Bodleian Library, other MSS

8° A. 13 Med BS

An exemplum bearinging no trace of Cowley's own hand but inscribed by a contemporary librarian ‘ex dono Authoris’. 1662.

CoA 211: Abraham Cowley, Cowley, Abraham. Plantarum libri duo (London, 1662)

MS Add. A. 48

A quarto composite verse miscellany, principally of poems upon affairs of state, in two hands, i + 52 leaves. Late 17th century.

ff. 2r-9v

WiG 30: George Wither, Vox et Lacrimae Anglorum (‘Renowned patriots, open your eyes’)

Copy, including a title-page and prefatory poem (beginning ‘These lines had kissed your hands October last’), but without the postscript.

First published in London, 1668. Probably not by Wither; possibly by Edward Raddon: see Stephen K. Roberts, ‘A Poet, a Plotter and a Postmaster: a Disputed Polemic of 1668’, Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research, 53 (1980), 258-65. See also David Norbrook, ‘Some Notes on the Canon of George Wither’, N&Q, 241 (1996), 276-81.

ff. 10r-12r

MaA 394: Andrew Marvell, The Fourth Advice to a Painter (‘Draw England ruin'd by what was giv'n before’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Osborne.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 140-6, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 33-5, as anonymous. Regarded as anonymous in Margoliouth, I, 348-50.

ff. 16r-17r

MaA 483: Andrew Marvell, Further Advice to a Painter (‘Painter once more thy Pencell reassume’)

Copy of a 56-line version, untitled, preceded by the words ‘this being published abroad was called in and condemned to be burnt by the common hangman. betwixt 70 and 71. and about 1673. ½ it was againe revived and published abroad’.

This MS collated in Margoliouth. Recorded in Osborne.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1697). Margoliouth, I, 176-7. POAS, I, 163-7. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 38-9. Rejected from the canon by Lord and the authorship considered doubtful by Chernaik, pp. 211-12.

ff. 17r-18v

MaA 443: Andrew Marvell, Advice to a Painter to draw the Duke by (‘Spread a large canvass, Painter, to containe’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Osborne.

First published [in London], 1679. A Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689), as by ‘A-M-l, Esq’. Thompson III, 399-403. Margoliouth, I, 214-18, as by Henry Savile. POAS, I, 213-19, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 40-2, as by Henry Savile.

f. 19r

MaA 163.5: Andrew Marvell, The Dream of the Cabal: A Prophetical Satire Anno 1672 (‘As t'other night in bed I thinking lay’)

Copy.

A lampoon sometimes called The Gamball or a dreame of ye Grand Caball. First published in A Second Collection of the Newest and Most Ingenious Poems, Satyrs, Songs, &c. (London, 1689). Edited in POAS, I (1963), pp. 191-203, as possibly by John Ayloffe. Ascribed to Marvell in two MS copies (MaA 163.4 and MaA 163.92).

ff. 46v-9r

MaA 149: Andrew Marvell, A Dialogue between the Two Horses (‘Wee read in profane and Sacred records’)

Copy, headed ‘A diologue betwixt the bras hors at Charing Cross and the market hors in Cheapsid or stocks market’.

This MS collated in Margoliouth.

First published in The Second Part of the Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689). Margoliouth, I, 208-13, as ‘probably Marvell's’. POAS, I, 274-83, as anonymous. Rejected from the canon by Lord.

MS Add. A. 63

Account in Latin of Queen Elizabeth's visit to Oxford from 31 August to 6 September 1566, on twenty small quarto leaves, cropped. By John Bereblock, fellow of Exeter College, Oxford, written in a semi-calligraphic predominantly secretary script. c.1566.

Owned before 30 May 1864 by the Rev. John C. Jackson.

ff. 16v-17r

ElQ 154: Queen Elizabeth I, Queen Elizabeth's Latin Oration at Oxford University, September 5, 1566

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Autograph Compositions.

Beginning ‘Qui male agunt oderunt lucem et idcirco...’, in Autograph Compositions, pp. 125-6. An English translation, beginning ‘Those who do bad things hate the light...’, in Collected Works, Speech 8, pp. 89-91.

MS Add. A. 93

Copy, in a single secretary hand, i + 155 quarto leaves. Late 16th-early 17th century.

LeC 7: Anon, Leicester's Commonwealth

Later owned by John Somers (1651-1716), Baron Somers, Lord Chancellor, and afterwards by his brother-in-law Sir Joseph Jekyll (1662-1738), lawyer and politician (No. 278 in the sale catalogue of his library, 1759). Probably later owned by the Rev. Philip Bliss (1787-1857), antiquary and book collector (possibly No. 144 in the Bliss sale, Sotheby's 21 August 1858, to C.J. Stewart). James Colman's sale catalogue No. 59, 23 November 1867, item 198.

This MS recorded in Peck, p. 226.

First published as The Copie of a Leter, Wryten by a Master of Arte of Cambrige, to his Friend in London, Concerning some talke past of late betwen two worshipful and graue men, about the present state, and some procedinges of the Erle of Leycester and his friendes in England ([? Rouen], 1584). Soon banned. Reprinted as Leycesters common-wealth (London, 1641). Edited, as Leicester's Commonwealth, by D.C. Peck (Athens, OH, & London, 1985). Although various attributions have been suggested by Peck and others, the most likely author remains Robert Persons (1546-1610), Jesuit conspirator.

MS Add. A. 104

Copy, in a professional hand, with a title-page, on 41 quarto pages, in contemporary calf gilt. c.1634-41.

WoH 262: Sir Henry Wotton, A Parallel between Robert Earl of Essex and George Duke of Buckingham

Purchased from the Rev. John C. Jackson on 11 October 1870.

First published in London, 1641. Edited by Sir Robert Egerton Brydges (Lee Priory Press, Ickham, 1814).

MS Add. A. 112

Copy, in a cursive hand, the Epistle Dedicatory to R. R. in another hand, vi + 131 quarto leaves, in vellum. Early 17th century.

MrT 80: Sir Thomas More, Ro. Ba.'s Life of Sir Thomas More

Acquired on 12 November 1873 from C. T. Jefferies, bookseller, Bristol.

Collated in Hitchcock, Ro. Ba. and described, p. xii.

A life of More written in 1599, possibly by Robert Basset (1574-1641), of Devon, a zealous Catholic and kinsman of More: see Andrew Breeze, ‘Sir Robert Basset and The Life of Syr Thomas More’, N&Q, 249 (September 2004), 263. The work first published in Christopher Wordsworth, Ecclesiastical History, vol. II (London, 1839). Edited, as The Lyfe of Syr Thomas More Sometymes Lord Chancellor of England, by Elsie Vaughan Hitchcock and P.E. Hallett (EETS, London, 1950).

MS Add. A. 116

Copy, in a professional predominantly secretary hand, with some emendations in a later hand (of c.1649), ii + 87 quarto leaves (plus eight blanks partly used for later notes), in contemporary calf (rebacked). c.1620s.

DaJ 257: Sir John Davies, The Question concerning Impositions

A treatise, with dedicatory epistle to James I, comprising 33 chapters, beginning ‘The Question it self is no more than this, Whether the Impositions which the King of England hath laid and levied upon Merchandize, by vertue of his Prerogative onely...’. First published in London, 1656. Grosart, III, 1-116.

MS Add. A. 185

A 15th-century, French, illuminated MS book of hours with Ralegh's signature, ‘W Ralegh’, at the top of fol. 1r. Late 16th-early 17th century.

*RaW 1028: Sir Walter Ralegh, Horæ

This volume briefly discussed in Rosemond Tuve, ‘Spenser and some Pictorial Conventions’, SP, 37 (1940), 149-76 (p. 151), and in G.A. Wilkes, ‘The Authorship of “The Passionate Mans Pilgrimage”’, N&Q, 202 (August 1957), 335-6.

MS Add. A. 301

A quarto miscellany, principally of poems on affairs of state, xvi + 130 leaves. Entitled ‘Horæ subsecivæ, or Misselanies in Prose & Verse’ and arranged in four ‘books’. Early 18th century.

Given by J. Cater in 1756 to the Rev. William Cole (1714-82). In the Dalrymple sale. Afterwards owned by Joseph Haslewood (1769-1833), bibliographer and antiquary. Haslewood sale (16 December 1833), lot 1386. Evans, 1834. Owned in 1836 by Reginald Peacock (his bookplate). Bought from George A. Johnston, Edinburgh bookseller, 18 March 1885.

f. ixv

DoC 106: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, The Innocent Conjugates or The Maiden Bridegroom and Virgin Bride (‘Inflam'd by love and led by blind desires’)

Copy, headed ‘The Maiden Conjugates...Englishd by Ld. Dorsett’.

Edited from this MS in Harris.

First published in Harris (1979), p. 176.

f. xr-v

RoJ 272: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, The Platonic Lady (‘I could love thee till I die’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Lord Rochester’.

Edited from this MS in Hayward, in Vieth, and in Walker.

First published in Collected Works of John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester, ed. John Hayward (London, 1926). Vieth, pp. 25-6. Walker, pp. 23-4. Love, p. 35.

ff. 65v-64v rev.

DoC 186: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On the Countess of Dorchester (III) (‘Proud with the spoils of royal cully’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Harris.

First published in A Collection of Miscellany Poems, by Mr. Brown (London, 1699). POAS, V (1971), 384-5. Harris, pp. 43-4. In most texts the poem runs directly on from the previous poem on the Countess of Dorchester (DoC 173-85).

f. 65v rev.

DoC 173: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On the Countess of Dorchester (II) (‘Dorinda's sparkling wit and eyes’)

Copy, headed ‘A Satyr: Or, Dorsett on Dorchester’.

Edited from this MS in Harris. Collated in POAS.

First published in A Collection of Miscellany Poems, by Mr. Brown (London, 1699). POAS, V (1971), 384. Harris, pp. 43-4.

MS Add. A. 368

A quarto composite miscellany, in Latin and English, associated with Oxford University, iii + 68 leaves. In three parts, the first (ff. 1-20) owned in 1669 and probably compiled by Francis Philips (b.1651) of Brasenose College, Oxford; the second (ff. 21-46), c.1663 or so; the third part (ff. 47 onwards) 19th-century. c.1669.

Once owned by the Rev. Philip Bliss (1787-1857), antiquary and book collector. Sotheby's, 2 August 1858 (Bliss sale), lot 172. Purchased from the executors of Dr John Griffiths (d.1885) in May 1886.

ff. 26v-38v

UrT 3: Thomas Urquhart, The History of the Admirable Chrichton

Copy, headed ‘Taken out of a little book found in the channill, in the street after the fatall battle of Worcester, written by Sr Thomas Vrquhart of Cromarty knight…’. c.1663.

First published in Ekskubalauron: or the Discovery of a Most Exquisite Jewel, Found in the Kennel of Worcester-Streets, Anno 1651 (London, 1652). Willcock (1899), pp. 215-39. The Admirable Urquhart, ed. Richard Boston (London, 1975), pp. 65-96. Jack & Lyall (1983), [pp. 100-37].

f. 45v

DkT 3: Thomas Dekker, Vpon her bringing by water to White Hall (‘The Queene was brought by water to White Hall’)

Copy, here ascribed to Thomas Heywood. c.1663.

First published in The Wonderfull yeare (London, 1603). Reprinted in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1614), and in Thomas Heywood, The Life and Death of Queene Elizabeth (London, 1639). Grosart, I, 93-4. Tentatively (but probably wrongly) attributed to Camden in George Burke Johnston, ‘Poems by William Camden’, SP, 72 (December 1975), 112.

MS Add. A. 380

A quarto composite volume of MSS, in Latin and English, relating principally to Irish affairs, in various hands, vii + 225 leaves. Assembled in part by James Ussher (1581-1656), Archbishop of Armagh.

ff. 192r-3r

StW 1475: William Strode, Sermon at the Funeral of Dr Bainbridge, 6 November 1643

Copy of Strode's Latin oration, headed ‘In Exequijs Clarissimj Doctoris Bainbrigii, Mathematici ac Medici probatissimi, Astronomiae Praelectoris Publici apud Oxonienses, Oratio Funebris, Nouemb. 6: 1643. habita’, beginning ‘Si Medicinae loco sit Fama defunctis (ô aegrè Superstites Amici...’ and subscribed ‘Dixi Gulielmus Strodus, Orator Publicus’, with corrections in another hand, on two conjugate quarto leaves. c.1643.

Unpublished.

MS Add. B. 7

A complete transcript of the London edition of 1633, dated 1708. 1708.

WiG 82: George Wither, Faire-Virtue, the Mistresse of Phil'Arete

Generally bound with Juvenilia (London, 1622). Spenser Society No. 11 (1871).

MS Add. B. 8

A small quarto notebook compiled by H. Coley, i + 100 leaves. 1690-5.

f. 67r

DrJ 2.1: John Dryden, Absalom and Achitophel (‘In pious times, e'r Priest-craft did begin’)

Extracts.

First published in London, 1681. Kinsley, I, 215-43. California, II, 2-36. Hammond, I, 450-532.

MS Add. B. 83

A quarto miscellany of extracts in verse and prose, ii + 68 pages. Compiled by Bulkeley Bandinel (1781-1861), librarian and editor. c.1811.

f. 4r

CmT 104.5: Thomas Campion, ‘There is none, O none but you’

Copy, transcribed from CmT 104.

This MS recorded in May, p. 15.

First published in Two Bookes of Ayres (London, [c.1612-13]), Book II, No. xiii. Davis, p. 102.

MS Add. B. 97

A quarto miscellany of verse and prose, in English and Latin, 64 leaves, in contemporary limp vellum. Compiled by Leweston Fitzjames (1574-1638), of Leweston, Dorset, and the Middle Temple. c.1595-early 17th century.

f. 16r-v

CmT 208: Thomas Campion, ‘What if a day, or a month, or a yeare’

Copy of a three-strophe version, headed ‘A Songe’.

Possibly first published as a late 16th-century broadside. Philotus (Edinburgh, 1603). Richard Alison, An Howres Recreation in Musicke (London, 1606). Davis, p. 473. The different versions and attributions discussed in A.E.H. Swaen, ‘The Authorship of “What if a Day”, and its Various Versions’, MP, 4 (1906-7), 397-422, and in David Greer, ‘“What if a Day” — An Examination of the Words and Music’, M&L, 43 (1962), 304-19.

See also CmT 239-41.

f. 20v

DaJ 93: Sir John Davies, On the Marriage of Lady Mary Baker to Richard Fletcher, Bishop of London (‘The pride of Prelacy, which now longe since’)

Copy of poems 4 and 5, headed ‘In Londinense Episcopu iampride Dominæ & scortæ nuptu’ and beginning ‘It is a question in Heraldry’, dated 20 February 1594/5.

This MS recorded in Krueger, pp. 398, 442.

First published in Samuel A. Tannenbaum, ‘Unfamiliar Versions of Some Elizabethan Poems’, PMLA, 45.ii (1930), 809-21 (pp. 818-19). Krueger, pp. 177-9.

ff. 24v-38r

DaJ 100: Sir John Davies, Orchestra (‘Where lives the man that never yet did heare’)

Copy of an early version in 113 stanzas, headed ‘A Poem of Dauncinge’, with a dedicatory sonnet ‘To his very Friend, Ma. Rich: Martin’ (beginning ‘To whom shall I this dauncing Poeme send’), and eighteen additional stanzas inserted later (probably in 1596).

This MS collated in Krueger and described, p. 442, and in his ‘Sir John Davies: Orchestra Complete, Epigrams, Unpublished poems’, RES, NS 13 (1962), 17-29.

First published in London, 1596. Krueger, pp. 87-126.

f. 38v

HrJ 253: Sir John Harington, Of the commodities that men haue by their Marriage (‘A fine yong Clerke, of kinne to Fryer Frappert’)

Copy, headed ‘Ludicru of marriage’ and here beginning ‘A fine younge Preist of kin to ffryar ffrapp’.

First published in 1618, Book II, No. 70. McClure No. 166, pp. 213-14. Kilroy, Book III, No. 7, pp. 169-70.

f. 39r

HrJ 27: Sir John Harington, Against Swearing (‘In elder times an ancient custome was’)

Copy, headed ‘Of Othes’, subscribed ‘Authore Ben: Jonsonio’.

First published in Henry Fitzsimon, S.J., The Justification and Exposition of the Divine Sacrifice of the Masse (Douai, 1611). 1615. 1618, Book IV, No. 9. McClure No. 263, p. 256. Kilroy, Book IV, No. 30, p. 220.

f. 39v

DnJ 1895: John Donne, A licentious person (‘Thy sinnes and haires may no man equall call’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Shawcross.

First published in Henry Fitzgeffrey, Satyres and Satyricall Epigram's (London, 1617). Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 77. Milgate, Satires, p. 52. Shawcross, No. 90. Variorum, 8 (1995), pp. 8 and 11.

ff. 41r-5v

DaJ 4: Sir John Davies, Epigrammes

Copy of 44 epigrams (Nos. 1-11, 13-44), headed ‘Epigramata Jo: Dauisij’ and here beginning ‘Loue not yet Loue yt is a child and blynde’.

This MS collated in Krueger. Described in Krueger, pp. 378-9, 442, and in his ‘Sir John Davies: Orchestra Complete, Epigrams, Unpublished Poems’, RES, NS 13 (1962), 17-29, 113-24 (p. 120).

58 Epigrammes first published in ‘Middleborugh’ [i.e. London?], [1595-6?]. Krueger, pp. 127-51. Fourteen additional Epigrammes printed from MSS in Krueger, pp. 153-9.

ff. 49r-51r

DaJ 24: Sir John Davies, Epithalamion for the Marriage of Lady Elizabeth Vere and William Stanley, Earl of Derby (‘Love not that Love that is a child and blynde’)

Copy of a series of ten sonnets.

Edited from this MS in Krueger.

First published in Robert Krueger, ‘Sir John Davies: Orchestra Complete, Epigrams, Unpublished Poems’, RES, NS 13 (1962), 113-24 (pp. 114-18).

ff. 55v-6r

DnJ 76: John Donne, The Anagram (‘Marry, and love thy Flavia, for, shee’)

Copy, headed ‘In Flaviam’.

This MS recorded in Gardner and in Shawcross.

First published as ‘Elegie II’ in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 80-2 (as ‘Elegie II’). Gardner, Elegies, pp. 21-2. Shawcross, No. 17. Variorum, 2 (2000), pp. 217-18.

MS Add. B. 105

A quarto composite miscellany of verse and prose, in English and Latin, in several hands, 11 + 109 leaves. Early-mid-18th century.

Owned in 1812 by Miss Elizabeth Mansel. Given to Henry Gough, of Redhill, who presented it to the Bodleian in December 1884.

f. 7r

WaE 310: Edmund Waller, Of the Queen (‘The lark, that shuns on lofty boughs to build’)

Copy, headed ‘The Discription of a Lark by Edmond Waller Esqr’.

First published in Workes (1645). Thorn-Drury, I, 77-9.

ff. 13v-14v

CgW 31: William Congreve, Paraphrase upon Horace, Ode XIX, Lib. I (‘The Tyrant Queen of Soft Desires’)

Copy.

First published in Examen Poeticum…The Third Part of Miscellany Poems [by John Dryden et al.] (London, 1693). Summers, IV, 33. Dobrée, pp. 234-5. McKenzie, II, 313-14.

ff. 23r-5r

CgW 5: William Congreve, Horace, Lib. II. Ode 14. Imitated by Mr. Congreve (‘Ah! No, 'tis all in vain, believe me 'tis’)

Copy.

First published in Charles Gildon, Miscellany Poems upon Several Occasions (London, 1692). Examen Poeticum…The Third Part of Miscellany Poems [by John Dryden et al.] (London, 1693). Summers, IV, 3-4. Dobrée, pp. 235-7. McKenzie, II, 315-17.

ff. 29r-30r

DrJ 242.3: John Dryden, Veni Creator Spiritus, Translated in Paraphrase (‘Creator Spirit, by whose aid’)

Copy, headed ‘Veni Creator Spiritus Paraphras'd. By John Dryden Esqr’.

This MS recorded in California, IV, 802.

First published in Examen Poeticum (London, 1693). Kinsley, II, 843-4. California, IV, 422-3. Hammond, IV, 308-10.

ff. 31v, 49r-58r

DrJ 383: John Dryden, Extracts

Extracts, including quotations from The Character of a Good Parson, Ceyx and Alcyone and Palamon and Arcite.

Recorded in California, IV, 802.

f. 32r-v

RoJ 459: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Spoken Extempore to a Country Clerk after Having Heard Him Sing Psalms (‘Sternhold and Hopkins had great qualms’)

Copy, headed ‘As the late Earl of Rochester went by a Country Church, where the People were singing Sternhold, and Hopkins's Version of ye Psalms, he spake the following Verses, Ex Tempore’.

This MS recorded in Vieth and in Walker.

First published in The Miscellaneous Works of the Right Honourable the Late Earls of Rochester and Roscommon, 3rd edition (London, 1709). Vieth, p. 22. Walker, p. 122. Love, p. 301, as ‘Lord Rochester upon hearing the singing in a Country Church’.

ff. 37v-41v

CgW 33: William Congreve, Priam's Lamentation and Petition to Achilles, for the Body of his Son Hector (‘So spake the God, and Heav'nward took his Flight’)

Copy.

First published in Examen Poeticum…The Third Part of Miscellany Poems [by John Dryden et al.] (London, 1693). Summers, IV, 25-7. Dobrée, pp. 225-8. McKenzie, II, 303-6.

ff. 42r-8v

CgW 22: William Congreve, The Lamentations of Hecuba, Andromache, and Helen, over the dead Body of Hector (‘Now did the Saffron Morn her beams display’)

Copy.

First published in Examen Poeticum…The Third Part of Miscellany Poems [by John Dryden et al.] (London, 1693). Summers, IV, 28-32. Dobrée, pp. 228-33. McKenzie, II, 307-12.

ff. 71r-2r

DoC 263: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, To Mr. Edward Howard, on his Incomparable, Incomprehensible Poem Called ‘The British Princes’ (‘Come on, ye critics! Find one fault who dare’)

Copy, headed ‘To a Person of Honour: upon his Incomprehensible Poems’.

This MS collated in Harris.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions, By the Right Honourable, the E. of R[ochester] (‘Antwerpen’ [i.e. London], 1680). POAS, I (1963), 338-9. Harris, pp. 7-9.

ff. 72v-3v

DoC 145: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On Mr. Edward Howard upon his ‘New Utopia’ (‘Thou damn'd antipodes to common sense!’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon the same’ [i.e. Edward Howard].

This MS collated in Harris.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions, By the Right Honourable, the E. of R[ochester] (‘Antwerpen’ [i.e. London], 1680). POAS, I (1963), 340-1. Harris, pp. 15-17.

f. 97r

CoA 259: Abraham Cowley, Extracts

Extract(s) from work(s) by Cowley.

MS Add. B. 106

A duodecimo verse miscellany, in English and Latin, in several hands, ii + 53 leaves (plus numerous blanks), in contemporary calf. c.1690.

J. Salkeld, sale catalogue No. 222 (17 June 1885), item 273.

ff. 3v-4r

RnT 547: Thomas Randolph, Upon the Burning of a School (‘What heat of learning kindled your desire’)

Copy.

Published in Wit and Drollery (London, 1661), ascribed to ‘T. R.’. Usually anonymous in MS copies and the school variously identified as being in Castlethorpe or in Batley, Yorkshire, or in Lewes, Sussex, or elsewhere.

ff. 5r-7r

RoJ 21: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, An Allusion to Horace, the Tenth Satyr of the First Book (‘Well, sir, 'tis granted I said Dryden's rhymes’)

Copy in two hands, headed ‘By the E. of Rochester In imitation of the tenth Satye of the first booke of Horace's Sermons’.

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 120-6. Walker, pp. 99-102. Love, pp. 71-4.

f. 9v

CoA 13: Abraham Cowley, Anacreontiques. II. Drinking (‘The thirsty Earth soaks up the Rain’)

Copy, headed ‘An Anacriontick Ode paraphrasticaly Englished by Mr A Cowley’.

This MS recorded in Jean Loiseau, Abraham Cowley's Reputation in England (Paris, 1931), p. 27, n. 18.

First published in Wits Interpreter (London, 1655). Among Miscellanies in Poems (London, 1656). Waller, I, 51. Sparrow, p. 50.

Musical setting by Silas Taylor published in Catch that Catch Can: or the Musical Companion (London, 1667). Setting by Roger Hill published in Select Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1669).

f. 13v

BcF 1: Francis Bacon, ‘The world's a bubble, and the life of man’

Copy, headed ‘An Ode agst Mans life’, inscribed at the top ‘Stubbs Poems’, and followed (ff. 14r-17r) by ‘A Parode in praise of humane life’ (beginning ‘The worlds a Globe of State, our Life a Reigne’), a Latin version (beginning ‘Mundus Bulla lovis, nec vita humana porequat’), and a Greek version.

First published in Thomas Farnaby, Florilegium epigrammatum Graecorum (London, 1629). Poems by Sir Henry Wotton, Sir Walter Raleigh and others, ed. John Hannah (London, 1845), pp. 76-80. Spedding, VII, 271-2. H.J.C. Grierson, ‘Bacon's Poem, “The World”: Its Date and Relation to certain other Poems’, Modern Language Review, 6 (1911), 145-56.

ff. 19v-20v

RoJ 575: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Upon Nothing (‘Nothing! thou elder brother even to Shade’)

Copy, headed ‘Rochester Upon Nothing, or Somewhat of Nothing’.

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker and in Love, ‘The Text of Rochester's “Upon Nothing”’.

First published, as a broadside, [in London, 1679]. Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 118-20. Walker, pp. 62-4. Harold Love, ‘The Text of Rochester's “Upon Nothing”’, Centre for Bibliographical and Textual Studies, Monash University, Occasional Papers 1 (1985). Love, pp. 46-8.

ff. 20v-5r

RoJ 298: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, A Satyr against Reason and Mankind (‘Were I (who to my cost already am)’)

Lines 174-221 edited from this MS in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published (lines 1-173) as a broadside, A Satyr against Mankind [London, 1679]. Complete, with supplementary lines 174-221 (beginning ‘All this with indignation have I hurled’) in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 94-101. Walker, pp. 91-7, as ‘Satyr’. Love, pp. 57-63.

The text also briefly discussed in Kristoffer F. Paulson, ‘A Question of Copy-Text: Rochester's “A Satyr against Reason and Mankind”’, N&Q, 217 (May 1972), 177-8. Some texts followed by one or other of three different ‘Answer’ poems (two sometimes ascribed to Edward Pococke or Mr Griffith and Thomas Lessey: see Vieth, Attribution, pp. 178-9).

f. 33v

RoJ 220: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, On Rome's pardons (‘If Rome can pardon sins, as Romans hold’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 161-2. Walker, pp. 127-8, among ‘Poems Possibly by Rochester’. Love, p. 247, among Disputed Works.

ff. 39r-40r

RoJ 111: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, The Imperfect Enjoyment (‘Naked she lay, clasped in my longing arms’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 37-40. Walker, pp. 30-2. Love, pp. 13-15.

ff. 40r-2r

BeA 4: Aphra Behn, The Disappointment (‘One day the Amorous Lysander’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions, by the Right Honourable, the E[arl] of R[ochester] (‘Antwerp’ [i.e. London], 1680). Poems upon Several Occasions (London, 1684). Summers, VI, 178-82. Todd, I, No. 28, pp. 65-9.

Discussed in Vieth, Attribution, pp. 448-50.

f. 42r-v

RoJ 551: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Upon His Drinking a Bowl (‘Vulcan, contrive me such a cup’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon his drinking bowl.’

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 52-3. Walker, pp. 37-8. Love, pp. 41-2, as Nestor.

f. 44v

DoC 306: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Actus Primus, Scena Prima (‘For standing tarses we kind nature thank’)

Copy of lines 1-7, imperfect, lacking the rest.

This MS recorded in Vieth.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions, By the Right Honourable, the E. of R[ochester] (‘Antwerpen’ [i.e. London], 1680). Discussed in Harris, p. 185, and in Vieth, Attribution, pp. 437-8.

f. 45v

RoJ 178: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Love and Life (‘All my past life is mine no more’)

Copy, headed ‘Roch: Love & Life. a Song’.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution.

First published in Songs for i 2 & 3 Voyces Composed by Henry Bowman [London, 1677]. Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, p. 90. Walker, p. 44. Love, pp. 25-6.

ff. 48r-50r

CnC 98: Charles Cotton, On Tobacco (‘What horrid sin condemn'd the teeming Earth’)

Copy, probably transcribed from Poems (1689).

First published in Poems (1689), pp. 514-19. Beresford, pp. 341-4.

MS Add. B. 109

A quarto miscellany of Latin academic exercises and verses relating principally to Oxford University, in several hands, ii + 136 leaves, imperfect, in later half-calf. Compiled principally by George Stradling (d.1688), Dean of Christ Church. c.1650-4.

Acquired from John A. Murphy, bookseller, Aberystwyth, 1885.

f. 59r-v

ClJ 4: John Cleveland, The Antiplatonick (‘For shame, thou everlasting Woer’)

Copy, headed ‘The Antiplatonick’.

First published in Poems, by J. C., With Additions (1651), the edition with yet more additions. Morris & Withington, pp. 54-6.

MS Add. C. 83

Copy, in a secrretary hand, on 29 folio leaves, imperfect in the middle and at the end, with contemporary pagination 87-98, [103]-148. Untitled, but docketed (amidst scribbling) ‘A Defence of the proceedings of Q. Eliz. agst ye Scottish Queen. Imperfect’, here beginning ‘There hathe not hapned sithence the memorie of man…’, in a professional hand, with alterations in two other hands on ff. 5v, 9r, 12v and 22v. Late 16th century.

PtG 2.2: George Puttenham, An Apology or True Defence of Her Majesty's Honourable and Good Renown

Scribbling (by a juvenile hand) including the names of Thomas Phillip, John Curye, Richard Tempest, Tempest Rookes, Jonas Bookes, and also (f. 16r) ‘John fleetewood Recorder of london’.

This MS recorded in Willcock & Walker, pp. xxiii-xiv (where it is erroneously described as containing ‘corrections in Puttenham's own hand’). Extracts edited from this MS, with a facsimile of p. 96, in Breaking the Silence on the Succession: A Sourcebook of Manuscripts & Rare Elizabethan Texts (c.1587-1603), ed. Jean-Christophe Mayer (Montpellier, 2003), pp. 37-68.

A treatise on the execution of Mary Queen of Scots, beginning ‘There hath not happened since the memorie of man…’. First published, as ‘A Justification of Queene Elizabeth in relation to the Affaire of Mary Queene of Scottes’, in Accounts and Papers relating to Mary Queen of Scots, ed. Allan J. Crosby and John Bruce, Camden Society, 93 (1867), pp. 67-134.

MS Add. C. 132

A folio composite volume of state and parliamentary papers, in various hands, iii + 96 leaves.

Possibly once owned by Anthony Wood (1632-95), Oxford antiquary. Acquired from W.H. Turner in 1878.

ff. 20r-2r

WaE 789: Edmund Waller, Speech in the House of Commons, 22 April 1640

Copy.

Recorded in Proceedings of the Short Parliament of 1640 (1977), p. 306.

A speech beginning ‘I will use no preface, as they do who prepare men to something to which they would persuade them...’ First published in two variant editions, as A Worthy Speech Made in the house of commons this present Parliament 1641 and as An Honorable and Learned Speech made by Mr Waller in Parliament respectively (both London, 1641). In Proceedings of the Short Parliament of 1640 (1977), pp. 306-8. It is doubted whether Waller actually delivered this speech in Parliament, though ‘He may have prepared and circulated the speech in manuscript to impress contemporaries’.

MS Add. C. 165

Fair copy in the hand of Benjamin Pullen, with Hooker's autograph marginal notes and corrections, iii + 228 folio leaves. Bearing the signature and licence of Archbishop Whitgift and used as the printer's copy in 1597. c.1595-7.

*HkR 10: Richard Hooker, Of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity, Book V

Inscribed (f. 173v) ‘Margaret Keynes’. Later owned by the Rev. William Woolston (d.1817), of Adderbury. Purchased on 4 December 1878 from Mrs Mary M. Morison.

Edited from this MS in Folger edition, VII. Described in Keble (1888), II, v-xvii, and in Percy Simpson, Proof-Reading in the Sixteenth, Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries (London, 1935) pp. 76-9. Various facsimile examples in Folger edition; in Keble, II, v; in Greg, English Literary Autographs, plate LXXVIII; and in Simpson, facing p. 78. Also discusse, with a facsimile of f. 60r, in W. Speed Hill, ‘Casting off Copy and the Composition of Hooker's Book V’, SB, 33 (1980), 144-61.

First published in London, 1597. Keble, II, 1-533. Folger edition, Volume II.

MS Add. C. 262

Copy of the first two couplets, untitled. Among marginal annotations made by Charles Stanhope (1593-1675), second Baron Stanhope of Harrington, on p. 314 in a printed exemplum of John Selden's Mare clausum seu de dominio maris (London, 1635). c.1640.

DnJ 3192.5: John Donne, To his Mistris Going to Bed (‘Come, Madam, come, all rest my powers defie’)

Facsimile of p. 314 in McLeod, ‘Obliterature’, EMS (2005), 93.

First published in Poems (London, 1669). Grierson, I, 119-21 (as ‘Elegie XIX. Going to Bed’). Gardner, Elegies, pp. 14-16. Shawcross, No. 15. Variorum, 2 (2000), pp. 163-4.

The various texts of this poem discussed in Randall McLeod, ‘Obliterature: Reading a Censored Text of Donne's “To his mistress going to bed”’, EMS, 12: Scribes and Transmission in English Manuscripts 1400-1700 (2005), 83-138.

MS Add. C. 287

Copy of Henryson's Testament of Cresseid (transcribed, with emendations, on pp. 475-509, from the edition of 1598), headed ‘The Sixt & last booke...written by Mr Robert Henderson and called by him The Testament of Criseide’, following Chaucer's Troilus and Creseyde, both accompanied stanza for stanza by a Latin verse translation by Sir Francis Kinaston (1587-1642), in a professional hand, xiv + 536 folio leaves in all. 1639-40.

HnR 30: Robert Henryson, The Testament of Cresseid (‘Ane doolie sessoun to ane cairfull dyte’)

Later owned by Henry Aldrich (d.1710), Dean of Christ Church, Oxford; by John Haddon Hindley (his sale 9 March 1793, lot 1215); by Francis Godolphin Waldron (1743-1818), actor and playwright; by S.W. Singer (his sale 3 August 1858, lot 134); and by James Crossley (1800-83), author and book collector (his sale 20 June 1886, lot 2951). Quaritch's sale catalogue No. 369, item 35797. Acquired 10 September 1886.

Edited from this MS in Gregory Smith, I, xcvii-clxii. Collated in Wood. Recorded in Fox.

Possibly first published c.1508. First known publication in Workes of Geoffrey Chaucer, ed. William Thynne (London, 1532). Wood, pp. 105-26. Fox, pp. 111-31.

MS Add. C. 299

A folio commonplace book of miscellaneous historical material, in Latin and English, iii + 145 leaves (including blanks), in vellum. Originally used as a commonplace book by ‘T. Metcalf’ in 1598 (up to f. 63v), and then by James Ussher (1581-1656), Archbishop of Armagh. First half of 17th century.

f. 67ar

ElQ 88: Queen Elizabeth I, On the Sailing of the Cadiz Expedition, May 1596

Copy, headed ‘A prayer composed by the Queenes Matie for the psperous sucese of her highnes forces imbarqued for invading of the kinge of Spaines Dominions vnder the conduct of the Earle of Essex, And the Lo: Admirall, Ao: dno: 1596. et Regni An 38’.

This MS cited in Selected Works.

Beginning ‘Most omnipotent Maker and Guider of all our world's mass, that only searchest and fathomest...’. Collected Works, Prayer 38, pp. 425-6. Selected Works, Prayer 4, pp. 254-6 (as ‘For the success of the expedition against Spain, June 1596’).

ff. 67av-67br

SiP 88.9: Sir Philip Sidney, The Psalms of David

Copy of Psalms 100 and 101, docketed in the margin ‘By Sr. Philip Sidney’, the second with a sidenote by Ussher: ‘I delivered a copy of this to the King at Cardiffe, August 4, 1645, having preached there unto him, the day before’.

Psalms 1-43 translated by Sidney. Psalms 44-150 translated by his sister, the Countess of Pembroke. First published complete in London, 1823, ed. S.W. Singer. Psalms 1-43, without the Countess of Pembroke's revisions, edited in Ringler, pp. 265-337. Psalms 1-150 in her revised form edited in The Psalms of Sir Philip Sidney and the Countess of Pembroke, ed. J.C.A. Rathmell (New York, 1963). Psalms 44-150 also edited in The Collected Works of Mary Sidney Herbert Countess of Pembroke (1988), Vol. II.

ff. 67br-70r

EsR 158: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, First Letter of Advice to the Earl of Rutland

Copy, headed in another hand ‘A letter I suppose from the Ld Chancellor Bacon to a young Lord intending to travell’.

The letter, dated from Greenwich, 4 January [1596], beginning ‘My Lord, I hold it for a principle in the course of intelligence of state...’.

First published, as ‘The Late E. of E. his aduice to the E. of R. in his trauels’, in Profitable Instructions; Describing what speciall Obseruations are to be taken by Trauellers in all Nations, States and Countries (London, 1633), pp. 27-73. Francis Bacon, Resuscitatio (London, 1657), pp. 106-10. Spedding, IX, 6-15. W.B. Devereux, Lives and Letters of the Devereux, Earls of Essex (1853), I, No. xciii.

Essex's three letters to Rutland discussed by Paul E.J. Hammer in ‘The Earl of Essex, Fulke Greville, and the Employment of Scholars’, SP. 91/2 (Spring, 1994), 167-80, and in ‘Letters of Travel Advice from the Earl of Essex to the Earl of Rutland: Some Comments’, PQ, 74/3 (Summer 1995), 317-22. It is likely that the first letter was written substantially by Francis Bacon.

MS Add. C. 304b

A folio composite volume of state tracts and speeches, 81 leaves, in modern binding.

Among the collections of Gilbert Sheldon (1598-1677), Archbishop of Canterbury. Subsequently owned by members of the Dolben family, including probably John Dolben (1625-86), Archbishop of York.

f. 10v

RaW 383.8: Sir Walter Ralegh, An epitaph on the Earl of Leicester (‘Here lyes the noble warryor that never bludyed sword’)

Copy of the verses (here beginning ‘Heere lyes ye worthy waryer’), in a copy of Richard Verstegan's Causes of the Great Troubles...1592 (occupying ff. 2r-15r), in a single secretary hand, endorsed in a later hand ‘A slanderous Inuectiue against ye State and som partycular persons many yeares past’. Early 17th century.

First published as introduced ‘...yet immediately after his [Leicester's] death, a friend of his bestowed vpon him this Epitaphe’ and beginning ‘Heere lies the woorthy warrier’, in Richard Verstegan, A Declaration of the True Causes of the Great Troubles (London, ‘1592’), p. 54, which is sometimes entitled Cecil's Commonwealth: see E.A. Strathmann in MLN, 60 (1945), 111-14. Listed but not printed in Latham, p. 172, who notes that the epitaph was quoted, from a text among William Drummond's papers, in Sir Walter Scott's Kenilworth (1821). Rudick, No. 46, p. 120.

f. 16r-v

ElQ 259: Queen Elizabeth I, Elizabeth's Golden Speech, November 30, 1601

Copy of Version 2, here beginning ‘Mr Speaker, Yr comming is to present thanckes to vs...’, in a secretary hand, on a folded folio leaf (conjunct with a blank half-leaf). Early 1600s.

This MS cited in Hartley and in Collected Works.

First published (Version III), as Her maiesties most princelie answere, deliuered by her selfe at White-hall, on the last day of November 1601 (London, 1601: STC 7578).

Version I. Beginning ‘Mr. Speaker, we have heard your declaration and perceive your care of our estate...’. Hartley, III, 412-14. Hartley, III, 495-6. Collected Works, Speech 23, pp. 337-40 (Version 1). Selected Works, Speech 11, pp. 84-92.

Version II. Beginning ‘Mr. Speaker, we perceive your coming is to present thanks unto me...’. Hartley, III, 294-7 (third version). Collected Works, Speech 23, pp. 340-2 (Version 2).

Version III. Beginning ‘Mr. Speaker, we perceive by you, whom we did constitute the mouth of our Lower House, how with even consent...’. Hartley, III, 292-3 (second version). Collected Works, Speech 23, pp. 342-4 (Version 3). STC 7578.

Version IV. Beginning ‘Mr Speaker, I well understand by that you have delivered, that you with these gentlemen of the Lower House come to give us thankes for benefitts receyved...’. Hartley, III, 289-91 (first version).

ff. 64r-5v

TaJ 118: Jeremy Taylor, Extracts

Extracts from ‘Dr Taylors’, headed variously ‘For Repentance’ (beginning ‘O Ld God father of our Ld Jesus...’), ‘Comforts agt a violent sudden death’ (beginning ‘Consider at wt gate thy sicknes entred...’), and ‘An Exhortation after Thanksgivinge agst death-bed repentance’ (beginning ‘God intended we should live an holy life...’.

MS Add. C. 306

A composite volume of letters by Scottish and Irish bishops, 1661-9.

Among papers of Gilbert Sheldon (1598-1677), Archbishop of Canterbury.

ff. 218r-19r

*TaJ 98: Jeremy Taylor, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Taylor, to Gilbert Sheldon, Archbishop of Canterbury, from Portmore, 25 May 1664. 1664.

Edited in Eden, I, cxix, cxx.

MS Add. C. 307

A composite volume of ecclesiastical letters and papers, in various hands.

Among papers of Gilbert Sheldon (1598-1677), Archbishop of Canterbury.

ff. 61r-2v

TaJ 119: Jeremy Taylor, Extracts

Extracts, headed ‘considerations prparatory to death’ and ascribed to ‘Dr Taylor’, on two conjugate folio leaves.

MS Add. D. 16

Copy, in three hands, of Gilbert Burnet 's The History of my own Time and of Thomas Burnet's Life of his father, both with autograph corrections by their respective authors. Late 17th-early 18th century.

This MS collated in Brown, II, 513-14.

ff. 234v-5r

HaG 59.5: George Savile, First Marquess of Halifax, A Character of Dr. Burnet

Copy, in a professional hand, transcribed from HaG 59.8, headed in Thomas Burnet's hand ‘His Character by the Marquess of Halifax’.

This MS collated in Brown, II, 513-14.

First published at the end of Thomas Burnet's Life of his father appended to Gilbert Burnet, History of His Own Time, 2 vols (London, 1724-34), II, 725-6. Foxcroft, II, 529-31. Brown, II, 450-2.

MS Add. D. 21

An early autograph draft of part of Gilbert Burnet's The History of my own Time, with his son Thomas Burnet's autograph Life of his father, iii + 146 folio leaves. Late 17th-early 18th century.

ff. 142r, 92r

HaG 59.8: George Savile, First Marquess of Halifax, A Character of Dr. Burnet

Copy in Thomas Burnet's hand.

This MS collated in Brown, pp. 513-14.

First published at the end of Thomas Burnet's Life of his father appended to Gilbert Burnet, History of His Own Time, 2 vols (London, 1724-34), II, 725-6. Foxcroft, II, 529-31. Brown, II, 450-2.

MS Add. D. 111

A large folio composite volume of state letters, in various hands and paper sizes, 393 leaves, in 19th-century morocco gilt. Collected by the Hon. George Matthew Fortescue.

ff. 133r-4v

*DnJ 4126: John Donne, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Donne, to George Villiers, Marquess of Buckingham, 8 August 1621. 1621.

Edited in Gosse, II, 140.

ff. 174r-5r

*WrM 20: Lady Mary Wroth, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Wroth, to George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, 15 December 1621. 1621.

Edited in Roberts, Poems, p. 236 (No. V), with a complete facsimile on p. 77. Facsimile examples also in Josephine A. Roberts, ‘The Huntington Manuscript of Lady Mary Wroth's Play, Love's Victorie’, HLQ, 46 (1983), 156-74 (pp. 157, 159).

ff. 384r-5v, 386r-9v

ClE 130: Edward Hyde, First Earl of Clarendon, Letters to the Duke of York and the Duchess of York

Copy of both letters, in a rounded hand, on a pair of conjugate folio leaves. Late 17th century.

Recorded in HMC, 2nd report (1871), Appendix, p. 63.

Letters by Clarendon to his daughter Anne (who died on 31 March 1671 before the letter arrived) and to her husband, the Duke of York (later James II), on the occasion of her conversion to Roman Catholicism. The original letters, which received particular attention by his contemporaries because of their subject matter, are not known to survive.

These were first published in Two Letters written by…Edward Earl of Clarendon…one to His Royal Highness the Duke of York, the other to the Dutchess, occasioned by her Embracing the Roman Catholic Religion (London, [1680?]) and were reprinted in State Tracts (1689), in An Appendix to the History of the Grand Rebellion (Oxford, 1724), pp. 313-24, and elsewhere.

MS Add. D. 112

A folio volume of copies of some 24 letters by Bacon dating between 1616 and 1624, 144 leaves. c.1630.

BcF 556: Francis Bacon, Letter(s)

Once owned by by the Hon. George Matthew Fortescue.

Antiq. c. E.9(11)

Two detached proofsheets for the edition of 1639, mounted in a composite volume of printed sheets and pamphlets. Perfected sheet A and both formes of sheet I2 imposed for work and turn, with MS proof corrections in the three Prologues to the King and Queen and the University, in the list of Dramatis Personae, and in ‘The Epilogue to their Majesties’; one sheet bearing a ten-line MS inscription in which Nicholas Swanne of London challenges Robert Milles to a duel. c.1639.

CaW 83: William Cartwright, The Royal Slave

Discussed and reproduced in facsimile (Plates II -IV) in D.F. Foxon, ‘The Varieties of Early Proof: Cartwright's Royal Slave, 1639, 1640’, The Library, 25 (1970), 151-4. Jan Moore, p. 71.

First performed at Christ Church, Oxford, 30 August 1636. First published in Oxford, 1639. Evans, pp. 193-253.

Antiq. c. E.9(116)a,b

Two proofsheet fragments (the versos blank) for the edition of 1640, mounted in a composite volume of printed sheets and pamphlets. Comprising sigs B1v and 4r, including MS proof corrections in Act I, scene i, lines 39-66, and Act I, scene ii, lines 210-31. c.1640.

CaW 84: William Cartwright, The Royal Slave

One leaf endorsed ‘This book belongs to ye Library of Milding’.

Discussed and reproduced in facsimile (Plate V) in D.F. Foxon, ‘The Varieties of Early Proof: Cartwright's Royal Slave, 1639, 1640’, The Library, 25 (1970), 151-4. Jan Moore, p. 71, and art cit.

First performed at Christ Church, Oxford, 30 August 1636. First published in Oxford, 1639. Evans, pp. 193-253.

Antiq. f. E. 1648/1

Walton's exemplum. Mid-17th century.

*WtI 192: Izaak Walton, Raymond, John. An Itinerary (London, 1648)

Arch B. c. 3

Autograph formal inscription in a hand-coloured printed exemplum once owned by Brahe himself and presented by Wotton to the Bodleian Library. 1633.

*WoH 305: Sir Henry Wotton, Brahe, Tycho. Astronomiae instauratae mechanica (Wandesburg, 1598)

Originally owned by Tycho Brahe (1546-1601), Danish astronomer, and inscribed by him to Marino Grimani (1532-1605), Doge of Venice.

Wotton's inscription edited in Pearsall Smith, II, 347.

Arch G. d. 47

Four autograph corrections, in a special presentation poem printed on two conjugate leaves, in an exemplum of Works (1601). 1601-5.

*DaS 22: Samuel Daniel, S.D. To his Booke, In the Dedicating thereof to the Librarie in Oxford, erected by Sir Thomas Bodley Knight (‘Heere in this goodly Magazine of witte’)

Presented by Daniel in 1605 to the Bodleian Library.

Reprinted in Grosart, I, 4-7.

Arch H. c. 8

A printed exemplum, inscribed in pencil as ‘Thomas Killigrew's Copy’, but signed (on [sig. A6r]) only by his son Charles (‘Charles Killigrew his book’). Mid-17th century.

KiT 31: Thomas Killigrew, Hall, Joseph. Works (London, 1647)

Bookplates of the Rev. Arthur B. Evans, STP, headmaster of Massnet Bosworth School, and of H.R. Merewether. Donated to Francis Merewether by Evans's widow, 11 January 1855.

Arch H. e. 83

A printed exemplum of Donne's Pseudo-Martyr (London, 1610) bearing on the title-page an ex dono authoris inscription signed by Rowland Woodward and with his motto ‘De juegos el mejor es con la hoja’. c.1610.

DnJ 4090.5: John Donne, Pseudo-Martyr

The volume was later owned by John Sparrow (1906-92), literary scholar and book collector, sold at Christie's.

Facsimiles in Gosse, I, facing p. 248, and in Keynes, Bibliography, facing p. 6.

First published in London, 1610. Edited by Anthony Raspa (Montreal, 1993).

Arch. H.e. 89

A printed exemplum inscribed by Walton for Mrs Austen.

*WtI 83: Izaak Walton, The Lives of Dr. John Donne, Sir Henry Wotton, Mr. Richard Hooker, Mr. George Herbert (London, 1670)

Later in the Oxford library of John Sparrow (1906-92), literary scholar and book collector.

MS Arch. Seld. B. 8

A folio composite volume of miscellaneous and state tracts and speeches, in Greek, Latin and English, in various hands, 335 leaves, in near-contemporary panelled calf.

ff. 65r-82v

*CtR 465: Sir Robert Cotton, That the Kings of England have been pleased usually to consult with their Peeres in the great Councell, and Commons in Parliament, of Marriage, Peace, and Warre. Written...Anno 1611

Copy, in a cursive secretary hand, with autograph corrections and revisions by Cotton and signed by him at the end (‘Ro: Cotton’). c.1611.

Tract beginning ‘To search so high as the Norman Conquest...’. First published, as The Forme of Governement of the Kingdome of England collected out of the Fundamental Lawes and Statutes of this Kingdome, London, 1642. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [11]-39.

ff. 99r-116v

SuJ 140: John Suckling, An Account of Religion by Reason

Copy, in a professional hand, entitled (f. 99r) ‘A Discourse written by Sr John Suckling Knt. to the Earle of Dorset’. c.1630s.

This MS collated in Clayton.

First published, with a separate title-page, in Fragmenta Aurea (London, 1646). Clayton, pp. 168-80.

MS Arch. Seld. B. 26

A folio composite volume of MSS, on vellum and paper, 135 leaves.

ff. 103r-35r

CaW 86: William Cartwright, The Royal Slave

Copy, in a single hand, entitled ‘The Royall Slaue A Tragi-Comedy’, including dramatis personae and prologues and epilogues to the King and Queen and to the University. c.1636-8.

This MS collated in Evans.

First performed at Christ Church, Oxford, 30 August 1636. First published in Oxford, 1639. Evans, pp. 193-253.

8o Art P. 196

A printed exemplum inscribed ‘Dec. 28. 93. From ye Author For the Publick Library in Oxford’. 1690.

PpS 3.5: Samuel Pepys, Memoires relating to the State of the Royal Navy of England for Ten Years, Determin'd December 1688

First published in London, 1690. Edited by J.R. Tanner (Oxford, 1906).

MS Ash. Mus. d. 1

Copy, in a professional hand, with a title-page, on 23 folio leaves, in early 18th-century half-calf. c.1630s.

HoJ 339: John Hoskyns, Directions for Speech and Style

This MS selectively collated in Osborn.

First published, as Directions for Speech and Style by John Hoskins, ed. Hoyt H. Hudson (Princeton, 1935). Osborn (1937), pp. 114-66.

MS Aubrey 4

Autograph manuscript of John Aubrey's ‘Perambulations of Surrey’. Mid-late 17th century.

ff. 185r-6r, 189r-v

DeJ 7.2: Sir John Denham, Cooper's Hill (‘Sure there are Poets which did never dream’)

Extracts.

First published in London, 1642. Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 62-89. O Hehir, Hieroglyphicks.

MS Aubrey 6

A folio composite autograph manuscript of the first part of Brief Lives by John Aubrey (1626-97), 121 largely folio leaves, in vellum within modern boards. c.1679/80-1681.

f. 21r

DnJ 2063.8: John Donne, Loves diet (‘To what a combersome unwieldinesse’)

Copy of lines 23-4, in the hand of John Aubrey, in his ‘Life of William Aubrey’.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 55-6. Gardner, Elegies, pp. 45-6. Shawcross, No. 65.

f. 69

JnB 318: Ben Jonson, Lord Bacon's Birth-day (‘Haile, happie Genius of this antient pile!’)

Copy, in the hand of John Aubrey.

This MS collated in Herford & Simpson.

First published in The Vnder-wood (li) in Workes (London, 1640). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 225.

f. 71v

BcF 3: Francis Bacon, ‘The world's a bubble, and the life of man’

Copy, in the hand of John Aubrey.

Edited from this MS in Aubrey's Brief Lives, ed. Andrew Clark (Oxford, 1898), I, 72-3.

First published in Thomas Farnaby, Florilegium epigrammatum Graecorum (London, 1629). Poems by Sir Henry Wotton, Sir Walter Raleigh and others, ed. John Hannah (London, 1845), pp. 76-80. Spedding, VII, 271-2. H.J.C. Grierson, ‘Bacon's Poem, “The World”: Its Date and Relation to certain other Poems’, Modern Language Review, 6 (1911), 145-56.

f. 78v

RaW 360: Sir Walter Ralegh, Epitaph on the Earl of Salisbury (‘Here lies Hobinall, our Pastor while ere’)

Copy by Aubrey, as ‘Sr W R. the Epigram on Robert Cecil Earle of Salisbury who died in a ditch’, here beginning ‘Here lies Robert our shepherd whilom’, as given to Aubrey by ‘Sir Thomas Malett…who knew Sr W. Raleigh’, incomplete.

This MS recorded in Latham, p. 146.

First published in Francis Osborne, Traditionall Memoyres on the raigne of King Iames (London, 1658). Works (1829), VIII, 735-6. Latham, p. 53.

Of doubtful authorship according to Latham, p. 146, and Lefranc (1968), p. 84.

f. 81v

BrW 183: William Browne of Tavistock, On the Countess Dowager of Pembroke (‘Underneath this sable herse’)

Copy in the hand of John Aubrey.

Edited from this MS in Aubrey's Brief Lives, ed. Andrew Clark (Oxford, 1898), I, 312-13.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1623), p. 340. Brydges (1815), p. 5. Goodwin, II, 294. Browne's authorship supported in C.F. Main, ‘Two Items in the Jonson Apocrypha’, N&Q, 199 (June 1954), 243-5.

f. 107r-v

*WtI 12: Izaak Walton, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Walton, to John Aubrey, a memorandum about Ben Jonson and others, 22 November 1680. 1680.

Edited in Waltoniana (1878); in Keynes (1929), pp. 603-4; and in John Aubrey, Brief Lives, ed. Andrew Clark, 2 vols (Oxford, 1898), II, 15-16. Aubrey's accompanying notes on Jonson (f. 108r) edited in Ben Jonson, ed. C.H. Herford and Percy & Evelyn Simpson, I (Oxford, 1925), 181.

f. 113v

RnT 114: Thomas Randolph, An Epitaph (‘With Diligence And Trvst Most Exemplary’)

Copy, in the hand of John Aubrey, with his note ‘Dr Busby the school master of Westminster was Tom Randolphs school-fellow & coetanean; & sayth that he made these vses — 'tis his vaine’.

Edited from this MS in Clark. Reedited in Thorn-Drury.

First published in John Aubrey, Brief Lives, ed. Andrew Clark, 2 vols (Oxford, 1898), II, 197. Thorn-Drury, p. 147.

f. 115r

BuS 2: Samuel Butler, Hudibras (‘Sir Hudibras his passing worth’)

Copy of twelve lines, in the hand of John Aubrey, headed ‘Hudibras unprinted’ and beginning ‘No Jesuite ever took in hand’, preceded by Aubrey's note (intended for Anthony Wood) ‘Insert in vita Sam. Butler his verses of the Jesuites, not printed, which I gave to you about 12 or 14’, on a single octavo leaf.

These lines first pub. (from this MS) in the anonymous ‘Life’ of Butler in Hudibras (London, 1704), sig. a8v. Also edited from this MS in John Aubrey, Brief Lives, ed. Andrew Clark, 2 vols (Oxford, 1898), I, 137. The lines correspond, albeit in a redacted form, to a passage in Butler's autograph ‘additions’ to Hudibras in BuS 5 (f. 80).

Part I first published in London, ‘1663’ [i.e. 1662]. Part II published in London, ‘1664’ [i.e. 1663]. Part III published in London ‘1678’ [i.e. 1677]. the whole poem first published in London, 1684. Edited by John Wilders (Oxford, 1967).

MS Aubrey 8

A folio composite autograph manuscript of the third part of Brief Lives by John Aubrey (1626-97), 106 leaves of various sizes, in half-calf. 1681.

f. 8v

RnT 490.5: Thomas Randolph, On Michaell Drayton (‘Do pious marble let thy readers know’)

Copy, ascribed to Francis Quarles.

Unpublished? Generally attributed to Francis Quarles.

f. 15v

HoJ 276: John Hoskyns, ‘Hic jacet Egremundus Rarus’

Copy, ascribed by Aubrey to ‘Serjeant Hoskins’.

Edited from this MS in Clark and in Osborn.

Clark, I, 424. Osborn, No. V (p. 169).

f. 31r

CmT 104: Thomas Campion, ‘There is none, O none but you’

Copy in Aubrey's hand, headed ‘For my Lady Eliz: Viscountesse Purbec repeated by her’ and subscribed ‘made By Rob: E of Essex yt was beheade[d]’.

This MS recorded in The Poems of Edward De Vere, Seventeenth Earl of Oxford, and of Robert Devereux, Second Earl of Essex, ed. Steven W. May, Studies in Philology, 77, No. 5 (Early Winter 1980), p. 115, where the attribution to Essex is rejected.

First published in Two Bookes of Ayres (London, [c.1612-13]), Book II, No. xiii. Davis, p. 102.

f. 32v

DrW 177.6: William Drummond of Hawthornden, On a noble man who died at a counsel table (‘Vntymlie Death that neither wouldst conferre’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Uncivil death...’.

First published in Kastner (1931), II, 285. Often found in a version beginning ‘Immodest death, that wouldst not once conferre’. Of doubtful authorship: see MacDonald, SSL, 7 (1969), 116.

f. 55r

JnB 258: Ben Jonson, A Grace by Ben: Johnson. extempore. before King James (‘Our King and Queen the Lord-God blesse’)

Copy, in Aubrey's hand.

Edited from this MS in Clark and in Herford Simpson.

First published (?) in John Aubrey, Brief Lives, ed. Andrew Clark (Oxford, 1898), II, 14. Herford & Simpson, VIII, 418-19.

f. 95v

DnJ 2619.5: John Donne, The Primrose (‘Upon this Primrose hill’)

Copy of lines 1-10, in Aubrey's hand, in his ‘Life of Edward Herbert, Lord Herbert of Cherbury’.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 61-2. Gardner, Elegies, pp. 88-9. Shawcross, No. 69.

MS Aubrey 9

A folio composite autograph manuscript of the fourth part of Brief Lives by John Aubrey (1626-97), occupied by his collections for ‘The Life of Mr Thomas Hobbes, of Malmesburie’, 76 leaves of various sizes. c.1680-1.

f. 8r

HbT 158: Thomas Hobbes, Letter(s)

Copy, in the hand of John Aubrey, of a letter by Hobbes, to Josias Pullen, Vice-President of Magdalen Hall, Oxford, from London, 1[/11] February 1672/3. 1673.

Edited from this MS in Clark, I, 377-8. Malcolm, Correspondence, II, 729, Letter 193.

ff. 9r-10v

*HbT 165: Thomas Hobbes, Letter(s)

Letter by Hobbes, entirely in the hand of his amanuensis James Wheldon, to John Aubrey, from Hardwick, 5[/15] March 1677/8. 1678.

Edited in Clark, I, 378-9. Malcolm, Correspondence, II, 766-7, Letter 202.

f. 11r

HbT 167: Thomas Hobbes, Letter(s)

Letter by Hobbes, entirely in the hand of his amanuensis James Wheldon, to William Crook, bookseller, from Chatsworth, 25 March[/4 April] 1679. 1679.

Edited in Clark, I, 379. Malcolm, Correspondence, II, 769, Letter 204.

ff. 12r-13v

HbT 169: Thomas Hobbes, Letter(s)

Letter by Hobbes, entirely in the hand of his amanuensis James Wheldon, to John Aubrey, from Chatsworth, 25 March[/4 April] 1679. 1679.

Edited in Clark, I, 380. Malcolm, Correspondence, II, 770, Letter 205.

ff. 14r-15v

HbT 171: Thomas Hobbes, Letter(s)

Letter by Hobbes, entirely in the hand of his amanuensis James Wheldon, to John Aubrey, from Chatsworth, 18[/28] August 1679. 1679.

Edited in Clark, I, 380-1. Malcolm, Correspondence, II, 772-3, Letter 208.

ff. 23r-5v

HbT 39: Thomas Hobbes, Autobiography

Copy by Aubrey, transcribed from Hobbes's original autograph draft which Hobbes ‘did leave in [Aubrey's] hands’ but which he later ‘sent for about 2 yeares before he died’.

Edited from this MS in Clark. Formerly cited in IELM, II.i (1987) as HbT 37.

According to Aubrey, Hobbes revised and rewrote his autobiography and Aubrey lent the [new] MS to Dr Richard Blackbourne, who published it as the second item in his edition of Hobbes's Vita (London, 1681), but who neglected to retrieve the MS ‘from the printer and so “twas made wast paper of”’.

A brief autobiography in Latin. First published in Clark (1898), I, 395-403.

f. 42v

HbT 172: Thomas Hobbes, Letter(s)

Copy, in John Aubrey's hand, of Hobbes's letter to him, from Chatsworth, 18[/28] August 1679, omitting the first paragraph. c.1679.

Recorded in Malcolm, Correspondence, Letter 209.

f. 49r

HbT 6: Thomas Hobbes, ‘Tho' I am now past ninety, and too old’

Copy by Aubrey of ‘love verses he [Hobbes] made not long before his death’, on one side of a single quarto leaf.

Edited from this MS in Clark.

First published in Clark (1898), I, 364-5.

MS Aubrey 10

A folio composite volume of papers of John Aubrey (1626-97), i + 195 leaves. c.1684-90.

ff. 128-9

BcF 260: Francis Bacon, Prayers

Copy of ‘Two Prayers compos'd by Sr Francis Bacon, Baron of Verulam, and Viscount St Albans’, in Aubrey's hand, ‘The first Prayer called by his Lordship, The Student's Prayer’ and beginning ‘To God the Father, God the Word, God ye Spirit, we pour forth most humble and heartie Supplications...’, ‘The Second Prayer called by his Lordship, The Writer's Prayer’ and beginning ‘Thou, O Father! who gavest the Visible Light as the First-born of thy Creatures, and didst put into Man the Intellectual light...’.

First published in Baconiana. Or Certain Genuine Remains of Sr Francis Bacon (London, 1679). Spedding, VII, 259-60.

MS Aubrey 12

A folio composite volume of letters to John Aubrey, ii + 357 leaves.

ff. 153r-4v

*HaJ 4: James Harrington, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Harrington, to John Aubrey, cancelling an appointment, 16 February 1669[/70]. 1670.

Edited in H.F. Russell Smith, Harrington and his Oceana (Cambridge, 1914), p. 127. Facsimile in IELM, II.i (1987), Facsimile XXIIb, after p. xxiv.

ff. 162r-3v

HbT 144: Thomas Hobbes, Letter(s)

Letter by Hobbes, entirely in the hand of his amanuensis James Wheldon, to John Aubrey, from Chatsworth, 7[/17] September 1663. 1663.

Edited in Tönnies, Analekten, pp. 309-10. Malcolm, Correspondence, II, 555, Letter 153.

ff. 164r-5v

HbT 149: Thomas Hobbes, Letter(s)

Letter by Hobbes, entirely in the hand of his amanuensis James Wheldon, 30 June/[10 July] 1664. 1664.

Edited (with the date erroneously given as 1661) in Tönnies, Analekten, p. 312. Malcolm, Correspondence, II, 620-1, Letter 167.

ff. 166r-7v

HbT 162: Thomas Hobbes, Letter(s)

Copy, in Aubrey's hand, of Hobbes's letter to him, from Hardwick, 24 February[/16 March] 1674/5. c.1675.

Edited from this MS Tönnies, Analekten, pp. 313-14. Recorded in Malcolm, Correspondence, Letter 198.

MS Aubrey 13

A folio composite volume of letters to John Aubrey, in various hands, 385 leaves.

f. 237r

*VaH 5: Henry Vaughan the Silurist, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to John Aubrey, from Brecon, 9 December 1675. 1675.

Edited in Martin, pp. 692-3.

f. 238r-9v

*VaH 6: Henry Vaughan the Silurist, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Vaughan, to John Aubrey, from Brecon, 28 June 1680. 1680.

Edited in Martin, pp. 692-3.

ff. 240r-1v

*VaH 10: Henry Vaughan the Silurist, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Vaughan, to John Aubrey, 9 October 1694. 1694.

Edited in Martin, pp. 696-7.

MS Aubrey 21

A folio composite volume of miscellaneous collections of John Aubrey (1626-97), i + 120 leaves. Late 17th century.

f. 3r

*HaJ 1: James Harrington, Vpon the state of Nature (‘The state of Nature neuer was so raw’)

Autograph of a six-line poem by Harrington, subscribed by Aubrey ‘By Mr James Harrington Esq, autor Oceanae, whose handwriting this is’, on a single quarto leaf.

Edited from this MS in Clark and in Watson. Facsimile in IELM, II.i (1987), Facsimile XXIIa, after p. xxiv.

First published in John Aubrey, Brief Lives, ed. Andrew Clark, 2 vols (Oxford, 1898), I, 294. George Watson, ‘James Harrington: A Last Apology for Poetry’, MLN, 71 (1956), 170-2.

Auct. S. 10. 28-30

An exemplum of the 1707 printed edition of the History with annotations by Thomas Gray. 1707.

ClE 158: Edward Hyde, First Earl of Clarendon, The History of the Rebellion

Auct. S. 10. 31

An exemplum of the 1759 printed edition of Clarendon's Life with annotations by Thomas Gray. 1759.

ClE 159: Edward Hyde, First Earl of Clarendon, The Life of Clarendon

MS Autog. c. 8

A folio guardbook of miscellaneous letters, in various hands, i + 99 leaves.

ff. 37r-8v

*EvJ 162: John Evelyn, Theology, Prayers and Devotions

Autograph prayer, headed ‘Compline. For the 31: December, or Last Day of the Year, & first of the New’, with an ‘Advertisement’ or preface, on two conjugate quarto leaves, imperfect. Late 17th century.

MS Autog. c. 9, f. 81r-v

Autograph letter signed by Vaughan, to Anthony Wood, 25 April 1689. 1689.

*VaH 8: Henry Vaughan the Silurist, Letter(s)

Edited in Martin, p. 695. Facsimile examples in Greg, English Literary Autographs, Plate LIX (a-b).

B. 6. 16. Art.

Autograph emendations.

*CmW 131: William Camden, Milles, Thomas. The Catalogue of Honor (London, 1610)

For a discussion of annotations in Milles's books (which, however, does not mention this item) see P.H. Davison, ‘The Annotations to Copies of Thomas Milles's Books in the British Museum and Bodleian Libraries’, The Library, 5th Ser. 16 (1961), 133-9.

MS Ballard 10

A folio composite volume of letters by English noblemen, chiefly to Dr Arthur Charlett (d.1622), Master of University College, Oxford, 207 leaves.

f. 28r

RoJ 662: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Letter(s)

Copy of Rochester's letter on his death-bed to Dr Thomas Pierce, President of Magdalen College, Oxford, July 1680. c.1680.

Rochester's last known letter. Edited from this MS in Treglown, pp. 245-6. See also RoJ 663 and RoJ 664.

MS Ballard 11

A folio volume of letters, 186 leaves.

f. 3r

RaW 837: Sir Walter Ralegh, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Ralegh., 26 July 1584. Late 16th century.

MS Ballard 29

A folio composite volume of verse and letters by the Rev. William Parry (1687-1756), antiquary, to Thomas Rawlins, many on Oxford subjects, 172 leaves. c.1737-49.

f. 144r-v

SuJ 18: John Suckling, A Ballade, Upon a Wedding (‘I tell thee Dick, where I have been’)

Copy, headed ‘The Bride on her Wedding-day, describ'd. A Song’, on the first of two conjugate folio leaves.

This MS recorded in Clayton.

First published in Fragmenta Aurea (London, 1646): Clayton, pp. 79-84.

MS Ballard 44

A small narrow ledger-size volume of copies of letters, made by Thomas James (1572-1629), Bodley's Librarian, xix + 233 leaves (including blanks), in vellum boards. c.1620.

f. 146r-84 (pp. 320-3)

HlJ 91: Joseph Hall, Letter(s)

Copy by Thomas James of a letter sent to him by Hall, from Emmanuel College, undated. c.1619.

f. 177r-8v (pp. 381-4)

HlJ 92: Joseph Hall, Letter(s)

Copy by Thomas James of a letter sent to him by Hall, [1619]. 1619.

f. 179r-v (pp. 385-6)

HlJ 90: Joseph Hall, Letter(s)

Copy by Thomas James of a letter sent to him by Hall, [1619]. 1619.

MS Ballard 47

A folio composite volume of verse, in various hands and paper sizes, some printed, 175 leaves, in contemporary quarter-calf marbled boards.

f. 67r

CoA 260: Abraham Cowley, Extracts

Extract(s) from work(s) by Cowley.

ff. 83r-4r

DrJ 135: John Dryden, Prologue To The Prophetess. Spoken by Mr. Betterton (‘What Nostradame, with all his Art can guess’)

Copy, headed ‘Prologue to ye New Opera Call'd the Prophetesse’, subscribed at the end ‘This Prologue was spoken but once & after forbid by ye Ld Chamberlain, which I suppose will encrease the value with persons of yr Curiosity’, on two conjugate quarto leaves, addressed on the verso (f. 84v) to ‘Mr Charlett: att Trinity College Oxon.’, sent as a letter and bearing a postmark and seal tear. c.1690.

This MS collated in California.

First published in Thomas Betterton, The Prophetess: or, The History of Dioclesian (London, 1690). Poems on Affairs of State, Part III (London, 1698). Kinsley, II, 556-7. California, III, 255-6. Hammond, III, 231-4.

MS Ballard 50

A folio composite volume of verse in Latin and English, some relating to Oxford, in various hands, 215 leaves, in contemporary quarter-calf gilt vellum boards. Early-mid-18th century.

f. 2r

CoA 138: Abraham Cowley, Prologue to the Guardian (‘Who says the Times do Learning disallow?’)

Copy on the first page of two conjugate folio leaves. Mid-17th century.

First published, under the pseudonym ‘Francis Cole’, in The Prologue and Epilogue to a Comedie, presented, at the Entertainment of the Prince His Highnesse, by the Schollers of Trinity Colledge in Cambridge, in March last, 1641 (London, 1642). Waller, I, 31-2 (and II, 161). Autrey Nell Wiley, ‘The Prologue and Epilogue to the Guardian’, RES, 10 (1934), 443-7 (pp. 444-5).

See also CoA 68-81.

f. 2r

CoA 69: Abraham Cowley, The Epilogue [to the Guardian] (‘The Play, great Sir, is done. yet needs must fear’)

Copy on the first page of two conjugate folio leaves. Mid-17th century.

First published, under the pseudonym ‘Francis Cole’, in The Prologue and Epilogue to a Comedie, presented, at the Entertainment of the Prince His Highnesse, by the Schollers of Trinity Colledge in Cambridge, in March last, 1641 (London, 1642).Printed (with the first line: ‘The Play is done, great Prince, which needs must fear’) in The Guardian (London, 1650). Waller, I, 32 (and II, 242). Autrey Nell Wiley, ‘The Prologue and Epilogue to the Guardian’, RES, 10 (1934), 443-7 (pp. 444-5).

See also CoA 137-52.

ff. 2r-3r

ClJ 96: John Cleveland, Smectymnuus, or the Club-Divines (‘Smectymnuus? The Goblin makes me start’)

Copy, headed ‘On Smectymnius, or the Clubb Divine’, on three pages of two conjugate folio leaves. Mid-17th century.

First published in Character (1647). Morris & Withington, pp. 23-6.

f. 108r

EtG 80: Sir George Etherege, Sylvia (‘The nymph that undoes me is fair and unkind’)

Copy, headed ‘Charming Sylvia sett by Dr Green’, being No. 9 of a series of 42 poems on seven folio leaves on ff. 104, 106-11v (lacking an eighth leaf after f. 109 with poems 21-23). Early 18th century.

This MS collated in Thorpe.

First published in A Collection of Poems, Written upon several Occasions (London, 1672). Thorpe, p. 26.

f. 111v

StW 748.8: William Strode, Song (‘I saw faire Cloris walke alone’)

Copy.

First published in Walter Porter, Madrigales and Ayres (London, 1632). Dobell, p. 41. Forey, pp. 76-7. The poem also discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Notes on some Poems attributed to William Strode’, PQ, 34 (1955), 444-8 (pp. 445-6), and see Mary Hobbs, ‘Early Seventeenth-Century Verse Miscellanies and Their Value for Textual Editors’, EMS, 1 (1989), 182-210 (pp. 199, 209).

f. 196r

WoH 176.5: Sir Henry Wotton, Upon the Death of Sir Albert Morton's Wife (‘He first deceased. she for a little tried’)

Copy, untitled, here beginning ‘She first deceased, he for a little tried’.

First published as an independent couplet in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1636). Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 529. Hannah (1845), p. 44. The authorship is uncertain.

This couplet, which was subject to different versions over the years, is in fact lines 5-6 of a twelve-line poem beginning ‘Here lye two Bodyes happy in their kinds’, which has also been attributed to George Herbert: see HrG 290.5-290.8.

f. 196r

RnT 202.5: Thomas Randolph, On Mr parson(s) Organist of Westminster Abbye (‘Death passing by, and hearing parsons play’)

Copy.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1637), p. 415. Thorn-Drury, pp. 147-8.

See also Introduction.

f. 196r

StW 317.5: William Strode, On a Butcher marrying a Tanners daughter (‘A fitter Match hath never bin’)

Copy.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1636). Dobell, p. 119. Forey, p. 18.

MS Ballard 52

A folio volume of tracts relating to seafaring, in a single professional predominantly secretary hand, 237 leaves. c.1640.

ff. 64r-124v

GgA 132: Sir Arthur Gorges, The Islands Voyage

Copy, with a title-page and dedicatory epistle to England.

This MS recorded in Sandison (1928), p. 670. The prefatory material edited from this MS in Sandison (1940), pp. 247-52.

First published, as ‘A larger Relation of the...Iland Voyage’ (but without any dedicatory epistle), in Hakluytus Posthumus or Purchas his Pilgrimes (London, 1625). Glasgow edition of Purchas, XX (1907), 34-129. According to Purchas the work was written in 1607 and dedicated to Prince Henry.

ff. 125r-36v

RaW 684: Sir Walter Ralegh, Observations concerning the Royal Navy and Sea-Service

Copy, ascribed to Gorges.

This MS recorded in Sandison (1928), p. 671. The previously unpublished introduction in this MS edited in Sandison (1940), p. 252.

A tract dedicated to Prince Henry and beginning ‘Having formerly, most excellent prince, discoursed of a maritimal voyage, and the passages and incidents therein...’. First published in Judicious and Select Essayes and Observations (London, 1650). Works (1829), VIII, 335-50. These notes probably written by Ralegh but usually appended to Sir Arthur Gorges, A larger Relation of the...Iland Voyage, printed in Purchas his Pilgrimes (London, 1625). Glasgow edition, XX (1907), 34-129. See Helen Estabrook Sandison, ‘Manuscripts of the “Islands Voyage” and “Notes on the Royal Navy”’, Essays and Studies in Honor of Carleton Brown (New York, London & Oxford, 1940), 242-52, and Lefranc (1968), pp. 53, 58-9.

MS Ballard 54

Copy, chiefly in a mixed hand, partly in a second hand, ii + 293 folio leaves. The two main hands also in HrE 113.2. Mid-17th century.

HrE 113.2: Edward, Lord Herbert of Cherbury, A Dialogue between a Tutor and his Pupil

Griffin's ‘B’ text. Facsimile of the first page in Griffin, p. 172.

First published and attributed to Herbert in an edition by Horace Walpole (Strawberry Hill, 1768).

Commonly rejected from the canon, but see arguments for possible authorial involvement of Herbert (as well as Charles Blount) in Julia Griffin, ‘Edward Lord Herbert of Cherbury's A Dialogue between a Tutor and his Pupil: Some New Questions’, EMS, 7 (1998), 162-201, where the various MS texts are discussed.

MS Ballard 70

A quarto composite volume of miscellaneous papers, chiefly relating to Oxford, in various hands, x + 154 leaves and pages (including blanks), in half-calf gilt marbled boards. Collected by Anthony Wood (1632-95), Oxford antiquary, and by Thomas Rawlins.

ff. 1r-15r

LeJ 32: John Leland, Collectanea [Other transcripts and extracts]

Extracts, ‘ex Lelando Collect’, transcribed by Anthony Wood, dated by him ‘Jun 17: 1660’, and inscribed (f. 15v) ‘perused Feb.6th 1728/9 TR’ [i.e. Thomas Rawlins].

Lent by Rawlins to Thomas Hearne c.November 1732: see S.G. Gillam, ‘Arthur Charlett's Letters and Manuscripts’, Bodleian Library Record, 4 (1952-3), 105-14 (p. 108).

MS Ballard 72

A small quarto volume of works by Thomas More, apparently transcribed from Workes (1557), iii + 106 leaves, in marbled boards. Mid-16th century.

ff. 1r-51v

MrT 36: Sir Thomas More, The Supplication of Souls

Copy of the second book.

This MS recorded in Yale, Part III, p. 1420.

First published in London, 1529. Yale, Vol. 7, pp. 109-228.

All exempla of the two editions of 1529 bear a MS correction, evidently made in the printer William Rastell's workshop, on sig h2v: see Ralph Keen, A Correction by Hand in More's Supplication, 1529, Moreana, Vol. 20 (February 1983), 100.

ff. 51v-81r

MrT 18: Sir Thomas More, The Confutation of Tyndale's Answer

Copy of the ‘preface to the crysten reader’.

This MS recorded in Yale, Part III, p. 1420.

First published in 2 vols, London, 1532-3. Yale, Vol. 8, Parts I-III (1973).

ff. 81r-97v, 101v-3v

MrT 52: Sir Thomas More, Certaine Letters

Copy of ‘certaine letters’ written by More ‘while he was prysoner in the Towre of London’ in 1534, including one to his daughter Margaret.

MS Bodl. 6

Autograph manuscript volume prepared by Princess Elizabeth in her italic hand as 64a New Year's gift to Edward VI, 30 December [1547], vii + 36 small quarto-size leaves (plus six blanks at the end), on vellum throughout, in modern crimson velvet. Elizabeth's translation from Italian into Latin in the Princess's calligraphic roman hand, some words and subheadings rubricated, with a title-page in capitals (f. 1r), ‘Berna/rdini. Oc/hinisene/sis de Chr/isti. Sermo/ ex. Italico, i / Latinv. co/versvs’, and dedication to her brother Edward (ff. 2r-4v), dated from ‘Enfeldie, 30 Decembris’ and signed ‘Elizabeta’. [1547-8].

*ElQ 64: Queen Elizabeth I, Bernardino Ochino's ‘Sermo de Christo’

Inscribed (f. vr) ‘J. Bowle, Idmerston. July 25, 1759’.

Edited from this MS in Translations, with a facsimile of f. 19v on p. 298.

Elizabeth's translation from Italian into Latin. Translations, pp. 300-27, with a translation of the Latin into modern English.

MS Bodl. 22

A quarto MS of commendatory poems by six Oxford University men (chiefly members of New College), in a semi-calligraphic hand, ii + 12 leaves (plus blanks), in contemporary vellum gilt, traces of silk ties. A presentation MS to Lady Elizabeth Paulet. [1636].

f. 1r-v

CaW 55: William Cartwright, To the Right vertuous the Ladie Elizabeth Powlet (‘Could wee iudge here Most vertuous Madam then’)

Copy, headed ‘To the Right vertuous the Ladie Elizabeth Powlet vpon her Present to the Vniuersitie of Oxon being the Birth, Death, Resurrection and Ascension of our Saviour wrought by her selfe in Needle-worke’, subscribed ‘William Cartwright Mr of Arts of Christ=Church’.

First published in Works (1651), pp. 195-6. Evans, pp. 459-60.

MS Bodl. 73

Autograph volume of notes, verses, and other matter relating to the Carmelite order, beginning (f. lv) ‘Ex magistro historiarum…’, including (ff. 140r-55r) lives of certain saints, xiii + 217 quarto leaves, in contemporary leather. c.1522-7, with additions to 1533.

*BaJ 16: John Bale, Collectiones Germanicae

Owned in 1697 by Dr Francis Bernard; afterwards by Sir Hans Sloane, Bt (1660-1753), physician and collector; and on 28 June 1710 by Thomas Hearne (1678-1735), Oxford antiquary. Donated to the Bodleian by Mr Tanner, of Norwich.

Brief extracts from this MS edited in Monumenta historica Carmelitana. Recorded and discussed in Davies, p. 236 (iii), with a facsimile of f. 37v in plate II, after p. 244; in McCusker (1942), pp. 104-5; and in Fairfield, pp. 158-9.

Unpublished (complete).

MS Bodl. 353

Copy of a portion of the Collectanea, transcribed from Leland's autograph (LeJ 17) for the antiquary Robert Plot (1640-96), viii + 48 folio pages. Inscribed ‘taken out of a manuscript copy of Leyland's own handwriting in the hands of Sr Henry St. George, Clarenceaux King at Arms, procured by Rob: Plot. LL. D. Vniv.’ 1682.

LeJ 33: John Leland, Collectanea [Other transcripts and extracts]

Edited from this MS in Thomas Hearne's edition of The Itinerary, 3rd edition (Oxford, 1769), IV, 135-81. Recorded in Smith, I, xxx; II, 117.

MS Bodl. 354

An autograph note by Leland comparing Plutarch and Sulpicius Severus as biographers. On f. iiv, headed ‘Carmen Joannis Leylandi Londinensis’, in an early 13th-century MS on parchment of lives of saints entitled by Leland ‘Vitae illustrium virorum’, ii + 289 folio leaves in all, bound for Henry VIII. c.1528-43.

*LeJ 98: John Leland, Vitae illustrium virorum

Presented to the Bodleian in 1604 by Charles Howard (1536-1624), second Baron Howard of Effingham and first Earl of Nottingham, naval commander.

See also LeJ 50.

MS Bodl. 431

A folio volume of More's works, in an accomplished hand, in varying secretary and italic scripts, with ornamental capitals, probably produced for a man of wealth or high position, i + 234 leaves. c.1553-8.

Acquired by the Bodleian between 1605 and 1611.

ff. 1r-137r, 148r-9r

MrT 45: Sir Thomas More, A Treatise upon the Passion

Copy, untitled.

This MS collated in Yale, with facsimiles of ff. 37r and 149r facing p. 51 and p. xxvii. Facsimile examples also in M. P. Parkes, English Cursive Book Hands 1250-1500 (Oxford, 1969), facing p. 20.

First published in Workes (London, 1557), pp. 1270-1349. Yale, Vol. 13, pp. 1-177.

ff. 138r-46v

MrT 40: Sir Thomas More, A Treatise to Receive the Blessed Body

This MS collated in Yale.

First published in Workes (London, 1557), pp. 1264-9. Yale, Vol. 13, pp. 189-204.

ff. 150r-224v

MrT 21: Sir Thomas More, De tristitia Christi

This MS collated in Yale.

First published, as Expositio passionis Domini, in Thomae Mori...omnia...latina opera (Louvain, 1565). Mary Basset's English translation, An exposicion of a parte of the passion of our saviour Iesus Christe, published in Workes (London, 1557), pp. 1350-1404. Yale, Vol. 14, Parts I & II.

MS Bodl. 470

Copy of five ‘parts’ of Leland's The Itinerary, iii + 127 folio leaves. Transcribed from Leland's autograph MS (LeJ 54) for William Burton and presented by him to the Bodleian. c.1632.

This MS recorded in Smith, I, xxvi.

The MS as a whole

LeJ 61: John Leland, The Itinerary of John Leland [Burton transcript]

Copy.

ff. 1r-2r

LeJ 92: John Leland, The Laboryouse Journey and Serche of Johan Leylande for Englandes Antiquitees

Copy of Leland's account of his travels.

First published in London, 1549, ed. John Bale.

MS Bodl. 616

A presentation copy, the main text beginning ‘What is Natture...’, including (f. 11r-v) verse, written chiefly in the hand of one of Howard's amanuenses in two styles of secretary script, with some of the sidenotes in Howard's own hand, ii + 67 quarto leaves, in contemporary red calf elaborately tooled in gilt. Produced for Howard's sister Lady Katherine Berkeley; the dedication (ff. 1r-12v) ‘To hys very lovinge sister the Lady Kathe. Barkley’ beginning ‘Your earnest affection (my dere sister)...’ and including (f. 11r-v) verses beginning ‘Nothing applyede to common vse’, dated ‘From Trinity haule in Cambridge the 6 of August 1569’ and signed by Howard ‘your lounge and fayth full brother durynge lyfe Henry Howarde’. 1569.

*HoH 96: Henry Howard, Earl of Northampton, Treatise on Natural Philosophy

Donated to the Bodleian on 2 May 1735 by Dr Thomas Waine, who has inscribed f. iir‘Sir / I Desire that Mr Nichs, Holland of Merton College may have ye Liberty of peruseing Henry Howard's Manuscript of Philosophy att ye Request of me ye Donor Thos Waine’.

Unpublished treatise on natural philosophy.

MS Bodl. 617

A quarto manuscript of a catechism of Christian doctrine, in the Tupi-Guarini language of Brazil, with Portuguese rubrics, composed by a Jesuit missionary, written in double columns, ii + 109 leaves, inscribed ‘Ex dono Thomæ Lodge D.M. Oxoniensis, qui sua manu e Brasilia deduxit’. Acquired by Lodge at Santos in 1591 when he sailed with Thomas Cavendish to Brazil. Donated by him to the Bodleian Library probably when he was incorporated M.D. at Oxford in 1602. Late 16th century.

LoT 17: Thomas Lodge, Doutrina Christãa na lingoa Brasilica

Recorded in Eccles, p. 81. Facsimile of the title-page in The Last Voyage of Thomas Cavendish 1591-1592, ed. David Beers Quinn (Chicago, 1975), p. 22.

MS Bodl. 900

A folio composite volume, comprising three MSS, in English and Latin, i + 12 leaves, in limp vellum.

Probably presented to the Bodleian in 1639 by Patrick Young (1584-1652), Royal Librarian.

f. 1r-v

ElQ 231: Queen Elizabeth I, Queen Elizabeth's Latin Speech to the Heads of Oxford University, September 28, 1592

Copy of the original Latin version, in a professional hand. c.1593.

Edited from this MS in Autograph Compositions.

Beginning ‘Merita et gratitudo sic meam rationem captiuam duxerunt...’, in Autograph Compositions, pp. 163-5. An English translation, beginning ‘Merits and gratitude have so captured my reason...’, in Collected Works, Speech 20, pp. 327-8.

ff. 2r-8v

*ElQ 60: Queen Elizabeth I, Cicero's oration titled ‘Pro Marcello’

Autograph MS of the Queen's translation in her cursive hand. c.1592.

Edited from this MS in Selected Works and in Translations (2), the latter with a facsimile of f. 6r on p. 2.

Translations (2), pp. 16-41, facing a modernized spelling version. Selected Works, pp. 268-86.

MS Bodl. 903

A presentation copy, chiefly in the accomplished secretary and italic scripts of one of Howard's amanuenses, with autograph additions, corrections and sidenotes by Howard throughout, 177 folio leaves, in purple velvet, with remains of silk ties. Prepared for a member of the Stanhope family, probably Sir John Stanhope, later first Baron Stanhope of Harrington (c.1545-1621), Treasurer of the Chamber (in 1596-1616), with a lengthy title-page (f. 1r), subscribed by four lines in Latin in Howard's own hand quoting from Daniel 13.57; illuminated arms of the Stanhope family (f. 1v) followed by eight autograph lines of Latin verse by Howard and with his sidenote, signed ‘Amicus tibi in perpetuum fidelissimus H. Hwward’; a Dedication ‘To the Quenes most excellent Maiestie’ on ff. 2r-19v, 19 bis - 20r, subscribed with two autograph lines of Latin signed by Howard (f. 20r) ‘Your Maiesties most loyall / and humble subiecte and / seruante till deathe / H. Hwward’; the main text on ff. 21r-176v, with separate title-pages for the second book (f. 97r after a blank leaf) and third book (f. 119v). Late 16th century.

*HoH 69: Henry Howard, Earl of Northampton, A dutiful defence of the lawful regiment of women

Given to the Bodleian in 1621 by Ralph Radcliffe, Town Clerk of Oxford.

An unpublished answer to, and attack upon, John Knox's ‘railing invective’ against Mary Queen of Scots, First Blast of the Trumpet against the Monstrous Regiment of Women (1558). Written, Howard claims in his Dedication, some thirteen years after he was asked to do so by a Privy Councillor [i.e. c.1585-90]. The Dedication to Queen Elizabeth beginning ‘It pricketh now fast upon the point of thirteen years (most excellent most gratious and most redoubted Soveraign...’; the main text, in three books, beginning ‘It may seem strange to men of grounded knowledge...’, and ending ‘...Sancta et individuae Trinitati sit omnis honor laus et gloria in secula seculorum. Amen.’

MS Bodl. 910

Copy, in an accomplished professional roman hand, xxvi + 966 folio pages, in dark blue calf elaborately gilt. 1638.

*HrE 123: Edward, Lord Herbert of Cherbury, The Life and Reign of King Henry VIII

Prefixed (p. iii) by an autograph letter to John Rouse, Bodley's Librarian, 31 January 1643, presenting the volume to the Bodleian via Thomas Master.

This MS recorded in Rossi, III, 490.

First published in London, 1649. Published in London, 1880 (with Autobiography).

MS Bodl. 966

A double-folio-size composite volume of historical tracts and papers, many relating to state arraignments, in a single professional secretary hand up to p. 527, xxiv + 552 pages (plus blank pp. 553-684), in red morocco elaborately gilt. c.1610 [with addition to c.1630].

Presented to the Bodleian in 1620 by Sir Peter Manwood (1571-1625), judge and antiquary.

pp. 93-189

CvG 7: George Cavendish, The Life of Cardinal Wolsey

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Sylvester, p. 278.

First published in George Cavendish, The Life of Cardinal Wolsey and Metrical Visions, ed. Samuel W. Singer, 2 vols (Chiswick, 1825). The Life and Death of Cardinal Wolsey by George Cavendish, ed. Richard S. Sylvester, EETS, orig. ser. 243 (London, New York and Toronto, 1959).

pp. 193-220

MrT 87: Sir Thomas More, William Roper's Life of Sir Thomas More

Copy, in a neat cursive secretary hand, untitled.

Collated in Hitchcock and briefly described, p. xviii.

First published in London, 1626. Edited, as The Lyfe of Sir Thomas Moore, knighte, written by William Roper Esquire, by Elsie Vaughan Hitchcock (EETS, London, 1935).

p. 254-5

RaW 728.4: Sir Walter Ralegh, Ralegh's Arraignment(s)

A summary of Ralegh's arraignment in 1603.

Accounts of the arraignments of Ralegh at Winchester Castle, 17 November 1603, and before the Privy Council on 22 October 1618. The arraignment of 1603 published in London, 1648. For documentary evidence about this arraignment, see Rosalind Davies, ‘“The Great Day of Mart”: Returning to Texts at the Trial of Sir Walter Ralegh in 1603’, Renaissance Forum, 4/1 (1999), 1-12.

pp. 289-309

EsR 197: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Essex's Arraignment, 19 February 1600/1

Copy.

pp. 311-13

EsR 265: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Essex's speech at his execution

Copy of an account of the execution.

Generally incorporated in accounts of Essex's execution and sometimes also of his behaviour the night before.

pp. 453-4

EsR 266: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Essex's speech at his execution

Copy.

Generally incorporated in accounts of Essex's execution and sometimes also of his behaviour the night before.

pp. 527-42

CtR 497: Sir Robert Cotton, Twenty-four Argvments, Whether it be more expedient to suppress Popish Practises against the due Allegeance of His Majesty, by the Strict Execution touching Jesuits and Seminary Preists? Or, to restraine them to Close Prisons, during life, if no Reformation follow?

Copy, unascribed. c.1630.

Tract beginning ‘I am not ignorant, that this latter age hath brought forth a swarm of busie heads...’, dated 11 August 1613. First published in two editions, as respectively Seriovs Considerations for Repressing of the Increase of Iesvites and A Treatise against Recusants (both London, 1641). Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [109]-159.

MS Bodl. 987

Autograph calligraphic MS, 77 leaves (51 x 80 mm.), in contemporary calf gilt, dated 21 June 1617. A presentation MS to Joseph Hall (1574-1656), Dean of Worcester and later Bishop of Exeter, with a prose Dedication to him in English, in roman and italic scripts, with decoration and a self-portrait. 1617.

*InE 52: Esther Inglis, [Quatrains de Pybrac] Les six vingts et six quatrains de Guy de Faur sieur de Pybrac, escrits, par Esther Inglis pour son dernier adieu, ce 21 iour de Iuin, 1617

Given to the Bodleian Library in 1638 by Edward Hall.

Scott-Elliot & Yeo, No. 50 (pp. 77-8).

Quatrains in French by Guy du Faur, Sieur de Pybrac (1529-84), first published in 1576.

MS Bodl. 990

Autograph calligraphic MS, xviii + 70 pages (184 x 128mm.), in red leather gilt, dated 13 April 1599. A presentation MS to Robert Devereux (1566-1601), second Earl of Essex, with a prose Dedication to him in French, in numerous styles of script, with arms, decoration, and a self-portrait. 1599.

*InE 24: Esther Inglis, [Proverbs] Les Proverbes de Salomon escrites en diverses sortes de lettres par Esther Anglois Françoise. A Lislebourg en Ecosse, 1599

Presented to the Bodleian in 1620 by Sir Thomas Nevill. Inscribed in 1711 by Thomas Hearne (1678-1735), Oxford antiquary, and also by Esther Inglis's great-grandson, Samuel Kello.

Scott-Elliot & Yeo, No. 9 (pp. 37-9), with a facsimile of p. 12 as Plate 11 (between pp. 42 and 43). Facsimile of the portrait page, f. xvr, in Jonathan Goldberg, Writing Matter: From the Hands of the English Renaissance (Stanford, 1990), p. 151. Facsimile of the Latin verses to Essex and the portrait page, ff. xivv-xvr, in Sally Mapstone, Scots and their Books in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance: An exhibition in the Bodleian Library, Oxford (Bodleian Library, 1996), p. 25.

A French translation of the Book of Proverbs in the Bible, with Latin verses to Essex by Melville, Rollock and Johnston and to Esther Inglis by Melville and Johnston.

Broxbourne 84.23

Copy, in the hands of two amanuenses. Entitled (f. 1r) ‘Reges, Reginæ Nobiles in Ecclesia St. Petri Westmonasterij sepulti’, with rubrication and 166 emblazoned coats of arms, on 95 quarto leaves (including 22 blanks), gilt edged, in contemporary calf elaborately gilt with the arms of Queen Elizabeth and probably presented to her. c.1600.

CmW 16: William Camden, Reges, reginae, nobiles & alij in Ecclesia Collegiata B. Petri Westmonasterij sepulti, vsque ad annum 1600

Bookplate of Strickland Freeman, Fawley Court, Buckinghamshire, 1810. Sotheby's, 23 April 1945, lot 40.

Formerly Broxbourne R 276. Described, with an illustration, in Howard M. Nixon, Broxbourne Library: Styles and Designs of Bookbindings from the Twelfth to the Twentieth Century (London, 1956), pp. 112-14.

First published in London, 1600.

Broxbourne 85.18

A duodecimo notebook and miscellany, entitled (f. [1r]) ‘Vade mecum or A Pocket-Booke’, ii + 84 leaves, in contemporary calf. Compiled by John Gibson (1630-1711), of Welburn, near Kirkby Moorside, North Yorkshire, and in his minute hand throughout. c.1665-78.

Inscribed (f. [iir]) ‘Joseph King / Lewes Sussex / Sept 30 1834 to Mr S.B. Williams’.

Formerly Broxbourne R 359.

f. [27v]

MaA 89: Andrew Marvell, Bludius et Corona (‘Bludius, ut ruris damnum repararet aviti’)

Copy, headed ‘In Diadema Regium a Bluddio Furto ablatum’.

First published in Thompson (1776), I, xxxix. Margoliouth, I, 178. Lord, p. 249. Smith, p. 414, with English translation.

For the English version, which accompanies many of the MS texts, see MaA 253-80.

f. [27v]

MaA 260: Andrew Marvell, Upon Blood's Attempt to Steal the Crown (‘When daring Blood, his rents to have regain'd’)

Copy, headed ‘In English’ and subscribed ‘A.M.’.

First published as a separate poem in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1697). POAS, I, 78. Lord, p. 193. Smith, p. 414.

This poem also appears as lines 178-85 of The Loyal Scot (see MaA 191-8 and Margoliouth, I, 379, 384).

For the Latin version, which accompanies many of the MS texts, see MaA 85-97.

f. [37v.]

WoH 14.5: Sir Henry Wotton, The Character of a Happy Life (‘How happy is he born and taught’)

Copy, transcribed from a printed source (p. 497).

First published in Sir Thomas Overbury, A Wife, 5th impression (London, 1614). Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), pp. 522-3. Hannah (1845), pp. 28-31. Some texts of this poem discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Wotton's “The Character of a Happy Life”’, The Library, 5th Ser. 10 (1955), 270-4, and in Ted-Larry Pebworth, ‘New Light on Sir Henry Wotton's “The Character of a Happy Life”’, The Library, 5th Ser. 33 (1978), 223-6 (plus plates).

f. [38r]

WoH 201.5: Sir Henry Wotton, Upon the Sudden Restraint of the Earl of Somerset then falling from favour (‘Dazzled thus with the height of place’)

Copy, headed ‘On Somersets Fall. Sr H.W.’

First published in Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 522. Hannah (1845), pp. 25-7. Some texts of this poem discussed in Ted-Larry Pebworth, ‘Sir Henry Wotton's “Dazel'd Thus, with Height of Place” and the Appropriation of Political Poetry in the Earlier Seventeenth Century’, PBSA, 71 (1977), 151-69.

ff. [38v-9r]

WoH 216.8: Sir Henry Wotton, A Description of the Country's Recreations (‘Quivering fears, heart-tearing cares’)

Copy, untitled, transcribed from Walton's Compleat Angler, p. 348.

First published in Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), pp. 531-3, subscribed ‘Ignoto’, among ‘Poems Found among the Papers of S. H. Wotton’. Described in Izaak Walton, The Complete Angler (London, 1653), pp. 239-40, as ‘a Copy printed amongst Sir Henry Wottons Verses, and doubtless made either by him, or by a lover of Angling’. Hannah (1845), pp. 55-9.

ff. [39v-40r]

WoH 228.5: Sir Henry Wotton, A Farewell to the Vanities of the World (‘Farewell, ye gilded follies, pleasing troubles!’)

Copy, untitled, transcribed from Walton's Compleat Angler, p. 351.

First published, as ‘a farewell to the vanities of the world, and some say written by Dr. D[onne], but let them bee writ by whom they will’, in Izaak Walton, The Complete Angler (London, 1653), pp. 243-5. Hannah (1845), pp. 109-13. The Poems of John Donne, ed. Herbert J.C. Grierson, 2 vols (Oxford, 1912), I, 465-7.

f. [42r]

WoH 60.5: Sir Henry Wotton, On a Bank as I sat a-Fishing. A Description of the Spring (‘And now all nature seemed in love’)

Copy, headed ‘Sr Hen: Wotton's Description of ye Spring’ and here beginning ‘This day dame Nature seemd in Love’.

First published in Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 524. Hannah (1845), pp. 32-5.

ff. [44r-5r]

RnT 291: Thomas Randolph, The second Epod: of Horace translated (‘Happy the man which farre from city care’)

Copy, probably transcribed from a printed source.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 49-51.

f. [48r]

HrG 281.5: George Herbert, Vertue (‘Sweet day, so cool, so calm, so bright’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 87-8.

f. [51r]

CoA 107: Abraham Cowley, Martial. L. 10. Ep. 47 (‘Since dearest Friend, 'tis your desire to see’)

Copy, headed ‘Mr Cowley's Translation of Vitam quae faciunt lecturem’, transcribed from a printed source.

First published, among Several Discourses by way of Essays, in Verse and Prose, in Works (London, 1668). Waller, II, 460.

MSS Broxbourne R 359

A duodecimo ‘Vade mecum or A Pocket-Book’ of verse, compiled by John Gibson the Younger (1630-1711), of Welburne, Yorkshire, 86 unnumbered leaves, in contemporary calf, with traces of clasps. c.1666-78.

f. [38v]

WoH 14.8: Sir Henry Wotton, The Character of a Happy Life (‘How happy is he born and taught’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Sir Thomas Overbury, A Wife, 5th impression (London, 1614). Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), pp. 522-3. Hannah (1845), pp. 28-31. Some texts of this poem discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Wotton's “The Character of a Happy Life”’, The Library, 5th Ser. 10 (1955), 270-4, and in Ted-Larry Pebworth, ‘New Light on Sir Henry Wotton's “The Character of a Happy Life”’, The Library, 5th Ser. 33 (1978), 223-6 (plus plates).

f. [39r]

WoH 201.8: Sir Henry Wotton, Upon the Sudden Restraint of the Earl of Somerset then falling from favour (‘Dazzled thus with the height of place’)

Copy, headed ‘On Somersets fall. Sr H. W.’

First published in Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 522. Hannah (1845), pp. 25-7. Some texts of this poem discussed in Ted-Larry Pebworth, ‘Sir Henry Wotton's “Dazel'd Thus, with Height of Place” and the Appropriation of Political Poetry in the Earlier Seventeenth Century’, PBSA, 71 (1977), 151-69.

f. [39v]

WoH 216.5: Sir Henry Wotton, A Description of the Country's Recreations (‘Quivering fears, heart-tearing cares’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), pp. 531-3, subscribed ‘Ignoto’, among ‘Poems Found among the Papers of S. H. Wotton’. Described in Izaak Walton, The Complete Angler (London, 1653), pp. 239-40, as ‘a Copy printed amongst Sir Henry Wottons Verses, and doubtless made either by him, or by a lover of Angling’. Hannah (1845), pp. 55-9.

f. [39v]

SaG 5.4: George Sandys, Ovid's Metamorphosis

Extracts.

Books I-IV first published in London, 1621. Complete in 1626.

ff. [40v-41r]

WoH 219.2: Sir Henry Wotton, A Farewell to the Vanities of the World (‘Farewell, ye gilded follies, pleasing troubles!’)

Copy, untitled.

First published, as ‘a farewell to the vanities of the world, and some say written by Dr. D[onne], but let them bee writ by whom they will’, in Izaak Walton, The Complete Angler (London, 1653), pp. 243-5. Hannah (1845), pp. 109-13. The Poems of John Donne, ed. Herbert J.C. Grierson, 2 vols (Oxford, 1912), I, 465-7.

f. [43r]

WoH 59.5: Sir Henry Wotton, On a Bank as I sat a-Fishing. A Description of the Spring (‘And now all nature seemed in love’)

Copy, headed ‘Sr Hen Wottons Description of ye spring’, here beginning ‘This day dame Nature...’.

First published in Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 524. Hannah (1845), pp. 32-5.

ff. [46v, 48v-9r, 52r]

CoA 261: Abraham Cowley, Extracts

Extracts from poems by Cowley. c.1678.

Buxton 27(1)

Exemplum of Daniel's printed Works (London, 1601).

Later in the library of John Buxton (1912-89), Reader in English Literature, Oxford University.

sig. A1r

*DaS 7: Samuel Daniel, Delia. Sonnet II (‘Goe wailing Verse, the Infants of my loue’)

Autograph correction in line 2.

Grosart, I, 38. Sprague, p. 11.

sig. A3r

*DaS 9: Samuel Daniel, Delia. Sonnet IX (‘If this be loue, to draw a wearie breath’)

Autograph correction in line 1.

Grosart, I, 42-3. Sprague, p. 15.

sigs. Fiiiir, Kiiiv

*DaS 48: Samuel Daniel, Cleopatra

Autograph corrections in Act I, line 9, and Act V, scene ii, line 17.

First published in London, 1594. Grosart, III, 1-94.

sigs. G4r, H1r

*DaS 44: Samuel Daniel, A Defence of Rhyme

Autograph corrections on sigs. G4r (line 20) and H1r (line 20).

First published in London, [1603]. Grosart, IV, 29-67. Sprague, pp. 125-58.

sigs. Lvir, sig. Nvir

*DaS 5: Samuel Daniel, The Complaint of Rosamond (‘Out from the horror of infernall deepes’)

Autograph revision in the first stanza, line 5, and an autograph correction in the final stanza, line 1.

First published, together with Delia, in London, 1592. Grosart, I, 79-113. Sprague, pp. 37-63.

sig. Siiiv

*DaS 2: Samuel Daniel, The Civile Wars between the Two Houses of Lancaster and Yorke

Autograph correction in Book VI, stanza 82, last line.

Books I-IV first published in London, 1595. Grosart, Vol. II. Edited by Laurence Michel (New Haven, 1958).

C. 2. 21. Art.

Autograph, headed ‘Pindarique Ode. The Book Humbly presenting it selfe to the Vniversity Librarie at Oxford’, inscribed on the preliminary flyleaves of an exemplum of Cowley's Poems (London, 1656), presented by him to the Bodleian Library. 1656.

*CoA 119: Abraham Cowley, Ode. Mr. Cowley's Book presenting it self to the University Library of Oxford (‘Hail Learnings Pantheon! Hail the sacred Ark’)

Facsimiles and facsimile examples of this MS in the Scolar Press facsimile edition of the 1656 Poems (Menston, 1971); in Croft, Autograph Poetry, I, 51; and in Greg, English Literary Autographs, plate XXVII(c).

First published in Poems, by Several Persons (Dublin, 1663). Verses, Lately Written upon several Occasions (London, 1663). Waller, I, 409-11.

C. 7. 2 Art.

Camden's copious autograph annotations in a printed exemplum of Brooke's Catalogue and Succession (London, 1619. Constituting a detailed critique of the book, some on interleaves, inscribed ‘Mr Yorke sent his booke to me to be censured the 19 of Febr: and I did resend it the 25th of the same month’, and some pages inscribed ‘This page reprinted’. [1619-22].

*CmW 100: William Camden, On Ralph Brooke's Catalogue and Succession (1619)

Unpublished.

MS Carte 22

A folio composite volume of state letters and papers for the period January 1647/8 to November 1648, 699 leaves.

f. 20r

*DeJ 129: Sir John Denham, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed ‘MK’, to James Butler, Marquess of Ormonde, from London, 28 February [1647/8]. 1648.

Edited in Kelliher, p. 5.

ff. 436r-7r

*DaW 132: Sir William Davenant, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Davenant, to the Marquess of Ormond, from Paris, 25 October 1648, endorsed ‘By Mr Fanshaw’. 1648.

MS Carte 24

A folio composite volume of state letters and papers for the period March 1648/9 to May 1649, in various hands, 801 leaves.

ff. 21r-2r

*DaW 133: Sir William Davenant, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Davenant, to Sir George Hamilton, from Kinsale, 3 March 1648/9. 1649.

MS Carte 29

A folio composite volume of state letters and papers for the period December 1650 to January 1650/1, in various hands, 660 leaves.

ff. 45r-6v

*DeJ 130: Sir John Denham, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to Lady Isabella Thynne, from The Hague, 27 December [1651]. 1651.

Edited in Kelliher, pp. 9-11, with a facsimile of the first page. Facsimile also in IELM, II.i (1987), Facsimile XIII, after p. xxiv.

ff. 223-4v

*DeJ 131: Sir John Denham, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to Isabella Thynne, 8 February [1651/2]. 1652.

Edited in Kelliher, pp. 11-12.

MS Carte 30

A folio volume of copies of documents relating to state matters in Ireland and to the Butler family of Ormonde and their estates, 1632-60, 715 leaves.

ff. 515r-16v

*CoA 238: Abraham Cowley, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Cowley, [to James Butler, Marquess of Ormonde], from Paris, 26 December 1659. 1659.

Edited in C.H. Firth, ‘Abraham Cowley at the Restoration’, The Academy, 44, No. 1118 (7 October 1893), 296.

MS Carte 31

A folio composite volume of miscellaneous correspondence and state papers, chiefy of the Duke of Ormonde, in various hands, 1660-2, 613 leaves.

f. 58r

*TaJ 75: Jeremy Taylor, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Taylor, to Hugh, Viscount Montgomery, from Hillsborough, 27 October 1660. 1660.

Edited in H.J. Lawlor, ‘Two Letters of Jeremy Taylor’, Church of Ireland Gazette, 43 (14 June 1901), 482-3.

MS Carte 77

A folio composite volume of papers, chiefly correspondence of the fifth and seventh Earls of Huntingdon, on state affairs, 723 leaves, in half-calf.

ff. 41r-2r

RaW 710.5: Sir Walter Ralegh, Short Apology for his last Actions at Guiana

Copy, in a professional hand, untitled but subscribed ‘The Coppie of Sr. wa. Raleigh his appologie to ye Kinge at his returne from Guiana in July 1618’. c.1620s.

Ralegh's letter of 1618 to his cousin George, Lord Carew of Clopton (beginning ‘Because I know not whether I shall live...’). First published in Judicious and Select Essays (London, 1650). Edwards, II, 375 et seq. Youings, No. 222, pp. 364-8.

ff. 43r-6r

RaW 838: Sir Walter Ralegh, Letter(s)

Copy of one or more letters by Ralegh.

ff. 60r-v

RaW 728.5: Sir Walter Ralegh, Ralegh's Arraignment(s)

A summary of Ralegh's arraignment.

Accounts of the arraignments of Ralegh at Winchester Castle, 17 November 1603, and before the Privy Council on 22 October 1618. The arraignment of 1603 published in London, 1648. For documentary evidence about this arraignment, see Rosalind Davies, ‘“The Great Day of Mart”: Returning to Texts at the Trial of Sir Walter Ralegh in 1603’, Renaissance Forum, 4/1 (1999), 1-12.

ff. 89r-102r

RaW 622: Sir Walter Ralegh, A Discourse touching a Marriage between Prince Henry and a Daughter of Savoy

Copy, in a professional hand, the first leaf imperfect, endorsed (f. 102v) ‘A discourse of w. Rawleigh agt a match with the daughter of Savoy’. c.1620s.

A tract beginning ‘There is nobody that persuades our prince to match with Savoy, for any love to the person of the duke...’. First published in The Interest of England with regard to Foreign Alliances, explained in two discourses:...2) Touching a Marriage between Prince Henry of England and a Daughter of Savoy (London, 1750). Works (1829), VIII, 237-52. Ralegh's authorship is not certain.

ff. 183r-v, 235r-v, 237r-8v

BcF 432: Francis Bacon, Bacon's Humble Submissions and Supplications

Copy of all Bacon's submissions.

The Humble Submissions and Supplications Bacon sent to the House of Lords, on 19 March 1620/1 (beginning ‘I humbly pray your Lordships all to make a favourable and true construction of my absence...’); 22 April 1621 (beginning ‘It may please your Lordships, I shall humbly crave at your Lordships' hands a benign interpretation...’); and 30 April 1621 (beginning ‘Upon advised consideration of the charge, descending into mine own conscience...’), written at the time of his indictment for corruption. Spedding, XIV, 215-16, 242-5, 252-62.

MS Carte 79

A folio composite volume of correspondence and papers of Philip, fourth Baron Wharton (1613-96), and Thomas, first Marquess of Wharton (1648-1715), between 1665 and 1699, 759 leaves.

ff. 386r-401r passim

CtR 267: Sir Robert Cotton, An Exact Abridgement of the Records in the Tower of London, from the reign of Edward the Second unto Richard the Third, of all the Parliaments holden in each King's reign

Extracts, made by Theophilus Hastings (1650-1701), seventh Earl of Huntingdon. 1682-3.

First published, as ‘Collected by Sr. R. Cotton’, in London, 1657. Probably collected rather by William and Robert Bowyer, Keepers of the Records in the Tower, and revised and edited by William Prynne.

MS Carte 80

A folio composite volume of miscellaneous correspondence, including papers of the Wharton family, 1640-67, in various hands, 828 leaves.

ff. 121r-2v

*WaE 801: Edmund Waller, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Waller, to Colonel Arthur Goodwyn, [July 1643]. 1643.

Edited in Lord Nugent, Some Memorials of John Hampden, his Party, and his Times, 2 vols (London, 1832), II, 417-19. Text in Deas, pp. 170-1.

MS Carte 81

A folio composite volume of state correspondence, in various hands, of Philip, fourth Baron Wharton (1613-96), politician, and of Thomas Wharton (1648-1715), first Marquess of Wharton, politician.

f. 37r

*MaA 537: Andrew Marvell, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Marvell, to Philip, fourth Baron Wharton, 9 May 1668. 1668.

Discussed by Nicholas von Maltzahn in TLS, 21 June 2002, pp. 14-15, and in ‘Andrew Marvell and the Lord Wharton’, The Seventeenth Century, 18/2 (Autumn 2003), 252-65 (p. 254).

MS Carte 96

A folio volume of state papers and treatises, chiefly relating to relations between England and Spain, in a single professional hand, vi + 166 leaves (including some blanks), in half-calf.

ff. 1r-5r

CtR 75: Sir Robert Cotton, A Breife Abstract of the Question of Precedencie between England and Spaine: Occasioned by Sir Henry Nevill the Queen of Englands Ambassador, and the Ambassador of Spaine, at Calais Commissioners appointed by the French King...

Copy, ascribed to ‘Robert Cotton Esqr’.

Tract, relating to events in 1599/1600, beginning ‘To seek before the decay of the Roman Empire...’. First published in London, 1642. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [73]-‘79’ [i.e. 89].

ff. 82r-94r

RaW 1057.8: Sir Walter Ralegh, A discourse concerneing peace or warre with Spaine

Copy, as by ‘Sr Walter Rawlaigh Knt’. Early 17th century.

This MS discussed in Lefranc (1968), p. 64.

An unpublished tract, dedicated to James I, beginning ‘By the relation of the Spanish project agt this State of England most illustrious Prince...’.

Keymer

ff. 158r-60v

CtR 103: Sir Robert Cotton, A Briefe Discovrse concerning the Power of the Peeres and Commons of Parliament in point of Judicature

Copy, as written by ‘Sr Robert Cotton to Sr. Edward Mountague Anno Dni 1621’. c.1620s.

Tract, the full title sometimes given as A Brief discourse prouinge that the house of Comons hath Equall power with the Peeres in point of Judicature written by Sr Rob: Cotton to Sr Edward Mountague Ano Dni. 1621, beginning ‘Sir, To give you as short an accompt of your desire as I can...’. First published in London, 1640. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [341]-351.

See also the Introduction.

MS Carte 103

A folio composite volume of state papers and correspondence, in various hands, 661 leaves.

ff. 258r-9v

*MaA 535: Andrew Marvell, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Marvell, to [Philip, fourth Baron Wharton], from London, 2 April 1667. 1667.

Margoliouth, II, 309-11.

MS Carte 104

A folio composite volume of state papers, in various hands, 306 leaves, in half-calf.

ff. 247r-56v

DaJ 258: Sir John Davies, The Question concerning Impositions

Copy of the dedication and Chapter 1 to the beginning of Chapter 10, in a professional hand, imperfect, lacking a title-page and the ending.

A treatise, with dedicatory epistle to James I, comprising 33 chapters, beginning ‘The Question it self is no more than this, Whether the Impositions which the King of England hath laid and levied upon Merchandize, by vertue of his Prerogative onely...’. First published in London, 1656. Grosart, III, 1-116.

MS Carte 107

A folio composite volume of papers on antiquarian and state matters, in various hands, 207 leaves, in half-calf.

ff. 90r-1r

CtR 237: Sir Robert Cotton, A Discourse Of the Offyce of the Lord Highe Connstable of England, written by Sr: Robte Cotton, knight, and Baronett

Copy, in a professional hand, as written by ‘Sr Robert Cotton knt and Barontt’. c.1620s.

Tract beginning ‘Yff wee curiouslye will looke the Roote of this question...’. Hearne (1771), II, 65-7.

ff. 91v-4v

CtR 53: Sir Robert Cotton, The Antiquitye and Offyce of Earle Marshall of England, Written by Sr Robte Cotton, knight, and Baronett

Copy, in a professional hand, as ‘written by Sr Robt: Cotton’. c.1620s.

Tract beginning ‘The plentye of this discourse, the last question of Highe Connstables, whereto...’. Hearne (1771), II, 97-103.

ff. 94v-6r

CtR 217: Sir Robert Cotton, A Discourse Of the Antiquitye, and Offyce of the Earle Marshall of England, written by Sr Robte Cotton, knight, Att the request of the Lord Henrye Howard, Earle of Northampton [25 November 1602]

Copy, in a professional hand. c.1620s.

A dedicatory epistle beginning ‘Sir, Yor small tyme, I must Ballance, wth as sclendr Aunswere...’ followed by a tract beginning ‘Because the Jurisdiction att the Comon Lawe was vncertayne...’.

ff. 101v-5v

CmW 23.4: William Camden, The Antiquity and Office of the Earl Marshall of England

Copy, in a professional hand, headed ‘The Etimologyie Antiquitie and office of the office [sic] of Erle Marshal...’. c.1620s.

A tract beginning ‘Such is the vncertainety of etimologyes...’ and sometimes entitled in manuscripts ‘The Etymology, Antiquity and Office of the Earl Marshall of England’. First published, as ‘Commentarius de etymologia, antiquitate, & officio Comitis Marescalli Angliae’, in Camdeni epistolae (London, 1691), Appendix, pp. 87-93. Hearne (1771), II, 90-7.

ff. 105v-6v

EsR 267: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Essex's speech at his execution

Copy of an account of Essex's execution and ‘prayer at his death’, in a professional hand. Early 17th century.

Generally incorporated in accounts of Essex's execution and sometimes also of his behaviour the night before.

ff. 195r-105v

EsR 198: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Essex's Arraignment, 19 February 1600/1

Copy.

MS Carte 119

A folio composite volume of papers on Parliamentary subjects, in various hands, some printed, 195 leaves, in half-calf.

ff. 26r-55v

CtR 466: Sir Robert Cotton, That the Kings of England have been pleased usually to consult with their Peeres in the great Councell, and Commons in Parliament, of Marriage, Peace, and Warre. Written...Anno 1611

Copy, in a professional hand, headed ‘The Antiquitie and Dignitie of Parliaments. Script p Sr Robt: Cotton’. c.1630.

Tract beginning ‘To search so high as the Norman Conquest...’. First published, as The Forme of Governement of the Kingdome of England collected out of the Fundamental Lawes and Statutes of this Kingdome, London, 1642. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [11]-39.

ff. 92r-106v

CtR 447: Sir Robert Cotton, A Speech Made by Sir Rob Cotton Knight and Baronet, before the Lords of his Majesties most Honorable Privy Covncel, At the Councel Table being thither called to deliver his Opinion touching the Alteration of Coyne. 2. Sept. [1626]

Copy, in a professional hand. c.1630s.

Speech beginning ‘My Lords, Since it hath pleased this Honourable Table to command...’. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [283]-294, with related texts (‘The Answer of the Committees Appointed...2 September 1626’ and ‘Questions to be proposed’, etc.) on pp. 295-307. W.A. Shaw, Writers on English Monetary History, pp. 21-38.

MS Carte 130

A folio composite volume principally of state correspondence and papers of Sir Robert Long, Bt (c.1602-73), Secretary of State, 542 leaves.

f. 169r

*CoA 236: Abraham Cowley, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, [to Sir Robert Long], from Paris, 13 March ‘1650’. 1650/1.

Edited in J. Simmons, ‘An Unpublished Letter from Abraham Cowley’, MLN, 57 (1942), 194-5.

MS Carte 213

A folio composite volume of state papers and correspondence of James Butler, first Duke of Ormonde, 1660-84, in various hands, 704 leaves.

ff. 634r-5v

*CoA 241: Abraham Cowley, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, [to James Butler, Marquess of Ormonde], from Paris, 2 March ‘1660’. 1660/1.

Edited in C.H. Firth, ‘Abraham Cowley at the Restoration’, The Academy, 44, No. 1118 (7 October 1893), 296.

MS Carte 245

Copy of 25 Rules, including (ff. 1r-7r) a dedication to Queen Elizabeth dated 8 January ‘1596’ and (ff. 8r-15r) a Preface, in secretary and italic hands, on 82 quarto leaves, in modern half-calf. Early 17th century.

BcF 218: Francis Bacon, Maxims of the Law

First published in The Elements of the Common Lawes of England (London, 1630). Spedding, VII, 307-87.

Bacon claimed to have collected ‘300 of them’, of which only ‘some few’ (25 maxims) were subsequently published. For an attempt to track down the ‘missing’ maxims, see John C. Hogan and Mortimer D. Schwartz, ‘On Bacon's “Rules and Maximes” of the Common Law’, Law Library Journal, 76/1 (Chicago, Winter 1983), 48-77.

MS Casaub. 9

A folio volume of correspondence of the scholar Isaac Casaubon (1559-1614).

pp. 419-22

AndL 70: Lancelot Andrewes, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Lancelot Andrewes, to Daniel Heinsius, [1614]. Early 17th century.

Edited in LACT, Minor Works (1854), pp. xlv-xlvii.

MS Cherry 19

A quarto composite volume of ecclesiastical papers, in various hands, i + 76 leaves, in contemporary calf.

Among collections of Francis Cherry (1665-1713), of Shollesbrooke, Berkshire, nonjuror.

ff. 48r-54r

AndL 31: Lancelot Andrewes, Judgment of the Lambeth Articles

Copy, headed ‘Sententia dris Andrews episcopi Wintoniensis de Articulis Lambethanis...’. c.1697.

First published in Articuli Lambethani (London, 1651). LACT, Pattern of Catechistical Doctrine (1846), pp. 287-300.

MS Cherry 35

A quarto miscellany of sermons and verse, in Greek, Latin and English, written from both ends, 84 leaves. Inscribed inside the front cover, apparently by the principal scribe, ‘George Taylar his booke witnesse by him that writ it October ye :21: Ano domini 1646’. 1646.

Among collections of Francis Cherry (1665-1713), of Shollesbrooke, Berkshire, nonjuror.

f. 7r

BcF 5: Francis Bacon, ‘The world's a bubble, and the life of man’

Copy, accompanied by a version in Greek. c.1640.

First published in Thomas Farnaby, Florilegium epigrammatum Graecorum (London, 1629). Poems by Sir Henry Wotton, Sir Walter Raleigh and others, ed. John Hannah (London, 1845), pp. 76-80. Spedding, VII, 271-2. H.J.C. Grierson, ‘Bacon's Poem, “The World”: Its Date and Relation to certain other Poems’, Modern Language Review, 6 (1911), 145-56.

MS Cherry 36

Autograph MS by Princess Elizabeth, with a prayer by her added by someone else later, on vellum throughout, 65 small quarto-size leaves (including 2 blanks), in an elaborately embroidered binding. 1544.

Among collections of Francis Cherry (1665-1713), of Shollesbrooke, Berkshire, nonjuror.

The embroidered binding and dedication to Katherine Parr illustrated in colour in Margaret H. Swain, ‘A New Year's Gift from the Princess Elizabeth’, The Connoisseur, 183 (1973, 258-66 (pp. 258-9). Binding also illustrated in colour in Reading Early Modern Women, ed. Helen Ostovich and Elizabeth Sauer (New York & London, 2004), p. 472.

ff. 2r-63r

*ElQ 62: Queen Elizabeth I, Marguerite de Navarre's ‘Le Miroir de l'Âme Pécheresse’ (The Glass of the Sinful Soul)

Autograph MS, in the Princess's neat hand, a New Year's Gift presented to Queen Katherine, including (ff. 2r-4v) Elizabeth's prose dedicatory epistle to her and (ff. 5r-6r) a preface to the reader, dated 31 December 1544.

Complete facsimile and transcription in Marc Shell, Elizabeth's Glass (Lincoln, Nebraska, & London, 1993). The dedicatory epistle edited in Collected Works, pp. 6-7, and in Autograph Compositions, pp. 6-7. Edited from this MS in Translations. Facsimile examples of the binding and of f. 2r in The Bodleian Library 1602-2002 (Oxford, 2002), No. 41, pp. 94-5. Discussed, with facsimile examples, in Frances Teague, ‘Princess Elizabeth's Hand in The Glass of the Sinful Soul’, EMS, 9 (2000), 33-48.

The translation first published, edited by John Bale, in A Godly Medytacyon of the Christen Sowle (Marburg, 1548). Translations, pp. 23-125.

ff. 63v-4r

ElQ 102: Queen Elizabeth I, On the Sailing of the Azores Expedition, July 1597

Copy, in an unidentified italic hand, headed ‘A praier made by her Matie’. c.1597.

Edited from this MS, in both a diplomatic and an edited version, in Tucker Brooke, ‘Queen Elizabeth's Prayers’, HLQ, 2 (1938-90, 69-77 (p. 77). Cited in Selected Works.

Beginning ‘O God, All-maker, Keeper, and Guider, inurement of thy rare-seen, unused and seld-heard-of goodness...’. Collected Works, Prayer 39, pp. 426-7. Autograph Compositions, pp. 104-5. Selected Works, Prayer 5, pp. 257-9.

4° D.8.Art.Seld.

A printed exemplum of the 1651 quarto edition with Davenant's autograph inscription ‘For the most honor'd and Learned John Selden Esquire’. c.1651.

*DaW 150: Sir William Davenant, Gondibert (4to, London, 1651)

A complete facsimile edition of this exemplum published by the Scolar Press, 1970.

DD.9.Art

Autograph inscription ‘Sum Nicolai Vdalli. 1544’. 1544.

*UdN 13: Nicholas Udall, Froissart, Jean. Le Tiers Volume de froissart Des Cronique de France, dangleterre, descoce, despaigne, de bretaigne, de gascogne, de Flandres Et lieux circunouisins (Paris, 1513)

Also inscribed in 1523 by John Fox (d.1530), of Corpus Christi College, Oxford.

Juhász-Ormsby, No. 11.

MS Dep. Bland Burges 44

Portion of a copy of Etherege's letterbook, on eighteen quarto leaves, unbound. c.1686-8.

This MS later brought from Ratisbon by Thomas Walpole, Envoy to the Court of Bavaria, and sent by him to Sir James Bland Burges (1752-1824) on 30 May 1795. Walpole's letter, in which he says ‘Inclosed I have the Honor to send you the only part of the copy of Sir G. Etheredge's papers which I have hitherto received from Ratisbon’, is f. 136r.

Recorded in IELM, II.i (1987) as ‘L 4’.

The MS as a whole

EtG 152: Sir George Etherege, Letterbook(s)

Portion of a transcript of Etherege's letterbook, comprising some twenty letters (plus verse) dated from Ratisbon, 19/29 November 1685 to 1/11 July 1686, in a single professional hand.

ff. 140v-1v

EtG 23: Sir George Etherege, A Letter to Lord Middleton (‘From hunting whores and haunting play’)

Copy.

First published, as ‘Another from Sir G.E. to the E. of M--Greeting’, in The History of Adolphus (London, 1691). Thorpe, pp. 46-7.

ff. 150r-1v

EtG 46: Sir George Etherege, Second Letter to Lord Middleton (‘Since love and verse, as well as wine’)

Copy.

First published in The History of Adolphus (London, 1691). Thorpe, pp. 48-50.

MS Dep. c. 225-6

Collections of Edmund Gibson for his edition of Britannia in English (1695). c.1695.

CmW 13.4: William Camden, Britannia

First published in London, 1586, with additions in 1607 and successive editions.

MS Dep. d. 817

Autograph MS, iv + 88 leaves (ff. 54-88 blank). Early 17th century.

*CaE 37: Elizabeth Cary, Viscountess Falkland, The Mirror of the World translated out of French into Englishe

Later owned by H.A. Lee-Dillon, seventeenth Viscount Dillon, who gave it to Burford parish in 1925, whence it was deposited in the Bodleian in 1991.

A translation of the Mirroir du Monde of Abraham Ortelius and dedicated to her uncle Sir Henry Lee.

MS Dep. e. 460

Copy, in a neat probably non-professional secretary hand, concluding with ‘Three Sonnetts in the comendatio of ye Pamphlett’, iv + 59 quarto leaves, in contemporary vellum. c.1600.

SoR 318.5: Robert Southwell, S.J., Catholic Saint, A Short Rule of Good Life

Formerly owned by Lloyd Tyrell-Kenyon (1917-93), fifth Baron Kenyon, of Gredington, Shropshire.

First published [in London? 1596-7?]. Brown, Two Letters, pp. 21-73.

MS Dep. g. 4/1

A sextodecimo composite booklet of autograph notes and memoranda by the young Southwell, i + 33 leaves (including nine blanks), in late 17th-century vellum gilt. Comprising three MSS containing copies, in Latin and Italian, of Jesuit rules and spiritual exercises, a calendar of duties, and a Latin devotional tract ‘On Christ's condemnation to death and the injustice of such a sentence’, compiled while Southwell was a novice or scholastic in Rome. c.1579-80.

*SoR 342: Robert Southwell, S.J., Catholic Saint, Notebook

The booklet sent from Rome by Christopher Green, S.J., to John Keynes, S.J., Rector of the Jesuit college at Liège; later probably sent to Stonyhurst College at its foundation in 1794. Given to Thomas Anthony Southwell (1777-1860), third Viscount Southwell. Temporarily deposited in 1930 by the fifth Viscount Southwell (1872-44) in St Joseph's Church, Newbury, Berkshire. A typescript summary and partial transcript of the MS made in London in 1930 by or for Fr C.A. Newdigate, S.J. Afterwards in the custody of Patrick C. Barry, in the Office of the Vice-Postulation for the Cause of the English and Welsh Martyrs, in the English Province of the Society of Jesus, London. Deposited in the Bodleian in 1988 by Iain Cameron.

Described in H[erbert] T[hurston, S.J.], ‘An Autograph Manuscript of the Venerable Robert Southwell, S.J.’, The Month, 193, No. 718 (April 1924), p. 353. Also described in Spiritual Exercises and Devotions of Blessed Robert Southwell, S.J., ed. J.-M. de Buck, S.J. (London, 1931), pp. 29-31, and in McDonald, pp. 14-15.

Unpublished.

MS Dep. g. 4/2

A sectodecimo autograph notebook, comprising lists of saints and of subjects for prayers, in Latin, inscribed ‘Manu P. Rob. Southwelli Martyris scripta’, 16 unsewn leaves (ff. 9v-16r blank). c.1679-80.

*SoR 343: Robert Southwell, S.J., Catholic Saint, Notebook

Unpublished.

MS Digby 138

A 15th-century rubricated MS of John Gower's Vox Clamantis, on vellum throughout, 157 folio-size leaves, ff' 158r-69v comprising later additions on paper, in old calf gilt (rebacked).

From the library of Sir Kenelm Digby (1603-65), natural philosopher and courtier. Inscribed name ‘Roger Waller’.

f. 159r

ElQ 15: Queen Elizabeth I, ‘The doubt of future foes’

Copy, headed ‘E Reg’, here beginning ‘The Dowte of future [force superscribed by] foes’. Late 16th-century.

This MS cited in Bradner and in Selected Works.

A version first published in George Puttenham, The Arte of English Poesie (London, 1589), sig. 2E2v (p. 208). Bradner, p. 4. Collected Works, Poem 5, pp. 133-4. Selected Works, Poem 4, pp. 7-9.

MS Dodsw. 20

A folio composite volume of heraldic and genealogical papers belonging to Camden, Robert Glover, and others, 172 leaves.

Among collections of Roger Dodsworth (1585-1654), antiquary, passed on to Lord Fairfax, who donated them to the Bodleian.

The MS as a whole

CmW 138: William Camden, Collectanea

One of Camden's miscellaneous collections, largely in his hand. c.1590s.

f. 90r-v

*CmW 45: William Camden, Armories

Fragment of an early autograph rough draft, here beginning ‘When I first sett penne to write of Armes…’, on a single leaf.

A tract beginning ‘Whereas somewhat hath bene saide of Allusions and Anagrams...’. First published in Remaines (London, 1614), pp. 177-95.

See also CmW 69-70.

ff. 91r-2v

*CmW 46: William Camden, Armories

Fragment of a later draft, here beginning ‘coates of Armes whch were registred alwayes…’, in the hand of an amanuensis with Camden's autograph corrections and revisions, on two separate leaves.

A tract beginning ‘Whereas somewhat hath bene saide of Allusions and Anagrams...’. First published in Remaines (London, 1614), pp. 177-95.

See also CmW 69-70.

MS Dodsw. 49

A folio composite volume of miscellaneous papers, in various hands, ix + 121 leaves, in modern cloth.

Among collections of Roger Dodsworth (1585-1654), antiquary, passed on to Lord Fairfax, who donated them to the Bodleian.

ff. 112r-15r

CtR 149: Sir Robert Cotton, The Danger wherein this Kingdome now Standeth, and the Remedy

Copy, in a professional predominantly secretary hand, ascribed to Cotton. c.1630.

Tract beginning ‘As soon as the house of Austria had incorporated it self into the house of Spaine...’. First published London, 1628. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. 308-20.

ff. 120r-5r

WoH 264: Sir Henry Wotton, A Parallel between Robert Earl of Essex and George Duke of Buckingham

Copy, in a professional predominantly secretary hand. c.1630s.

First published in London, 1641. Edited by Sir Robert Egerton Brydges (Lee Priory Press, Ickham, 1814).

MS Dodsw. 61

A folio composite miscellany of antiquarian materials, in various hands, viii + 183 leaves, bound with MSS Dodsworth 62 and 63, in old calf.

Among collections of Roger Dodsworth (1585-1654), antiquary, passed on to Lord Fairfax, who donated them to the Bodleian.

f. 63r-v

SuJ 148: John Suckling, An Answer to a Gentleman in Norfolk that sent to enquire after the Scotish business

Copy, in a secretary hand, headed ‘Sr John Sucklings Lre out of Scotland, April. 1639’, on a single folio leaf. c.1640.

This MS collated in Clayton.

First published in Last Remains (London, 1659). Clayton, pp. 142-4.

MS Dodsw. 79

A folio volume of miscellaneous historical and genealogical papers and verses, in several hands, x + 158 leaves.

ff. 161v-2r

CaE 10: Elizabeth Cary, Viscountess Falkland, An Epitaph upon the death of the Duke of Buckingham (‘Reader stand still and see, loe, how I am’)

Copy of a 50-line version.

This MS recorded in Akkerman.

A six-line (epitaph) version is ascribed to ‘the Countesse of Faukland’ in two MS copies. In some sources it is followed by a further 44 lines (elegy) beginning ‘Yet were bidentalls sacred and the place’. The latter also appears, anonymously, as a separate poem in a number of other sources. The authorship remains uncertain. For an argument for Lady Falkland's authorship of all 50 lines, see Akkerman.

Both sets of verse were first published, as separate but sequential poems, in Poems or Epigrams, Satyrs (London, 1658), pp. 101-2. All 50 lines are edited in Akkerman, pp. 195-6.

MS Dodsw. 82

A folio composite volume of historical and antiquarian papers, in various hands and paper sizes, vii + 129 leaves, bound with two other MSS (MSS Tanner 81 and 83), in contemporary calf.

Among collections of Roger Dodsworth (1585-1654), antiquary, passed on to Lord Fairfax, who donated them to the Bodleian.

ff. 1r, 42r

LeJ 35: John Leland, Collectanea [Other transcripts and extracts]

Extracts, transcribed from an antiquarian collection of St Loe Kniveton (d.1628) of Gray's Inn, together with extracts from calendars of public records made by Francis Thynne (1545?-1608), herald and antiquary.

MS Dodsw. 105

A folio composite volume of historical and antiquarian papers, predominantly in one cursive secretary hand, xiv + 142 leaves, in later calf.

Among collections of Roger Dodsworth (1585-1654), antiquary, passed on to Lord Fairfax, who donated them to the Bodleian.

ff. 97r-104v passim

LeJ 30: John Leland, Collectanea [Dugdale transcript]

Extracts from Leland's works — probably the Collectanea and perhaps the Itinerary — including transcriptions from (f. 97r-v) ‘booke M’ of ‘mr Dugdale’ [Sir William Dugdale (1605-86), antiquary and herald]; (f. 98r) ‘Ex Leland, and Dugdale’; and (f. 102v), ‘Ex Leland’. c.1642-51.

MS Dodsw. 140

A quarto composite volume of historical and antiquarian papers by Dodsworth and others, iv + 166 leaves, bound with MS Dodsworth 139, in contemporary calf (rebacked).

Among collections of Roger Dodsworth (1585-1654), antiquary.

ff. 32r-6r

CtR 104: Sir Robert Cotton, A Briefe Discovrse concerning the Power of the Peeres and Commons of Parliament in point of Judicature

Copy, in a cursive secretary hand. c.1620s.

Tract, the full title sometimes given as A Brief discourse prouinge that the house of Comons hath Equall power with the Peeres in point of Judicature written by Sr Rob: Cotton to Sr Edward Mountague Ano Dni. 1621, beginning ‘Sir, To give you as short an accompt of your desire as I can...’. First published in London, 1640. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [341]-351.

See also the Introduction.

MS Dodsw. 144

A quarto antiquarian miscellany, xii + 118 leaves.

Among collections of Roger Dodsworth (1585-1654), antiquary.

f. 98v

StW 1263: William Strode, Jack on both Sides (‘I holde as fayth What Englandes Church Allowes’)

Copy, headed ‘Carmen Equiuocum’. c.1634.

First published, as ‘The Church Papist’, in Wits Recreations (London, 1640). Reprinted as ‘The Jesuit's Double-faced Creed’ by Henry Care in The Popish Courant (16 May 1679): see August A. Imholtz, Jr, ‘The Jesuits' Double-Faced Creed: A Seventeenth-Century Cross-Reading’, N&Q, 222 (December 1977), 553-4. Dobell, p. 111. Listed, without text, in Forey, p. 339.

Douce A subt. 75(1)

Autograph annotations and marginalia.

*HvG 18: Gabriel Harvey, Alciato, D. Andrea. Paradoxorum, ad Pratum, lib. VI. Dispunctionum, lib. IIII. In treis libros Cod. lib. III. De eo quid interest, liber unus. Praetermissorum, lib.II. Declamatio una. De stip. divisionib. Commentariolus (Basle, 1531)

Stern, p. 199.

Douce A subt. 75(2)

Autograph annotations and marginalia.

*HvG 17: Gabriel Harvey, Alciato, D. Andrea. De verborum significatione libri quatuor. Eisdem, in tractatum eius argumenti veterum JureconsultoR, Commentaria (Lyons, 1530)

Stern, pp. 198-9.

Douce A subt. 75(3)

Autograph annotations and marginalia.

*HvG 16: Gabriel Harvey, Alciato, D. Andrea. Ad rescripta principum commentarii, de summa trinitate. Sacrosanct. eccl. aedendo. in ius vocando. Pactis. Transactionibus. His accessit euisdem de quinque pedum praescript. lib. I (Lyons, 1532)

Stern, p. 199.

Douce DD 136

Two signatures pasted in a printed exemplum of Drayton's Poems (London, 1605) the second probably not genuine. c.1605?.

*DrM 79: Michael Drayton, Document(s)

Facsimiles of both signatures in W.W. Greg, ‘Fragments from Henslowe's Diary’, Collections: Volume IV, Malone Society (Oxford, 1956), 27-32 (facing p. 32), and in Foakes.

Douce H 421

Autograph four-line inscription, presenting the volume to Sir Henry Fanshawe. c. 1614.

*ChG 25: George Chapman, Chapman, George. Homers Odysses, Books I-XII (London [1614?])

Later owned by the Rev. Richard Farmer, FSA (1735-97), Master of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, literary scholar. Farmer sale, 7 May-16 June 1798, lot 6670, to Park, thence to Francis Douce.

The inscription is edited in The Odysseys of Homer translated by George Chapman, ed. Richard Hooper (London, 1857), I, xxvii, and in Chapman's Homer, ed Allardyce Nicoll (New York, 1956), II, xiii. Facsimile in Cummings, p. 221.

Douce M 382

Autograph signature (‘Gabrielis Harveij’) and inscription ‘Ex dono Edmundi Spenseri Episcopi Roffensis Secretarij’. c.1578.

*HvG 131: Gabriel Harvey, More, Sir Thomas. La Description de l'Isle d'Vtopie ov est comprins le Miroer des republicques du monde [trans. Jean le Blond] (Paris, 1550)

Discussed, with a facsimile of the inscribed title-page, in D. M. Rogers, ‘Edmund Spenser and Gabriel Harvey: A New Find’, Bodleian Library Record, 12, No. 4 (April 1987), 334-7.

MS Douce 46

An octavo volume of tracts and sermons, including (f. 22 et seq.) a copy of John Stubbs's Gaping Gulf (1579), in various hands, iii + 165 pages. c.1637.

Early notes and accounts (f. 160r) refer to Chancery Lane, Bishops Court, and Whites Alley. The volume was once owned by William Herbert (1711-95), bibliographer and print seller. Among the collections of Francis Douce (1757-1834), antiquary and collector.

ff. 2r-15v

SiP 186: Sir Philip Sidney, A Letter to Queen Elizabeth touching her Marriage with Monsieur

Copy, in a single predominantly secretary hand, originally untitled, with a title-page (f. 1r) added in a different hand: ‘A Letter to Queen Elizabeth diswading her from marrying wth. Monsieur written in the yeare 1581’.

This MS collated in Feuillerat, III, 326 et seq., and in Duncan-Jones & Van Dorsten. Beal, In Praise of Scribes, p. 275, No. 5.

First published in Scrinia Caeciliana: Mysteries of State & Government (London, 1663) and in Cabala: sive Scrinia Sacra (London, 1663). Feuillerat, III, 51-60. Duncan-Jones & Van Dorsten, pp. 46-57.

This work and its textual transmission discussed, with facsimile examples, in Peter Beal, In Praise of Scribes: Manuscripts and their Makers in Seventeenth-Century England (Oxford, 1998), Chapter 4, pp. 109-46 (with most MSS catalogued as Nos 1-37, with comments on their textual tradition, in Appendix IV, pp. 274-80).

MS Douce 70

A quarto volume of miscellaneous papers, v + 21 leaves. c.1620s.

ff. 7r-8r

BcF 701: Francis Bacon, An Essay of a King

Spedding, VI, 595-7; discussed 592-4

Essay, beginning ‘A king is a mortal god on earth...’. Spedding, VI, 595-7 (discussed pp. 592-4).

MS Douce 170

MS of the continuation of Chaucer's Squire's Tale by the poet John Lane (fl.1600-30). 1615.

f. v

SpE 8.5: Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene

Quotations from Book IV, Canto II, stanzas 31-5. 1615.

Books I-III first published in London, 1590. Books IV-VI published in London, 1596. Variorum, Vols I-VI.

MS Douce 280

A quarto verse miscellany, made up from a larger book, 184 leaves, stubs of some excised leaves, in green boards. Compiled by John Ramsay (b.1578), of Peterhouse, Cambridge, and the Middle Temple. c.1596-1633.

Name (inscribed several times) of Thomas Russell. Given in 1724 by Robert Cook of Bokenham to Francis Blomefield (1705-52), Norfolk topographer, and with Blomefield's bookplate, 1736. Among the collections of Francis Douce (1757-1834), antiquary and collector.

ff. 22r-34v

SpE 14: Edmund Spenser, Prosopopoia: or Mother Hubberds Tale (‘It was the month, in which the righteous Maide’)

Copy, ascribed to ‘Edward Spencer’ (changed in red ink to ‘Edmund Spencer’).

First published in Complaints (London, 1591). Variorum, Minor Poems, II, 103-40.

ff. 36r-43r

SpE 28: Edmund Spenser, The Teares of the Muses (‘Rehearse to me ye sacred Sisters nine’)

Copy, ascribed to ‘E. Spencer’.

First published in Complaints (London, 1591). Variorum, Minor Poems, II, 59-79.

ff. 44r-5r

SpE 37: Edmund Spenser, The Visions of Petrarch (‘Being one day at my window all alone’)

Copy, ascribed to ‘E: Spencer’.

First published in Complaints (London, 1591). Variorum, Minor Poems, II, 186-8.

f. 67r

EsR 27: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, ‘Say, what is love?’

Copy, under a general heading ‘Songes & Dittyes to ye Lute & Viol de gambo’, with a sidenote ‘E: Essex Downe’.

Edited from this MS in May, Courtier Poets.

May, Poems, No. 6, p. 46. May, Courtier Poets, p. 253.

f. 67v

EsR 94: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, ‘Can she excuse my wrongs with vertues cloake’

Copy, under a general heading ‘Songes & Dittyes to ye Lute & Viol de gambo’, with a sidenote ‘Mr Jno Dowland’.

First published in John Dowland, The First Booke of Songes or Ayres (London, 1597). Discussed and attribution to Essex rejected in May, Poems, pp. 114-15. EV 4476.

f. 69r

SiP 138: Sir Philip Sidney, Old Arcadia. Second Eclogues, No. 34 (‘O sweet woods the delight of solitarines!’)

Copy of lines 1-2 as the first two lines of a song (here first stanza only) by John Dowland, untitled and with sidenote ‘Mr: Jno: Dowland’.

This MS recorded in Robertson, p. 447.

Ringler, pp. 68-9. Robertson, pp. 166-7. Dowland's song (in a musical setting) published in The Second Booke of Songs or Ayres (London, 1600).

ff. 123r-4v

EsR 61: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, A Poem made on the Earle of Essex (being in disgrace with Queene Eliz): by mr henry Cuffe his Secretary (‘It was a time when sillie Bees could speake’)

Copy of a fourteen-stanza version, closely written in a minute hand, headed ‘E. Essex’ with sidenote ‘R: D: E. E.’ and subscribed ‘p R. D: E:’.

This MS collated in May, pp. 128-32.

First published, in a musical setting by John Dowland, in his The Third and Last Booke of Songs or Aires (London, 1603). May, Poems, No. IV, pp. 62-4. May, Courtier Poets, pp. 266-9. EV 12846.

f. 124v

DrM 1: Michael Drayton, ‘Bright starre of Beauty, on whose eye-lids sit’

Copy of a parodied version, headed ‘Rosamond. Mich. D. 1. Second’ and beginning ‘The worles faire rose...’, followed by a couplet on ‘The Admired Sr. Philip Sidneye’ (beginning ‘Divine Sr Philip I avouch thy writt’), subscribed ‘M: D.’

This parody unpublished.

First published, as sonnet 4, in Idea in Englands Heroicall Epistles (London, 1599). Hebel, II, 312.

f. 180v

SoR 229: Robert Southwell, S.J., Catholic Saint, The Sequence on the Virgin Mary and Christ, vi. The Nativitie of Christ (‘Beholde the father, is his daughters sonne’)

Copy.

Brown, pp. 6-7.

MS Douce 357

A folio volume of poems chiefly on affairs of state, in professional hands, ff. 1-49 comprising poems of the 1640s, ff. 49v onwards Restoration poems up to 1681, 174 leaves (including twelve blanks), in contemporary calf, both covers stamped ‘1642’, with remains of clasps. Including nine poems in the Marvell canon (plus apocryphal poems); ff. 1-157 a single unit in variant styles of hand; ff. 158-62 in yet another hand on a smaller tipped-in quire of paper. Mid-late 17th century.

Among the collections of Francis Douce (1757-1834), antiquary and collector.

Cited in IELM, II.i (1993) as the Douce MS: MaA Δ 3. Marvell contents recorded and selectively collated in Margoliouth and in POAS, I and II.

f. 4v

ClJ 16: John Cleveland, A Dialogue between two Zealots, upon the &c. in the Oath (‘Sir Roger, from a zealous piece of Freeze’)

Copy.

First published in Character (1647). Morris & Withington, pp. 4-5.

f. 8r

DeJ 63: Sir John Denham, On the Earl of Strafford's Tryal and Death (‘Great Strafford! worthy of that Name, though all’)

Copy, headed ‘Wentworth's Tryumph over all’. The text followed (f. 8r-v) by a parody.

First published in Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 153-4.

f. 11v

ClJ 178: John Cleveland, Epitaph on the Earl of Strafford (‘Here lies Wise and Valiant Dust’)

Copy.

First published in Character (1647). Edited in CSPD, 1640-1641 (1882), p. 574. Berdan, p. 184, as ‘Internally unlike his manner’. Morris & Withington, p. 66, among ‘Poems probably by Cleveland’. The attribution to Cleveland is dubious. The epitaph is also attributed to Clement Paman: see Poetry and Revolution: An Anthology of British and Irish Verse 1625-1660, ed. Peter Davidson (Oxford, 1998), notes to No. 275 (p. 363).

ff. 17v-18r

FeO 46: Owen Felltham, On the Duke of Buckingham slain by Felton, the 23. Aug. 1628 (‘Sooner I may some fixed Statue be’)

Copy.

This MS cited in Pebworth & Summers.

First published in Lusoria (London, 1661). Pebworth & Summers, pp. 6-7.

f. 19r

WoH 69: Sir Henry Wotton, On his Mistress, the Queen of Bohemia (‘You meaner beauties of the night’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Ye glorious trifles of the east’, accompanied by a Latin version by one ‘T. L.’.

First published (in a musical setting) in Michael East, Sixt Set of Bookes (London, 1624). Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 518. Hannah (1845), pp. 12-15. Some texts of this poem discussed in J.B. Leishman, ‘“You Meaner Beauties of the Night” A Study in Transmission and Transmogrification’, The Library, 4th Ser. 26 (1945-6), 99-121. Some musical versions edited in English Songs 1625-1660, ed. Ian Spink, Musica Britannica XXXIII (London, 1971), Nos. 66, 122.

ff. 22v-3r

DeJ 28: Sir John Denham, Elegy on the Death of Judge Crooke (‘This was the Man! the Glory of the Gown’)

Copy.

First published in The Topographer for the year 1790 (London, 1790), II, 177. Banks, pp. 156-8.

ff. 26r-30r

CoA 161: Abraham Cowley, A Satyre. The Puritan and the Papist (‘So two rude waves, by stormes together throwne’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Sparrow.

First published, anonymously, [Oxford], 1643. Ascribed to Cowley in Wit and Loyalty Reviv'd (London, 1682). Waller, II, 149-57. Sparrow, pp. 17-28. J.H.A. Sparrow, ‘The Text of Cowley's Satire The Puritan and the Papist’, Anglia, 58 (1934), 78-102.

ff. 38v-9v

DeJ 88: Sir John Denham, A Speech against Peace at the Close Committee (‘But will you now to Peace incline’)

Copy, headed ‘A Libell agst ye Parliamt’.

First published as a broadside entitled Mr. Hampdens speech occasioned upon the Londoners Petition for Peace [Lonon, 1643]. Poems and Translations (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 122-7.

ff. 39v-40r

DeJ 118: Sir John Denham, A Western Wonder (‘Do you not know, not a fortnight ago’)

Copy, headed ‘A Libell Concerning a Misreport of Sr. Raeph Hoptons death’.

First published in Rump: or an Exact Collection of the Choycest Poems and Songs (London, 1668). Banks, pp. 130-2.

f. 41r

CoA 139: Abraham Cowley, Prologue to the Guardian (‘Who says the Times do Learning disallow?’)

Copy, headed ‘The Prologue and Epilogue in a Comedy made by ye Poet Aquila prsented att ye Entertainmt of the Princes Highnss by the Schollars of Trinity Colledge in Cambridge March 1641’, with the marginal note ‘Pooly’.

This MS recorded in G.C. Moore Smith, College Plays Performed in the University of Cambridge (Cambridge, 1923), p. 90.

First published, under the pseudonym ‘Francis Cole’, in The Prologue and Epilogue to a Comedie, presented, at the Entertainment of the Prince His Highnesse, by the Schollers of Trinity Colledge in Cambridge, in March last, 1641 (London, 1642). Waller, I, 31-2 (and II, 161). Autrey Nell Wiley, ‘The Prologue and Epilogue to the Guardian’, RES, 10 (1934), 443-7 (pp. 444-5).

See also CoA 68-81.

f. 41r-v

CoA 70: Abraham Cowley, The Epilogue [to the Guardian] (‘The Play, great Sir, is done. yet needs must fear’)

Copy, headed ‘Epilogue...to the Game at Cheese by Pooley’.

This MS recorded in G.C. Moore Smith, College Plays Performed in the University of Cambridge (Cambridge, 1923), p. 90.

First published, under the pseudonym ‘Francis Cole’, in The Prologue and Epilogue to a Comedie, presented, at the Entertainment of the Prince His Highnesse, by the Schollers of Trinity Colledge in Cambridge, in March last, 1641 (London, 1642).Printed (with the first line: ‘The Play is done, great Prince, which needs must fear’) in The Guardian (London, 1650). Waller, I, 32 (and II, 242). Autrey Nell Wiley, ‘The Prologue and Epilogue to the Guardian’, RES, 10 (1934), 443-7 (pp. 444-5).

See also CoA 137-52.

ff. 42r-9r

CoA 43: Abraham Cowley, The Civil War (‘What rage does England from it selfe divide’)

Copy of Book I, lines 1-568, headed ‘On the Civill Warr Suppos'd to be written by Abr: Cowly and that upon very good ground tho not in his Printed Workes’.

This MS collated and described in Pritchard's edition, pp. 61-3.

Most of Book I first published as A Poem on the late Civil War (London, 1679). Waller, II, 465-81. The full text of Books I-III first published in Toronto, 1973, ed. Allan Pritchard. Collected Works, I, pp. 115-62.

ff. 49v-53r

MaA 192: Andrew Marvell, The Loyal Scot (‘Of the old Heroes when the Warlike shades’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Margoliouth.

First published in one version [c.1669?] (exemplum without title-page owned by the Library Company of Philadelphia, 935Q). An incomplete version in Charles Gildon, Chorus Poetarum (London, 1694). Margoliouth, I, 180-7. Lord, pp. 188-92. Smith, pp. 403-12.

Lines 15-62 also appear as lines 649-96 in The last Instructions to a Painter (MaA 500-4), and lines 178-85 appear as a separate poem in Upon Blood's Attempt to Steal the Crown (MaA 253-280).

ff. 53r-5v

MaA 210.3: Andrew Marvell, Oceana and Britannia (‘Whither, O whither, wander I forlorn?’)

Copy.

Published in Thompson (1776), III, 307-14. Cooke, II, 17-25. Grosart, I, 443-9. The poem probably dates from 1680-1, after Marvell's death.

ff. 64r-8v

RoJ 104.7: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, The History of Insipids (‘Chaste, pious, prudent, Charles the Second’)

Copy.

See Vivian de Sola Pinto in ‘“The History of Insipids”: Rochester, Freke, and Marvell’, MLR, 65 (1970), 11-15 (and see also Walker, p. xvii).

See Vivian de Sola Pinto in ‘“The History of Insipids”: Rochester, Freke, and Marvell’, MLR, 65 (1970), 11-15 (and see also Walker, p. xvii). Rejected by Vieth, by Walker, and by Love.

ff. 66v-8v

DoC 38: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Colon (‘As Colon drove his sheep along’)

Copy, headed ‘A Satyr’.

This MS collated in POAS and in Harris.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1697). POAS, II (1965), 167-75. Harris, pp. 124-35.

f. 81r

MaA 86: Andrew Marvell, Bludius et Corona (‘Bludius, ut ruris damnum repararet aviti’)

Copy, headed ‘In Bludium habitu Sacerdotali Indutum cum Coronam caperet ffanatici cuiusdem Carmen’.

This MS collated in Margoliouth.

First published in Thompson (1776), I, xxxix. Margoliouth, I, 178. Lord, p. 249. Smith, p. 414, with English translation.

For the English version, which accompanies many of the MS texts, see MaA 253-80.

f. 81r

MaA 254: Andrew Marvell, Upon Blood's Attempt to Steal the Crown (‘When daring Blood, his rents to have regain'd’)

Copy, headed ‘Englisht’ and ascribed to ‘Marvel’.

This MS collated in POAS, I.

First published as a separate poem in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1697). POAS, I, 78. Lord, p. 193. Smith, p. 414.

This poem also appears as lines 178-85 of The Loyal Scot (see MaA 191-8 and Margoliouth, I, 379, 384).

For the Latin version, which accompanies many of the MS texts, see MaA 85-97.

ff. 81v-4r

DoC 338: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Rochester's Farewell (‘Tir'd with the noisome follies of the age’)

Copy.

This MS collated in POAS.

First published in A Third Collection of the Newest and Most Ingenious Poems, Satyrs, Songs &c (London, 1689). POAS, II (1965), 217-27. Discussed and Dorset's authorship rejected in Harris, pp. 190-2. The poem is noted by Alexander Pope as being ‘probably by the Ld Dorset’ in Pope's exemplum of A New Collection of Poems Relating to State Affairs (London, 1705), British Library, C.28.e.15, p. 121.

ff. 103r-4r

RoJ 104.8: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, The History of Insipids (‘Chaste, pious, prudent, Charles the Second’)

Copy, headed ‘The History of the times’, in double columns.

See Vivian de Sola Pinto in ‘“The History of Insipids”: Rochester, Freke, and Marvell’, MLR, 65 (1970), 11-15 (and see also Walker, p. xvii). Rejected by Vieth, by Walker, and by Love.

f. 104r-v

MaA 216: Andrew Marvell, The Statue at Charing Cross (‘What can be the Mistery why Charing Cross’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon the Statue of Brass of King Charles the first on Horsback to be set up at Chairing Cross’.

Edited from this MS in Margoliouth and in POAS, I.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1698). Margoliouth, I, 199-201. POAS, I, 270-3. Lord, pp. 201-4. Smith, pp. 418-19.

f. 105r-v

MaA 477: Andrew Marvell, Further Advice to a Painter (‘Painter once more thy Pencell reassume’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Margoliouth and in POAS, I. Recorded in Osborne.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1697). Margoliouth, I, 176-7. POAS, I, 163-7. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 38-9. Rejected from the canon by Lord and the authorship considered doubtful by Chernaik, pp. 211-12.

ff. 105v-8r

MaA 141: Andrew Marvell, A Dialogue between the Two Horses (‘Wee read in profane and Sacred records’)

Copy, untitled.

Edited from this MS in Margoliouth. Collated in POAS, I.

First published in The Second Part of the Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689). Margoliouth, I, 208-13, as ‘probably Marvell's’. POAS, I, 274-83, as anonymous. Rejected from the canon by Lord.

ff. 108v-10r

MaA 436: Andrew Marvell, Advice to a Painter to draw the Duke by (‘Spread a large canvass, Painter, to containe’)

This MS collated in POAS, I. Recorded in Osborne.

First published [in London], 1679. A Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689), as by ‘A-M-l, Esq’. Thompson III, 399-403. Margoliouth, I, 214-18, as by Henry Savile. POAS, I, 213-19, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 40-2, as by Henry Savile.

f. 110v

MaA 84.5: Andrew Marvell, A Ballad called The Haymarket Hectors (‘I sing a woeful ditty’)

Copy.

Sometimes called Upon the cutting of Sr John Coventry's nose. First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1704). Thompson, I, xxxix-xli (from ‘Marvell's writing’). Grosart, I, 456-8. Edited in POAS, I (1963), 168-71, as doubtfully by Marvell.

f. 113r

DoC 221: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On the Young Statesmen (‘Clarendon had law and sense’)

Copy, headed ‘The Game at Chess’ and the text here preceded by three stanzas beginning ‘My Muse and I are drunk tonight’.

This MS collated in POAS and in Harris.

First published in A Third Collection of…Poems, Satyrs, Songs (London, 1689). POAS, II (1965), 339-41. Harris, pp. 50-4.

ff. 113v-15v

MaA 100: Andrew Marvell, Britannia and Rawleigh (‘Ah! Rawleigh, when thy Breath thou didst resign’)

Copy, headed ‘A Dialogue between Brittania and Sr. W: Rawleigh’.

Edited from this MS Margoliouth and in POAS, I.

First published in A Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689). Margoliouth, I, 194-9, as of doubtful authorship. POAS, I, 228-36, attributed to John Ayloffe. See also George deF. Lord, ‘Satire and Sedition: The Life and Work of John Ayloffe’, HLQ, 29 (1965-6), 255-73 (p. 258).

ff. 116v-17r

DoC 123: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, My Opinion (‘After thinking this fortnight of Whig and of Tory’)

Copy, headed ‘My Opinion: Or the nine pins’.

This MS collated in POAS and in Harris.

First published in Miscellaneous Works, Written by…George, late Duke of Buckingham (London, 1704-5). POAS, II (1965), 391-2. Harris, pp. 55-6.

f. 129r

StW 1264: William Strode, Jack on both Sides (‘I holde as fayth What Englandes Church Allowes’)

Copy, untitled.

First published, as ‘The Church Papist’, in Wits Recreations (London, 1640). Reprinted as ‘The Jesuit's Double-faced Creed’ by Henry Care in The Popish Courant (16 May 1679): see August A. Imholtz, Jr, ‘The Jesuits' Double-Faced Creed: A Seventeenth-Century Cross-Reading’, N&Q, 222 (December 1977), 553-4. Dobell, p. 111. Listed, without text, in Forey, p. 339.

ff. 136v-8v

RoJ 532: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Tunbridge Wells (‘At five this morn, when Phoebus raised his head’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Ld R: fecit Sept 20: 81’.

This MS recorded in Vieth. Collated in Walker.

First published in Richard Head, Proteus Redivivus: or the Art of Wheedling (London, 1675). Vieth, pp. 73-80. Walker, pp. 69-74. Love, pp. 49-54.

f. 142v

DoC 266: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, To Mr. Edward Howard, on his Incomparable, Incomprehensible Poem Called ‘The British Princes’ (‘Come on, ye critics! Find one fault who dare’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon Mr. Howards Brittish Princes’.

This MS collated in POAS and in Harris.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions, By the Right Honourable, the E. of R[ochester] (‘Antwerpen’ [i.e. London], 1680). POAS, I (1963), 338-9. Harris, pp. 7-9.

f. 142v

WaE 769: Edmund Waller, To the Honourable Ed. Howard Esq. upon his Incomparable, Incomprehensible Poem of the British Princes (‘Sir/ You have oblig'd the British Nation more’)

Copy, headed ‘On ye same’ [i.e.‘Upon Mr. Howardes Brittish Princes’] and subscribed ‘Hudebras’.

First published, ascribed to ‘Mr. Waller’, in The Third Part of Miscellany Poems (London, 1716), pp. 68-9. The Works of Edmund Waller, ed. Elijah Fenton (London, 1729). The Genuine Remains in Verse and Prose of Mr. Samuel Butler, ed. Robert Thyer, 2 vols (London, 1759), I, 104-6.

Because of the last publication, this poem was rejected from the Waller canon by Thorn-Drury (I, p. vii). See, however, the Introduction above and IELM, II.i, Samuel Butler, pp. 31-8.

ff. 145v-6v

EtG 98: Sir George Etherege, Mrs. Nelly's Complaint (‘If Sylla's ghost made bloody Catiline start’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Thorpe.

First published in Miscellaneous Works, Written by…Buckingham, Vol. I (London, 1704). Thorpe, pp. 62-4.

ff. 155v-7r

MaA 126: Andrew Marvell, Clarindon's House-Warming (‘When Clarindon had discern'd beforehand’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Margoliouth and in POAS, I.

First published with Directions to a Painter…Of Sir John Denham ([London], 1667). Margoliouth, I, 143-6. POAS, I, 88-96. Lord, pp. 144-51. Smith, pp. 358-61.

MS Douce 361

Copy of Harington's complete Psalter, entitled ‘King Davids Psalmes’, inscribed in a later hand on a flyleaf ‘The Psalmes putt into verse by Sr John Harrington’, iv + 96 folio leaves. Early 17th century.

HrJ 5: Sir John Harington, Metrical Paraphrases of the Psalms (‘Right happie hee that neither walked hath’)

Bookplate of Algernon Capell (1654-1710), second Earl of Essex, Privy Councillor, dated 1701. Among the collections of Francis Douce (1757-1834), antiquary and collector.

Harington's complete Psalter, intended for publication just before his death, but unpublished.

MS Douce 363

A large folio formal miscellany of verse and prose, in a single accomplished hand, that of Stephen Batman, DD (d.1584), 146 leaves, in half-calf gilt.

Among the collections of Francis Douce (1757-1834), antiquary and collector.

ff. 48r-93v

CvG 8: George Cavendish, The Life of Cardinal Wolsey

Copy, with gilt decoration and a series of pen and ink illustrations (a procession, coloured, f. 52v; battle scene, f. 57r; procession, f. 58r; executed head, f. 61r; delivery of a seal, coloured, f. 71r; King's visit to the sick Cardinal, f. 76r; Cardinal's burial, f. 91r); inscribed (f. 93r) ‘Copied forthe by S. B [i.e. Stephen Balman] Ano 1578 the first daye of September &c’. 1578.

Sylvester, No. 2, with the first page (f. 48), missing in British Library Egerton MS 2402, used as his copytext. Two illustrations reproduced in Singer, I, 181 and 221.

First published in George Cavendish, The Life of Cardinal Wolsey and Metrical Visions, ed. Samuel W. Singer, 2 vols (Chiswick, 1825). The Life and Death of Cardinal Wolsey by George Cavendish, ed. Richard S. Sylvester, EETS, orig. ser. 243 (London, New York and Toronto, 1959).

Douce D. 238 (3)

Copy, written on sig. A6 in an exemplum of John Stanbridge's Pervula printed by Wynkyn de Woorde [1495?]. ?Mid-17th century.

SiP 64: Sir Philip Sidney, The Epitaph (‘His being was in her alone’)

Among the collections of Francis Douce (1757-1834), antiquary and collector.

This MS recorded in Ringler, p. 493.

First published in Arcadia (London, 1593), a blank space having been left for this epitaph in the edition of 1590. Ringler, p. 241.

MS Douce e. 16

Transcript of The Paradise of Dainty Devises (London, 1577), iii + 162 quarto leaves (ff. 119-62 blank), mainly on rectos only, in contemporary vellum boards. Made largely by William Herbert (1718-95), bibliographer and printseller (ff. 116-18 in two other hands). 1777.

Among the collections of Francis Douce (1757-1834), antiquary and collector.

ff. 43r, 44r

OxE 6: Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford, ‘Fraud is the front of fortune past all recovery’

Copy, headed ‘34. His good name being blemished, he bewayleth’, here beginning ‘Framd is the front of forlorne hope, past all recoverie’, and subscribed ‘E. O.’

Edited from this MS in May, Courtier Poets. Collated in May, Poems.

First published, headed ‘His good name being blemished, he bewayleth’ and subscribed ‘E. O.’, in The Paradyse of Daynty Deuises (London, 1576). A variant version beginning ‘Framd in the front of forlorne hope, past all recoverie’, in May, Poems, No. 4 (pp. 27-8), and in May, Courtier Poets, pp. 272-3. EV 7038.

ff. 93r, 94r

OxE 1: Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford, ‘A Croune of Bayes shall that man weare’

Copy, headed ‘78. The complaint of a louer, wearing Blacke & Tawnie’, beginning with the second stanza (‘The more I followed on’), and subscribed ‘E. O.’

This MS collated in May, Poems.

First published in The Paradyse of Daynty Deuises (London, 1576). May, Poems, No. 3 (pp. 26-7). E V 23490.5.

ff. 97r, 98r

OxE 7: Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford, ‘If care or skill could conquere vaine desire’

Copy, headed ‘81. Being in loue he complaineth’ and subscribed ‘E.O.’

This MS collated in May, Poems.

First published, headed ‘Beyng in love, he complaineth’ and subscribed ‘M. B.’, in The Paradyse of Daynty Deuises (London, 1576). May, Poems, No. 6 (pp. 29-30). May, Courtier Poets, pp. 274-5. EV 10667.

ff. 98r, 99r

OxE 11: Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford, ‘The tricklyng teares that fales along my cheeks’

Copy, headed ‘82. A louer reiected, complaineth’ and subscribed ‘E.O.’

This MS collated in May.

First published, as ‘A louer reiected, complaineth’ and subscribed ‘E. O.’, in The Paradyse of Daynty Deuises (London, 1576). May, Poems, No. 9 (pp. 31-2). May, Courtier Poets, pp. 276-7. EV 24528.

ff. 99r, 100r

EsR 15.5: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, ‘I am not as I seeme, I seeme and am the same’

Copy, headed ‘83. Not attaining to his desire, he complaineth’ and subscribed ‘E. Oxf.’

This MS collated in May, Poems.

First published, headed ‘Not attainyng to his desire, he complaineth’ and subscribed ‘E. O.’, in The Paradyse of Daynty Deuises (London, 1576). May, Poems, No. 5 (pp. 28-9). May, Courtier Poets, pp. 273-4. EV 9569. Also attributed to the Earl of Oxford: see OxE 6.

ff. 100r, 101r

OxE 2: Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford, ‘Even as the waxe doeth melt, or dewe consume awaie’

Copy, headed ‘84. His mind not quietly setled, he writeth this’ and subscribed ‘E. Ox.’

This MS collated in May, Poems.

First published, headed ‘His mynde not quietly setled, he writeth this’ and subscribed ‘E. O.’, in The Paradise of Dainty Devices (London, 1576). May, Poems, No. 2 (p. 26). May, Courtier Poets, p. 271. EV 5884.

f. 118r

EsR 31: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Verses made by the Earle of Essex in his Trouble (‘The waies on earth have paths and turnings knowne’)

Copy, headed ‘Verses by Robert Earl of Essex in his trouble’ and subscribed ‘R.E.E.’

May, Poems, p. 47. May, Courtier Poets, p. 254. EV 24641.

MS Douce f. 5

An octavo verse miscellany compiled by an Oxford University man, i i + 37 leaves, in later half-calf. c.1630s.

Among the collections of Francis Douce (1757-1834), antiquary and collector.

fols 1r-2r

StW 955: William Strode, A Song of Capps (‘The witt hath long beholding bin’)

Copy, headed ‘Verses on the cap by Mr Strode’.

This MS collated in Forey.

First published in Wits Interpreter (London, 1655). Dobell, pp. 104-7. Forey, pp. 47-51.

fol. 2v

StW 318: William Strode, On a Butcher marrying a Tanners daughter (‘A fitter Match hath never bin’)

Copy.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1636). Dobell, p. 119. Forey, p. 18.

fols 2v-3r

StW 939: William Strode, Song A Parallel betwixt bowling and preferment (‘Preferment, like a Game at bowles’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Forey.

First published in Dobell (1907), pp. 103-4. Forey, pp. 94-5.

fol. 3r-v

StW 179: William Strode, In commendation of Musique (‘When whispering straines do softly steale’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Forey, p. 329.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656). Dobell, pp. 2-3. Four Poems by William Strode (Flansham, Bognor Regis, 1934), pp. 1-2. Forey, pp. 196-7. The poem also discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Notes on some Poems attributed to William Strode’, PQ, 34 (1955), 444-8 (p. 445).

fol. 3v

StW 772: William Strode, Song (‘I saw faire Cloris walke alone’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon the snowe falling vpon Cloris her breast’.

First published in Walter Porter, Madrigales and Ayres (London, 1632). Dobell, p. 41. Forey, pp. 76-7. The poem also discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Notes on some Poems attributed to William Strode’, PQ, 34 (1955), 444-8 (pp. 445-6), and see Mary Hobbs, ‘Early Seventeenth-Century Verse Miscellanies and Their Value for Textual Editors’, EMS, 1 (1989), 182-210 (pp. 199, 209).

fols 3v-4r

CoR 483: Richard Corbett, On John Dawson, Butler at Christ-Church. 1622 (‘Dawson the Butler's dead. although I thinke’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Bennett & Trevor-Roper, 144.

First published (omitting lines 7-10) in Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 72-3.

fol. 5r

RaW 233: Sir Walter Ralegh, On the Life of Man (‘What is our life? a play of passion’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Latham, p. 144.

First published, in a musical setting, in Orlando Gibbons, The First Set of Madrigals and Mottets (London, 1612). Latham, pp. 51-2. Rudick, Nos 29A, 29B and 29C (three versions, pp. 69-70). MS texts also discussed in Michael Rudick, ‘The Text of Ralegh's Lyric “What is our life?”’, SP, 83 (1986), 76-87.

fol. 5r

DnJ 1754: John Donne, A lame begger (‘I am unable, yonder begger cries’)

Copy, headed ‘On a beggar & cripple’ and here beginning ‘Nor goe nor sit, nor stand ye cripple cries’.

This MS recorded in Milgate.

First published in Thomas Deloney, Strange Histories (London, 1607), sig. E6. Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 76. Milgate, Satires, p. 51. Shawcross, No. 88. Variorum, 8 (1995), pp. 7 (as ‘Zoppo’) and 10.

fol. 5v-6v

MrJ 20: John Marston, The Duke Return'd Againe. 1627 (‘And art returned again with all thy faults’)

An anonymous copy.

fol. 10r

DaJ 129: Sir John Davies, An Epitaph (‘Here lieth Kitt Craker, the kinge of good fellowes’)

Copy, headed ‘Uppon a bellowes-maker’ and here beginning ‘Browne lies here ye maker of bellowes’.

A version, ascribed to John Hoskyns, first published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1605). Krueger, p. 303. Edited in The Life, Letters, and Writings of John Hoskyns 1566-1638, ed. Louise Brown Osborn (New Haven & London, 1937), p. 170.

fol. 10r

CoR 434: Richard Corbett, On Great Tom of Christ-Church (‘Bee dum, you infant chimes. thump not the mettle’)

Copy of lines 1-20.

This MS recorded in Bennett & Trevor-Roper, p. 149.

First published (omitting lines 25-48) in Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 79-82. Ithuriel, ‘Great Tom of Oxford’, N&Q, 2nd Ser. 10 (15 December 1860), 465-6 (printing ‘(from a MS collection) which bears the signature of Jerom Terrent’).

fol. 11

DrW 177.7: William Drummond of Hawthornden, On a noble man who died at a counsel table (‘Vntymlie Death that neither wouldst conferre’)

Copy of a version beginning ‘Immodest death, that wouldst not once conferre’.

First published in Kastner (1931), II, 285. Often found in a version beginning ‘Immodest death, that wouldst not once conferre’. Of doubtful authorship: see MacDonald, SSL, 7 (1969), 116.

fols 11r-12r

RaW 150: Sir Walter Ralegh, The Lie (‘Goe soule the bodies guest’)

Copy of lines 1-54, headed ‘Sr Walter Rawleighes farewell’.

This MS recorded in Latham, p. 129.

First published in Francis Davison, A Poetical Rapsodie (London 1611). Latham, pp. 45-7. Rudick, Nos 20A, 20B and 20C (three versions), with answers, pp. 30-45.

This poem is attributed to Richard Latworth (or Latewar) in Lefranc (1968), pp. 85-94, but see Stephen J. Greenblatt, Sir Walter Ralegh (New Haven & London, 1973), pp. 171-6. See also Karl Josef Höltgen, ‘Richard Latewar Elizabethan Poet and Divine’, Anglia, 89 (1971), 417-38 (p. 430). Latewar's ‘answer’ to this poem is printed in Höltgen, pp. 435-8. Some texts are accompanied by other answers.

fol. 12r

StW 1356: William Strode, A Riddle on a Kisse (‘What thing is that, nor felt, nor seene’)

Copy, headed ‘A tresured blessing from one his kisse’.

This MS recorded in Forey.

First published in Dobell (1907), pp. 48-9. Listed, without text, in Forey, p. 340.

fol. 12v

CoR 101: Richard Corbett, An Elegy Upon the death of Queene Anne (‘Noe. not a quatch, sad Poets. doubt you’)

Copy, headed ‘An Exhortacion to ye vniursitie concerning their printed poetry more especiallie at ye queens death’.

First published in Poëtica Stromata ([no place], 1648). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 65-7.

fol. 15r

DaJ 130: Sir John Davies, An Epitaph (‘Here lieth Kitt Craker, the kinge of good fellowes’)

Copy, headed ‘Vppon a Bellowes maker’ and also beginning ‘Browne lyes heere ye maker of Bellowes’.

A version, ascribed to John Hoskyns, first published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1605). Krueger, p. 303. Edited in The Life, Letters, and Writings of John Hoskyns 1566-1638, ed. Louise Brown Osborn (New Haven & London, 1937), p. 170.

fol. 18v

RaW 457: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Say not you love, unless you do’

Copy, headed ‘A conference betwixt 2 lovers’.

This MS recorded in Latham.

First published in Inedited Poetical Miscellanies, 1584-1700, ed. W.C. Hazlitt ([London], 1870), p. [179]. Listed but not printed in Latham, p. 174. Rudick, No. 38, p. 106.

fol. 19v

HrJ 229: Sir John Harington, Of certain puritan wenches (‘Six of the weakest sex and purest sect’)

Copy, headed ‘The conference of 6 Puritanicall wenches’.

First published (anonymously) in Rump: or An Exact Collection of the Choycest Poems and Songs (London, 1662), II, 158-9. McClure No. 356, p. 292. Kilroy, Book II, No. 94, p. 164.

fol. 20r-v

StW 631: William Strode, On Twins divided by death (‘Where are you now, Astrologers, that looke’)

Copy, headed ‘On the death of A twinne’.

This MS collated in Forey.

First published in Dobell (1907), p. 66. Forey, pp. 115-16.

fol. 20v

CwT 1256: Thomas Carew, A Louers passion (‘Is shee not wondrous fayre? but oh I see’)

Copy.

First published, as ‘The Rapture, by J.D.’, in Robert Chamberlain, The Harmony of the Muses (London, 1654), pp. 3-4 [unique exemplum in the Huntington edited in facsimile by Ernest W. Sullivan (Aldershot, 1990)]. Cupids Master-Piece (London, [?1656]). Dunlap, p. 192.

fol. 20v

CmT 122: Thomas Campion, ‘Though you are yoong and I am olde’

Copy of the first strophe, headed ‘An old man to a yong Mris’.

First published in A Booke of Ayres (London, 1601), No. ii. Davis, pp. 20-1.

fol. 21v

MrJ 77: John Marston, Upon the Dukes Goeing into Fraunce (‘And wilt thou goe, great duke, and leave us heere’)

Anonymous copy.

fol. 22v

MiT 2: Thomas Middleton, Petition to King James (‘A harmless game raised merely for delight’)

Copy, headed ‘On the author of the play called ye game at chesse’.

This MS collated in Wagner, PQ, 14 (1935), 288.

First published in Edward Capell, The School of Shakespeare, III (London, [1780]), p. 31. Bullen, I, lxxxiii. A Game at Chesse, ed. R.C. Bald (Cambridge, 1929), p. 166. Oxford Middleton, p. 1895.

fols 22v-5r

CoR 24: Richard Corbett, A Certaine Poeme As it was presented in Latine by Divines and Others, before his Maiestye in Cambridge (‘It is not yet a fortnight, since’)

Copy.

First published in Poëtica Stromata ([no place], 1648). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 12-18.

Some texts accompanied by an ‘Answer’ (‘A ballad late was made’).

fols 27r-8r

CoR 435: Richard Corbett, On Great Tom of Christ-Church (‘Bee dum, you infant chimes. thump not the mettle’)

Copy, complete.

First published (omitting lines 25-48) in Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 79-82. Ithuriel, ‘Great Tom of Oxford’, N&Q, 2nd Ser. 10 (15 December 1860), 465-6 (printing ‘(from a MS collection) which bears the signature of Jerom Terrent’).

fol. 28r-9r

HoJ 40: John Hoskyns, The Censure of a Parliament Fart (‘Downe came graue auncient Sr John Crooke’)

Copy, headed ‘The Parliamentall fart’ and here beginning ‘Downe came ancient Sr John Crooke’.

Attributed to Hoskyns by John Aubrey. Cited, but unprinted, as No. III of ‘Doubtful Verses’ in Osborn, p. 300. Early Stuart Libels website.

fol. 30v

RnT 538: Thomas Randolph, Uppon a Cuckold (‘God in Eden's garden's shade’)

Copy.

fol. 31r

RaW 340: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘The word of deniall, and the letter of fifty’

Copy, headed ‘Sr Walter Rawleigh to Bp. Nowell’.

This MS recorded in Latham, p. 138.

First published, as ‘The Answer’ to ‘A Riddle’ (‘Th'offence of the stomach, with the word of disgrace’), in Works (1829), VIII, 736. Latham, pp. 47-8. Rudick, Nos 19A, 19B and 19C (three versions, pp. 28-9).

fol. 31r

HrJ 259: Sir John Harington, Of Treason (‘Treason doth neuer prosper, what's the reason?’)

Copy.

First published in 1615. 1618, Book IV, No. 5. McClure No. 259, p. 255. This epigram also quoted in a letter to Prince Henry, 1609 (McClure, p. 136). Kilroy, Book III, No. 43, p. 185.

fol. 31v

PoW 84: Walton Poole, On the death of King James (‘Can Christendoms great champion sink away’)

Copy, headed ‘On the death of King James’.

First published in Oxford Drollery (1671), p. 170. A version of lines 1-18, on the death of Gustavus Adolphus, was published in The Swedish Intelligencer, 3rd Part (1633). Also ascribed to William Strode.

fols 31v-3r

EaJ 60: John Earle, Bishop of Worcester and Salisbury, Hortus Mertonensis (‘Hortus delitiae domus politae’)

Copy.

First published in John Aubrey, The Natural History and Antiquities of the County of Surrey, ed. Richard Rawlinson (London, 1718-19), IV, 166-71.

fol. 33r-v

CwT 264: Thomas Carew, A flye that flew into my Mistris her eye (‘When this Flye liv'd, she us'd to play’)

Copy, headed ‘On a flye’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 37-9. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in The Treasury of Musick, Book 2 (London, 1669).

fol. 33v

CwT 698: Thomas Carew, Secresie protested (‘Feare not (deare Love) that I'le reveale’)

Copy, headed ‘The Earle of Dorset to his sweete’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 11. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in The Second Book of Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1655).

See also Introduction.

fol. 34r

HrJ 32: Sir John Harington, Against Swearing (‘In elder times an ancient custome was’)

Copy, headed ‘The degrees of sweareing’.

First published in Henry Fitzsimon, S.J., The Justification and Exposition of the Divine Sacrifice of the Masse (Douai, 1611). 1615. 1618, Book IV, No. 9. McClure No. 263, p. 256. Kilroy, Book IV, No. 30, p. 220.

fol. 34v

RaW 391: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘ICUR, good Mounser Carr’

Copy, untitled.

First published in Love-Poems and Humourous Ones, ed. Frederick J. Furnivall, The Ballad Society (Hertford, 1874; reprinted in New York, 1977), p. 20. Listed but not printed in Latham, p. 174. Rudick, No. 48, p. 121 (as ‘Sir Walter Raleigh to the Lord Carr’).

fol. 34v

CoR 462: Richard Corbett, On Henry Bowling (‘If gentlenesse could tame the fates, or wit’)

Copy, headed ‘On Mr Henrie Boling his death by Dr Corbett’.

First published in Witts Recreations (London, 1640). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, p. 74.

fol. 35r-v

BmF 27: Francis Beaumont, An Elegy on the Death of the Virtuous Lady, Elizabeth Countess of Rutland (‘I may forget to eat, to drink, to sleep’)

Copy, headed ‘Vppon the Countesse of Rutlands death’.

First published in Sir Thomas Overbury, A Wife, 11th impression (London, 1622). Dyce, XI, 507-11.

fol. 36r-v

PoW 14: Walton Poole, ‘If shadows be a picture's excellence’

Copy, headed ‘On Mris Poale my lord Shandowes sister who dispaired because of her blacke haire & eyes’.

First published, as ‘In praise of black Women; by T.R.’, in Robert Chamberlain, The Harmony of the Muses (London, 1654), p. 15 [unique exemplum in Huntington, edited in facsimile by Ernest W. Sullivan, II (Aldershot, 1990)]; in Abraham Wright, Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656), pp. 75-7, as ‘On a black Gentlewoman’. Poems (1660), pp. 61-2, as ‘On black Hair and Eyes’ and superscribed ‘R’; in The Poems of John Donne, ed Herbert J.C. Grierson, 2 vols (Oxford, 1912), I, 460-1, as ‘on Black Hayre and Eyes’, among ‘Poems attributed to Donne in MSS’; and in The Poems of William Herbert, Third Earl of Pembroke, ed. Robert Krueger (B.Litt. thesis, Oxford, 1961: Bodleian, MS B. Litt. d. 871), p. 61.

fol. 37v

HoJ 212: John Hoskyns, Sr Fra: Bacon. L: Verulam. Vicount St Albons (‘Lord Verulam is very lame, the gout of go-out feeling’)

Copy, headed ‘Sr francis Bacon Lo: chan: of England deposed’ and here beginning ‘Greate Virulam is verie lame the gout of goe out feeleing’.

Osborn, No. XXXIX (p. 210). Whitlock, pp. 558-9.

Douce H. 421

An exemplum, inscribed to Sir Henry Fanshawe.

*ChG 25.5: George Chapman, Chapman, George. Homers Odysses, Books I-XII (London [1614?])

The inscription is edited in Hooper, op. cit., I, xxvii, and in Chapman's Homer, ed Allardyce Nicoll (New York, 1956), II, xiii.

Douce MM 459

Copy of lines 91-6, here beginning ‘That Antique Pile behold’, on a rear endpaper in a printed exemplum of Milton's “Paradise Lost” (London, 1668). Inscribed on the title-page of the volume ‘E Libris J Jenckinson Em: Coll: Cant: AB: 1746’. Early-mid-18th century.

WaE 337.5: Edmund Waller, On St. James's Park, as lately improved by His Majesty (‘Of the first Paradise there's nothing found’)

First published as a broadside (London, 1661). Poems (London, 1664). Thorn-Drury, II, 40-5.

MS Dugdale 25

A folio composite volume of historical and heraldic papers, in various hands, ii + 122 leaves (plus stubs of excised leaves), in later reversed calf. Compiled by, and partly in the hand of, Sir William Dugdale (1605-86), antiquary and herald. Mid-late 17th century.

Once owned by Sir Henry Spelman (1563/4-1641), historian and antiquary. MS XXX Vol 2 of the collections of Hudson Gurney (1775-1864), banker and antiquary.

pp. 49-132

CmW 18: William Camden, Regni regis Jacobi I annalium apparatus

Transcript of Camden's autograph MS (CmW 17).

First published in Camdeni epistolae (London, 1691), Appendix, pp. 1-85.

MS Dugdale 28

A folio composite volume of state and heraldic tracts, in various professional hands (including that of the ‘Feathery Scribe’), 370 leaves.

Assembled, annotated, and copiously indexed by Sir William Dugdale (1605-86), antiquary and herald. Inscribed (f. 8v) ‘Thomas Longman’.

Peter Beal, In Praise of Scribes: Manuscripts and their Makers in Seventeenth-Century England (Oxford, 1998), pp. 254-5 (No. 87), with facsimiles of ff. 145v and 178r on pp. 99 and 98.

ff. 220r-8r

CvG 9: George Cavendish, The Life of Cardinal Wolsey

An abridgment of the work.

Sylvester, No. 3.

First published in George Cavendish, The Life of Cardinal Wolsey and Metrical Visions, ed. Samuel W. Singer, 2 vols (Chiswick, 1825). The Life and Death of Cardinal Wolsey by George Cavendish, ed. Richard S. Sylvester, EETS, orig. ser. 243 (London, New York and Toronto, 1959).

ff. 228v-64

CvG 2: George Cavendish, Metrical Visions (‘In the monyth of Iune / I lyeng sole alon’)

Copy, headed ‘diuers Elegiecall Poems upon sundry persons’, transcribed from British Library Egerton MS 2402 or a transcript of it, with four stanzas omitted but including an additional stanza, p. 279.

This MS recorded in Edwards and in his ‘The Text of George Cavendish's Metrical Visions’, Analytical & Enumerative Bibliography, 2/1. (Winter, 1978), 3-62, as also in Sylvester, with the additional stanza edited, p. 279.

A series of poetical lamentations, comprising 2425 lines, on the deaths (the majority by execution) of Cardinal Wolsey, George, Viscount Rochford, Sir Henry Borris, sir Francis Weston, Sir William Brereton, Mark Smeaton, Anne Boleyn, Thomas Cromwell, Henry Courtenay, Marquess of Exeter, Henry Pole, Baron Montague, Catherine Howard, her lover Culpeper, Viscountess Rochford, Margaret Pole, Countess of Salisbury, Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, Henry VIII, Thomas Seymour, Lord Protector, Edward Seymour, Duke of Somerset, Sir Thomas Arundel, Sir Michael Stanhope, Sir Ralph Vane, Sir Miles Partridge, Edward VI, John Dudley, Duke of Northumberland, Henry Grey, Duke of Suffolk, Lady Jane Grey, and Queen Mary.

First published in George Cavendish, The Life of Cardinal Wolsey and Metrical Visions, ed. Samuel W. Singer, 2 vols (London, 1825). Metrical Visions by George Cavendish, ed. A.S.G. Edwards (Columbia, SC, 1980).

MS Dugdale 51

A folio volume of miscellaneous collections, ii + 124 leaves.

Among collections of Sir William Dugdale (1605-86), antiquary and herald. Once owned by Sir Henry Spelman (1564?-1641), historian and antiquary. Later owned by Cox Macro (1683-1767), antiquary. Christie's, February 1820 (Macro sale, Part VI). Then owned by Hudson Gurney (1775-1864), banker and antiquary (Gurney MS XXX, Vol. 2). Sotheby's, 30 March 1936 (Gurney sale), lot 108

ff. 108r-22v

CtR 489: Sir Robert Cotton, That the Soveraignes Person is Required in the Great Covncells, or Assemblies of the State, aswell at the Consultations as at the Conclusions

Copy, in a professional hand. c.1630.

Tract beginning ‘Since at these Assemblies few Diaries, or exact Iournall Books are remaining...’. First published as A Treatise, shewing that the Soveraignes Person is Required in the great Councells or Assemblies of the State, aswell at the Consultations as at the conclusions, London, 1641. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [41]-57.

MS e. Mus. 37

Copy of Arcadia, i + 247 folio leaves, imperfect, in 17th-century panelled calf (rebacked). Probably in three secretary hands: A, ff. 1r-183v, 197r to the bottom of f. 240v; B, ff. 184r-92v; C, ff. 193r-6v, bottom of f. 240v to 246r. c.1580s.

ff. 1r-236v

SiP 92: Sir Philip Sidney, The Old Arcadia

Copy of the complete text, untitled but beginning ‘The ffirst booke or Acte of the countes of pembrookes Arcadia’.

This MS collated in Robertson and the poems collated in Ringler. Described in Ringler, p. 529.

The unfinished revised version of Arcadia (the ‘New Arcadia’) first published in London, 1590. The original version (the ‘Old Arcadia’) first published in Feuillerat, IV (1926). The complete Old Arcadia edited by Jean Robertson (Oxford, 1973). The poems edited in Ringler, pp. 7-131.

f. 237v

DyE 67: Sir Edward Dyer, Sonnet (‘Prometheus, when first from heuen hie’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Prometheus first from heaven high’.

First published in The Countess of Pembrokes Arcadia, 3rd edition (London, 1598). Sargent, No. I, p. 176. May, Courtier Poets, p. 302. EV 19124.

ff. 237r-46r

SiP 19: Sir Philip Sidney, Certain Sonnets

Copy of sonnets 1-4, 6-24, 26-8, and 31 (in an irregular order), headed ‘Certein lowse Sonnettes and songes’.

This MS collated in Ringler. Facsimile of f. 246r in H.R. Woudhuysen, Sir Philip Sidney and the Circulation of Manuscripts 1558-1640 (Oxford, 1996), Plate VI after p. 272.

First published in Arcadia (London, 1598). Ringler, pp. 133-62.

MS e. Mus. 55

A folio composite volume of state tracts, in English and Latin, in various hands, 155 leaves, in limp vellum.

Inscribed (several times), by the principal compiler, ‘ex dono D. Clay’: i.e. Dr Robert Clay (1576?-1628), vicar of Halifax.

ff. 17r-25r

EsR 199: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Essex's Arraignment, 19 February 1600/1

Copy.

ff. 26r-35r

BcF 63: Francis Bacon, An Advertisement touching the Controversies of the Church of England

Copy, in a professional secretary and italic hand. End of 16th-early 17th century.

Edited from this MS in Spedding.

A tract beginning ‘It is but ignorance if any man find it strange that the state of religion (especially in the days of peace) should be exercised...’. First published as A Wise and Moderate Discourse concerning Church-Affaires ([London], 1641). Spedding, VIII, 74-95.

ff. 48r-9r

ElQ 58: Queen Elizabeth I, The Second Chorus from Seneca's ‘Hercules Oetaeus’ (‘What harming hurl of fortune's arm thou dreadest’)

Copy, headed ‘A Translatio of Q Elizabeth’, in a neat secretary hand. c.1589.

Edited from this MS in Anglia, 14 (1892), 34; in Bradner; in Selected Works, and in Translations.

Bradner, pp. 16-19. Selected Works, pp. 287-95. Translations, pp. 447-56.

ff. 73r-81r

EsR 107: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Apology

Copy, closely written in Dr Clay's hand. c.1600.

First published, addressed to Anthony Bacon, as An Apologie of the Earle of Essex, against those which jealously and maliciously tax him to be the hinderer of the peace and quiet (London, [1600]), but immediately suppressed. Reprinted in 1603.

ff. 83r-6v

HkR 28: Richard Hooker, Walter Travers's Supplication to the Council

Copy, closely written in Dr Clay's hand. c.1605.

This MS collated in Keble (see I, liii).

First published in Oxford, 1612. Keble, III, 548-9. Folger edition, Volume V, pp. 189-210.

ff. 87r-92r

HkR 37: Richard Hooker, Hooker's Answer to Walter Travers's Supplication to the Council

Copy, closely written in Dr Clay's hand. c.1605.

This MS collated in Keble and in Folger edition, Volume V.

First published, with Travers's Supplication, in Oxford, 1612. Keble, III, 570-96. Folger edition, Volume V, pp. 225-57.

MS e. Mus. 86

A mid-15th-century MS volume of writings in Latin relating to John Wycliffe and the Lollards, viii + 224 leaves, in double columns on parchment throughout, in black embossed calf over wooden boards.

passim

*BaJ 4: John Bale, The battayle of Iohan Wycleffe and serten other cristen souldyours ageynst the synagogue of sathan or malygnaunt churche of the romishe pope

Bale's copious autograph notes and additions neatly entered throughout the volume, relating to Wycliffe and used for Bale's own work on the subject, particularly extensive additions occurring on ff. 61v-3v (sketches of various people including Bale himself), 91v (1 column), 127v (2 cols), 157r (1 col.), 161v-2v (4 cols), 222r-3v (8 cols), and 223r-v (‘tabula’ in 3 cols). c.1537-43.

This MS recorded in Davies, p. 237 (xiii), and in McCusker (1942), p. 106.

Unpublished.

ff. iiir-viiir

*BaJ 28: John Bale, Tabula eorum que Ioannis Wicleui in tempora respiciunt vsque ad folium presentis libri. 120

Bale's autograph index to Thomas Walden, Fasciculus zizaniorum Magistri Iohannis Wyclif, beginning ‘Abhominatio desolationis, fo. 107’, preceding a scribal copy of the Fasciculus with Bale's annotations. c.1537-43.

The Fasciculus, without Bale's notes, was edited from this MS in Fasciculi Zizaniorum Magistri Johannis Wyclif, ascribed to Thomas Netter of Walden, ed. Walter Waddington Shirley, Rolls Series 5 (London, 1858), with a facsimile of f. 91 (which includes annotations by Bale) as the frontispiece. Recorded in Davies, p. 237 (xiv), and in McCusker (1942), p. 106.

Unpublished. This work corresponds to the ‘In fasciculum zizaniorum...’ which Bale records in his Illustrium...scriptorum summarium (1548), f. 243.

See also BaJ 4, BaJ 19.

ff. 105v-10v

*BaJ 19: John Bale, Examinatio magistri Guilhelmi Thorpe sacerdotis

Autograph Latin translation by Bale of the examination of William Thorpe for heresy in 1407, in 21 consecutive columns, on ff. 98v-103v of Bale's foliation. c.1537-43.

First published in Select Works of John Bale, ed. Henry Christmas, Parker Society (Cambridge, 1849), pp. 61-133. Recorded in Davies, p. 237 (xv), and in McCusker (1942), p. 106.

See also BaJ 4, BaJ 28.

MS e. Mus. 95

Copy of the complete Latin version, with a dedicatory epistle to the King dated 10 August 1630 and a preface ‘Ad Lectorem’, in a professional hand, 165 folio leaves, in dark blue calf gilt. c.1630.

HrE 119: Edward, Lord Herbert of Cherbury, The Expedition to the Isle of Rhé

Edited from this MS in Select Works (1849).

Latin version (Expeditio in Ream Insulam) first published in London, 1656, edited by Timothy Baldwin. English version first published by the Philobiblon Society in London, 1860, edited by Lord Powis.

MS e. Mus. 131

A partly autograph MS of Donne's Biathanatos, 287 folio pages.

The MS as a whole

*DnJ 4054: John Donne, Biathanatos

Copy in a neat scribal hand, bearing Donne's numerous autograph corrections, marginal annotations, and one autograph sixteen-word insertion (on p. 215); some lines on page 73 in another hand; this MS being a copy presented by Donne to Sir Edward Herbert. c.1608-12.

Edited from this MS in Sullivan's edition. Also discussed by Ernest W. Sullivan in ‘The Genesis and Transmission of Donne's Biathanatos’, The Library, 5th Ser. 31 (1976), 52-72, and in ‘Dating the Bodleian Manuscript of John Donne's Biathanatos’, Analytical & Enumerative Bibliography, 1 (1977), 26-9. Discussed, with facsimile examples, in Peter Beal, In Praise of Scribes: Manuscripts and their Makers in Seventeenth-Century England (Oxford, 1998), chapter 2, pp. 31-57 passim. Discussed, as if in the hand of Ben Jonson, in Mark Bland, ‘Jonson, Biathanatos and the Interpretation of Manuscript Evidence’, SB, 51 (1998), 154-82, with a facsimile of p. 177 on p. 172.

First published in London, [1647]. Reprinted in facsimile, ed. J.W. Hebel (New York, 1930). Edited by Michael Rudick and M. Pabst Bettin (New York, 1982) and by Ernest W. Sullivan II (Newark, NJ, 1984).

p. x

*DnJ 4109: John Donne, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to Sir Edward Herbert, on a single page facing the title-page of Biathanatos. c.1608-12.

Edited in Sullivan's edition. Facsimiles in Evelyn M. Simpson, A Study of the Prose Works of John Donne (Oxford, 1924), frontispiece; in Evelyn Hardy, Donne: A Spirit in Conflict (London, 1942), facing p. 264; in Derek Parker, John Donne and his World (London, 1975), p. 42; and in Beal, In Praise of Scribes, p. 33.

MS e. Mus. 201

Copy, iii + fifteen quarto leaves, with a title-page, f. 1r originally paginated ‘241’. Copy, initially entitled ‘Mr: George Sands on the Canticles’ and then headed ‘The Songe of Salomon’. c.1637-43.

SaG 23: George Sandys, A Paraphrase upon the Song of Solomon (‘Join thy life-breathing lips to mine’)

This MS discussed in Richard Beale Davis, ‘Sandys's Song of Solomon: Its Manuscript Versions and Their Circulation’, PBSA, 50 (1956), 328-41 (p. 332).

First published in London, 1641. Hooper, II, 335-56. Dedicatory verses ‘To the Queen’ first published in A Paraphrase upon the Divine Poems (London, 1676). Hooper, II, 338.

MS Eng. c. 2278

Collection of fourteen letters by Robert Herrick, all written in his student days at Cambridge, to his uncle, Sir William Herrick.

Formerly in the Leicestershire Record Office, DG 9/2422-2435. Sotheby's, 5 December 1988, lot 14 (i-xiv), with facsimile examples.

Martin, pp. 445-53. Facsimile examples also in Grosart (frontispiece); in Hazlitt, p. ix; in John Nicols, The History and Antiquities of the County of Leicester, II, ii (1798), Plate CV, facing p. 613; in George Walton Scott, Robert Herrick (London, 1974), p. 93; and in Ray Rawlins, The Guinness Book of Autographs (London, 1977), p. 105. See also HeR 000.

Letter 1: ff. 3r-4v (2422/1-2)

*HeR 416: Robert Herrick, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Herrick, to his uncle, subscribed by Robert's older brother Thomas, acknowledging receipt of £15 from Sir William on 1 October 1613, [September 1613]. 1613.

Martin, p. 445. Sotheby's (i)

Letter 2: ff. 5r-6v (2423/1-2

*HeR 417: Robert Herrick, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Herrick, to his uncle, from St John's College, Cambridge. c.1613.

Martin, pp. 445-6. Sotheby's (i i), with a facsimile in the sale catalogue, p. 16.

Letter 3: ff. 9r-10v (2424/1-2)

*HeR 418: Robert Herrick, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Herrick, to his uncle, from St John's College, Cambridge.

Martin, pp. 446-7. Sotheby's (iii).

Letter 4: ff. 13-14v (24245/1-2)

*HeR 419: Robert Herrick, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Herrick, to his uncle. c.1613.

Martin, p. 447. Sotheby's (iv), with a facsimile of Herrick's signature and subscription by Robert Martine acknowledging receipt from Sir William of £10.

Letter 5: f. 17r (2426/1-2)

*HeR 420: Robert Herrick, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Herrick, to his uncle [end of 1616 or beginning of 1616/7]. 1617.

Martin, pp. 447-8. Sotheby's (v), with a facsimiles in the sale catalogue, p. 18 and cover. Facsimiles also in IELM, II.i (1987), Facsimile XXIII, after p. xxiv, and in in DLB 126: Seventeenth-Century British Nondramatic Poets, Second Series, ed. M. Thomas Hester (Detroit, 1993), p. 170.

Letter 6: ff. 20r-1v (2427/1-2)

*HeR 421: Robert Herrick, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Herrick, to his uncle, [early 1616/7]. 1617.

Martin, p. 448. Sotheby's (vii)

Letter 7: ff. 24r-5v (2428/1-2)

*HeR 422: Robert Herrick, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Herrick, to his uncle, [March-April 1617]. 1617.

Martin, p. 449. Sotheby's (vii), with a facsimile of Herrick's signature and the subscription by Anthony Uphill acknowledging receipt from Sir William of £10 on 11 April 1617.

Letter 8: f. 26r (2429)

*HeR 423: Robert Herrick, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Herrick, to his uncle.

Martin, p. 449. Sotheby's (viii).

Letter 9: ff. 29r-30v (2430/1-2)

*HeR 424: Robert Herrick, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Herrick, to his uncle.

Martin, p. 450. Sotheby's (ix), with a facsimile example in the sale catalogue, p. 21.

Letter 10: ff. 33r-34v (2431/1-2)

*HeR 425: Robert Herrick, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Herrick, to his uncle.

Martin, p. 450. Sotheby's (x).

letter 11: ff. 37r-8v (2432/1-2)

*HeR 426: Robert Herrick, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Herrick, to his uncle, from St John's College, Cambridge.

Martin, 451. Sotheby's (xi).

Letter 12: ff. 41r-2v (2433/1-2)

*HeR 427: Robert Herrick, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Herrick, to his uncle, 11 October [no year]. c.1616.

Martin, p. 451. Sotheby's (xii), with a facsimile in the sale catalogue, p. 22. Facsimile also in DLB 126: Seventeenth-Century British Nondramatic Poets, Second Series, ed. M. Thomas Hester (Detroit, 1993), p. 171.

Letter 13: ff. 45r (2434

*HeR 428: Robert Herrick, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Herrick, to his uncle. c.1616.

Martin, p. 452. Sotheby's (xiii).

Letter 14: f. 48r (2435)

*HeR 429: Robert Herrick, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Herrick, to his uncle, from Trinity hall, Cambridge, [c.1616]. c.1616.

Martin, pp. 452-3. Sotheby's (xiv), with a facsimile of Herrick's signed subscription in the sale catalogue, p. 23.

MS Eng. c. 7019

A folder of unbound verse MSS and part of a diary (1672), in various hands and paper sizes, 42 leaves. At least some relating to Sir Willoughby Aston, of Aston Hall, Warrington, Cheshire. Acquired in 2000 from the estate of H.G. Pollard.

ff. 1r, 2r

ClE 131: Edward Hyde, First Earl of Clarendon, Letters to the Duke of York and the Duchess of York

Copy of Clarendon's letter to York, on two pages of a pair of conjugate folio leaves, endorsed ‘The Earle of Clarenden to the Duke & Dutchess of Yorke’. Late 17th century.

Letters by Clarendon to his daughter Anne (who died on 31 March 1671 before the letter arrived) and to her husband, the Duke of York (later James II), on the occasion of her conversion to Roman Catholicism. The original letters, which received particular attention by his contemporaries because of their subject matter, are not known to survive.

These were first published in Two Letters written by…Edward Earl of Clarendon…one to His Royal Highness the Duke of York, the other to the Dutchess, occasioned by her Embracing the Roman Catholic Religion (London, [1680?]) and were reprinted in State Tracts (1689), in An Appendix to the History of the Grand Rebellion (Oxford, 1724), pp. 313-24, and elsewhere.

ff. 36r-41r

DrJ 43.72: John Dryden, An Essay upon Satire (‘How dull and how insensible a beast’)

Copy, in a rounded hand, in a folio sewn booklet, addressed ‘For Sr Wilughby Aston Bart’, subscribed (f. 42r) ‘These were supposed and confidently said to be Dreydons, but he by his lre to my Ld Devonsh: hath vtterly renounced them - Some since have father'd them on Ld Rocheste. But ye word Coward touchest soe neare ye quick that 'tis thought he would not have mention'd it touching him selfe choosing rather to abuse himselfe in things he is supposd to be less guilty of.’ c.1679.

A satire written in 1675 by John Sheffield, Earl of Mulgrave, but it was widely believed by contemporaries (including later Alexander Pope, who had access to Mulgrave's papers) that Dryden had a hand in it, a belief which led to the notorious assault on him in Rose Alley on 18 December 1679, at the reputed instigation of the Earl of Rochester and/or the Duchess of Portsmouth.

First published in London, 1689. POAS, I (1963), pp. 396-413.

The authorship discussed in Macdonald, pp. 217-19, and see John Burrows, ‘Mulgrave, Dryden, and An Essay upon Satire’, in Superior in His Profession: Essays in Memory of Harold Love, ed. Meredith Sherlock, Brian McMullin and Wallace Kirsop, Script & Print, 33 (2009), pp. 76-91, where is it concluded, from stylistic analysis, that ‘Mulgrave had by far the major hand’. Recorded in Hammond, V, 684, in an ‘Index of Poems Excluded from this Edition’.

MS Eng. c. 7065

A collection of autograph manuscripts, compiled in the 19th century.

Once owned by the Enys family of Cornwall. Bonham's, 28 September 2004 (Enys sale), lot 392.

f. 124r

*SaT 1.5: Thomas Sackville, On Sir Philip and Sir Thomas Hobby (‘Two woorthie knightes, and Hobbyes both by name’)

MS, in a cursive secretary hand, possibly autograph, with alterations, subscribed ‘T. B.’, on one page of a pair of conjugate folio leaves. c.1567.

Later owned by John Wilson Croker (1780-1857), politician and writer, and given by him to Lord Londesborough.

Edited from this MS in Collier. Discussed in Jessica L. Malay, ‘Thomas Sackville's Elegy to Thomas and Philip Hoby: The Discovery of a Draft Manuscript’, N&Q, December 2009, 513-15.

A twenty-line elegy, originally inscribed c.1567 on the Hoby monument in the parish church of All Saints Bisham, in Berkshire. First published in John Payne Collier, ‘On Norton and Sackville, the authors of “Gorboduc”, the earliest blank verse Tragedy in our language’, The Shakespeare Society's Papers, IV (London, 1849), 123-8.

MS Eng d. 2912

A folio volume of state tracts and letters, in several probably professional secretary hands, 225 pages, in marbled boards. c.1630.

Formerly among the F. Bacon Frank MSS at Campsall Hall, Yorkshire. Sotheby's, 11 August 1942, lot 70. Afterwards owned by Annie Winifred Bryher (née Ellerman, d.1983) and by the Ralegh scholar Agnes Latham (1905-96), of Pickering, North Yorkshire.

Recorded, as B. 3, in HMC, 6th Report (1877), Appendix, p. 459.

pp. 9-11

EsR 62: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, A Poem made on the Earle of Essex (being in disgrace with Queene Eliz): by mr henry Cuffe his Secretary (‘It was a time when sillie Bees could speake’)

Copy of the fifteen-stanza version, headed ‘Th'erle of Essex his Buzze, made in his decayed estate by mr Henry Cuffe his Secretary’, with two lines deleted in the fifth stanza.

First published, in a musical setting by John Dowland, in his The Third and Last Booke of Songs or Aires (London, 1603). May, Poems, No. IV, pp. 62-4. May, Courtier Poets, pp. 266-9. EV 12846.

pp. 73-7

EsR 200: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Essex's Arraignment, 19 February 1600/1

Copy.

pp. 77-80

EsR 268: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Essex's speech at his execution

Copy, headed ‘The maner of his death’.

Generally incorporated in accounts of Essex's execution and sometimes also of his behaviour the night before.

pp. 96-106

RaW 728.6: Sir Walter Ralegh, Ralegh's Arraignment(s)

Copy of Ralegh's arraignment on 17 November 1603.

Accounts of the arraignments of Ralegh at Winchester Castle, 17 November 1603, and before the Privy Council on 22 October 1618. The arraignment of 1603 published in London, 1648. For documentary evidence about this arraignment, see Rosalind Davies, ‘“The Great Day of Mart”: Returning to Texts at the Trial of Sir Walter Ralegh in 1603’, Renaissance Forum, 4/1 (1999), 1-12.

pp. 107-10, 115-23

RaW 839: Sir Walter Ralegh, Letter(s)

Copy of letters by Ralegh, to his wife (2, 1603 and 1618); to Sir Robert Carr (1608); and to Winwood.

pp. 133-58

RaW 559: Sir Walter Ralegh, Apology for his Voyage to Guiana

Copy, headed ‘Sr Wa: Ralegh his Apologie’.

A tract beginning ‘If the ill success of this enterprise of mine had been without example...’. First published in Judicious and Select Essays and Observations (London, 1650). Works (1829), VIII, 477-507. Edited by V. T. Harlow in Ralegh's Last Voyage (London, 1932), pp. 316-34.

pp. 175-213

BcF 750: Francis Bacon, The Use of the Law

Copy, headed ‘In what things the vse of the Law consisteth’.

A discourse beginning ‘The use of the Law consisteth principally in these two things...’. Spedding, VII, 459-504 (and discussed pp. 302, 453-7). Probably by Sir Robert Forster (1589-1663), judge.

pp. 215-17

BcF 268: Francis Bacon, A Preparation for the Union of Laws

Copy, headed ‘The equalling of Lawes done by Sr Fran: Bacon knt his maties Sollicitor generall, 1607’.

A discourse beginning ‘Your Majesty's desire of proceeding towards the union of this whole island...’. First published in Cases of Treason (London, 1641). Spedding, VII, 731-43 (and see p. 775 et seq.).

MS Eng. e. 2016

Copy of ‘A Draught of Sir Philip Sidney's Arcadia’, a satirical poem based on Arcadia, beginning ‘Hee that would read and understand’, in the same hand as SiP 000. c.1640s.

SiP 168.7: Sir Philip Sidney, Arcadia related

Later owned by John Buxton.

Privately edited at the New Bodleian Library, Oxford, 1961, and reedited in Historical Essays 1600-1750 Presented to David Ogg (London, 1963), pp. 60-77.

MS Eng. e. 2017

A MS index to Arcadia, in two parts, in the same hand as SiP 000. The first part entitled Sr Philip Sydneys exact Characters wherein hee is both painter & poet; the owtward Character poynting at the painter, the inward description at the poet; the second entitled A Clavis opening ye names and referring to the Characters. c.1640s.

SiP 168.8: Sir Philip Sidney, Arcadia related

Later owned by John Buxton.

Discussed by John Buxton in ‘Sidney and Theophrastus’, ELR, 2 (1972), 79-82.

MS Eng. e. 3027

A small octavo volume of poems chiefly by Michael Drayton, iv +10 leaves (plus seven blanks), in modern brown morocco gilt. Mid-17th century.

Inscribed name (f. 1r) of John Saye, Sayce or Sayer. Purchased in 1951 from Dobell by Dr Bent Juel-Jensen (1922-2006), Oxford physician and book collector. Formerly classified after 1977 as MS Juel-Jensen Drayton f. 1.

ff. 3r-5v

DrM 40: Michael Drayton, The Legend of Pierce Gaveston (‘From gloomie shaddowes of eternall Night’)

Copy of the last thirty stanzas, here beginning ‘then dayly begg'd I. / And being inconsideratly proud’, probably transcribed from Poems (London, 1619); imperfect, lacking the first part of the poem.

Edited from this MS in Hebel, II, 431-50.

First published (1740-line version) in London, [1593-4]. Hebel, I, 157-207. 702-line version among Legends in Poems (London, 1619). Hebel, II, 431-50.

f. 6r

DrM 70: Michael Drayton, To the Reader (‘The word LEGEND...’)

Abbreviated version of the Preface to Legends, untitled, probably transcribed from Poems (London, 1619).

Edited from this MS in Hebel, II, 382.

First published in Poems (London, 1619). Hebel, II, 382.

f. 7r

DrM 37: Michael Drayton, The Heart (‘If thus we needs must goe’)

Copy, in double columns, probably transcribed from Poems (London, 1619).

First published, among Odes with Other Lyrick Poesies, in Poems (London, 1619). Hebel, II, 355-6. For a later version, see PeW 84.

f. 7r-v

DrM 12: Michael Drayton, The Cryer (‘Good Folke, for Gold or Hyre’)

Copy, untitled, probably transcribed from Poems (London, 1619).

First published, among Odes with Other Lyrick Poesies, in Poems (London, 1619). Hebel, II, 371.

f. 7v

DrM 56: Michael Drayton, To His Coy Love, A Conzonet (‘I pray thee leave, love me no more’)

Copy, headed ‘A Canzonet to his coy love’, probably transcribed from Poems (London, 1619).

First published, among Odes with Other Lyrick Poesies, in Poems (London, 1619). Hebel, II, 372.

f. 7v

DrM 66: Michael Drayton, To his Rivall (‘Her lov'd I most’)

Copy, in double columns, probably transcribed from Poems (London, 1619).

First published, among Odes with Other Lyrick Poesies, in Poems (London, 1619). Hebel, II, 368-9.

f. 8r

DrM 48: Michael Drayton, A Skeltoniad (‘The Muse should be sprightly’)

Copy, probably transcribed from Poems (London, 1619).

Edited from this MS in Hebel, II, 370

First published in Poemes Lyrick and pastorall (London, [1606]). Among Odes with Other Lyrick Poesies in Poems (London, 1619). Hebel, II, 370.

f. 10r

WaE 619: Edmund Waller, To the King, on his Navy (‘Wher'er thy navy spreads her canvas wings’)

Copy, headed ‘Edmond Waller Esqr his Poeme To ye King on his navy’.

First published in Workes (1645). Thorn-Drury, I, 15-16.

See also WaE 765.

MS Eng. e. 3028

A quarto volume chiefly comprising sermons, in at least four hands, written from both ends, i + 66 leaves, imperfect, in contemporary limp vellum. c.1624-5.

Purchased from Blackwell's in 1949 by Dr Bent Juel-Jensen (1922-2006), Oxford physician and book collector. Formerly classified after 1977 as MS Juel-Jensen Drayton e. 2.

ff. 59av-58v

BrW 17: William Browne of Tavistock, Britannia's Pastorals, Book III, Song I, lines 45 et seq. (‘Marina's gone, and now sit I’)

Copy of a 24-line version, possibly in the hand of Hugh Halswell (b. 1597/8) of Wadham College and All Souls College, Oxford, the last two lines in another hand, subscribed ‘W: B.’

MS Eng. e. 3381

A quarto notebook of English and Latin verse and prose, in two or more cursive hands, ii + 100 leaves, in later black morocco. Late 17th century.

Armorial bookplate of Henry Ellison, of University College, Oxford, and his inscription (f. 43r) dated March 14th 1841. Donated in 1951 by Mrs G.L. Barstow.

ff. 1r-8r

HbT 7.5: Thomas Hobbes, Vita carmine expressa (‘Natus erat noster servator Homo-Deus annos’)

Copy, headed ‘Vita Thomæ Hobbes Malmes-buriensis usque ad Annum Millesemum, sexcentissimum septuagesimum secundum, ætatis vero Octagisimum quartum ab ipso conscripta’.

First published in London, 1679. Molesworth, Latin, I, lxxxi-xcix. See also HbT 0.8.

ff. 44r-5r

MaA 139.3: Andrew Marvell, A Country Clowne call'd Hodge Went to view the Pyramid, pray mark what did ensue (‘When Hodge had number'd up how many score’)

Copy, headed ‘A Countrey Swain call'd Hodge’.

First published, as ‘Hodge a Countryman went up to the Piramid, His Vision’, in A Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689), p. 5. Sometimes called Hodge's Vision from the Monument, [December, 1675]. Cooke, II, Carmina Miscellanea, pp. 81-8. Thompson, III, 359-65. Grosart, I, 435-40. Poems on Affairs of State: Augustan Satirical Verse, 1660-1714, Volume II: 1678-1681, ed. Elias F. Mengel, Jr (New Haven & London, 1965), pp. 146-53.

First attributed to Marvell in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1697), but probably written in 1679, after Marvell's death.

f. 47r

MaA 202.5: Andrew Marvell, Nostradamus's Prophecy (‘The Blood of the Just London's firm Doome shall fix’)

Copy, headed ‘A Translation of a Prophecy of Nostredamus’.

First published in A Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689). Margoliouth, I, 178-9, as of doubtful authorship. POAS, I, 185-9 (first part only as possibly by John Ayloffe). Rejected from the canon by Lord.

ff. 48r-51r

MaA 106.5: Andrew Marvell, Britannia and Rawleigh (‘Ah! Rawleigh, when thy Breath thou didst resign’)

Copy, headed ‘A Dialogue between Sr Walter Rawleigh's Ghost & Britannia’.

First published in A Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689). Margoliouth, I, 194-9, as of doubtful authorship. POAS, I, 228-36, attributed to John Ayloffe. See also George deF. Lord, ‘Satire and Sedition: The Life and Work of John Ayloffe’, HLQ, 29 (1965-6), 255-73 (p. 258).

f. 53v

RoJ 123.5: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Impromptu on Louis XIV (‘Lorraine you stole. by fraud you got Burgundy’)

Copy, headed ‘On the French King’.

First published in The Agreeable Companion (London, 1745). Vieth, p. 21. Walker, p. 121, as ‘[On Louis XIV]’. See also A. S. G. Edwards, ‘Rochester's “Impromptu on Louis XIV”’, N&Q, 219 (November 1974), 418-19.

MS Eng. e. 3400

A duodecimo notebook of extracts from sermons, in a non-professional small secretary hand, 8 leaves, in half-calf. Entitled (f. 5r) ‘Apte and fit similes taken out of learned mens sermons in Oxford 1590; begun the xxijth of Aprill’. A modern owner has suggested that the compiler may have been Robert Cawdray, author of A Treasurie; or Storehouse of Similies (London, 1609). c.1590.

Book label ‘Ex Libris J. W. M. Vyse’. Purchased in 2002 from Andrew Stewart.

f. 6r-v

TiW 5: William Tindale, The practise of prelates

Extracts, headed ‘Tindale in his booke called the practise of prelates’ and beginning ‘As the Ivy first springeth out of the earth and then a while, weepeth alonge by the grond...’.

First published [in Antwerp?, 1530].

MS Eng. lett.c. 328

A composite volume of correspondence of Francis Parry, Envoy Extraordinary at the Court of Portugal, in various hands.

Later in the library of Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bt (1792-1872), manuscript and book collector. Sotheby's, 26 June 1974, lot 3005.

f. 512r

DoC 368: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, ‘Whilst wth such various bounty you are able’

Copy, headed My Lord Buckhursts first Coppy, with two other satires on Edward Howard, in the hand of one William Ball, on a single leaf sent as a letter to Parry, docketed by the recipient ‘London June 21. 1669 ffrom Mr Ball Recd Augt 9...’. 1669.

f. 512v

DoC 267: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, To Mr. Edward Howard, on his Incomparable, Incomprehensible Poem Called ‘The British Princes’ (‘Come on, ye critics! Find one fault who dare’)

Copy, headed ‘my Ld Buckhursts last coppy’, with two other satires on Edward Howard, in the hand of one William Ball, on a single leaf sent as a letter to Parry, docketed by the recipient ‘London June 21. 1669 ffrom Mr Ball Recd Augt 9...’. 1669. 1669.

First published in Poems on Several Occasions, By the Right Honourable, the E. of R[ochester] (‘Antwerpen’ [i.e. London], 1680). POAS, I (1963), 338-9. Harris, pp. 7-9.

MS Eng. lett. e. 1

A quarto composite volume chiefly of original letters by Sir Paul Rycaut (1729-1700), Resident at Hamburg, to William Blathwayt (1650-1717), secretary to William III in Flanders, 1692, i + 242 leaves, in 19th-century cloth.

Later in the library of Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bt (1792-1872), manuscript and book collector. Sotheby's. 17 May 1897, lot 170, to Halliday. Bernard Halliday's sale catalogue No. 167 (1933), item 1103.

ff. 241r-2v

*VaJ 36: Sir John Vanbrugh, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Vanbrugh, to the Duke [of Marlborough], from London, 24 August 1705. 1705.

Edited in Whistler, pp. 230-1 (Appendix 1, No. 3).

F. 2. 62 Linc

Containing annotations by Sir Thomas Posthumous Hobby (1566-1641). Late 16th-early 17th century.

SpE 87: Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene (London, 1590)

Discussed in the anonymous ‘MS Notes to Spenser's “Faerie Queene”’, N & Q, 202 (December 1957), 509-15, and in Alastair Fowler, ‘Oxford and London Marginalia to “The Faerie Queene”’, N & Q, 206 (November 1961), 416-18.

4° F.56.Th. (Arch. G.e.44)

A volume comprising eleven printed prose tracts by Milton, with Milton's autograph presentation inscription to John Rous, Librarian of the Bodleian Library, on a flyleaf, together with Milton's autograph list of contents (originally accompanying MnJ 115). Comprising exempla of: Of Reformation touching Church-Discipline in England (1641), with possibly autograph corrections of some nine words on pp. 6-7, 44, 70); Of Prelatical Episcopacy (1641); The Reason of Church-Government (1641); Animadversions upon the Remonstrants Defence against Smectymnuus (1641); An Apology against…A Modest Confutation (1642); The Doctrine and Discipline of Divorce (1644), with possibly autograph corrections on pp. 65 and 73;The Judgement of Martin Bucer (1644); Colasterion (1645); Tetrachordon (1645); Areopagitica (1644); and Of Education [1644]. 1641-7.

*MnJ 114: John Milton, Eleven Prose Tracts

A complete facsimile edition of this volume in John Milton, Prose Works 1641-50, 3 vols (Menston: Scolar Press, 1967-8), Vols I and II. Facsimile examples of the inscription, list and corrections in Sotheby, Ramblings, p. 120; in Greg, English Literary Autographs, Plate LIII(c); in English Literature in the Seventeenth Century: Guide to an Exhibition held in 1957, Bodleian Library (Oxford, 1957), frontispiece; and in Nicholas von Maltzahn, ‘Naming the Author: Some Seventeenth-Century Milton Allusions’, Milton Quarterly, 27/1 (March 1993), 1-19 (p. 9). Edited in Columbia, XVIII, 269-70, and in LR, II, 139-42.

MS Fairfax 40

A quarto verse miscellany entitled The Imployment of my Solitude, ii + 734 pages. Compiled by Thomas Fairfax (1612-71), third Lord Fairfax of Cameron, Parliamentary general. c.1660-70.

Once owned by Ralph Thoresby (1658-1725), Yorkshire antiquary and topographer. Bookplate of Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex (1773-1843). Sold at the sale of his library at Evans's, 31 July 1844, lot 436 to William Pickering. Then owned by the Rev. Philip Bliss (1787-1857), antiquary and book collector.

pp. 647-56

FaE 1: Edward Fairfax, Eclogue: Hermes and Lycaon (‘The sweatie sith-man wth his rasor keene’)

Copy, headed ‘An Egloge maide by my vncle Mr Ed: Fairfax in a Dialoge betwixt two sheapards’.

Edited from this MS by all editors.

First published in Miscellanies of the Philobiblon Society, 12 (London, 1868-9), No. 4, ed. Clements R. Markham. Ed. William Grainge in Edward Fairfax, Daemonologia (Harrogate, 1882; reprinted London, 1971), pp. 181-9. Lea & Gang, pp. 665-75.

MS Firth c. 15

A folio miscellany of poems on affairs of state entitled A Choice Collection of Poems, Lampoons, Satyrs &ca, xx + 412 pages (339-411 blank). c.1700.

Among the collections of Sir Charles Harding Firth (1857-1936), historian.

This MS collated in POAS, I.

pp. 3-10

BuS 20: Samuel Butler, Dildoides (‘Such a sad Tale prepare to hear’)

Copy.

Dated in some sources 1672 but not published until 1706.

pp. 10-14

RoJ 362: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Signior Dildo (‘You ladies all of merry England’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Vieth and in Walker.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1704). Vieth, pp. 54-9. Walker, pp. 75-8.

The poem discussed, texts collated, and the attribution to Rochester questioned, in Harold Love, ‘A Restoration Lampoon in Transmission and Revision: Rochester's(?) “Signior Dildo”’, SB, 46 (1993), 250-62. Love (two versions and added stanzas), pp. 248-9, 250-2, 252-3, 253-7, among Disputed Works.

p. 15

RoJ 502: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, To the Postboy (‘Son of a whore, God damn you! can you tell’)

Copy, headed ‘E; of Rochesters Conference With a Post Boy. 1674’.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution. Collated in Walker.

First published, in shortened form, in Johannes Prinz, Rochesteriana (Leipzig, 1926), p. 56. Vieth, pp. 130-1. Walker, p. 103. Love, pp. 42-3.

pp. 17-25

MaA 69: Andrew Marvell, A Ballad call'd the Chequer Inn (‘I'll tell thee Dick where I have beene’)

Copy, headed ‘The Chequer Inn. To the Tune I tell thee Dick. By Mr. H. Savile, Esqr. 1674’.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1704). Margoliouth, I, 201-8. POAS, I, 252-62. Rejected from the canon by Lord.

pp. 25-6

RoJ 43: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Dialogue (‘When to the King I bid good morrow’)

Copy, headed ‘A Dialogue between Nell Gwyn, & Dutchess of Portsmouth. By E: Rochester’.

This MS recorded in Vieth, Attribution. Collated in Walker.

First published in Vieth, pp. 129-30. Walker, pp. 102-3. Love, p. 91, as ‘Dialogue L: R.’

pp. 129-32

EtG 99: Sir George Etherege, Mrs. Nelly's Complaint (‘If Sylla's ghost made bloody Catiline start’)

Edited in part from this MS in Thorpe and collated pp. 141-2.

First published in Miscellaneous Works, Written by…Buckingham, Vol. I (London, 1704). Thorpe, pp. 62-4.

pp. 232-53

DoC 91: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, A Faithful Catalogue of our Most Eminent Ninnies (‘Curs'd be those dull, unpointed, doggerel rhymes’)

Copy, the poem dated 1686.

This MS collated in POAS and in Harris.

First published in The Works of the Earls of Rochester, Roscommon, and Dorset (London, 1707). POAS, IV (1968), 189-214. Harris, pp. 136-67.

p. 268

BeA 30: Aphra Behn, The last Nights Ramble. 1686 (‘Warm'd with the pleasures wch: debauches yield’)

Copy.

Ascribed to Aphra Behn in BeA 32. Various other MS copies of this poem are anonymous.

p. 338

DoC 142: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, On King William's Happy Deliverance from the Intended Assassination (‘The youth whose fortune the vast globe obey'd’)

Copy, headed On K: Wm: By E. of Dorset.

Edited from this MS in Harris.

First published in Harris (1979), pp 61-2.

MS Firth c. 16

A folio miscellany of poems on affairs of state, originally entitled Astrea's Booke of Songs & Satyr's 1686, in probably seven hands, vi + 332 pages (including 23 blanks), in half-calf. Predominantly in two alternating semi-professional hands, the second of which (on altogether 117 pages) is probably that of the author Aphra Behn (1640?-89); poems on pp. 307-8 added by a later hand in 1736-8. c.1686-9 [with additions to 1738].

Bookplate of ‘William Busby’. Among the collections of Sir Charles Harding Firth (1857-1936), historian.

This MS volume discussed, and the second hand identified as Aphra Behn's, in Mary Ann O'Donnell, ‘A Verse Miscellany of Aphra Behn: Bodleian Library MS Firth c. 16’, EMS, 2 (1990), 189-218, with facsimile examples of the ‘title-page’, and of pp. 50, 119, 180, 226, 238, 261, 307. Also discussed by her in ‘Private jottings, public utterances: Aphra Behn's published writings and her commonplace book’, in Aphra Behn Studies, ed. Janet Todd (Cambridge, 1996), pp. 285-309.

p. 8

DoC 326.3: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Dorsetts Lamentation for Moll Howards Absence (‘Dorset no gentle Nimph can find’)

Copy.

Recorded in Harris, p. 55, as ‘obviously not by Dorset’.

pp. 13-15

EtG 100: Sir George Etherege, Mrs. Nelly's Complaint (‘If Sylla's ghost made bloody Catiline start’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Thorpe.

First published in Miscellaneous Works, Written by…Buckingham, Vol. I (London, 1704). Thorpe, pp. 62-4.

p. 29

DoC 125: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, My Opinion (‘After thinking this fortnight of Whig and of Tory’)

Copy, headed ‘The Opinion’ and here ascribed to ‘Dk B’ [Duke of Buckingham].

This MS collated in POAS and in Harris.

First published in Miscellaneous Works, Written by…George, late Duke of Buckingham (London, 1704-5). POAS, II (1965), 391-2. Harris, pp. 55-6.

pp. 55-6

EtG 73: Sir George Etherege, A Song on Basset (‘Let equipage and dress despair’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Thorpe.

First published (lines 1-16 only) in Choice Ayres and Songs, Fourth Book (London, 1683). Published complete in Lycidas (London, 1688). Thorpe, pp. 11-12.

pp. 68-9

DoC 255: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, To Mr. Bays (‘Thou mercenary renegade, thou slave’)

Copy, headed ‘A Sater to Mr Bayes’.

This MS collated in POAS and in Harris.

First published in J.R., Religio Laici, or A Layman's Faith ([London, 1688]). POAS, IV (1968), 79-80. Harris, pp. 18-20.

p. 86

EtG 26: Sir George Etherege, A Letter to Lord Middleton (‘From hunting whores and haunting play’)

Copy of lines 1-8, deleted.

This MS collated in Thorpe.

First published, as ‘Another from Sir G.E. to the E. of M--Greeting’, in The History of Adolphus (London, 1691). Thorpe, pp. 46-7.

pp. 102-3

DoC 256: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, To Mr. Bays (‘Thou mercenary renegade, thou slave’)

Second copy.

This MS collated in POAS and in Harris.

First published in J.R., Religio Laici, or A Layman's Faith ([London, 1688]). POAS, IV (1968), 79-80. Harris, pp. 18-20.

p. 103

BeA 18: Aphra Behn, Satyr on Dryden (‘Scorning religion all thy life time past’)

Copy, headed ‘Another on Mr Bays’.

See BeA 18-20.

pp. 130-4

DoC 319: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, The Deist: A Satyr on the Parsons (‘Religion's a politic law’)

Copy, headed ‘The Atheist’.

This MS recorded in Harris.

Unpublished. Discussed in Harris, pp. 189-90.

p. 135

DoC 107: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, The Innocent Conjugates or The Maiden Bridegroom and Virgin Bride (‘Inflam'd by love and led by blind desires’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Harris.

First published in Harris (1979), p. 176.

pp. 170-2

EtG 49: Sir George Etherege, Second Letter to Lord Middleton (‘Since love and verse, as well as wine’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Thorpe.

First published in The History of Adolphus (London, 1691). Thorpe, pp. 48-50.

pp. 172-3

EtG 27: Sir George Etherege, A Letter to Lord Middleton (‘From hunting whores and haunting play’)

Copy, headed ‘Sir George Etheredge to the Earl of Middleton Greeting’.

This MS collated in Thorpe.

First published, as ‘Another from Sir G.E. to the E. of M--Greeting’, in The History of Adolphus (London, 1691). Thorpe, pp. 46-7.

pp. 173-5

DrJ 203: John Dryden, To Sir George Etherege Mr. D.- Answer (‘To you who live in chill Degree’)

Copy.

First published at the end of The History of Adolphus (London, 1691). Kinsley, II, 578-80. California, III, 224-6. Hammond, III, 21-7. The Letterbook of Sir George Etherege, ed. Sybil Rosenfeld (London, 1928), pp. 346-8. Letters of Sir George Etherege, ed. Frederick Bracher (Berkeley, Los Angeles & London, 1974), pp. 270-2.

pp. 201-14

DoC 92: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, A Faithful Catalogue of our Most Eminent Ninnies (‘Curs'd be those dull, unpointed, doggerel rhymes’)

Copy.

This MS collated in POAS and in Harris.

First published in The Works of the Earls of Rochester, Roscommon, and Dorset (London, 1707). POAS, IV (1968), 189-214. Harris, pp. 136-67.

pp. 217-26

DoC 309: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Caesar's Ghost (‘'Twas still low ebb of night, when not a star’)

Copy, apparently in the hand of Aphra Behn.

Edited from this MS in Burrows & Love.

First published in The Muses Farewell to Poetry and Slavery (London, 1690), pp. 200-10. Lines 1-12 published, ascribed to ‘Dors’ [i.e. Charles Sackville, Earl of Dorset], in Edward Bysshe, Art of English Poetry, 2nd edition (London, 1705). Published complete, and attributed to Aphra Behn, in John Burrows and Harold Love, ‘Did Aphra Behn write “Cæsar's Ghost”?’, in The Culture of the Book: Essays from Two Hemispheres in honour of Wallace Kirsop, Bibliographical Society of Australia and New Zealand, occasional publication No. 8 (Melbourne, 1999), pp. 146-72 (poem on pp. 163-9). Also discussed in Harris, pp. 193-4.

pp. 243-5

DoC 65: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, The Duel (‘Of Clineas' and Dametas' sharper fight’)

Copy, headed ‘The Quarell’ and here beginning ‘Of Chineas & Dorinda’.

This MS collated in Harris.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State…Part III (London, 1698). Harris, pp. 21-4. This poem is part of a series by William Wharton and Robert Wolseley.

MS Firth d. 7

A transcript of two 17th-century verse MSS, the second a miscellany, 195 large quarto pages, in calf gilt. 19th century.

Once owned by F.W. Cosens, FSA (1819-89), of Clapham Park, book collector. Sotheby's, 25 July 1890 (Cosens sale), in lot 136. Among the collections of Sir Charles Harding Firth (1857-1936), historian.

ff. 60r-9r

CoR 25.5: Richard Corbett, A Certaine Poeme As it was presented in Latine by Divines and Others, before his Maiestye in Cambridge (‘It is not yet a fortnight, since’)

Copy, transcribed from CoR 40.

First published in Poëtica Stromata ([no place], 1648). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 12-18.

Some texts accompanied by an ‘Answer’ (‘A ballad late was made’).

ff. 121r-2r

CwT 1202.5: Thomas Carew, Vpon a Ribband (‘This silken wreath, which circles in mine arme’)

Copy, transcribed from CwT 1205.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 29.

f. 123r

CwT 168.8: Thomas Carew, Disdaine returned (‘Hee that loves a Rosie cheeke’)

Copy, transcribed from CwT 174.

First published (stanzas 1-2), in a musical setting, in Walter Porter, Madrigales and Ayres (London, 1632). Complete in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 18. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1653).

f. 124r

CwT 820.5: Thomas Carew, Song. Celia singing (‘Harke how my Celia, with the choyce’)

Copy, transcriibed from CwT 828.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 38.

ff. 125r-6r

CwT 1146.5: Thomas Carew, To T.H. a Lady resembling my Mistresse (‘Fayre copie of my Celia's face’)

Copy, transcribed from CwT 1150.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 26-7.

ff. 127r-8r

CoR 645.5: Richard Corbett, To the Lord Mordant upon his returne from the North (‘My Lord, I doe confesse, at the first newes’)

Copy, transcribed from CoR 649.

First published in Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 23-31.

ff. 135r-7r

CwT 1030.5: Thomas Carew, To Ben. Iohnson. Vpon occasion of his Ode of defiance annext to his Play of the new Inne (‘'Tis true (deare Ben:) thy just chastizing hand’)

Copy, transcribed from CwT 1031.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 64-5.

f. 138r

CoR 111.5: Richard Corbett, An Elegie vpon the Death of Sir Thomas Ouerbury Knight poysoned in the Tower (‘Hadst thou, like other Sirs and Knights of worth’)

Copy.

First published in Sir Thomas Overbury, A Wife, 9th impression (London, 1616). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 18-19.

ff. 138r-9r

CoR 115.5: Richard Corbett, An Elegie vpon the Death of Sir Thomas Ouerbury Knight poysoned in the Tower (‘Hadst thou, like other Sirs and Knights of worth’)

Copy, transcribed from CoR 121.

First published in Sir Thomas Overbury, A Wife, 9th impression (London, 1616). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 18-19.

ff. 146r-50r

RaW 151.5: Sir Walter Ralegh, The Lie (‘Goe soule the bodies guest’)

Copy, transcribed from RaW 161.

First published in Francis Davison, A Poetical Rapsodie (London 1611). Latham, pp. 45-7. Rudick, Nos 20A, 20B and 20C (three versions), with answers, pp. 30-45.

This poem is attributed to Richard Latworth (or Latewar) in Lefranc (1968), pp. 85-94, but see Stephen J. Greenblatt, Sir Walter Ralegh (New Haven & London, 1973), pp. 171-6. See also Karl Josef Höltgen, ‘Richard Latewar Elizabethan Poet and Divine’, Anglia, 89 (1971), 417-38 (p. 430). Latewar's ‘answer’ to this poem is printed in Höltgen, pp. 435-8. Some texts are accompanied by other answers.

f. 152r

RaW 392.5: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘ICUR, good Mounser Carr’

Copy, transcribed from RaW 404.

First published in Love-Poems and Humourous Ones, ed. Frederick J. Furnivall, The Ballad Society (Hertford, 1874; reprinted in New York, 1977), p. 20. Listed but not printed in Latham, p. 174. Rudick, No. 48, p. 121 (as ‘Sir Walter Raleigh to the Lord Carr’).

f. 157r

HoJ 190: John Hoskyns, Of Sr Tho. Gressam (‘Here lyes Gressam under the ground’)

Copy.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1605). Osborn, No. XIII (p. 171).

f. 167r

SdT 23.5: Thomas Shadwell, Bury-Fair. Song: I sent a fish

Copy of Oldwit's jocular verses, in a version beginning ‘In a dish came fish’.

First published in London, 1689. Jocular lines by Oldwit. Versions published in Ben Jonson, ed. Herford and Simpson, VIII (Oxford, 1947), pp. 424-5.

ff. 169r-70r

KiH 284.5: Henry King, An Epitaph on his most honour'd Freind Richard Earle of Dorset (‘Let no profane ignoble foot tread neere’)

Copy, transcribed from KiH 291.

First published, in an abridged version, in Certain Elegant Poems by Dr. Corbet (London, 1647). Poems (1657). Crum, pp. 67-8.

f. 172r

CoR 588.5: Richard Corbett, To the Ghost of Robert Wisdome (‘Thou, once a Body, now, but Aire’)

Copy, transcribed from CoR 591.

First published in Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, p. 75.

ff. 173r-7r

HrG 295: George Herbert, To the Queene of Bohemia (‘Bright soule, of whome if any countrey knowne’)

Copy, transcribed from HrG 298.

This MS recorded in Pebworth.

First published in Inedited Poetical Miscellanies 1584-1700, ed. W.C. Hazlitt ([London], 1870), pp. [186-92]. Hutchinson, pp. 211-13. Ted-Larry Pebworth, ‘George Herbert's Poems to the Queen of Bohemia: A Rediscovered Text and a New Edition’, ELR, 9/1 (Winter 1979), 108-20 (pp. 117-20). Herbert's authorship supported in Kenneth Alan Hovey, ‘George Herbert's Authorship of “To the Queene of Bohemia”’, RQ, 30/1 (Spring 1977), 43-50, and in Pebworth.

MS Firth e. 4

A small quarto verse miscellany, apparently a presentation MS, 133 pages (including blanks), plus index, in half-calf. Including twenty poems by Randolph, plus ten of doubtful authorship (some here ascribed to ‘T.R.’), in two hands (A: pp. 3-99; B: pp. 1, 99-129), with some scribbling and one heading in other hands on pp. 3, 98 and 133; a poem on p. 1 (beginning ‘Loe here a sett of paper=pilgrimes sent’) dedicatingthe collection [‘To ye] Incomparably vertuous Lady the Lady Harflette’: i.e. Afra (d.1664), wife of Sir Christopher Harflete of Canterbury. c.1640.

Among the collections of Sir Charles Harding Firth (1857-1936), historian.

Cited in IELM, II.ii (1993) as the Harflete MS: RnT Δ 2.

pp. 3-5

RaW 152: Sir Walter Ralegh, The Lie (‘Goe soule the bodies guest’)

Copy, headed ‘Sir Walter Rawley his Lye to ye Worlde’.

First published in Francis Davison, A Poetical Rapsodie (London 1611). Latham, pp. 45-7. Rudick, Nos 20A, 20B and 20C (three versions), with answers, pp. 30-45.

This poem is attributed to Richard Latworth (or Latewar) in Lefranc (1968), pp. 85-94, but see Stephen J. Greenblatt, Sir Walter Ralegh (New Haven & London, 1973), pp. 171-6. See also Karl Josef Höltgen, ‘Richard Latewar Elizabethan Poet and Divine’, Anglia, 89 (1971), 417-38 (p. 430). Latewar's ‘answer’ to this poem is printed in Höltgen, pp. 435-8. Some texts are accompanied by other answers.

p. 6

WoH 179: Sir Henry Wotton, Upon the Death of Sir Albert Morton's Wife (‘He first deceased. she for a little tried’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon a Man who dyed wth greife For his wife deceased’ and here beginning ‘The first deceased, he for a little tryed’.

First published as an independent couplet in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1636). Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 529. Hannah (1845), p. 44. The authorship is uncertain.

This couplet, which was subject to different versions over the years, is in fact lines 5-6 of a twelve-line poem beginning ‘Here lye two Bodyes happy in their kinds’, which has also been attributed to George Herbert: see HrG 290.5-290.8.

pp. 7-13

HeR 132: Robert Herrick, His age, dedicated to his peculiar friend, Master John Wickes, under the name of Posthumus (‘Ah Posthumus! Our yeares hence flye’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 132-6. Patrick, pp. 179-83.

pp. 14-17

HeR 264: Robert Herrick, The Welcome to Sack (‘So soft streams meet, so springs with gladder smiles’)

Copy, headed ‘Mr Hearick his welcome to Sack’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 77-9. Patrick, pp. 110-12.

pp. 18-19

HeR 117: Robert Herrick, The fare-well to Sack (‘Farewell thou Thing, time-past so knowne, so deare’)

Copy, headed ‘Mr Hearick his farwell to Sacke’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Recreations for Ingenious Head-peeces (London, 1645). Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 45-6. Patrick, pp. 62-3.

pp. 20-2

HeR 337: Robert Herrick, King Oberon his Cloathing (‘When the monethly horned Queene’)

Copy, headed ‘Oberon attired’.

This MS collated in Farmer.

First published, as ‘A Description of the King of Fayries Clothes’ and attributed to Sir Simeon Steward, in A Description of the King and Queene of Fayries (London, 1634). Musarum Deliciae (London, 1656), p. 32. Attributed to Herrick in Hazlitt, II, 473-7, and in Norman K. Farmer, Jr., ‘Robert Herrick and “King Oberon's Clothing”: New Evidence for Attribution’, Yearbook of English Studies 1 (1971), 68-77. Not included in Martin or in Patrick. See also T.G.S. Cain, ‘Robert Herrick, Mildmay Fane, and Sir Simeon Steward’, ELR, 15 (1985), 312-17.

pp. 23-5

HeR 178: Robert Herrick, Oberons Feast (‘A Little mushroome table spred’)

Copy, headed ‘Oberon his Banquet’ and without the preliminary lines.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published complete, with six preliminary lines beginning ‘Shapcot! To thee the Fairy State’, in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 119-20. Patrick, pp. 161-3. An earlier version, entitled ‘A Description of his Dyet’, published in A Description of the King and Queene of Fayries (London, 1634). Martin, pp. 454-5.

p. 25

JnB 452: Ben Jonson, Song. To Celia (‘Drinke to me, onely, with thine eyes’)

Copy, subscribed ‘B: J:’.

This MS collated in Herford & Simpson.

First published in The Forrest (ix) in Workes (London, 1616). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 106.

pp. 26-9

RnT 122: Thomas Randolph, A gratulatory to Mr. Ben. Johnson for his adopting of him to be his Son (‘I was not borne to Helicon, nor dare’)

Copy, headed ‘T. Randolph his gratulatory to B: J: vpon his adoption’.

This MS recorded in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 40-2.

pp. 29-30

RnT 369: Thomas Randolph, Upon the losse of his little finger (‘Arithmetique nine digits, and no more’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon the losse of a finger’, subscribed ‘T. R’.

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 56-7.

pp. 30-5

JnB 370: Ben Jonson, Ode to himselfe (‘Come leaue the lothed stage’)

Copy, headed ‘B. J: his discontented Soliloquye Vpon ye Censure of his Play called ye new inne, answered by T: R:’, here beginnning ‘Ben leaue ye stage’, and each stanza alternating with Randolph's ‘answer’.

This MS collated in Davis.

First published, with the heading ‘The iust indignation the Author tooke at the vulgar censure of his Play, by some malicious spectators, begat this following Ode to himselfe’, in The New Inn (London, 1631). Herford & Simpson, VI, 492-4.

pp. 30-5

RnT 21: Thomas Randolph, An answer to Mr Ben Johnson's Ode to perswade him not to leave the stage (‘Ben doe not leave the stage’)

Copy, headed ‘B. J. his discontented Soliloquye Vpon ye censure of his Play called ye new Inne, answered by T: R:’ and here beginning ‘Ben, doe not leaue ye stage’, each stanza alternating with Jonson's original ‘ode’.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 82-4. Davis, pp. 63-76.

For the poem by Ben Jonson, which appears with Randolph's ‘answer’ in many of the MSS, see JnB 367-81.

pp. 35-9

RnT 37: Thomas Randolph, The Character of a perfect Woman (‘Apelles curious eye must gaze upon’)

Copy, headed ‘The character of a perfect Woman. T: R:’.

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Parry (1917), pp. 220-3. Thorn-Drury, pp. 165-7.

pp. 40-1

RnT 92: Thomas Randolph, An Elegie (‘Love, give me leave to serve thee, and be wise’)

Copy, headed ‘A True Mistresse. T: R:’.

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 66-7.

pp. 42-3

RnT 412: Thomas Randolph, A Wronged Mistresse to a False Seruant (‘False man whose best religion hath but bin’)

Copy, ascribed to ‘T: R:’.

Edited from this MS in Moore Smith and in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Moore Smith (1925), pp. 253-4. Thorn-Drury, pp. 162-3.

pp. 43-51

RnT 267: Thomas Randolph, A Pastorall Courtship (‘Behold these woods, and mark my Sweet’)

Copy, headed ‘A Pastorall: T: R.’

This MS collated in part in Thorn-Drury and also in Davis.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 109-15. Davis, pp. 77-91.

p. 51

JnB 276: Ben Jonson, The Houre-glasse (‘Doe but consider this small dust’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Consider the dust moving in this glass’.

This MS collated in Herford & Simpson.

First published in John Benson's 4to edition of Jonson's poems (1640) and in The Vnder-wood (viii) in Workes (London, 1640). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 148-9.

pp. 51-2

CwT 266: Thomas Carew, A flye that flew into my Mistris her eye (‘When this Flye liv'd, she us'd to play’)

Copy, headed ‘T: R: his Answere’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 37-9. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in The Treasury of Musick, Book 2 (London, 1669).

pp. 52-7

HeR 191: Robert Herrick, Oberons Palace (‘Full as a Bee with Thyme, and Red’)

Copy, headed ‘Oberon his Pallace: by Mr Herrick’ and without the preliminary lines.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, with eight preliminary lines beginning ‘After the Feast (my Shapcot) see’, in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 165-8. Patrick, pp. 222-5.

pp. 57-60

RnT 329: Thomas Randolph, Upon a very deformed Gentlewoman, but of a voice incomparably sweet (‘I chanc'd sweet Lesbia's voice to heare’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon ye hearing of a deformed Woman, sing sweetly. T: R’.

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury and in Davis.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 115-17. Davis, pp. 92-105.

pp. 60-5

RnT 81: Thomas Randolph, An Eglogue on the noble Assemblies revived on Cotswold Hills, by M. Robert Dover (‘What Clodpates, Thenot, are our Brittish swains’)

Copy, headed ‘An Eglogue Vpon ye Pallalia: at Cotswold hill’.

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Matthew Walbancke, Annalia Dvbrensia. Vpon the yeerely celebration of Mr. Robert Dovers Olimpick Games vpon Cotswold-Hills (London, 1636). Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 118-23.

pp. 66-9

RnT 75: Thomas Randolph, An Eglogue occasion'd by two Doctors disputing upon predestination (‘Ho jolly Thirsis whither in such hast?’)

Copy, headed ‘An Eglogue’, subscribed ‘T: R:’.

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 101-4.

p. 69

FeO 65: Owen Felltham, This ensuing Copy the late Printer hath been pleased to honour, by mistaking it among those of the most ingenious and too early lost, Sir John Suckling (‘When, dearest, I but think on thee’)

Copy, ascribed to ‘T. R.’

Fitst published in The Last Remains of Sr John Suckling (London, 1659), pp. 32-3. Lusoria (London, 1661). Pebworth & Summers, pp. 48-9.

pp. 69-71

FeO 66: Owen Felltham, To the Lady D.S. (‘Madam, / I would but praise, not flatter: yet’)

Copy, headed ‘To his Mrs’, ascribed to ‘T. R.’.

This MS cited in Pebworth & Summers.

First published in Lusoria (London, 1661). Pebworth & Summers, pp. 4-5.

pp. 71-2

JnB 543: Ben Jonson, To the Same (‘Kisse me, sweet: The warie louer’)

Copy, headed ‘Catullus ad Lesbiam’, ascribed to ‘B. J.’

This MS collated in Herford & Simpson.

Lines 19-22 first published in Volpone, III, vii, 236-9 (London, 1607). Published complete in The Forrest (vi) in Workes (London, 1616). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 103.

pp. 72-3

B&F 116: Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher, The Nice Valour, III, iii, 36-4. Song (‘Hence, all you vain delights’)

Copy of the song, headed ‘A Sonnett’.

Bowers, VII, 468-9. This song first published in A Description of the King and Queene of Fayries (London, 1634). Thomas Middleton, The Collected Works, general editors Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (Oxford, 2007), pp. 1698-9.

For William Strode's answer to this song (which has sometimes led to both songs being attributed to Strode) see StW 641-663.

pp. 73-4

JnB 156: Ben Jonson, Eupheme. or, The Faire Fame Left to Posteritie Of that truly noble Lady, the Lady Venetia Digby. 3. The Picture of the Body (‘Sitting, and ready to be drawne’)

Copy, headed ‘A Sonnett’.

This MS collated in Herford & Simpson.

First published (Nos. 3 and 4) in John Benson's 4to edition of Jonson's poems (1640) and (all poems) in The Vnder-wood (lxxxiv) in Workes (London, 1640). Herford & Simpson, VIII, 272-89 (pp. 275-7).

pp. 75-82

HeR 167: Robert Herrick, A Nuptiall Song, or Epithalamie, on Sir Clipseby Crew and his Lady (‘What's that we see from far?’)

Copy of a nineteen-stanza version, headed ‘Epithalamium’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 112-16. Patrick, pp. 154-8.

pp. 82-3

RnT 314: Thomas Randolph, To one admiring her selfe in a Looking-Glasse (‘Faire Lady when you see the Grace’)

Copy, headed ‘On his Mistresse admiring herselfe in a lookinglasse’, subscribed ‘T: R.’

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 99-100.

p. 83

RnT 33: Thomas Randolph, Ausonii Epigram 38 (‘Shee which would not I would choose’)

Copy, subscribed ‘T: R:’.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 92-3.

pp. 84-6

RnT 205: Thomas Randolph, On six maids bathing themselves in a River (‘When bashfull day-light now was gone’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon 6: Wenches washing Them selues in Cambridge riuer. June 25: 1629’, subscribed ‘T: R:’.

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury and in Davis.

First published in Poems, 2nd edition (1640). Thorn-Drury, pp. 138-40. Davis, pp. 56-62.

pp. 86-8

CwT 742: Thomas Carew, A Song (‘Aske me no more whether doth stray’)

Copy, headed ‘A Sonnett’.

First published in a five-stanza version beginning ‘Aske me no more where Iove bestowes’ in Poems (1640) and in Poems: by Wil. Shake-speare, Gent. (London, 1640), and edited in this version in Dunlap, pp. 102-3. Musical setting by John Wilson published in Cheerful Ayres or Ballads (Oxford, 1659). All MS versions recorded in CELM, except where otherwise stated, begin with the second stanza of the published version (viz. ‘Aske me no more whether doth stray’).

For a plausible argument that this poem was actually written by William Strode, see Margaret Forey, ‘Manuscript Evidence and the Author of “Aske me no more”: William Strode, not Thomas Carew’, EMS, 12 (2005), 180-200. See also Scott Nixon, ‘“Aske me no more” and the Manuscript Verse Miscellany’, ELR, 29/1 (Winter 1999), 97-130, which edits and discusses MSS of this poem and also suggests that it may have been written by Strode.

p. 88

RnT 254: Thomas Randolph, On the Passion of Christ (‘What rends the temples vail, where is day gone?’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon Good Fryday’, subscribed ‘T: R:’.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, p. 57. This poem is the ‘Englished’ version of Latin verses beginning ‘Quid templum abscindit? quo luxque diesque recessit’, printed in Thorn-Drury, pp. 178-9.

pp. 93-4

RnT 478: Thomas Randolph, Hobson and Charon (‘Charon, come hither Charon. What art thou’)

Copy, ascribed to Randolph.

Edited from this MS in Moore Smith (1927).

Published, and attributed to Randolph, in Moore Smith (1927), pp. 96-7.

pp. 101-3

ClJ 112: John Cleveland, Square-Cap (‘Come hither Apollo's bouncing Girle’)

Copy, headed ‘Cleevelands square Cappe’.

First published in The Character of a London-Diurnall, with severall select Poems by the same Author (1647). Morris & Withington, pp. 43-5.

p. 103

BrW 153: William Browne of Tavistock, On One Drowned in the Snow (‘Within a fleece of silent waters drown'd’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon one yt was drown'd in ye snow at Christ=Church jn Oxford’.

First published in Wits Recreations (London, 1640). Brydges (1815), p. 76. Goodwin, II, 290.

p. 103

RnT 486: Thomas Randolph, On Feild and Day standing for the Procteourshippe (‘Fortune contended whether she should yeeld’)

Copy.

First published in A Crew of Kind London Gossips (London, 1663).

p. 105

CwT 1077: Thomas Carew, To Mris Katherine Nevill on her greene sicknesse (‘White innocence that now lies spread’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon one haueinge ye greene sicknesse’.

First published in Musarum Deliciae (London, 1655). Dunlap. p. 129.

pp. 106-7

ClJ 41: John Cleveland, A Faire Nimph scorning a Black Boy Courting her (‘Stand off, and let me take the aire’)

Copy, headed ‘The faire Maide to ye blacke Boy’, subscribed ‘J. C.’

First published in Character (1647). Morris & Withington, pp. 22-3.

p. 109

RnT 360: Thomas Randolph, Upon his Picture (‘When age hath made me what I am not now’)

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, p. 79.

pp. 109-10

RnT 327: Thomas Randolph, TR upon his dead ffreinds picture (‘George, in this peice something like thee I spie’)

Edited from this MS in Moore Smith and in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Moore Smith (1925), pp. 249-50. Thorn-Drury, p. 158.

p. 110

BrW 114: William Browne of Tavistock, On Mrs. Anne Prideaux, Daughter of Mr. Doctor Prideaux, Regius Professor (‘Nature in this small volume was about’)

Copy, headed ‘On a Gentlewoman’.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1636). Wits Recreations (London, 1640). Facetiæ (London, 1655). Osborn, No. XLIV (p. 213), ascribed to John Hoskyns.

p. 111

KiH 42: Henry King, The Boy's answere to the Blackmore (‘Black Mayd, complayne not that I fly’)

Copy, headed ‘The Answer’.

This MS recorded in Crum.

First published in The Academy of Complements (London, 1646). Poems (1657). Crum, p. 151. The text almost invariably preceded, in both printed and MS versions, by (variously headed) ‘A Blackmore Mayd wooing a faire Boy: sent to the Author by Mr. Hen. Rainolds’ (‘Stay, lovely Boy, why fly'st thou mee’). Musical settings by John Wilson in Henry Lawes, Select Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1669).

pp. 111-12

RnT 584: Thomas Randolph, Verse upon the death of Mr. Harrison, Vice-Master of Trinity College (‘If virtue, honour, truth and fame’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Moore Smith (1925).

Published, and attributed to Randolph, in Moore Smith (1925), pp. 255-6.

pp. 112-14

RnT 186: Thomas Randolph, On Importunate Dunnes (‘Poxe take you all, from you my sorrowes swell’)

Copy, headed ‘Mr Randolph on his Dunn’.

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Poems, 2nd edition (1640). Thorn-Drury, pp. 131-4.

pp. 114-15

CwT 821: Thomas Carew, Song. Celia singing (‘Harke how my Celia, with the choyce’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon a Gentlewoman singing, and playing’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 38.

p. 115

RnT 368: Thomas Randolph, Upon Hobson the Carrier (‘Charon take Hobsons ghost and let it passe’)

Copy, headed ‘T. R.’

Edited from this MS in Moore Smith and in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Moore Smith (1927), p. 112. Thorn-Drury, p. 159.

p. 115

RnT 530: Thomas Randolph, A Paralell twixt Tobacco pipes and weomen (‘Tobacco-pipes and maids are brittle ware’)

Copy, ascribed to ‘T. R.’.

Unpublished?

p. 116

StW 776: William Strode, Song (‘I saw faire Cloris walke alone’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon a Gentlewoman in ye snow’, subscribed ‘T. R.’

First published in Walter Porter, Madrigales and Ayres (London, 1632). Dobell, p. 41. Forey, pp. 76-7. The poem also discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Notes on some Poems attributed to William Strode’, PQ, 34 (1955), 444-8 (pp. 445-6), and see Mary Hobbs, ‘Early Seventeenth-Century Verse Miscellanies and Their Value for Textual Editors’, EMS, 1 (1989), 182-210 (pp. 199, 209).

p. 116

CwT 574: Thomas Carew, A prayer to the Wind (‘Goe thou gentle whispering wind’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon a sigh’, subscribed ‘T. R.’

First published in Poems (1640) and in Poems: written by Wil. Shake-speare, Gent. (London, 1640). Dunlap, pp. 11-12.

p. 116

RnT 447: Thomas Randolph, ‘As Chloris warm'd her by the fire’

Copy, ascribed to ‘T. R.’

By Thomas Philipott. Numerous largely anonymous MS copies exist.

p. 117

FeO 26: Owen Felltham, A Farewell (‘When by sad fate from hence I summon'd am’)

Copy, headed ‘On a Lovers absence’.

This MS cited in Pebworth & Summers.

First published in Lusoria (London, 1661). Pebworth & Summers, p. 18.

pp. 117-19

CwT 646: Thomas Carew, A Rapture (‘I will enjoy thee now my Celia, come’)

Copy, here beginning ‘I will embrace ye now my dearest come’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 49-53.

pp. 119-20

CwT 73: Thomas Carew, The Comparison (‘Dearest thy tresses are not threads of gold’)

Copy, headed ‘To his Mrs’.

First published in Poems (1640), and lines 1-10 also in Wits Recreations (London, 1640). Dunlap, pp. 98-9.

pp. 120-1

RnT 18: Thomas Randolph, Annagram: Virtue alone thy Blisse (‘Descent of birth is a vaine good’)

Copy, headed ‘An Anagr: vpon his Mris name. Vertue alone thy blisse’, subscribed ‘T. R.’

This MS recorded in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Hazlitt (1875). Thorn-Drury, pp. 168-9.

p. 121

KiH 650: Henry King, Sonnet. The Double Rock (‘Since Thou hast view'd some Gorgon, and art grow'n’)

Copy, headed ‘A Sonnet’.

This MS recorded in Crum.

First published in Poems (1657). Crum, pp. 167-8.

pp. 121-2

CwT 520: Thomas Carew, On sight of a Gentlewomans face in the water (‘Stand still you floods, doe not deface’)

Copy, headed ‘On seing his Mrs face in the water’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 102.

pp. 122-8

RnT 238: Thomas Randolph, On the Inestimable Content He Injoyes in the Muses, To those of his Friends that dehort him from Poetry (‘Goe sordid earth, and hope not to bewitch’)

Copy, ascribed to ‘T. R.’

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 23-8.

pp. 128-9

RnT 585: Thomas Randolph, Verses spoken by the two daughters of the truly vertuous Mrs. Br: Sk: at the solemnization of the Annuall Nuptialls of the Right Noble Sr R. Cooke and his Lady Theophila (‘Madam, by us the genial gods do greet you’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Moore Smith (1927).

Published, and attributed to Randolph, in Moore Smith (1927), pp. 118-19.

pp. 130-2

RnT 121: Thomas Randolph, An Epithalamium (‘Muse be a bride-maid, dost not heare’)

Copy, headed ‘An Epithal: on his honored ffreind Mr Hunt’, subscribed ‘T. R.’

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 54-6.

pp. 132-3

RnT 103: Thomas Randolph, An Elegie upon the Lady Venetia Digby (‘Death, who'ld not change prerogatives with thee’)

Copy, headed ‘An Elegy vpon ye incomparablely beautyous Lady Maddam Venetia Digby’ and omitting the epitaph, subscribed ‘T. R’.

This MS collated in Thorn-Drury.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 52-3.

MS Firth e. 6

A quarto miscellany of largely Jacobite poems on affairs of state, x + 187 leaves, in red morocco gilt. c.1688-91.

Later owned by F.W. Cosens (1819-89), book collector. Sotheby's, 25 July 1890 (Cosens sale), in lot 93. Afterwards owned by William Hayman Cummings, FSA (1831-1915), singer and musical antiquary. Among the collections of Sir Charles Harding Firth (1857-1936), historian.

f. 60r-v

DrJ 187.5: John Dryden, Song By Mr Dryden, in the Person of my Lord Salisbury, then in the Tower (‘While Europe is alarmed with wars’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Hammond.

First published, in a musical setting by Robert King, in Comes Amoris (London, 1689), pp. 6-7. Hammond, III, 452-3. Also published and discussed in Paul Hammond, ‘A Song Attributed to Dryden’, The Library, 21/1 (March 1999), 59-66, and in Martin Holmes, ‘A Song Attributed to Dryden: A Postscript’, The Library, NS 2/1 (March 2001), 65-8.

f. 61r

DrJ 224: John Dryden, Upon the Death of the Viscount Dundee (‘O Last and best of Scots! who didst maintain’)

Copy.

This MS collated in California.

First published in Poetical Miscellanies: The Fifth Part (London, 1704). Poems on Affairs of State…Part III (London, 1704). Kinsley, IV, 1777. California, III, 222. Hammond, III, 219.

ff. 69v-71av

DrJ 137: John Dryden, Prologue To The Prophetess. Spoken by Mr. Betterton (‘What Nostradame, with all his Art can guess’)

Copy.

This MS collated in California.

First published in Thomas Betterton, The Prophetess: or, The History of Dioclesian (London, 1690). Poems on Affairs of State, Part III (London, 1698). Kinsley, II, 556-7. California, III, 255-6. Hammond, III, 231-4.

ff. 95v-104v

SdT 13: Thomas Shadwell, A Poem on His Majesty's Happy Accession to the Crown (‘Sweet as short Slumber to a troubled Mind’)

Copy, including dedicatory epistle satirically attributed to John Dryden, subscribed ‘This Mock-Apology and Poem are said to be writ by Mr Shadwel’.

First published in Poems on Affairs of State…Part III (London, 1698). Summers, V, 353-8.

ff. 119v-22v

DoC 310: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, The Conditional Recantation or A Dialogue between the Oracle of St. Patrick and King James After his Abdication (‘If both the Indies were my own’)

Copy.

This MS recorded in Harris.

Unpublished. Discussed in Harris, p. 187.

Godwyn folio 276

Copy, headed ‘A translation of Horace his 10th Ode of ye second booke ab Licinium’, on a leaf inserted after p. 476 in a printed exemplum of Arcadia (London, 1598). 17th century.

SiP 34: Sir Philip Sidney, Certain Sonnets, Sonnet 12 (‘You better sure shall live, not evermore’)

Ringler, pp. 142-3.

MS Gough Cambridge 36

A folio volume, comprising ‘A Collection of Lives out of Fuller's Worthies, other authors, &c., to be inserted in the second vol. of my Athenæ Cantabrigienses M D M’, compiled by Morris Drake Morris (1695-c.1733), biographer, 133 leaves, including numerous blanks, plus an index. c.1720s.

FuT 5.265: Thomas Fuller, The History of the Worthies of England

First published in London, 1662.

Gough Cambridge 98

A composite volume of printed works and MSS.

Among the collections of Richard Gough, FSA (1735-1809), antiquary and topographer.

at end

CoR 33: Richard Corbett, A Certaine Poeme As it was presented in Latine by Divines and Others, before his Maiestye in Cambridge (‘It is not yet a fortnight, since’)

Copy on a single folio leaf. c.1630.

First published in Poëtica Stromata ([no place], 1648). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 12-18.

Some texts accompanied by an ‘Answer’ (‘A ballad late was made’).

MS Gough Gen. Top. 1

Copy of Leland's The Itinerary, in two hands, iv + 804 folio pages. Late 17th-early 18th century.

Among the collections of Richard Gough, FSA (1735-1809), antiquary and topographer

This MS recorded in Smith, I, xxix.

The MS as a whole

LeJ 62: John Leland, The Itinerary of John Leland [Burton transcript]

Copy of five ‘parts’, transcribed from William Burton's scribal transcript (LeJ 61).

[unspecified page numbers]

LeJ 93: John Leland, The Laboryouse Journey and Serche of Johan Leylande for Englandes Antiquitees

Copy, transcribed from LeJ 92.

This MS recorded in Smith, I, xxix.

First published in London, 1549, ed. John Bale.

MS Gough Gen. Top. 2

A folio composite volume of transcripts of Leland's works, xvi + 276 pages, some imperfect, partly gnawed by rodents, in old marbled boards. Made largely by William Burton (1575-1645), Leicestershire antiquary, with some original gaps supplied in another hand, entitled (f. xir) ‘The Itinerarye of john Leiland the famous Antiquarie / The first part copied out of the original: 1628: by me William Burton of Lindley com: Leic:’, with the dedicatory epistle to Henry VIII. [1628-41].

Inscribed (f. ixr) ‘Liber Willimi Burton de Lindley com: Leicestr. 1628’. Given by Thomas Allen, Lord of the Manor of Finchley, in June 1758, to William Stukely (1687-1765), antiquary and natural philosopher. Among the collections of Richard Gough, FSA (1735-1809), antiquary and topographer.

The MS as a whole

LeJ 91: John Leland, The Laboryouse Journey and Serche of Johan Leylande for Englandes Antiquitees

Copy, transcribed by Burton from Leland's autograph MS.

This MS recorded in Smith, I, xxv.

First published in London, 1549, ed. John Bale.

pp. 1-156, 224-8, 241-52

LeJ 60: John Leland, The Itinerary of John Leland [Burton transcript]

Burton's copy of five ‘parts’.

This MS recorded in Smith, I, xxv.

pp. 157-62, 165

LeJ 25: John Leland, Collectanea [Burton transcript]

Extracts, transcribed by Burton from Leland's autograph MS.

This MS recorded in Smith, I, xxv-xxvii.

MS Gough Gen. Top. 10

A folio composite volume of antiquarian tracts, in English and Latin, in various hands, ii + 93 leaves, in marbled boards.

Once owned by Thomas Martin (1697-1771), of Palgrave, antiquary and collector (No. 4556 in the 1773 catalogue of his books). Among the collections of Richard Gough, FSA (1735-1809), antiquary and topographer.

f. 2r

CtR 549: Sir Robert Cotton, Miscellaneous

Copy of the ending, in a professional hand, imperfect, all the beginning excised. c.1630.

ff. 2v-4v

CtR 54: Sir Robert Cotton, The Antiquitye and Offyce of Earle Marshall of England, Written by Sr Robte Cotton, knight, and Baronett

Copy, in a professional hand, imperfect, the lower half of f. 2 excised. c.1630.

Tract beginning ‘The plentye of this discourse, the last question of Highe Connstables, whereto...’. Hearne (1771), II, 97-103.

ff. 5r-9r

CtR 219: Sir Robert Cotton, A Discourse Of the Antiquitye, and Offyce of the Earle Marshall of England, written by Sr Robte Cotton, knight, Att the request of the Lord Henrye Howard, Earle of Northampton [25 November 1602]

Copy, in a professional hand. c.1630.

A dedicatory epistle beginning ‘Sir, Yor small tyme, I must Ballance, wth as sclendr Aunswere...’ followed by a tract beginning ‘Because the Jurisdiction att the Comon Lawe was vncertayne...’.

ff. 10r-13r

CmW 24: William Camden, The Antiquity and Office of the Earl Marshall of England

Copy, in a professional hand. c.1630.

A tract beginning ‘Such is the vncertainety of etimologyes...’ and sometimes entitled in manuscripts ‘The Etymology, Antiquity and Office of the Earl Marshall of England’. First published, as ‘Commentarius de etymologia, antiquitate, & officio Comitis Marescalli Angliae’, in Camdeni epistolae (London, 1691), Appendix, pp. 87-93. Hearne (1771), II, 90-7.

MS Gough Gen. Top 34-36

The MSS for Richard Gough's edition of Britannia in English (1789), almost entirely in Gough's hand, dated 1771-82, in three volumes, 648, 680 and iii + 609 leaves respectively. 1771-82.

CmW 13.6: William Camden, Britannia

First published in London, 1586, with additions in 1607 and successive editions.

MS Gough Gen. Top 51

Exemplum of the printed edition of 1607 with notes in the hand of Thomas Gale (1635?-1702) and Richard Gough (1735-1809). 1607.

CmW 13.7: William Camden, Britannia

First published in London, 1586, with additions in 1607 and successive editions.

MS Gough Gen. Top 53

An exemplum of the printed edition of 1607 with annotations made by one Dr Mason. 17th century.

CmW 13.8: William Camden, Britannia

First published in London, 1586, with additions in 1607 and successive editions.

MS Gough Gen. Top 60-1

An exemplum of the printed edition of Britannia (1607) with Richard Gough's extensive annotations. c.1789.

CmW 13.9: William Camden, Britannia

First published in London, 1586, with additions in 1607 and successive editions.

MS Gough Gen. Top 140-3

An exemplum of the printed edition of Britannia (1607) with Richard Gough's extensive annotations. With Gough's extensive annotations. c.1789.

CmW 13.11: William Camden, Britannia

First published in London, 1586, with additions in 1607 and successive editions.

MS Gough Gen. Top 167

An exemplum of the printed edition of 1637, with annotations in possibly several hands. Mid-late 17th century.

CmW 102.4: William Camden, Remaines of a Greater Worke concerning Britaine

Inscribed on a flyleaf ‘T Balldwyn prtium 3s’ and ‘used by Mr Sumner’, and, on p. 420, ‘Robert Elwis’.

First published, dedicated to Sir Robert Cotton, in London, 1605. 2nd edition (with additions) London, 1614. 3rd edition (with a few further additions) London, 1623. Edited by R.D. Dunn (Toronto, Buffalo & London, 1984).

For individual essays in Remaines, see under separate titles.

MS Gough Gen. Top 170

An exemplum of the printed quarto edition of 1614, with annotations by William Cole (1714-82). 18th century.

CmW 102.5: William Camden, Remaines of a Greater Worke concerning Britaine

Inscribed on the title-page ‘R. Spence’.

First published, dedicated to Sir Robert Cotton, in London, 1605. 2nd edition (with additions) London, 1614. 3rd edition (with a few further additions) London, 1623. Edited by R.D. Dunn (Toronto, Buffalo & London, 1984).

For individual essays in Remaines, see under separate titles.

MS Gough Gen. Top 372-3

An exemplum of the printed edition of Britannia (1607) with Richard Gough's extensive annotations. c.1789.

CmW 13.12: William Camden, Britannia

First published in London, 1586, with additions in 1607 and successive editions.

MS Gough Herts. 3

MS of John Shrimpton's History of St Albans. c.1640.

f. 56r

SpE 23.5: Edmund Spenser, The Ruines of Time (‘It chaunced me on day beside the shore’)

Copy of lines 36-42.

First published in Complaints (London, 1591). Variorum, Minor Poems, II, 35-56.

f. 79r

DrM 46.2: Michael Drayton, Poly-Olbion

Quotations.

First published in London, 1612. 1622. Hebel, IV.

See also DrM 74.

MS Gough Ireland 2

Copy, closely written in a non-professional secretary hand, iv + 64 leaves (plus five blanks), in quarter-calf marbled boards. With a lengthy title-page (f. ivr), ‘Ireland's survey, or A Historical Dialogue & View of ancient & modern times...with many other matters...worthy of observation to ye Judicious Reader...’ and headed (f. 1r) ‘A View of ye prsent state of Ireland, by way of Dialogue’. 1596-early 17th century.

SpE 46: Edmund Spenser, A View of the Present State of Ireland

Among the collections of Richard Gough, FSA (1735-1809), antiquary and topographer, and inscribed by him (f. 1r) ‘R. G. ex lib. G. Scott, 1781’.

This MS collated in Variorum.

First published in Sir James Ware, The Historie of Ireland (Dublin, 1633). Variorum, Prose Works (ed. Rudolf Gottfried), pp. 39-231.

Spenser's authorship of this ‘View’ is generally accepted, especially in light of the comparable views about Ireland in The Faerie Queene. A cautionary note about authorship is sounded, however, in Jean R. Brink, ‘Constructing the View of the Present State of Ireland’, Spenser Studies, 11 (1994), 203-28; in her ‘Appropriating the Author of The Faerie Queene: The Attribution of the View of the Present State of Ireland and A Brief Note of Ireland to Edmund Spenser’, in Soundings of Things Done: Essays in Early Modern Literature in Honor of S.K. Heninger, Jr., ed. Peter E. Medine and Joseph Wittreich (Newark, Delaware, 1997), 93-136. See also, inter alia, Andrew Hadfield, ‘Certainties and Uncertainties: By Way of Response to Jean Brink’, Spenser Studies, 12 (1998), 197-202, and Jean R. Brink, ‘Spenser and the Irish Question: Reply to Andrew Hadfield’, Spenser Studies, 13 (1999), 265-6.

MS Gough London 8

A folio volume of historical material relating to London, iv + 112 leaves. Late 16th century.

f. 13v et seq.

FxJ 1.2: John Foxe, Actes and Monuments

Extracts, together with extracts from Holinshed's Chronicles, with a preliminary table of contents.

First published (complete) in London, 1563. Edited by Josiah Pratt, 8 vols (London, 1853-70).

MS Gough London 14

An octavo composite volume of MS and printed tracts, in Latin and English, iii + 338 leaves.

Among the collections of Richard Gough, FSA (1735-1809), antiquary and topographer.

ff. 44r-50r

MaA 327: Andrew Marvell, The Second Advice to a Painter (‘Nay, Painter, if thou dar'st design that fight’)

Numerous MS alterations in the text of a printed exemplum of Directions to a Painter ([London], 1667).

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 34-53. Lord, pp. 117-30. Smith, pp. 332-43. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 28-32, as anonymous.

The case for Marvell's authorship supported in George deF. Lord, ‘Two New Poems by Marvell?’, BNYPL, 62 (1958), 551-70, but see also discussion by Lord and Ephim Fogel in Vol. 63 (1959), 223-36, 292-308, 355-66. Marvell's authorship supported in Annabel Patterson, ‘The Second and Third Advices-to-the-Painter’, PBSA, 71 (1977), 473-86. Discussed also in Margoliouth, I, 348-50, and in Chernaik, p. 211, where Marvell's authorship is considered doubtful. A case for Sir John Denham's authorship is made in Brendan O Hehir, Harmony from Discords: A Life of Sir John Denham (Berkeley & Los Angeles, 1968), pp. 212-28.

ff. 50v-8r

MaA 369: Andrew Marvell, The Third Advice to a Painter (‘Sandwich in Spain now, and the Duke in love’)

Numerous MS alterations to the printed text.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 67-87. Lord, pp. 130-44. Smith, pp. 346-56. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 32-3, as anonymous.

See discussions of the disputed authorship of this poem, as well as of the ‘Second Advice’, cited before MaA 314.

ff. 58v-60v

MaA 398: Andrew Marvell, The Fourth Advice to a Painter (‘Draw England ruin'd by what was giv'n before’)

Numerous MS alterations to the printed text.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 140-6, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 33-5, as anonymous. Regarded as anonymous in Margoliouth, I, 348-50.

ff. 61r-3v

MaA 427: Andrew Marvell, The Fifth Advice to a Painter (‘Painter, where was't thy former work did cease?’)

Numerous MS alterations to the printed text.

First published in Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). POAS, I, 146-52, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 35-6, as anonymous. Regarded as anonymous in Margoliouth, I, 348-50.

ff. 64r-6v

MaA 131: Andrew Marvell, Clarindon's House-Warming (‘When Clarindon had discern'd beforehand’)

Numerous MS alterations to the printed text.

Edited from this text in Margoliouth. Collated in POAS, I

First published with Directions to a Painter…Of Sir John Denham ([London], 1667). Margoliouth, I, 143-6. POAS, I, 88-96. Lord, pp. 144-51. Smith, pp. 358-61.

f. 66v

MaA 293: Andrew Marvell, Upon his House (‘Here lies the sacred Bones’)

Numerous MS alterations to the printed text.

Edited from this text in Margoliouth.

First published with Directions to a Painter…Of Sir Iohn Denham ([London], 1667). Margoliouth, I, 146-7. Rejected from the canon by Lord and also by Chernaik, p. 211.

MS Gough maps 44

A large double-folio album containing some 349 antiquarian engravings, drawings, and other items, in diced calf gilt.

Among the collections of Richard Gough, FSA (1735-1809), antiquary and topographer.

f. 149r

CaW 58: William Cartwright, Vpon the death of the Right valiant Sir Bevill Grenvill Knight (‘Not to be wrought by Malice, Gaine, or Pride’)

Copy of lines 51-74, here begining ‘When now th' incensed Rebel proudly came’, on a folio leaf attached to a page relating to a monument for Sir Bevil Granvil. Mid-18th century.

First published as Verses on the death of the Right Valiant Sr Bevill Grenvill, Knight (1643). Works (1651), pp. 303-6. Evans, pp. 555-8.

MS Gough Norfolk 43

A folio volume originally used c.1528 as a manorial rental (up to f. 23) and subsequently, c.1580s, as a commonplace book of miscellaneous entries by Thomas Brampton, of Norfolk and Suffolk, i + 61 leaves, in marbled boards. c.1528-90.

Once owned by Thomas Martin (1697-1771), of Palgrave, antiquary and collector. Among the collections of Richard Gough, FSA (1735-1809), antiquary and topographer.

f. 27v

EsR 18: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, ‘Muses no more but mazes be your names’

Copy, in a secretary hand, untitled.

This MS collated in May, p. 123.

May, Poems, No. 1, pp. 43-4. May, Courtier Poets, pp. 250-1EV 14991.

Gough Oxford 22

Extensive emendations and deletions to the text in a printed exemplum of Cavendish's The Life and Death of Thomas Woolsey (8vo, London, 1667), in contemporary calf. In the small italic hand of Humfrey Wanley (1672-26), scholar and librarian, for an intended new edition, some notes on slips of paper pinned or tipped in, the alterations transcribed from one of the early manuscript sources (comprising 74 leaves, probably British Library Harley MS 428), a list of seven MSS known to him supplied at the beginning. c.1676.

CvG 10: George Cavendish, The Life of Cardinal Wolsey

The front free endpaper inscribed ‘Wm: Herbert 1773’ [i.e. William Herbert (1718-95), bibliographer and print seller] and ‘The corrections in this book are made from one of the MS. copies...Mary Coney her Booke 1676’. Among the collections of Richard Gough, FSA (1735-1809), antiquary and topographer.

Sylvester, No. 4 (and see note on p. 288).

First published in George Cavendish, The Life of Cardinal Wolsey and Metrical Visions, ed. Samuel W. Singer, 2 vols (Chiswick, 1825). The Life and Death of Cardinal Wolsey by George Cavendish, ed. Richard S. Sylvester, EETS, orig. ser. 243 (London, New York and Toronto, 1959).

MS Gr. th. f. 18

Copy in the hand of an amanuensis, incomplete, 188 pages (169-88 blank), in vellum. Given by Andrewes in 1626 to William Laud (1573-1645), later Archbishop of Canterbury. Later owned by one ‘J. Mandevile’ (name inscribed p. 188); by W. Bristow (fl.1760s), bookseller or auctioneer in Maiden Lane, Covent Garden, London; and by R. G. Livingstone, whose daughter Isobel Henrietta bequeathed it to the Bodleian in 1969. [1618-26].

AndL 44: Lancelot Andrewes, Preces privatae

Edited from this MS in The Greek Devotions of Lancelot Andrewes, ed. Peter Goldsmith Medd (London, 1892). Described in Brightman, pp. xiii-xv.

First published in an English translation as The Private Devotions, ed. Humphrey Moseley (London, 1647). Selections of the original Greek and Latin version published in Verus Christianus, ed. David Stokes (Oxford, 1668). A more comprehensive version published as Preces privatae, Graece et Latine, ed. John Lamphire (London, 1675). Translated by F. E. Brightman as The Preces Privatae of Lancelot Andrewes (London, 1903).

H 1.9 Art. Seld. (3)

An exemplum of the first printed edition with some MS stage directions on pp. 48-9 in the last act of the non-tragic version, made by someone apparently familiar with a MS or performance of the play. Mid-17th century.

SuJ 159: John Suckling, Aglaura

Once owned by John Selden (1584-1654).

This item collated in Beaurline and described, p. 259.

First published in London, 1638. Beaurline, Plays, pp. 33-119.

MS Hearne's diaries 11

An autograph diary of the antiquary Thomas Hearne (1678-1735), 252 octavo pages, in contemporary calf. 24 June-16 September 1706.

p. 96

RoJ 9: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Against Marriage (‘Out of mere love and arrant devotion’)

Copy, untitled, here beginning ‘Out of stark love, & kindnes, & arrant devotion’, ascribed to ‘some libertine, I know not whether T. Brown’, dated 23 March 1700/1, the text followed by Joshua Barnes's parody beginning ‘Out of stark love and kindness, with zeal and devotion’.

First published in Vieth (1968), p. 159. Walker, pp. 130-1, among ‘Poems Possibly by Rochester’. Love, pp. 40-1, as Of Marriage and beginning Out of Stark Love, and arrant Devotion.

MS Hearne's diaries 12

An autograph diary of the antiquary Thomas Hearne (1678-1735), 256 octavo pages, in contemporary calf. 23 September 1706-18 February 1706/7.

pp. 93-4

RoJ 130: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Impromptu on the English Court (‘Here's Monmouth the witty’)

Copy, with introductory preamble ‘...my Ld Rochester vpo the Kings Request made ye following verses’. 17 November 1706.

Edited from this MS in Reliquiae Hearnianae, ed. Philip Bliss, 2 vols (Oxford, 1857), I, 113-14; in Remarks and Collections of Thomas Hearne, Vol. I, ed. C.E. Doble (Oxford Historical Society, 2, 1885), p. 308; and in Walker, p. 220.

First published in The Agreeable Companion (London, 1745). Vieth, p. 135. Walker, p. 123, as ‘A Lampoon upon the English Grandees’.

p. 94

RoJ 116: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Impromptu on Charles II (‘God bless our good and gracious King’)

Copy of a version headed ‘The Ld Rochesters verses vpo the King an occasion of His Majestys saying he would leave everyone to his liberty in lathing when Himself was in company, & would not take wt was said, at all amiss, viz:’, beginning ‘We have a pretty witty king’, subscribed ‘These verses were put in one of the windows of the Room’. 17 November 1706.

Edited from this MS in Reliquiae Hearnianae, ed. Philip Bliss, 2 vols (Oxford, 1857), I, 114 and in Remarks and Collections of Thomas Hearne, Vol. I, ed. C.E. Doble (Oxford Historical Society, 2, 1885), p. 308.

First published, in a version headed ‘Posted on White-Hall-Gate’ and beginning ‘Here lives a Great and Mighty Monarch’, in The Miscellaneous Works of the Right Honourable the Late Earls of Rochester and Roscommon (London, 1707). Vieth, p. 134. Walker, p. 122, as ‘[On King Charles]’.

MS Hearne's diaries 30

An autograph diary of Thomas Hearne (1678-1735), Oxford antiquary, for 6 July-12 September 1711, 242 quarto pages. 1711.

p. 229

RaW 455.5: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Say not you love, unless you do’

Copy.

First published in Inedited Poetical Miscellanies, 1584-1700, ed. W.C. Hazlitt ([London], 1870), p. [179]. Listed but not printed in Latham, p. 174. Rudick, No. 38, p. 106.

MS Hearne's diaries 35

An autograph diary of the antiquary Thomas Hearne (1678-1735).

p. 171

StW 1263.5: William Strode, Jack on both Sides (‘I holde as fayth What Englandes Church Allowes’)

Hearne's transcript of StW 1263.

First published, as ‘The Church Papist’, in Wits Recreations (London, 1640). Reprinted as ‘The Jesuit's Double-faced Creed’ by Henry Care in The Popish Courant (16 May 1679): see August A. Imholtz, Jr, ‘The Jesuits' Double-Faced Creed: A Seventeenth-Century Cross-Reading’, N&Q, 222 (December 1977), 553-4. Dobell, p. 111. Listed, without text, in Forey, p. 339.

MSS Jesus College 71-4

Draft of the complete work, partly autograph, in 4 large folio volumes, 1090 + 388 leaves, the first dated 1634, the third 1638, each in contemporary calf (rebacked). Principally in the hands of three or four of Herbert's amanuenses, one of them Thomas Master (1602/3-43), poet, of New College, Oxford, who has written the dedicatory epistle; some pages are in Herbert's hand and with his frequent corrections and revisions; the last volume comprising a composite collection of related historical documents in various hands, including a number of pages written by Herbert, many of the documents transcribed by Thomas Master, and labelled ‘Collectorum liber secundus’. 1634-8.

*HrE 121: Edward, Lord Herbert of Cherbury, The Life and Reign of King Henry VIII

Later inscriptions including ‘Hen. Topp. Jan. 10. 1652’ and ‘Maii 2, 1653, Jam tandem acquisita ab Tho. Earle, rectore de Shorncot, Wilts. ita nunc opus completum et perfectum hoc est (historiæ Henrici 8) in originali suo manuscripto a magistro Th. Master, Neo-Gymnasii Oxon.’

These MSS described in Rossi, III, 488-90.

First published in London, 1649. Published in London, 1880 (with Autobiography).

MS Jesus College 83

A folio volume of state papers, in two or three hands, 70 leaves, in vellum. c.1620s.

ff. 1r-4r

EsR 159: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, First Letter of Advice to the Earl of Rutland

Copy, in a secretary hand, headed ‘The Earle of Essex advice to the Earle of Rutland in his Travailes’, the letter dated ‘this 4th of Ju.’.

The letter, dated from Greenwich, 4 January [1596], beginning ‘My Lord, I hold it for a principle in the course of intelligence of state...’.

First published, as ‘The Late E. of E. his aduice to the E. of R. in his trauels’, in Profitable Instructions; Describing what speciall Obseruations are to be taken by Trauellers in all Nations, States and Countries (London, 1633), pp. 27-73. Francis Bacon, Resuscitatio (London, 1657), pp. 106-10. Spedding, IX, 6-15. W.B. Devereux, Lives and Letters of the Devereux, Earls of Essex (1853), I, No. xciii.

Essex's three letters to Rutland discussed by Paul E.J. Hammer in ‘The Earl of Essex, Fulke Greville, and the Employment of Scholars’, SP. 91/2 (Spring, 1994), 167-80, and in ‘Letters of Travel Advice from the Earl of Essex to the Earl of Rutland: Some Comments’, PQ, 74/3 (Summer 1995), 317-22. It is likely that the first letter was written substantially by Francis Bacon.

ff. 5r-18r

EsR 108: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Apology

Copy.

First published, addressed to Anthony Bacon, as An Apologie of the Earle of Essex, against those which jealously and maliciously tax him to be the hinderer of the peace and quiet (London, [1600]), but immediately suppressed. Reprinted in 1603.

f. 22v

EsR 6: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, ‘Happy were Hee could finish foorth his Fate’

Copy in an italic hand, headed ‘Certaine verses made by the Earle of Essex not longe before his death’.

May, Poems, No. 7, p. 47. May, Courtier Poets, p. 254. EV 8176.

f. 23 et seq.

EsR 201: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Essex's Arraignment, 19 February 1600/1

Copy.

ff. 60r-7r

RaW 546: Sir Walter Ralegh, Apology for his Voyage to Guiana

Copy, in a secretary hand

A tract beginning ‘If the ill success of this enterprise of mine had been without example...’. First published in Judicious and Select Essays and Observations (London, 1650). Works (1829), VIII, 477-507. Edited by V. T. Harlow in Ralegh's Last Voyage (London, 1932), pp. 316-34.

ff. 68r-8v

RaW 710.6: Sir Walter Ralegh, Short Apology for his last Actions at Guiana

Copy, in a secretary hand, untitled.

Ralegh's letter of 1618 to his cousin George, Lord Carew of Clopton (beginning ‘Because I know not whether I shall live...’). First published in Judicious and Select Essays (London, 1650). Edwards, II, 375 et seq. Youings, No. 222, pp. 364-8.

ff. 68v-70r

RaW 746: Sir Walter Ralegh, Speech on the Scaffold (29 October 1618)

Copy of an account of the speech and execution, in two secretary hands, headed ‘The Confession of Sr Water R’.

Transcripts of Ralegh's speech have been printed in his Remains (London, 1657). Works (1829), I, 558-64, 691-6. VIII, 775-80, and elsewhere. Copies range from verbatim transcripts to summaries of the speech, they usually form part of an account of Ralegh's execution, they have various headings, and the texts differ considerably. For a relevant discussion, see Anna Beer, ‘Textual Politics: The Execution of Sir Walter Ralegh’, MP, 94/1 (August 1996), 19-38.

MS Jesus College 150

Copy of the complete text, closely written in a small and probably professional secretary hand, the headings, incipits and colophons in engrossed lettering, 285 quarto pages (including various blanks and plus a number of blanks at the end), imperfect at the beginning and end and lacking a title, in contemporary calf. Late 16th century.

SiP 93: Sir Philip Sidney, The Old Arcadia

Inscribed inside the front cover ‘Edward Thelwall’, ‘Anne Thelwalls brother’, and ‘Sidnay Tholwall’.

This MS collated in Robertson and the poems collated in Ringler. Described in Ringler, p. 525.

The unfinished revised version of Arcadia (the ‘New Arcadia’) first published in London, 1590. The original version (the ‘Old Arcadia’) first published in Feuillerat, IV (1926). The complete Old Arcadia edited by Jean Robertson (Oxford, 1973). The poems edited in Ringler, pp. 7-131.

J-J Sidney 13

Lady Anne Clifford's exemplum of the 4th edition, folio, in 19th-century olive morocco. Inscribed in her rugged italic hand (on the verso of the title-page) ‘This Booke did I beegine to red ouor att Shipton in Crauen aboutt the Latter-ende of Januaray and I made an ende of Reding itt all ower in Apollbey Castell in Westmorland the 19 day of Marche folloing; in 1651: as the yeare beegines on Nwors-daye’, with marginal annotations by her on pp. 195-6 and other readers' annotations elsewhere. 1651-2.

CdA 20: Lady Anne Clifford, Sidney, Sir Philip. Arcadia (London, 1605)

An exemplum of ‘Arcadia’ is shown in the celebrated triptych of Lady Anne Clifford in the Abbot hall Art Gallery, Kendal.

Bookplate of Edward Pease, of Otterburn Tower, Northumberland. Sotheby's, 22 July 1985, lot 8, to Blackwell. Afterwards in the library of Dr Bent Juel-Jensen (1922-2006), Oxford physician and book collector.

Briefly discussed in Paul Salzman, ‘Anne Clifford's Annotated Copy of Sidney's Arcadia’, N&Q, 254 (December 2009), 554-5.

MS Jones 12

Copy, untitled, in a professional hand, 196 folio leaves, in contemporary vellum gilt. c.1630.

CvG 11: George Cavendish, The Life of Cardinal Wolsey

Among collections of the Rev. Henry Jones (d.1707), nonjuror.

Sylvester, No. 5.

First published in George Cavendish, The Life of Cardinal Wolsey and Metrical Visions, ed. Samuel W. Singer, 2 vols (Chiswick, 1825). The Life and Death of Cardinal Wolsey by George Cavendish, ed. Richard S. Sylvester, EETS, orig. ser. 243 (London, New York and Toronto, 1959).

MS Jones 14

A folio composite volume of ecclesiastical tracts, iii + 356 leaves, in half-vellum boards.

ff. 1r-97v.

CvG 12: George Cavendish, The Life of Cardinal Wolsey

Copy, in a professional hand, subscribed by him ‘Finis Per me Thoma Woodcock’: i.e. the printer Thomas Woodcock (d.1693). Early 17th century.

Sylvester, No. 6.

First published in George Cavendish, The Life of Cardinal Wolsey and Metrical Visions, ed. Samuel W. Singer, 2 vols (Chiswick, 1825). The Life and Death of Cardinal Wolsey by George Cavendish, ed. Richard S. Sylvester, EETS, orig. ser. 243 (London, New York and Toronto, 1959).

MS Jones 27*

A folio composite volume of MSS, eighteen leaves, in modern cloth.

f. 18r

EaJ 61: John Earle, Bishop of Worcester and Salisbury, Hortus Mertonensis (‘Hortus delitiae domus politae’)

Copy, untitled, with other verses, on one page of two conjugate folio leaves.

First published in John Aubrey, The Natural History and Antiquities of the County of Surrey, ed. Richard Rawlinson (London, 1718-19), IV, 166-71.

MS Jones 27

Copy, in a professional hand, 224 quarto leaves (plus two blanks), in contemporary limp vellum. c.1600.

BcF 65: Francis Bacon, An Advertisement touching the Controversies of the Church of England

A tract beginning ‘It is but ignorance if any man find it strange that the state of religion (especially in the days of peace) should be exercised...’. First published as A Wise and Moderate Discourse concerning Church-Affaires ([London], 1641). Spedding, VIII, 74-95.

MS Jones 28

Copy, in a professional hand, 55 quarto leaves (plus 3 blanks), ruled margins, in contemporary vellum gilt. Headed ‘The point handled is Whether it be better to suppresse Popish practises by the strict execution of Lawes touching Jesuites and seminary priests, or to restraine them to close Prison during life, &c.’, the tract dated 11 August 1613 and subscribed ‘Robertus Cotton’. c.1615-20.

CtR 498: Sir Robert Cotton, Twenty-four Argvments, Whether it be more expedient to suppress Popish Practises against the due Allegeance of His Majesty, by the Strict Execution touching Jesuits and Seminary Preists? Or, to restraine them to Close Prisons, during life, if no Reformation follow?

Tract beginning ‘I am not ignorant, that this latter age hath brought forth a swarm of busie heads...’, dated 11 August 1613. First published in two editions, as respectively Seriovs Considerations for Repressing of the Increase of Iesvites and A Treatise against Recusants (both London, 1641). Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [109]-159.

MS Jones 32

A quarto volume of three tracts (two on the Succession ‘written the 6t [and 4th] of novebr. 1599’) respectively), in three different professional secretary hands, 87 quarto leaves (plus two blanks), in contemporary vellum. End of 16th century.

Inscribed twice (f. 1r) ‘Gualterus Johnes verus possessor huius libri’.

ff. 3r-72r

LeC 8: Anon, Leicester's Commonwealth

Copy, untitled.

This MS recorded in Peck. p. 226.

First published as The Copie of a Leter, Wryten by a Master of Arte of Cambrige, to his Friend in London, Concerning some talke past of late betwen two worshipful and graue men, about the present state, and some procedinges of the Erle of Leycester and his friendes in England ([? Rouen], 1584). Soon banned. Reprinted as Leycesters common-wealth (London, 1641). Edited, as Leicester's Commonwealth, by D.C. Peck (Athens, OH, & London, 1985). Although various attributions have been suggested by Peck and others, the most likely author remains Robert Persons (1546-1610), Jesuit conspirator.

MS Jones 56

A large folio composite volume of papers on public affairs, in English and Latin, in various hands, 180 leaves, in half-vellum marbled boards.

The first leaf inscribed by Thomas Hearne (1678-1735), Oxford antiquary.

f. 11r

KiH 512: Henry King, A Salutation of His Majestye's Shipp The Soveraigne (‘Move on thou Floating Trophee built to Fame!’)

Copy, on the first page of two conjugate folio leaves. c.1630s.

This MS collated in Crum.

First published in Poems (1657). Crum, pp. 92-3.

ff. 35r-6r

RaW 842.5: Sir Walter Ralegh, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Ralegh, to James I.

ff. 36v-46v

RaW 573: Sir Walter Ralegh, A Dialogue between a Counsellor of State and a Justice of the Peace

Copy.

A treatise, with a dedicatory epistle to James I beginning ‘Those that are suppressed and hopeless are commonly silent ...’, the dialogue beginning ‘Now, sir, what think you of Mr. St. John's trial in the Star-chamber?...’. First published as The Prerogative of Parliaments in England (‘Midelburge’ and ‘Hamburg’ [i.e. London], 1628). Works (1829), VIII, 151-221.

MS Jones 58

Copy, in the margins on ff. 50v, 59r-65r of a 15th-century MS on parchment of Petrarch's Quatuor invectivarum libri. Mid-17th century.

HoJ 320: John Hoskyns, John Hoskins to the Lady Jacob (‘Oh loue whose powre & might non euer yet wthstood’)

Inscribed names of Sampson Walker (f. 2v) and Roger and Richard Martin.

Osborn, p. 301.

Juel-Jensen Drayton d. 6

A printed exemplum of Poems (London, 1619) with annotations in the hand of Richard Butcher (1587-1664), including an extra stanza added to the Ballad of Agincourt. c.1620.

DrM 68: Michael Drayton, To the Cambro-Britans, and their Harpe, his Ballad of Agincourt (‘Faire stood the Wind for France’)

This item recorded and the extra stanza edited in Hebel, V (1961), 291; facsimile in Hebel, III (1961), facing p. 9.

First published, among Odes with Other Lyrick Poesies, in Poems (London, 1619). Hebel, II, 375-8.

Juel-Jensen E 1

Copy. c.1630s.

NaR 1.5: Sir Robert Naunton, Fragmenta Regalia

Fragmenta Regalia (or, Observations on the late Q. Elizabeth, her Times and Favorites), first published in London, 1641. Edited by John S. Cerovski (Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington, D.C., etc., 1985).

Juel-Jensen E 5 [item 1]

Copy of an early version, in seventeen chapters, in two or three mixed hands, untitled, on 87 tall folio pages, followed by a series of blanks and then lists of books belonging to W.Leveson Gower in several hands, in 19th-century calf. Early-mid-17th century.

GrF 24: Fulke Greville, Life of Sir Philip Sidney

Book lists c.1677-85 relating to Sir William Leveson-Gower, fourth Baronet (c.1647-91) and partly in the hand of Mr Plaxton, rector of Donington and Kinnardley, Shropshire, apparently librarian to Sir John Leveson-Gower, fifth Baronet (1675-1709). Descended to Dukes of Sutherland, of Trentham Hall. Sotheby's, 19 November 1906 (Trentham Hall Library sale). Christie's, 24 November 1959, lot 334, to Quaritch.

This MS collated in Gouws.

Generally entitled A Dedication to Sir Philip Sidney. First published in London, 1652. Grosart, IV, 1-224. Edited by Nowell Smith (Oxford, 1907). Gouw, pp. 3-135.

Juel-Jensen E 6 [item 5]

An octavo volume of essays on travel, largely in one professional secretary hand, a ‘Table’ and some notes in other hands, with a formal title-page ‘Itineraria Collectanea or Instructions for A Traveler Directing him how to make the best use of his Travels Together with the Politique survay of A Kingdome’, 107 pages (plus blanks), in old vellum boards. c.1630.

This MS recorded in BC, 15 (Summer 1966), p. 156.

pp. 7-20

SiP 180.92: Sir Philip Sidney, A Letter of Advice to Robert Sidney

Copy, headed ‘A letter written by Sr Phillip Sidney to his brother Robert Sidney (now Lord Lisle) shewing what cours was fit for him to hold in his travails’.

A letter beginning ‘My most deere Brother. You have thought unkindness in me, I have not written oftner unto you...’. First published in Profitable Instructions. Describing what speciall Obseruations are to be taken by Trauellers in all Nations, States and Countries (London, 1633), pp. 74-103. Feuillerat (as Correspondence No. XXXVIII), III, 124-7.

ff. 21r-31r

GrF 22: Fulke Greville, Letter to Grevill Varney on his Travels

Copy, headed ‘A Letter written by Sr. Fulke Greville to a Kinsman of his residing in France wherein are set downe Certaine Rules directing him how to make ye best use of his travaile’, dated 1609.

An epistolary essay beginning ‘My good Cousin, according to the request of your letter, dated the 19. of October, at Orleance...’, dated from Hackney, 20 November 1609. First published in Certaine Learned and Elegant Workes (London, 1633). Grosart, IV, 301-6. This essay perhaps originally written by Thomas Bodley and possibly also used by Francis Bacon and/or the Earl of Essex. Also perhaps sent by Greville to John Harris rather than Greville Varney: see Norman K. Farmer, Jr., ‘Fulke Greville's Letter to a Cousin in France and the Problem of Authorship in Cases of Formula Writing’, RQ, 22 (1969), 140-7.

ff. 81-6

BcF 211.5: Francis Bacon, Essays or Counsels Civil and Moral. Of Travaile

Copy, headed ‘Sr Fran: Bacons essay of Travell’.

The Oxford Francis Bacon, XV, 56-8.

pp. 87-107

EsR 173: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, First Letter of Advice to the Earl of Rutland

Copy, headed ‘The Erle of Essex his aduice to ye E: of R: in his Travels’, dated from Greenwich, 4 January ‘1596’.

The letter, dated from Greenwich, 4 January [1596], beginning ‘My Lord, I hold it for a principle in the course of intelligence of state...’.

First published, as ‘The Late E. of E. his aduice to the E. of R. in his trauels’, in Profitable Instructions; Describing what speciall Obseruations are to be taken by Trauellers in all Nations, States and Countries (London, 1633), pp. 27-73. Francis Bacon, Resuscitatio (London, 1657), pp. 106-10. Spedding, IX, 6-15. W.B. Devereux, Lives and Letters of the Devereux, Earls of Essex (1853), I, No. xciii.

Essex's three letters to Rutland discussed by Paul E.J. Hammer in ‘The Earl of Essex, Fulke Greville, and the Employment of Scholars’, SP. 91/2 (Spring, 1994), 167-80, and in ‘Letters of Travel Advice from the Earl of Essex to the Earl of Rutland: Some Comments’, PQ, 74/3 (Summer 1995), 317-22. It is likely that the first letter was written substantially by Francis Bacon.

Juel-Jensen E 6 [item 7]

Copy in a secretary hand. Headed (with side-note) ‘Sr Philippe Sydneys Letter to the Q: concearning her mariage wth Mounsier’, and the salutation (‘Most feared & beloued sweete, and gracious Souereigne’) set apart and slightly engrossed, on twelve folio pages, in contemporary limp vellum. c.1625-30s.

SiP 205: Sir Philip Sidney, A Letter to Queen Elizabeth touching her Marriage with Monsieur

Formerly bound with three other tracts dating up to 1626. William H. Robinson's sale catalogue No. 72 (1940), item 147. Sold by Seven Gables Bookshop at Sotheby's, 10 April 1962, lot 467.

This MS recorded in The Book Collector, 15 (Summer 1966), 156, and in Duncan-Jones & Van Dorsten, p. 38. Beal, In Praise of Scribes, No. 26 (pp. 278-9).

First published in Scrinia Caeciliana: Mysteries of State & Government (London, 1663) and in Cabala: sive Scrinia Sacra (London, 1663). Feuillerat, III, 51-60. Duncan-Jones & Van Dorsten, pp. 46-57.

This work and its textual transmission discussed, with facsimile examples, in Peter Beal, In Praise of Scribes: Manuscripts and their Makers in Seventeenth-Century England (Oxford, 1998), Chapter 4, pp. 109-46 (with most MSS catalogued as Nos 1-37, with comments on their textual tradition, in Appendix IV, pp. 274-80).

Juel-Jensen E 7 [item 1]

A duodecimo volume of four tracts. Early 17th century.

Formerly in the library of the Harvey family, of Ickwell Bury, Bedfordshire, and of Finningley Park, Yorkshire. Maggs's sale catalogue No. 536 (1930), item 2129. Then owned by André de Coppet (1892-1953), New York financial broker. Sotheby's, 4 July 1955 (de Coppet sale), lot 888, to Quaritch.

Recorded in HMC, 1st Report (1870), Appendix, p. 62, and in The Book Collector, 15 (Summer 1966), p. 156.

No.1

SiP 230: Sir Philip Sidney, The Manner of Sir Philip Sidney's Death

Copy, on ten pages.

Recorded in Duncan-Jones and Van Dorsten. Edited from this MS in a private edition printed in the New Bodleian, 1959.

An account, probably by George Gifford. Duncan-Jones and Van Dorsten, pp. 166-72.

No. 2

RaW 1074: Sir Walter Ralegh, A Military Discourse

Copy, on 23 leaves.

Removed from this volume before the volume was acquired by Dr Juel-Jensen.

A treatise beginning ‘Forasmuch as in every doubtfull and questionable matter, it is familiar and common amongst men to be diverse...’. First published in London, 1734. It was probably written by Sir Thomas Wilford (1541-1601?), or possibly by Sir Francis De Vere or Nathaniel Boothe. See Lefranc (1968), pp. 64-5.

[No. 3]

BcF 389: Francis Bacon, Speech(es)

Copy of Bacon's speech on 17 May 161, on three pages.

[No. 4]

BcF 713.5: Francis Bacon, An Essay of a King

Copy.

Essay, beginning ‘A king is a mortal god on earth...’. Spedding, VI, 595-7 (discussed pp. 592-4).

Juel-Jensen E 7 [item 5]

A duodecimo verse miscellany, including 24 poems by Strode, in a single mixed hand, associated with Oxford, 56 leaves (out of an original eight gatherings), in contemporary calf. c.1630s.

Inscriptions inside the covers including the name ‘Phil. Mu’ (or ‘Mer.’). Later in the library of John Sparrow (1906-92), literary scholar and book collector. Acquired in 1969 by Dr Bent Juel-Jensen (1922-2006), Oxford physician and book collector.

Cited in IELM, II.ii (1993) as the ‘Sparrow MS’: StW Δ 31.

f. 1r

KiH 300: Henry King, An Epitaph on his most honour'd Freind Richard Earle of Dorset (‘Let no profane ignoble foot tread neere’)

Copy, headed ‘On the Earle of Dorsets death’, imperfect, half torn away.

First published, in an abridged version, in Certain Elegant Poems by Dr. Corbet (London, 1647). Poems (1657). Crum, pp. 67-8.

f. 14r

CoR 411: Richard Corbett, On Christ-Church Play at Woodstock (‘If wee, at Woodstock, haue not pleased those’)

Copy, headed ‘On Ch: Ch: Play’.

First published in Poëtica Stromata ([no place], 1648). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, p. 70.

ff. 14r-16v

EaJ 33: John Earle, Bishop of Worcester and Salisbury, An Elegie, Upon the death of Sir John Burrowes, Slaine at the Isle of Ree (‘Oh wound us not with this sad tale, forbear’)

Copy, headed ‘An Elegy on the death of Sr. John Burrowe’.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656), pp. 12-16. Extract in Bliss, pp. 225-6. Edited in James Doelman, ‘John Earle's Funeral Elegy on Sir John Burroughs’, English Literary Renaissance, 41/3 (Autumn 2011), 485-502 (pp. 499-502).

f. 19r

StW 918: William Strode, Song (‘When Orpheus sweetly did complaine’)

Copy, imperfect, lacking the first nine lines and here beginning ‘The aspen tree’, subscribed ‘W. S.’

First published in Poems: Written by Wil. Shake-speare, Gent. (London, 1640). Dobell, pp. 1-2. Forey, pp. 79-80. The poem also discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Notes on some Poems attributed to William Strode’, PQ, 34 (1955), 444-8 (p. 445).

ff. 19r-21r

StW 521: William Strode, On Mistress Mary Prideaux dying younge (‘Sleepe pretty one, oh sleepe while I’)

Copy of the first and third poems, headed respectively ‘On Mrs. Mary Prideaux dying’ and ‘Mrs. Mary Prideaux Epitaph’.

This MS recorded in Forey, p. 335.

Sequence of three poems, the second headed ‘Consolatorium, Ad Parentes’ and beginning ‘Lett her parents then confesse’, the third headed ‘Her Epitaph’ and beginning ‘Happy Grave, thou dost enshrine’. The third poem probably by George Morley and first published in Wit and Drollery (London, 1656). The three poems published in Dobell (1907), pp. 59-63. Forey, pp. 211-16.

ff. 22r-4r

StW 1242: William Strode, Westwell Elme (‘Prethe stand still a while, and view this Tree’)

Copy, headed ‘On a greate hollow Tree’, subscribed ‘W. S.’

This MS collated in Forey.

First published in Dobell (1907), pp. 21-4. Forey, pp. 1-5.

f. 24r-v

StW 461: William Strode, On a good legge and foote (‘If Hercules tall Stature might be guest’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Forey.

First published in Wit Restor'd (London, 1658). Dobell, pp. 108-9. Forey, pp. 16-17.

ff. 25r-6r

CwT 1131: Thomas Carew, To Saxham (‘Though frost, and snow, lockt from mine eyes’)

Copy, headed ‘A gentleman on his entertainment at Sarum in Kent’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 27-9.

ff. 26r-30v

StW 496: William Strode, On Faireford windores (‘I know noe paint of Poetry’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Forey.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656). Dobell, pp. 25-7. Forey, pp. 7-10.

ff. 30v-1r

StW 854: William Strode, Song (‘Keepe on your maske, yea hide your Eye’)

Copy, headed ‘A song’, subscribed ‘W. S.’

This MS collated in Forey.

First published, in a musical setting by Henry Lawes, in Ayres and Dialogues (London, 1653). Wits Interpreter (London, 1655). Dobell, pp. 3-4. Forey, pp. 88-9.

ff. 31r-2r

DnJ 3763: John Donne, A Valediction: forbidding mourning (‘As virtuous men passe mildly away’)

Copy, headed ‘To his loue on his departure from her’.

This MS recorded in Gardner.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 49-51. Gardner, Elegies, pp. 62-4. Shawcross, No. 31.

f. 32r

StW 1125: William Strode, To a Valentine (‘Fayre Valentine, since once your welcome hand’)

Copy, subscribed ‘W. S.’

This MS recorded in Forey, p. 328.

First published in The Academy of Complements (London, 1650). Dobell, p. 42. Forey, p. 193.

ff. 32v-3r

StW 137: William Strode, For a Gentleman who kissing his frinde, at his departure out of England, left a Signe of blood upon her (‘What Mystery was this, that I should finde’)

Copy, headed ‘On a gentleman who kissing a gentle woman left some blood on her lipp’.

This MS collated in Forey.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656). Dobell, pp. 32-3. Forey, pp. 22-3.

f. 33r-v

StW 704: William Strode, A Register for a Bible (‘I am the faithfull deputy’)

Copy.

First published in Dobell (1907), pp. 52-3. Forey, p. 52.

f. 33v

StW 15: William Strode, Another (‘I, your Memory's Recorder’)

Copy, subscribed ‘W. S.’

This MS collated in Forey.

First published in Dobell (1907), p. 53. Forey, p. 52.

ff. 33v-4r

StW 674: William Strode, Poses for Braceletts (‘This keepes my hande’)

Copy.

Third stanza (beginning ‘Voutchsafe my Pris'ner thus to be’) and fourth stanza (beginning ‘When you putt on this little bande’) first published in Wits Interpreter (London, 1655), Part II, p. 386. Published complete in Dobell (1907), pp. 43-4. Forey, p. 34.

f. 34r

StW 83: William Strode, An Earestring (‘'Tis vaine to adde a ring or Gemme’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Forey.

First published in Poems…by William Earl of Pembroke…[and] Sr Benjamin Ruddier, [ed. John Donne the Younger] (London, 1660), p. 101. Dobell, p. 44. Forey, pp. 34-5.

f. 34v

StW 261: William Strode, A Necklace (‘These Vaines are Natures Nett’)

Copy.

First stanza first published in Wits Interpreter (London, 1655), Part II, p. 386. Second stanza (‘Loe on my necke…’) first published in Poems…by William Earl of Pembroke…[and] Sr Benjamin Ruddier, [ed. John Donne the Younger] (London, 1660), p. 100. Complete in Dobell, p. 45. Forey, p. 35.

ff. 34v-5r

StW 154: William Strode, A Girdle (‘When ere the wast makes too much hast’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Forey.

First published in Dobell (1907), pp. 45-6. Forey, p. 193.

f. 35r

StW 1232: William Strode, A watchstring (‘Tymes picture here invites your eyes’)

Copy.

First published in Dobell (1907), p. 44. Forey, p. 210.

f. 35r

StW 688: William Strode, A pursestringe (‘Wee hugg, imprison, hang and save’)

Copy.

First published in Dobell (1907), pp. 44-5. Forey, p. 210.

f. 35v

StW 1136: William Strode, To his Sister (‘Lovinge Sister, every line’)

Copy, headed ‘A Gentleman to his Sisters’ and here beginning ‘Loving sisters euery line’, subscribed ‘W. S.’.

This MS recorded in Forey, p. 328.

First published in Wit Restor'd (London, 1658). Dobell, p. 88. Forey, p. 198.

f. 36r

StW 1063: William Strode, Thankes for a welcome (‘For your good Lookes, and for your Clarett’)

Copy, here beginning ‘ffor your good lookes & yr good clarret’.

First published in Parnassus Biceps (London, 1656). Dobell, p. 102. Forey, p. 30.

ff. 36r-7r

RnT 521: Thomas Randolph, On the Goodwife's Ale (‘When shall we meet again and have a taste’)

Copy, subscribed ‘B. G.’.

First published, anonymously, in Witts Recreations Augmented (London, 1641), sig. Y5v. Francis Beaumont, Poems (London, 1653), sig. M8v. Moore Smith (1925), pp. 252-4, and in Moore Smith (1927), pp. 92-3. Edited, discussed, and the possible attribution to Randolph supported, in Ben Jonson, ed. C.H. Herford and Percy & Evelyn Simpson, VIII (Oxford, 1947), 448-9.

The poem is most commonly attributed to Ben Jonson. Also sometimes ascribed to Sir Thomas Jay, JP, and to Randolph.

f. 37r-v

StW 1078: William Strode, To a frinde (‘Like as the hande which hath bin usd to play’)

Copy, here beginning ‘Like to a hand that hath beene vs'd to play’, subscribed ‘W. S.’.

This MS collated in Forey.

First published in Wit Restor'd (London, 1658). Dobell, pp. 99-100. The Poems of Thomas Carew, ed. Rhodes Dunlap (Oxford, 1949), p. 130. Forey, p. 31.

ff. 37v-8v

StW 358: William Strode, On a Dissembler (‘Could any shew where Pliny's people dwell’)

This MS collated in Forey.

First published in Wit Restor'd (London, 1658). Dobell, pp. 33-4. Forey pp. 42-3.

ff. 38v-9v

StW 1102: William Strode, To a Gentlewoman with Black Eyes, for a Frinde (‘Noe marvaile, if the Suns bright Eye’)

Copy, headed ‘To a gentle woman’, subscribed ‘W. S.’

This MS collated in Forey.

Lines 15-20 (beginning ‘Oft when I looke I may descrie’) first published in Thomas Carew, Poems (London, 1640). Published complete in Dobell (1907), pp. 29-30. Forey, pp. 37-9.

ff. 40r-1r

StW 737: William Strode, Song (‘As I out of a Casement sent’)

Copy, headed ‘A song’, subscribed ‘W. S.’

This MS collated in Forey.

First published in Dobell (1907), pp. 11-12. Forey, pp. 77-9.

f. 41r-v

StW 205: William Strode, Justification (‘See how the rainbow in the skie’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Forey.

First published in Dobell (1907), p. 55. Forey, p. 109.

ff. 41v-2v

DnJ 98: John Donne, The Anagram (‘Marry, and love thy Flavia, for, shee’)

Copy, headed ‘J. D. to his freind’, subscribed ‘W. S.’

This MS recorded in Gardner.

First published as ‘Elegie II’ in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 80-2 (as ‘Elegie II’). Gardner, Elegies, pp. 21-2. Shawcross, No. 17. Variorum, 2 (2000), pp. 217-18.

f. 43r

CoR 726: Richard Corbett, Upon the Same Starre (‘A Starre did late appeare in Virgo's trayne’)

Copy, headed ‘On the Blazing starr’ and here beginning ‘A starre of late appeared in virgo's traine’.

First published in Bennett & Trevor-Roper (1955), p. 65.

f. 43r-v

StW 562: William Strode, On the death of Mistress Mary Prideaux (‘Weepe not because this Child hath died soe young’)

Copy, subscribed ‘W. S.’

First published in Dobell (1907), pp. 58-9. Forey, p. 111.

ff. 43v-4r

DnJ 1515: John Donne, His parting from her (‘Since she must go, and I must mourn, come Night’)

Copy of a thirty-line version (comprising lines 1-4, 45-52, 67-8, 73-4, 95-8), headed ‘On his wiues departure D. Corbet’.

This MS recorded in Gardner.

First published, in a 42-line version as ‘Elegie XIIII’, in Poems (London, 1635). Published complete (104 lines) in Poems (London, 1669). Grierson, I, 100-4 (as ‘Elegie XII’). Gardner, Elegies, pp. 96-100 (among her ‘Dubia’). Shawcross, No. 21. Variorum, 2 (2000), pp. 332-4 (with versions printed in 1635 and 1669 on pp. 335-6 and 336-8 respectively).

f. 47r-v

CwT 1098: Thomas Carew, To my Mistresse in absence (‘Though I must live here, and by force’)

Copy, headed ‘To his Mrs in absence’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, p. 22.

ff. 47v-8r

CwT 299: Thomas Carew, A flye that flew into my Mistris her eye (‘When this Flye liv'd, she us'd to play’)

Copy, headed ‘An Elegy on a fly’ subscribed ‘T. C.’

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 37-9. Musical setting by Henry Lawes published in The Treasury of Musick, Book 2 (London, 1669).

ff. 48v-9v

CwT 1165: Thomas Carew, To the King at his entrance into Saxham, by Master Io. Crofts (‘Sir, Ere you passe this threshold, stay’)

Copy, headed ‘To the King’.

First published in Poems (1640). Dunlap, pp. 30-1.

ff. 49v-51v

CoR 224: Richard Corbett, An Exhortation to Mr. John Hammon minister in the parish of Bewdly, for the battering downe of the Vanityes of the Gentiles, which are comprehended in a May-pole… (‘The mighty Zeale which thou hast new put on’)

Copy, headed ‘A godly exhortation to Mr. John Hammond minister of the word of God in the parish of Beawdly for the battering downe of uanities of the Gentiles wch are comprehended in a May-poole by a zealous brother from ye Black ffriars’, imperfect, lacking the last eighteen lines.

First published in Poëtica Stromata ([no place], 1648). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 52-6.

An exemplum of Poëtica Stromata at Christ Church, Oxford, has against this poem the MS marginal note ‘None of Dr Corbets’ and an attribution to John Harris of Christ Church.