir Horace Vere (‘Which of thy names I take, not onely beares’)

Autograph fair copy, untitled, on the first page of a pair of conjugate quarto leaves.

This MS collated in Herford & Simpson.

First published in Epigrammes (xci) in Workes (London, 1616). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 58.

ff. 91r-2v

WrM 6: Lady Mary Wroth, ‘Sweete solitarines, joy to those hearts’

Copy of an early version, apparently in the hand of George Garrard, headed ‘Penshurst Mount’.

This MS recorded in Roberts, Poems, p. 153.

First published in The Countesse of Mountgomeries Urania (London, 1621). The First Part of the Countesse of Montgomeries Urania, ed. Josephine A. Roberts (Binghamton, NY, 1995), pp. 133-4. Roberts, Poems, [U9] (pp. 151-3). Pritchard, pp. 135-7.

f. 95r-v

DnJ 2841: John Donne, Satyre IV (‘Well. I may now receive, and die. My sinne’)

Copy of lines 203-44, here beginning ‘ffeathers and dust, wherewth they fornicate’, in the same accomplished roman hand as DnJ 2818, on two pages of a quarto booklet of five remaining leaves, imperfect, lacking lines 1-202. c.1620s.

This MS recorded in Milgate.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 158-68. Milgate, Satires, pp. 14-22. Shawcross, No. 4.

ff. 96r-8r

DnJ 2873: John Donne, Satyre V (‘Thou shalt not laugh in this leafe, Muse, nor they’)

Copy, in the same accomplished roman hand as DnJ 2852, on five pages of a quarto booklet of five remaining leaves. c.1620s.

This MS recorded in Milgate and in Shawcross.

First published (in full) in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 168-71. Milgate, Satires, pp. 22-5. Shawcross, No. 5.

ff. 99r-100r

DrW 117.2: William Drummond of Hawthornden, For the Kinge (‘From such a face quois excellence’)

Copy, in a hand similar to that of Sir Henry Goodyer (1571-1627), on three pages of a pair of conjugate quarto leaves. c.1620s.

Often headed in MSS ‘The [Five] Senses’, a parody of Patrico's blessing of the King's senses in Jonson's Gypsies Metamorphosed (JnB 654-70). A MS copy owned by Drummond: see The Library of Drummond of Hawthornden, ed. Robert H. Macdonald (Edinburgh, 1971), No. 1357. Kastner printed the poem among his ‘Poems of Doubtful Authenticity’ (II, 296-9), but its sentiments are alien to those of Drummond: see C.F. Main, ‘Ben Jonson and an Unknown Poet on the King's Senses’, MLN, 74 (1959), 389-93, and MacDonald, SSL, 7 (1969), 118. Discussed also in Allan H. Gilbert, ‘Jonson and Drummond or Gil on the King's Senses’, MLN, 62 (January 1947), 35-7. Sometimes also ascribed to James Johnson.

f. 107r

RaW 317: Sir Walter Ralegh, Sir Walter Rauleigh to his sonne (‘Three thinges there bee that prosper up apace’)

Copy, in a cursive mixed hand, untitled, on one side of a quarto-size leaf. c.1620s.

Printed from this MS in Latham.

First published in Latham (1929), p. 102. Latham (1951), p. 49. Rudick, No. 52, p. 125.

f. 126r-v

SuJ 42: John Suckling, Love's Sanctuary (‘The crafty Boy that had full oft assay'd’)

Copy of an untitled six-stanza version, in an italic hand, on both sides of a single quarto leaf. Mid-17th century.

This MS collated and the last two stanzas edited in Clayton.

First published, as ‘Song’, in Last Remains (London, 1659). Clayton, pp. 50-1.

f. 132r

DnJ 3154: John Donne, To E. of D. with six holy Sonnets (‘See Sir, how as the Suns hot Masculine flame’)

Copy, in a mixed hand, untitled, on one side of a folio leaf of verse. c.1620s.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 317. Gardner, Divine Poems, pp. 5-6. Shawcross, No. 161.

f. 132r

DnJ 3368: John Donne, To Mr T.W. (‘Pregnant again with th' old twins Hope, and Feare’)

Copy, untitled. c.1620s.

This MS collated in Grierson and in Shawcross; recorded in Milgate.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 206. Milgate, Satires, p. 61. Shawcross, No. 116.

f. 132r

DnJ 3348: John Donne, To Mr T.W. (‘At once, from hence, my lines and I depart’)

Copy, untitled. c.1620s.

This MS recorded in Milgate and in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 206-7. Milgate, Satires, p. 62. Shawcross, No. 117.

f. 132v

DnJ 3269: John Donne, To Mr R.W. (‘Zealously my Muse doth salute all thee’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS collated in Grierson and in Shawcross; recorded in Milgate.

First published in Gosse (1899), I, 318. Grierson, I, 207. Milgate, Satires, p. 62. Shawcross, No. 118.

f. 132v

DnJ 3267: John Donne, To Mr R.W. (‘Mvse not that by thy mind thy body is led’)

Copy, untitled, inscribed in the margin ‘R W’.

This MS collated in Grierson and in Shawcross; recorded in Milgate.

First published in Grierson (1912), I, 207-8. Milgate, Satires, p. 63. Shawcross, No. 119.

f. 132v

DnJ 3236: John Donne, To Mr C.B. (‘Thy friend, whom thy deserts to thee enchaine’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS collated in Grierson; recorded in Milgate and in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 208. Milgate, Satires, p. 63. Shawcross, No. 120.

Add. MS 23722

A quarto miscellany of poems on affairs of state, in a single neat hand, 79 leaves (plus an index), in modern black leather gilt. Including eleven poems in the Marvell canon (plus further apocryphal poems). c.1680.

Later owned by Dawson Turner (1775-1858), banker, botanist and antiquary. Puttick & Simpson's, 9 June 1859 (Turner sale), lot 389. Purchased from Boone, 9 June 1860.

Recorded in IELM, II.ii, as the ‘Turner MS’: MaA Δ 4. The Marvell poems recorded and selectively collated in Margoliouth and in POAS, I and II.

f. 2r-v

MaA 234: Andrew Marvell, The Statue in Stocks-Market (‘As cities that to the fierce conquerors yield’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon Sr Robt Viners setting up the Kings Statue in Woolchurch Markett’.

This MS collated in Margoliouth and in POAS, I.

First published in A Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689). Margoliouth, I, 188-90. POAS, I, 266-9. Lord, pp. 193-6. Smith, pp. 416-17.

ff. 5r-10v

MaA 163.6: Andrew Marvell, The Dream of the Cabal: A Prophetical Satire Anno 1672 (‘As t'other night in bed I thinking lay’)

Copy.

A lampoon sometimes called The Gamball or a dreame of ye Grand Caball. First published in A Second Collection of the Newest and Most Ingenious Poems, Satyrs, Songs, &c. (London, 1689). Edited in POAS, I (1963), pp. 191-203, as possibly by John Ayloffe. Ascribed to Marvell in two MS copies (MaA 163.4 and MaA 163.92).

ff. 11r-12v

MaA 437: Andrew Marvell, Advice to a Painter to draw the Duke by (‘Spread a large canvass, Painter, to containe’)

Copy.

This MS collated in POAS, I; recorded in Osborne.

First published [in London], 1679. A Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689), as by ‘A-M-l, Esq’. Thompson III, 399-403. Margoliouth, I, 214-18, as by Henry Savile. POAS, I, 213-19, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 40-2, as by Henry Savile.

f. 13r-v

MaA 478: Andrew Marvell, Further Advice to a Painter (‘Painter once more thy Pencell reassume’)

Copy, headed ‘A new Advice to ye Painter’ and the poem dated in different ink ‘1674’.

This MS collated in Margoliouth and in POAS, I; recorded in Osborne.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1697). Margoliouth, I, 176-7. POAS, I, 163-7. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 38-9. Rejected from the canon by Lord and the authorship considered doubtful by Chernaik, pp. 211-12.

f. 15v

MaA 281: Andrew Marvell, Upon his Grand-Children (‘Kendal is dead, and Cambridge riding post’)

Copy, headed ‘On Clarendons Grandchildren’.

This MS recorded in Margoliouth.

First published with Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). Margoliouth, I, 147. Rejected from the canon by Lord and also by Chernaik, p. 211.

f. 16r-v

RoJ 347: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, A Satyr on Charles II (‘I' th' isle of Britain long since famous grown’)

Copy, headed ‘By ye Lord Rochester 1675’.

This MS recorded in Vieth and in Walker.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1704). Vieth, pp. 60-1. Walker, pp. 74-5. Love (five versions), pp. 85-6, 86-7, 88, 89-90, 90. The manuscript texts discussed, with detailed collations, in Harold Love, ‘Rochester's “I' th' isle of Britain”: Decoding a Textual Tradition’, EMS, 6 (1997), 175-223.

f. 17r-19v

RoJ 104.9: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, The History of Insipids (‘Chaste, pious, prudent, Charles the Second’)

Copy.

See Vivian de Sola Pinto in ‘“The History of Insipids”: Rochester, Freke, and Marvell’, MLR, 65 (1970), 11-15 (and see also Walker, p. xvii). Rejected by Vieth, by Walker, and by Love.

ff. 20r-2v

MaA 139.4: Andrew Marvell, A Country Clowne call'd Hodge Went to view the Pyramid, pray mark what did ensue (‘When Hodge had number'd up how many score’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Mengel.

First published, as ‘Hodge a Countryman went up to the Piramid, His Vision’, in A Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689), p. 5. Sometimes called Hodge's Vision from the Monument, [December, 1675]. Cooke, II, Carmina Miscellanea, pp. 81-8. Thompson, III, 359-65. Grosart, I, 435-40. Poems on Affairs of State: Augustan Satirical Verse, 1660-1714, Volume II: 1678-1681, ed. Elias F. Mengel, Jr (New Haven & London, 1965), pp. 146-53.

First attributed to Marvell in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1697), but probably written in 1679, after Marvell's death.

ff. 23v-5v

DoC 40: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Colon (‘As Colon drove his sheep along’)

Copy, the poem dated ‘1679’.

This MS collated in POAS and in Harris.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1697). POAS, II (1965), 167-75. Harris, pp. 124-35.

ff. 29r-31v

MaA 142: Andrew Marvell, A Dialogue between the Two Horses (‘Wee read in profane and Sacred records’)

This MS collated in Margoliouth and in POAS, I.

First published in The Second Part of the Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689). Margoliouth, I, 208-13, as ‘probably Marvell's’. POAS, I, 274-83, as anonymous. Rejected from the canon by Lord.

ff. 34r-7r

MaA 101: Andrew Marvell, Britannia and Rawleigh (‘Ah! Rawleigh, when thy Breath thou didst resign’)

Copy, headed ‘A Dialogue between Britannia & Sr Walter Rawleigh’.

This MS collated in Margoliouth and in POAS, I.

First published in A Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689). Margoliouth, I, 194-9, as of doubtful authorship. POAS, I, 228-36, attributed to John Ayloffe. See also George deF. Lord, ‘Satire and Sedition: The Life and Work of John Ayloffe’, HLQ, 29 (1965-6), 255-73 (p. 258).

ff. 37v-41v

MaA 316: Andrew Marvell, The Second Advice to a Painter (‘Nay, Painter, if thou dar'st design that fight’)

Copy, the poem here dated ‘1665’.

This MS collated in POAS, I; recorded in Osborne.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 34-53. Lord, pp. 117-30. Smith, pp. 332-43. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 28-32, as anonymous.

The case for Marvell's authorship supported in George deF. Lord, ‘Two New Poems by Marvell?’, BNYPL, 62 (1958), 551-70, but see also discussion by Lord and Ephim Fogel in Vol. 63 (1959), 223-36, 292-308, 355-66. Marvell's authorship supported in Annabel Patterson, ‘The Second and Third Advices-to-the-Painter’, PBSA, 71 (1977), 473-86. Discussed also in Margoliouth, I, 348-50, and in Chernaik, p. 211, where Marvell's authorship is considered doubtful. A case for Sir John Denham's authorship is made in Brendan O Hehir, Harmony from Discords: A Life of Sir John Denham (Berkeley & Los Angeles, 1968), pp. 212-28.

ff. 42r-8v, 55v

MaA 362: Andrew Marvell, The Third Advice to a Painter (‘Sandwich in Spain now, and the Duke in love’)

Copy, the poem dated ‘1666’, separated from the envoy ‘To the King’ (f. 55v), which is inscribed as ‘belonging to ye 3d advice and placd page 96’.

This MS collated in POAS, I; recorded in Osborne.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 67-87. Lord, pp. 130-44. Smith, pp. 346-56. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 32-3, as anonymous.

See discussions of the disputed authorship of this poem, as well as of the ‘Second Advice’, cited before MaA 314.

f. 49r-v

MaA 84.7: Andrew Marvell, A Ballad called The Haymarket Hectors (‘I sing a woeful ditty’)

Copy.

Sometimes called Upon the cutting of Sr John Coventry's nose. First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1704). Thompson, I, xxxix-xli (from ‘Marvell's writing’). Grosart, I, 456-8. Edited in POAS, I (1963), 168-71, as doubtfully by Marvell.

f. 51v

RoJ 10: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Against Marriage (‘Out of mere love and arrant devotion’)

Copy, headed ‘By ye E. of Rochester’.

Edited from this MS in Vieth and in Walker.

First published in Vieth (1968), p. 159. Walker, pp. 130-1, among ‘Poems Possibly by Rochester’. Love, pp. 40-1, as Of Marriage and beginning Out of Stark Love, and arrant Devotion.

f. 52r-v

RoJ 62: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, The Disabled Debauchee (‘As some brave admiral, in former war’)

Copy, the poem here dated 1675.

This MS recorded in Vieth; collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 116-17. Walker, pp. 97-9. Love, pp. 44-5.

ff. 56r-8r

MaA 390: Andrew Marvell, The Fourth Advice to a Painter (‘Draw England ruin'd by what was giv'n before’)

Copy, the poem here dated 1668.

This MS collated in POAS, I; recorded in Osborne.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 140-6, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 33-5, as anonymous. Regarded as anonymous in Margoliouth, I, 348-50.

ff. 58v-9r

MaA 424: Andrew Marvell, The Fifth Advice to a Painter (‘Painter, where was't thy former work did cease?’)

This MS collated in POAS, I; recorded in Osborne.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 146-52, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 35-6, as anonymous. Regarded as anonymous in Margoliouth, I, 348-50.

ff. 60r-2r

MaA 127: Andrew Marvell, Clarindon's House-Warming (‘When Clarindon had discern'd beforehand’)

This MS collated in POAS, I.

First published with Directions to a Painter…Of Sir John Denham ([London], 1667). Margoliouth, I, 143-6. POAS, I, 88-96. Lord, pp. 144-51. Smith, pp. 358-61.

ff. 66r-70r

DrJ 43.73: John Dryden, An Essay upon Satire (‘How dull and how insensible a beast’)

Copy, the poem dated ‘1679’.

A satire written in 1675 by John Sheffield, Earl of Mulgrave, but it was widely believed by contemporaries (including later Alexander Pope, who had access to Mulgrave's papers) that Dryden had a hand in it, a belief which led to the notorious assault on him in Rose Alley on 18 December 1679, at the reputed instigation of the Earl of Rochester and/or the Duchess of Portsmouth.

First published in London, 1689. POAS, I (1963), pp. 396-413.

The authorship discussed in Macdonald, pp. 217-19, and see John Burrows, ‘Mulgrave, Dryden, and An Essay upon Satire’, in Superior in His Profession: Essays in Memory of Harold Love, ed. Meredith Sherlock, Brian McMullin and Wallace Kirsop, Script & Print, 33 (2009), pp. 76-91, where is it concluded, from stylistic analysis, that ‘Mulgrave had by far the major hand’. Recorded in Hammond, V, 684, in an ‘Index of Poems Excluded from this Edition’.

f. 77v

DoC 226: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On the Young Statesmen (‘Clarendon had law and sense’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS collated in POAS and in Harris.

First published in A Third Collection of…Poems, Satyrs, Songs (London, 1689). POAS, II (1965), 339-41. Harris, pp. 50-4.

Add. MS 24652

A formal presentation copy, for a member of the Heneage family, 239 folio leaves, in modern leather gilt. In the accomplished italic and secretary scripts of one or possibly two of Howard's principal amanuenses, with a formal title-page (f. 2r) including an autograph quotation in Latin by Howard from Daniel 13.57, twelve lines of autograph Latin verse by him, followed by illuminated arms of the Heneage family, subscribed by ten more autograph lines of Latin verse signed ‘Tibi in perpetuum / Leuinctissimus / H. Hwward’ (f. 2v), a Dedication ‘To the Queenes Most Excellent Maiestie’ in italic script (ff. 3r-29r), subscribed by Howard (f. 29r) ‘Your Maiesties most loyall / and humble subiecte till / death / H: Hwward’, the main text then in secretary script, after an unnumbered blank leaf, on ff. 30r-238r, with separate title-pages for the second book (f. 132v) and third book (f. 162r), and with some of the sidenotes also in Howard's hand. Late 16th century.

*HoH 72: Henry Howard, Earl of Northampton, A dutiful defence of the lawful regiment of women

Scribbled names on f. 1*v of ‘henry Dull’ and ‘John Poole’. Purchased from Bernard Quaritch, 17 May 1862.

An unpublished answer to, and attack upon, John Knox's ‘railing invective’ against Mary Queen of Scots, First Blast of the Trumpet against the Monstrous Regiment of Women (1558). Written, Howard claims in his Dedication, some thirteen years after he was asked to do so by a Privy Councillor [i.e. c.1585-90]. The Dedication to Queen Elizabeth beginning ‘It pricketh now fast upon the point of thirteen years (most excellent most gratious and most redoubted Soveraign...’; the main text, in three books, beginning ‘It may seem strange to men of grounded knowledge...’, and ending ‘...Sancta et individuae Trinitati sit omnis honor laus et gloria in secula seculorum. Amen.’

Add. MS 24706

A composite volume of verse collected by Peter Le Neve (1661-1729), his brother Oliver, and Thomas Martin (1697-1771) of Palgrave. Mid-17th century.

f. 110r-v

CoR 738: Richard Corbett, Nonsence (‘Like to the thund'ring tone of unspoke speeches’)

Copy, headed ‘A mess of non-sence’, and here beginning ‘Like to the tone..’.

First published in Witts' Recreations Augmented (London, 1641). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 95-6.

Add. MS 24844

A small quarto volume of legal documents and precedents. Early-mid-16th century.

ff. 38v-9r

HyJ 22.5: John Heywood, Document(s)

A contemporary copy of the grant to Heywood of Haydon Manor in 1521.

Edited in Robert W. Bolwell, The Life and Works of John Heywood (New York, 1921), p. 159.

Add. MS 24863

A folio composite volume of state papers and parliamentary speeches 1640-c.1660, in various hands, 91 leaves, in half-calf on marbled boards.

ff. 8r-9r

RuB 144: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, ?7 November 1640

Copy, in a mixed hand, headed ‘Sr Beniamin Ruddiers speech in Parliamt anno 1640’, ‘7 Nov’ added later in pencil, on 3 pages of a pair of conjugate folio leaves. c.1640s.

Speech (variously dated 4, 7, 9 and 10 November 1640) beginning ‘We are here assembled to do God's business and the King's...’. First published in The Speeches of Sr. Benjamin Rudyer in the high Court of Parliament (London, 1641), pp. 1-10. Manning, pp. 159-65.

f. 86r-v

ClJ 21: John Cleveland, A Dialogue between two Zealots, upon the &c. in the Oath (‘Sir Roger, from a zealous piece of Freeze’)

Copy, in a neat mixed hand, headed ‘A Dialogue betwixt two Zelotts Concerning &c. in the new Oath’, on two pages of a pair of conjugate quarto leaves. Mid-late 17th century.

First published in Character (1647). Morris & Withington, pp. 4-5.