Bodleian Library, Tanner Collection

MS Tanner 14

A large folio volume of antiquarian tracts relating to high offices of state, including papers delivered to the Society of Antiquaries, in a professional secretary hand, 223 pages, in half-calf. c.1620s-30s.

pp. 1-10

CtR 253: Sir Robert Cotton, A Discourse Off the Offyce of the Lord Steward of England, Written by Sr Robte Cotton, knight, and Baronnett

Copy.

Tract beginning ‘For the Clearinge whereof wee will intreate off the name...’. Hearne (1771), II, 1-12.

pp. 11-15

CtR 327: Sir Robert Cotton, Of the steward of the King's household by Sr. Robt Cotton Kt. & Bart.

Copy.

A tract beginning ‘Which office because it was neuer hereditary...’. Unpublished?

pp. 16-19

CmW 37: William Camden, The Antiquity, Authority, and Succession of the High Steward of England

Copy, headed ‘A Discourse of the Office of the Lord Steward of England, Collected by Mr. William Camden’.

A tract beginning ‘Whom we call in English steward, in Latine is called seneschallus...’. First published in Hearne (1771), II, 38-40.

pp. 20-3

CtR 236: Sir Robert Cotton, A Discourse Of the Offyce of the Lord Highe Connstable of England, written by Sr: Robte Cotton, knight, and Baronett

Copy.

Tract beginning ‘Yff wee curiouslye will looke the Roote of this question...’. Hearne (1771), II, 65-7.

pp. 24-31

CtR 52: Sir Robert Cotton, The Antiquitye and Offyce of Earle Marshall of England, Written by Sr Robte Cotton, knight, and Baronett

Copy.

Tract beginning ‘The plentye of this discourse, the last question of Highe Connstables, whereto...’. Hearne (1771), II, 97-103.

pp. 32-46

CtR 216: Sir Robert Cotton, A Discourse Of the Antiquitye, and Offyce of the Earle Marshall of England, written by Sr Robte Cotton, knight, Att the request of the Lord Henrye Howard, Earle of Northampton [25 November 1602]

Copy.

A dedicatory epistle beginning ‘Sir, Yor small tyme, I must Ballance, wth as sclendr Aunswere...’ followed by a tract beginning ‘Because the Jurisdiction att the Comon Lawe was vncertayne...’.

pp. 49-58

CmW 25: William Camden, The Antiquity and Office of the Earl Marshall of England

Copy.

A tract beginning ‘Such is the vncertainety of etimologyes...’ and sometimes entitled in manuscripts ‘The Etymology, Antiquity and Office of the Earl Marshall of England’. First published, as ‘Commentarius de etymologia, antiquitate, & officio Comitis Marescalli Angliae’, in Camdeni epistolae (London, 1691), Appendix, pp. 87-93. Hearne (1771), II, 90-7.

MS Tanner 28/2

A folio composite volume of state letters and papers, 382 leaves. Collected by William Sancroft (1617-93), Archbishop of Canterbury.

f. 269r-v

HaG 28: George Savile, First Marquess of Halifax, Maxims of the Great Almansor

Copy of 33 maxims, headed ‘The following Maxims weare found by a Jew amongst ye Papers of ye Greate Almanzor, & though they must loose a good deale of their originall Spirit by ye translation, yet they seeme to be soe applicable to all times yt it is thought noe disservice to make them Publick’, on a single folio leaf, docketed ‘1688’. c.1688.

This MS collated in Brown, I, 398-401. Recorded in Brown, HLQ (1972), p. 150.

First published, anonymously, under the heading The following Maxims were found amongst the Papers of the Great Almanzor…[&c] (London, 1693). Foxcroft, II, 447-53. Brown, I, 292-5.

MS Tanner 38

A folio composite volume of state letters and papers, 151 leaves.

f. 115r

*MoH 18: Henry More, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by More, to William Sancroft, Archbishop of Canterbury, from Christ's College, Cambridge, 2 January 1679/80. 1680.

MS Tanner 41

A folio composite volume of letters and other papers, in various hands, 222 leaves.

f. 60r

*KiW 47: Sir William Killigrew, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to an unidentified lord, 31 December 1677. 1677.

Motten, p. 352.

MS Tanner 42

A folio composite volume of state letters and papers, in various hands, 225 leaves.

ff. 38r-9v

*MoH 14: Henry More, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by More, to Dr Simon Patrick, from Christ's College, Cambridge, 5 October 1673. 1673.

MS Tanner 44

A folio composite volume of letters and papers, chiefly 1668-71, in various hands, 287 leaves.

ff. 20r-1v

*KiH 813: Henry King, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by King, to Gilbert Sheldon, Archbishop of Canterbury, from Chichester, 23 July 1668. 1668.

Ciited by Percy Simpson in BQR, 5 (1929), 324-40 (p. 339). Recorded in Keynes, p. 88. Edited in Hobbs, Correspondence, pp. 148-9.

ff. 24r-5v

*KiH 814: Henry King, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by King, to Gilbert Sheldon, Archbishop of Canterbury, from Chichester, 16 August 1668. 1668.

Cited by Percy Simpson in BQR, 5 (1929), 324-40 (p. 339). Recorded in Keynes, p. 88. Edited in Hobbs, Correspondence, pp. 149-50.

ff. 80r-1v

*KiH 815: Henry King, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by King, to Gilbert Sheldon, Archbishop of Canterbury, from Chichester, 3 February 1668/9. 1669.

Edited in Lawrence Mason, ‘The Life and Works of Henry King, D.D.’, Transactions of the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, 18 (November 1913), 225-89 (p. 289). Recorded in Keynes, p. 88. Edited in Hobbs, Correspondence, p. 152, with a facsimile on p. 151.

MS Tanner 45

A folio composite volume of state letters, chiefly for 1665-7, in various hands, 296 leaves.

ff. 64r-5v

*KiH 810: Henry King, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by King, to Gilbert Sheldon, Archbishop of Canterbury, from Chichester, 21 February 1665/6. 1666.

Cited by Percy Simpson in BQR, 5 (1929), 324-40 (p. 338). Recorded in Keynes, p. 88. Edited in Hobbs, Correspondence, p. 146.

ff. 73r-4v

*KiH 811: Henry King, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by King, to Gilbert Sheldon, Archbishop of Canterbury, [from Chichester], 23 April 1666. 1666.

Edited in Lawrence Mason, ‘The Life and Works of Henry King, D.D.’, Transactions of the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, 18 (November 1913), 225-89 (p. 289). Recorded in Keynes, p. 87. Edited in Hobbs, Correspondence, p. 147.

MS Tanner 46

A folio composite volume of miscellaneous letters and papers, 161 leaves.

f. 138r

*MoH 26: Henry More, Inscription(s)

An autograph signature of Henry More, cut from a document dated 1673. 1673.

MS Tanner 47

A folio composite volume of chiefly state letters and papers, in varius hands, dated 1663-4, 210 leaves.

ff. 28r-30r

ClE 58: Edward Hyde, First Earl of Clarendon, Articles of High Treason and other hainous misdemeanours agst Edward, Earle of Clarendon, Lord Chancellor, exhibited by Earl of Bristol, 10 July 1663

Copy.

MS Tanner 48

A folio composite volume of letters and other papers for 1662, in various hands, 157 leaves. 1662.

ff. 46r-7v

*EaJ 101: John Earle, Bishop of Worcester and Salisbury, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Earles, to Gilbert Sheldon, Bishop of London, from Sarum, 25 September 1662. 1662.

Edited in Bliss-Irwin, pp. 317-18. Quoted in Darwin, pp. 207-8.

MS Tanner 52

A folio composite volume of miscellaneous and state letters and papers, chiefly 1653-8, in various hands, 233 leaves.

ff. 7r-8v

TaJ 40: Jeremy Taylor, Letter(s)

Autograph letter by Taylor, to Gilbert Sheldon, Archbishop of Canterbury, 11 April 1653. 1653.

Edited in Eden, I, xxviii-xxix.

ff. 101r-2r

TaJ 43: Jeremy Taylor, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Taylor, to Gilbert Sheldon, Archbishop of Canterbury, 19 January 1655/6. 1656.

Edited in Eden, I, lvi-lvii.

f. 199a

TaJ 53: Jeremy Taylor, Letter(s)

Copy, in the hand of John Evelyn, of a letter by Taylor to [? Evelyn], from Ivy Lane, 21 March 1656/7. 1657.

Edited in Eden, I, lxxvi (where the date is given as 1657/8).

f. 199a bis

TaJ 55: Jeremy Taylor, Letter(s)

An extract, in the hand of John Evelyn, of a letter by Taylor to [Evelyn], 2 June 1657. c.1657.

Edited in Eden, I, lxvi.

ff. 216r-17v

*TaJ 59: Jeremy Taylor, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Taylor, to Gilbert Sheldon, Archbishop of Canterbury, [from London], 19 December 1657. 1657.

Edited in Eden, I, lxxii.

MS Tanner 57

A folio composite volume of chiefly state letters and papers for 1648, in various hands, 560 leaves, now in two volumes, foliated 1-282 and 284-560 respectively.

Vol. II, ff. 468r-73r

*TaJ 37: Jeremy Taylor, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Taylor, to Dr Richard Bayley, 24 December 1648. 1648.

Edited in Eden, I, cclxii-cclxiii.

MS Tanner 58

A folio composite volume of largely state letters and papers for 1647, in various hands, 785 leaves, now in two volumes, foliated 1-397 and 401-785 respectively.

Vol. II, f. 454r

*TaJ 106: Jeremy Taylor, Document(s)

Two copies, in different scribal hands, of an opinion on toleration, both signed by Taylor and other Royal chaplains in answer to a question by Charles I, 28 August 1647. 1647.

Recorded in Stranks, p. 11.

MS Tanner 59

A folio composite volume of chiefly state letters and papers for 1646, in various hands, 826 leaves, now in two volumes, foliated 1-422 and 424-826 respectively.

Vol. II, f. 689r

*HlJ 131: Joseph Hall, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Hall, to an unidentified gentleman, from Norwich, 28 January 1646/7. 1639.

Wynter, X, 520.

MS Tanner 60

A folio composite volume of a collection of state letters and papers, in various hands, 592 leaves, now in two volumes, foliated 1-321 and 322-592 respectively.

Vol. II, ff. 371r-2v

DaW 126: Sir William Davenant, Letter(s)

Letter by Davenant, in the hand of an amanuensis, unsigned, to John, first Lord Colepepper, and Sir Edward Hyde, from Paris, 17 January 1645/6. 1646.

Quoted in Harbage, pp. 96-7, and in Nethercot, p. 220.

Vol. II, ff. 489r-90v

DaW 127: Sir William Davenant, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Davenant, to Sir Hugh Pollard, [from Paris, February 1645/6], as ‘Intercepted’ and ‘deciphered…By Sr Walter Erle 28 Febr: 1645’. 1646.

Cited in Nethercot, p. 220.

MS Tanner 62

A folio composite volume of chiefly state letters and papers for 1643, in various hands, 656 leaves, now in two volumes, foliated 1-311 and 313-656 respectively.

Vol. I, ff. 111r-12v

*WaE 800: Edmund Waller, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed by Waller, to Jerome Weston, Earl of Portland, [June 1643]. 1643.

Edited in Works, ed. Elijah Fenton (London, 1729), pp. 430-2. Text in Deas, pp. 167-9.

MS Tanner 65

A folio composite volume of state papers, in various hands, 294 leaves, in half-calf. Mid-17th century.

ff. 30r-3r

SuJ 154: John Suckling, To Mr. Henry German, In the Beginning of Parliament, 1640

Copy, headed ‘Sr John Sucklings letter to Mr Hen: Jermin’, on seven quarto pages.

c.1640.

This MS collated in Clayton.

First published as A Coppy of a Letter Found in the Privy Lodgeings at Whitehall (London, 1641). Fragmenta Aurea (London, 1646). Clayton, pp. 163-7.

ff. 179r-v, 190r-2r

RuB 142: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, ?7 November 1640

Copy, in a secretary hand, headed ‘A Speech vsed by Sr Beniamin Rudyard in the Comons howse of Parliamt 7o: Nov: 1640’. c.1640.

Speech (variously dated 4, 7, 9 and 10 November 1640) beginning ‘We are here assembled to do God's business and the King's...’. First published in The Speeches of Sr. Benjamin Rudyer in the high Court of Parliament (London, 1641), pp. 1-10. Manning, pp. 159-65.

f. 242r-v.

RuB 178: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, 29 December 1640

Copy, in a secretary hand, headed ‘Sr Beniamin Rudyardes speech in Parliament 29o Decembris 1640’. c.1640-1.

Speech beginning ‘The principal part of this business is money...’. Manning, pp. 166-7.

MS Tanner 72

A folio volume of state letters, papers and speeches, 332 leaves.

f. 105r

BcF 551: Francis Bacon, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Bacon, to James I, 25 March 1621.

MS Tanner 73

A folio composite volume of original state papers, in numerous hands, 529 leaves, now in two volumes foliated 1-264 and 265-529 respectively, in half-calf.

Vol. I, ff. 5r-14r

BcF 436: Francis Bacon, Bacon's Humble Submissions and Supplications

Copy of Bacon's submissions, in secretary hands

The Humble Submissions and Supplications Bacon sent to the House of Lords, on 19 March 1620/1 (beginning ‘I humbly pray your Lordships all to make a favourable and true construction of my absence...’); 22 April 1621 (beginning ‘It may please your Lordships, I shall humbly crave at your Lordships' hands a benign interpretation...’); and 30 April 1621 (beginning ‘Upon advised consideration of the charge, descending into mine own conscience...’), written at the time of his indictment for corruption. Spedding, XIV, 215-16, 242-5, 252-62.

Vol. I, ff. 3r, 109r

BcF 552: Francis Bacon, Letter(s)

Copies of two letters by Bacon, to James I.

Vol. II, ff. 427r-32v

CtR 526: Sir Robert Cotton, Miscellaneous

Copy of Cotton's opinion concerning the course to be pursued with respect to the false charges against the Duke of Buckingham made by the Spanish ambassador Inojosa, beginning ‘In humble Obedience of yor Graces Comaunde, I am imboldened to present my poore Aduise in this the greatest and most important Cause that ever happened in this State...’; docketed on blank f. 426 bis‘Apr. or May 1624’ and endorsed on f. 532 bisv‘Sr Rob: Cotton touching Inojosa’. c.1624.

MS Tanner 74

A folio collection of state papers, in various hands, 257 leaves, once in stamped calf, now disbound in folders.

ff. 111r-12v, 146r, 147r

RaW 830.5: Sir Walter Ralegh, Letter(s)

Copy of letters by Ralegh, one to Winwood, 21 March 1617/18.

ff. 113r-14v

*HlJ 87: Joseph Hall, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to Dr Ward, from Waltham, 30 March 1618/19.

Wynter, 503-4.

ff. 140r-1v.

RaW 710.3: Sir Walter Ralegh, Short Apology for his last Actions at Guiana

Copy, in a secretary hand, untitled and incomplete, on two conjugate folio leaves, endorsed ‘Part of Sr Walter Raughleighes apology’. c.1620.

Ralegh's letter of 1618 to his cousin George, Lord Carew of Clopton (beginning ‘Because I know not whether I shall live...’). First published in Judicious and Select Essays (London, 1650). Edwards, II, 375 et seq. Youings, No. 222, pp. 364-8.

f. 144v

RaW 25: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Euen such is tyme which takes in trust’

Copy, in a secretary hand, headed ‘These words vnderwritten he wrote the nighte before he suffred’. c.1620s.

This MS recorded in Latham, p. 153.

First published in Richard Brathwayte, Remains after Death (London, 1618). Latham, p. 72 (as ‘These verses following were made by Sir Walter Rauleigh the night before he dyed and left att the Gate howse’). Rudick, Nos 35A, 35B, and part of 55 (three versions, pp. 80, 133).

This poem is ascribed to Ralegh in most MS copies and is often appended to copies of his speech on the scaffold (see RaW 739-822).

See also RaW 302 and RaW 304.

ff. 144v-5r

RaW 730.1: Sir Walter Ralegh, Ralegh's Second Testamentary Note

Copy, in a secretary hand, headed ‘These words following he putt into his Ladies pocket the night before he suffred and charged her not to publish them vntill he was dead’. c.1620s.

Ralegh's note, 1618, denouncing false allegations, beginning ‘I did never receive advise from my Lord Carew to make any escape, neither did I tell ytt Stukeley...’. First published in The Works of Sir Walter Ralegh, ed. Thomas Birch (London, 1751), II, 280-1. Edwards (1868), II, 494-5.

ff. 148r-50v

RaW 749: Sir Walter Ralegh, Speech on the Scaffold (29 October 1618)

Copy, in a secretary hand, on six pages of two conjugate folio leaves, headed ‘Walter Rawlighes speeche at his deathe whoe was beheaded at the ould Pallace at westminster ye 28th of october betwene 8 & 9 of the clocke in the morning’.

Transcripts of Ralegh's speech have been printed in his Remains (London, 1657). Works (1829), I, 558-64, 691-6. VIII, 775-80, and elsewhere. Copies range from verbatim transcripts to summaries of the speech, they usually form part of an account of Ralegh's execution, they have various headings, and the texts differ considerably. For a relevant discussion, see Anna Beer, ‘Textual Politics: The Execution of Sir Walter Ralegh’, MP, 94/1 (August 1996), 19-38.

ff. 159r-60v

*HlJ 93: Joseph Hall, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to Dr Ward, from Waltham, 2 February (Candlemas Day), 1619/20. 1619.

Wynter, X, 504-5.

f. 176r

BcF 553: Francis Bacon, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Bacon, to James I, 2 January 1618/19.

ff. 214r-15v

*HlJ 94: Joseph Hall, Letter(s)

Autograph letter signed, to Dr Ward, from Waltham, 14 July 1620. 1620.

Wynter, X, 507.

MS Tanner 75

A folio volume of state letters and papers, 355 leaves.

f. 12r

RaW 831: Sir Walter Ralegh, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Ralegh, to James I, 1603.

MS Tanner 76

A folio composite volume of state papers, in various hands, 180 leaves, in calf. Compiled by Thomas Tanner (1674-1735) 17th century.

ff. 12r-19r

EsR 104: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Apology

Copy, in a professional secretary hand. Early 17th century.

First published, addressed to Anthony Bacon, as An Apologie of the Earle of Essex, against those which jealously and maliciously tax him to be the hinderer of the peace and quiet (London, [1600]), but immediately suppressed. Reprinted in 1603.

f. 55v et seq.

EsR 196: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Essex's Arraignment, 19 February 1600/1

Copy.

ff. 80r-1v

EsR 263: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Essex's speech at his execution

Copy, with sidenotes (? in Archbishop Sancroft's hand), imperfect, lacking the ending.

Generally incorporated in accounts of Essex's execution and sometimes also of his behaviour the night before.

ff. 89r-92v

BrN 52.5: Nicholas Breton, The Passion of a Discontented Minde (‘From silent night, true register of mones’)

Copy of stanzas 22-61, headed ‘A Penitential wch I found with other Papers concerning the Earl of Essex's Crimes and Arraignmt in a MS of that time of his Confinemt to the Ld Keeper's House, from Octobr 1599 to April 1600; Or as it seems from Stanza 36, Compar'd wth Cambden's Annals in fine A. 1600...’. Early 17th century.

First published in London, 1601. Attributed to Breton in Robertson, pp. xcii-xcviii, but see also Doughtie, Lyrics from English Airs, pp. 613-15. Printed and firmly attributed to Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, in The Poems of Edward De Vere, Seventeenth Earl of Oxford, and of Robert Devereux, Second Earl of Essex, ed. Steven W. May, Studies in Philology, 77, No. 5 (Early Winter 1980), pp. 49-59 (No. 11) and pp. 94-106.

f. 92v

EsR 4: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, ‘Happy were Hee could finish foorth his Fate’

Copy, headed ‘His Decastick, on retir'd Life’ and subscribed ‘Quoth Robertus Comes Essexiæ’.

This MS collated in May, pp. 124-5.

May, Poems, No. 7, p. 47. May, Courtier Poets, p. 254. EV 8176.

ff. 93r-4r

EsR 59: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, A Poem made on the Earle of Essex (being in disgrace with Queene Eliz): by mr henry Cuffe his Secretary (‘It was a time when sillie Bees could speake’)

Copy of a 15-stanxa version, headed ‘Henry Cuff made these following verses, his Lord, and Mastr the Earl of Essex being then in some Disgrace’, also headed in a different hand ‘The Apologue of ye Bee’.

This MS text collated in May, pp. 128-32.

First published, in a musical setting by John Dowland, in his The Third and Last Booke of Songs or Aires (London, 1603). May, Poems, No. IV, pp. 62-4. May, Courtier Poets, pp. 266-9. EV 12846.

f. 94r

ElQ 8: Queen Elizabeth I, On Monsieur's Departure, circa 1582 (‘I grieve and dare not show my discontent’)

Copy, headed ‘Sonetto’, subscribed ‘Eliz. Regina’.

Edited from this MS in Bradner, in Collected Works, and in Selected Works.

Collected Works, Poem 9, pp. 302-3. Selected Works, Poem 6, pp. 12-13. Bradner, p. 5.

ff. 113v-16v

BrN 53: Nicholas Breton, The Passion of a Discontented Minde (‘From silent night, true register of mones’)

Copy of stanzas 22-61, in a secretary hand, headed ‘A penitential wch I found wth other papers concerning ye Earl of Essex's Crimes & Arraignmt in a MS. of ye time. Whether verses made by him in the time of confinement to ye Ld Keeps House, fro Oct. 1599 to April 1600...’. Early 17th century.

This MS recorded in Doughtie. Collated in May, pp. 125-7.

First published in London, 1601. Attributed to Breton in Robertson, pp. xcii-xcviii, but see also Doughtie, Lyrics from English Airs, pp. 613-15. Printed and firmly attributed to Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, in The Poems of Edward De Vere, Seventeenth Earl of Oxford, and of Robert Devereux, Second Earl of Essex, ed. Steven W. May, Studies in Philology, 77, No. 5 (Early Winter 1980), pp. 49-59 (No. 11) and pp. 94-106.

MS Tanner 79

A folio composite volume of letters and state papers, in various hands and paper sizes, 237 leaves, in 17th-century calf (rebacked).

ff. 14r-15r

DaJ 289: Sir John Davies, A Dialogue between a Gentleman-Usher and a Post

Copy, in a secretary hand, untitled, on three quarto pages (the second leaf laid-down). c.1600.

Printed from this MS in Grosart.

First published in John Nichols, The Progresses and Public Processions of Queen Elizabeth, III (London, 1823), 76-8. Grosart, I, 15-20.

ff. 17r-19v

EsR 105: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Apology

A fragment of a copy, on three folio leaves, the rest missing. Early 17th century.

First published, addressed to Anthony Bacon, as An Apologie of the Earle of Essex, against those which jealously and maliciously tax him to be the hinderer of the peace and quiet (London, [1600]), but immediately suppressed. Reprinted in 1603.

f. 117r

*RaW 1.5: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘A Secret murder hath bene done of late’

Reproduced in Edwards, II, frontispiece.

First published in The Phoenix Nest (London, 1593). Latham, pp. 78-9.

ff. 190r-1r

ElQ 201: Queen Elizabeth I, Queen Elizabeth's Speech at the Closing of Parliament, March 29, 1585

Copy, in a secretary hand, untitled, on two conjugate folio leaves. Late 16th century.

This MS partly collated in Hartley.

Beginning ‘My lords and you of the Lower House: My silence must not injure the owner...’. Hartley, II, 31-3. Collected Works, Speech 16, pp. 181-3.

MS Tanner 80

A folio composite volume of state letters and tracts, 176 leaves.

ff. 118r-20v

AndL 18: Lancelot Andrewes, A Discourse against Second Marriage after Divorce

Copy, lacking the last leaf (for which see AndL 19).

First published in LACT, Minor Works (1854), pp. 106-10.

f. 155r-v

SoR 267.2: Robert Southwell, S.J., Catholic Saint, A Foure-fold Meditation: of the foure last things (‘O wretched man, which louest earthlie thinges’)

Copy of stanzas 37-48, on a leaf detached from SoR 267.3.

First published, as ‘By R: S. The author of S. Peters complaint’, in London, 1606. The poem is more commonly ascribed to Philip Howard (1557-95), first Earl of Arundel, Catholic Saint, with whom Southwell was acquainted (see McDonald, pp. 6-7, 121-2). EV17760.

MS Tanner 82

A folio volume of letters and state papers, in various professional hands, one secretary hand predominating, with a table of contents, 354 leaves, in black leather gilt. c.1630s.

f. 23r-v

LyJ 15: John Lyly, A petitionary letter to Queen Elizabeth

Copy.

Beginning ‘Most Gratious and dread Soveraigne: I dare not pester yor Highnes wth many wordes...’. Written probably in 1598. Bond, I, 64-5. Feuillerat, pp. 556-7.

f. 24r-v

LyJ 38: John Lyly, A second petitionary letter to Queen Elizabeth

Copy.

Beginning ‘Most gratious and dread Soveraigne: Tyme cannott worke my peticons, nor my peticons the tyme...’. Written probably in 1601. Bond, I, 70-1. Feuillerat, pp. 561-2.

ff. 45v-53v, 118v-33r, 142r-6v

BcF 554: Francis Bacon, Letter(s)

Copy of letters by Bacon, to various recipients, including Queen Elizabeth, Essex, Northampton, Davies, Northumberland, Colr, Tobie Matthews, Burghley, Robert Cecil, Ellesmere, and James I.

ff. 53v-9r

BcF 176: Francis Bacon, Considerations touching the Queen's Service in Ireland

Copy.

First published in Remaines (London, 1648). Spedding, X, 46-51.

ff. 133r-5v

BcF 437: Francis Bacon, Bacon's Humble Submissions and Supplications

Copy of Bacon's submission on 22 April 1620/1.

The Humble Submissions and Supplications Bacon sent to the House of Lords, on 19 March 1620/1 (beginning ‘I humbly pray your Lordships all to make a favourable and true construction of my absence...’); 22 April 1621 (beginning ‘It may please your Lordships, I shall humbly crave at your Lordships' hands a benign interpretation...’); and 30 April 1621 (beginning ‘Upon advised consideration of the charge, descending into mine own conscience...’), written at the time of his indictment for corruption. Spedding, XIV, 215-16, 242-5, 252-62.

ff. 225v-9r

BcF 135.2: Francis Bacon, Certain Observations made upon a Libel published this present year, 1592

Copy of the letter on the Queen's religious policies.

A tract beginning ‘It were just and honourable for princes being in war together, that howsever they prosecute their quarrels...’. First published in Resuscitatio, ed. W. Rawley (London, 1657). Spedding, VIII, 146-208.

A letter to M. Critoy, Secretary of France, c.1589, ‘A Letter on the Queen's religious policies’, was later incorporated in Certain Observations made upon a Libel, and first published in Cabala, sive scrinia sacra (London, 1654), pp. 38-41.

For the Declaration of the True Causes of the Great Troubles (also known as Cecil's Commonwealth), the ‘Libel’ that Bacon answered, see RaW 383.8.

ff. 236v-43v

RaW 832: Sir Walter Ralegh, Letter(s)

Copy of five letters by Ralegh, to Winwood, James I, Lady Ralegh (2), and Robert Carr.

f. 244-7r

RaW 26: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Euen such is tyme which takes in trust’

Copy, headed ‘Verses found in Sr: Walter Raleighs Bible in the Gate howse’.

This MS recorded in Latham, p. 153.

First published in Richard Brathwayte, Remains after Death (London, 1618). Latham, p. 72 (as ‘These verses following were made by Sir Walter Rauleigh the night before he dyed and left att the Gate howse’). Rudick, Nos 35A, 35B, and part of 55 (three versions, pp. 80, 133).

This poem is ascribed to Ralegh in most MS copies and is often appended to copies of his speech on the scaffold (see RaW 739-822).

See also RaW 302 and RaW 304.

f. 267v

AndL 74: Lancelot Andrewes, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Andrewes to his Archdeacon, 15 August 1622.

f. 311r-v

HlJ 19: Joseph Hall, Episcopal Admonition, Sent in a Letter to the House of Commons, April 28, 1628

Copy, headed ‘Doctor Josuah Hall Bishop of Exeter his Letter to the Lower House of Parliament’.

See HlJ 17-30.

ff. 313v-26v

SpE 71: Edmund Spenser, Sir Kenelm Digby's Observations on the 22 Stanza in the 9th. Canto of the 2d. book of Spensers Faery Queen

Copy.

One of the earliest commentaries on The Faerie Queene, including quotations, dated 13 June 1628, addressed to Sir Edward Stradling, and beginning ‘My much honored freind, I am too well acquainted with the weaknes of my abillities...’. First published in London, 1643. Variorum, II, 472-8.

MS Tanner 84

A folio volume of state tracts and papers, 334 leaves. In various professional hands, including the ‘Feathery Scribe’.

Once owned Sir Robert Oxenbridge, MP (1595-1638) of Hurstbourne Priors, Hampshire; later by William Sancroft (1617-93), Archbishop of Canterbury; and by Thomas Tanner (1674-1735), Bishop of St Asaph, ecclesiastical historian, scholar and book collector, who on 2 May 1729 lent it to Thomas Hearne (1678-1735), antiquary. It was once bought from John Jackson of Tottenham High Cross.

Described in Peter Beal, In Praise of Scribes: Manuscripts and their Makers in Seventeenth-Century England (Oxford, 1998), pp. 257-8 (No. 95).

ff. 243r-63r

DaS 31: Samuel Daniel, A Breviary of the History of England

Copy, here ascribed to ‘Sr: Walter Ral,=eigh Knight’, in the hand of the ‘Feathery Scribe’.

This MS discussed in Gottfried. Beal, In Praise of Scribes, p. 257 (No. 95.1).

First published (from a MS ‘found in the Library of a Person of High Quality’) as An Introduction to a Breviary of the History of England with the Reign of King William the I, ascribed to Sir Walter Ralegh (London, 1693). Works of Sir Walter Ralegh (Oxford, 1829), VIII, 509-37. Daniel's probable authorship discussed in Rudolf B. Gottfried, ‘The Authorship of A Breviary of the History of England’, SP, 53 (1956), 172-90, and in William Leigh Godshalk, ‘Daniel's History’, JEGP, 63.1 (1964), 45-57.

MS Tanner 85

A folio volume of antiquarian tracts, in two or three professional hands, including that of the ‘Feathery Scribe’, 266 leaves. c.1630s.

Once owned by Sir Robert Oxenbridge, MP (1595-1638) of Hurstbourne Priors, Hampshire; later by Thomas Tanner (1674-1735), Bishop of St Asaph, ecclesiastical historian, scholar and book collector. It was once bought from John Jackson of Tottenham High Cross.

Briefly described in Peter Beal, In Praise of Scribes: Manuscripts and their Makers in Seventeenth-Century England (Oxford, 1998), pp. 258-9 (No. 96).

ff. 1r-6v

CtR 205: Sir Robert Cotton, A Discovre of Lawfvllnes of Combats to be performed in the presence of the King, or the Constable and Marshall of England. Written...1609

Copy in the hand of the ‘Feathery Scribe’.

Beal, In Praise of Scribes, p. 258 (No. 96.1).

Tract beginning ‘Where difference could not be determined...’. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [59]-[71]. Hearne (1771), II, 172-80.

ff. 7r-13v

DaJ 247: Sir John Davies, Of the Antiquity, Use, and Ceremony of Lawful Combats in England

Copy, in the hand of the ‘Feathery Scribe’.

Beal, In Praise of Scribes, p. 258 (No. 96.2).

Paper delivered to the Society of Antiquaries, beginning ‘Our Question is of the antiquity and manner of lawful combats...’, dated 22 May 1601. First published in Hearne (1771), II, 180-7. Grosart, III, 293-302.

ff. 13v-15v

DaJ 253: Sir John Davies, [Of the Antiquity, Use and Ceremony of Lawful Combats in England] Of the Same

Copy, untitled, in the hand of the ‘Feathery Scribe’.

Beal, In Praise of Scribes, p. 258 (No. 96.3).

Essay beginning ‘I supposed, and so it falleth forth amongst this learned assembly...’, dated 22 May 1601. First published in Hearne (1771), II, 187-90. Grosart, III, 303-6.

ff. 20r-39r

HoH 57: Henry Howard, Earl of Northampton, Duello Foiled

Copy in the hand of the ‘Feathery Scribe’, lacking a title-page, but headed ‘Duello Foil'd: The whole proceedinges, in the orderly Dissoluinge, of a designe for single, fight, Betwene, two Valiant, gentlemen by occasion, Whereof, the vnlawfulnes; and wickednes, of a Duello, is preparatorilye, Disputed, accordinge to the Rules, of honnor: and Right Reason: Written, by ye: Lo: Henry Howard, Earle of Northampton Ano:’.

Beal, In Praise of Scribes, p. 258 (No. 96.5).

A discourse, with a dedicatory epistle to ‘my very good Lord’, beginning ‘Reasons moving me to write this thing which handleth not the whole matter...’, the tract beginning ‘The two parties between whom this single fight was appointed...’. Published in Thomas Hearne, A Collection of Curious Discourses written by Eminent Antiquaries (London, 1771), II, 223-42, where it is attributed to Sir Edward Coke. It is not certain whether this tract is by Howard or simply annotated by him as a reader.

MS Tanner 88

A folio composite volume of miscellaneous papers, in various hands, 254 leaves, in contemporary calf. Compiled in part by William Sancroft (1617-93), Archbishop of Canterbury.

f. 3r-v

FuT 7: Thomas Fuller, Observations of the Shires

Copy in the hand of William Sancroft, headed ‘Mr Fullers observations of the shires’. Mid-17th century.

Edited from this MS in Gutch. Recorded in Gibson, XXXIV (p. 144), and in Bailey, pp. 139, 744-5. Mid-17th century.

First published in John Gutch, Collectanea Curiosa (Oxford, 1781), I, 222-6.

f. 4v

SuJ 149: John Suckling, An Answer to a Gentleman in Norfolk that sent to enquire after the Scotish business

Copy in the hand of William Sancroft, headed ‘A Letter sent by Sr John Sucklikng to a freind of his in Norfolke, concerning the Scottish businesse’. Mid-17th century.

This MS collated in Clayton.

First published in Last Remains (London, 1659). Clayton, pp. 142-4.

ff. 10v-11r

WoH 312: Sir Henry Wotton, Will

Copy of Wotton's last will and testament, dated 1 October 1637.

ff. 11v-12r

WoH 261: Sir Henry Wotton, A Meditation upon the XXIIth Chapter of Genesis. By H. W.

Copy in the hand of William Sancroft, ascribed to ‘Sr H. Wotton’. Mid-17th century.

First published in Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), pp. 343-50.

f. 13r

ClJ 262: John Cleveland, To the Earl of Arundel

Copy, headed ‘Mr Cleveland in ye Name of ye Mr. & Fellows of S. John's Coll. in Cambr. / To the Earle of Arundell’.

Letter on behalf of the Master and Fellows of St John's College, Cambridge, beginning ‘It equally afflicts us that we must answer your letter...’. Published in Clieveland Vindiciæ (London, 1677).

f. 13r

ClJ 264: John Cleveland, To the Earl of Holland

Copy.

Published in Clieveland Vindiciæ (London, 1677), pp. 148-9.

f. 13r

ClJ 266: John Cleveland, To the Earl of Newcastle

Copy.

Published in Clieveland Vindiciæ (London, 1677), pp. 146-7.

f. 13r

ClJ 268: John Cleveland, To the Lady Bowes

Copy.

Letter, beginning ‘Madam / We should altogether excuse our presumption in writing...’.

ff. 15r-17r

FeO 74: Owen Felltham, A Brief Character of the Low-Countries

Copy in the hand of William Sancroft, headed ‘Owen Felltham's Three weekes observations of the Low Countries / states-country; especially Holland. transcribed long before it was printed’. Mid-17th century.

First published as Three Monethes observation of the low Countries especially Holland by a traveller whose name I know not more then by the two letters of J:S: at the bottome of the letter. Egipt this 22th of Jannuary (London, 1648). Expanded text printed as A brief Character of the Low-Countries under the States. Being three weeks observation of the Vices and Vertues of the Inhabitants... (for Henry Seile: London, 1652).

ff. 142r-3r

WoH 260: Sir Henry Wotton, Italian Authors selected and censured by Sir Hen. Wotton

Copy of Wotton's list and comments, in an unidentified hand, on two folio leaves. Early 17th century.

Edited from this MS in Pearsall Smith.

First published in Pearsall Smith (1907), II, 484-6.

MS Tanner 89

A folio guardbook of separate state papers, in various hands, 271 leaves (but some removed to MS Tanner 89*).

f. 57r

BeJ 38: Sir John Beaumont, To my Lord Marquess of Buckingham. Concerning the Academ of Honor [1621] (‘My Lord the hart that loves you must have leave’)

A formal copy in a neat roman hand, headed ‘Verses written by the euery-way noble, my dearest freind, or your Graces worthie kinsman, JOHN BEAVMONT, esquire, concerning the Academ roial, or College of HONOR’, and subscribed ‘Your Grace had Sr William Alexanders uerses to the same purpose at Royston: and all worthie men are most willing to concurr, and assist therein under your name’, on one side of a single folio leaf. c.1620s.

This MS collated in Sell.

First published in Ethel M. Portall, ‘The Academ Roial of King James I’, Proceedings of the British Academy, 1915-1916, pp. 189-208. Sell, pp. 176-7.

f. 59r-60v

CtR 341: Sir Robert Cotton, A Relation of the Proceedings against Ambassadors who have miscarried themselves, etc. ...[27 April 1624]

Copy, in an accomplished professional hand, imperfect, lacking the ending (despite a note at the foot of f. 60v ‘For ye remainder of this see p. 36’). c.1630.

Tract, addressed to George, Duke of Buckingham, beginning ‘In humble obedience to your Grace's Command, I am emboldned to present my poor advice...’. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. 1-9.

ff. 69r-71r

BcF 699: Francis Bacon, An Essay of a King

Copy, in a secretary hand, headed ‘A character of a king’. Early 17th century.

Essay, beginning ‘A king is a mortal god on earth...’. Spedding, VI, 595-7 (discussed pp. 592-4).

f. 71v

WoH 200.5: Sir Henry Wotton, Upon the Sudden Restraint of the Earl of Somerset then falling from favour (‘Dazzled thus with the height of place’)

Copy, in a secretary hand, untitled and here beginning ‘Thus dazeled with the height of place’. Early 17th century.

First published in Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 522. Hannah (1845), pp. 25-7. Some texts of this poem discussed in Ted-Larry Pebworth, ‘Sir Henry Wotton's “Dazel'd Thus, with Height of Place” and the Appropriation of Political Poetry in the Earlier Seventeenth Century’, PBSA, 71 (1977), 151-69.

ff. 122r-41r

BcF 439: Francis Bacon, Bacon's Humble Submissions and Supplications

Copy, in an account of the proceedings against Bacon.

The Humble Submissions and Supplications Bacon sent to the House of Lords, on 19 March 1620/1 (beginning ‘I humbly pray your Lordships all to make a favourable and true construction of my absence...’); 22 April 1621 (beginning ‘It may please your Lordships, I shall humbly crave at your Lordships' hands a benign interpretation...’); and 30 April 1621 (beginning ‘Upon advised consideration of the charge, descending into mine own conscience...’), written at the time of his indictment for corruption. Spedding, XIV, 215-16, 242-5, 252-62.

f. 220r

*CnC 160: Charles Cotton, Inscription(s)

A leaf inscribed by Cotton to Mr. Goodread, probably extracted from an exemplum of Cotton's The History of the Life of the Duke of Espernon (London, 1670). c.1670.

Recorded in Parks, p. 15.

f. 261v

RoJ 126: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Impromptu on Louis XIV (‘Lorraine you stole. by fraud you got Burgundy’)

Copy, in a cursive hand, headed ‘E of Rochester’ and here beginning ‘Lorrain he stole by fraud he got Burgundy’, with other texts on one side of a single octavo leaf.

This MS recorded in Vieth and in Walker.

First published in The Agreeable Companion (London, 1745). Vieth, p. 21. Walker, p. 121, as ‘[On Louis XIV]’. See also A. S. G. Edwards, ‘Rochester's “Impromptu on Louis XIV”’, N&Q, 219 (November 1974), 418-19.

MS Tanner 90

A folio volume of state papers and letters, 217 leaves.

f. 89r et seq.

LeJ 8.5: John Leland, Verses made at the Coronation of Queen Anne

Copy, headed ‘Copie of divers and sundry verses as well in Latin as in English, devised and made partely by John Leland and partly by Nicholas Udal, whereof sum were sette up and sum were spoken and pronounced to the ladie Anne, wif unto our soverain Lorde K. Henry VIII. as her grace rode from the Tower of London to her coronation at Westminster’.

Verses made for the coronation procession of Queen Anne Boleyn, 31 May 1533. First published in John Nichols, The Progresses and Public Processions of Queen Elizabeth, I (London, 1788), i-xx.

f. 89r et seq.

UdN 1.5: Nicholas Udall, [Verses made at the Coronation of Queen Anne]

Copy, headed ‘Copie of divers and sundry verses as well in Latin as in English, devised and made partely by John Leland and partly by Nicholas Udal, whereof sum were sette up and sum were spoken and pronounced to the ladie Anne, wif unto our soverain Lorde K. Henry VIII. as her grace rode from the Tower of London to her coronation at Westminster’.

Verses made for the coronation procession of Queen Anne Boleyn, 31 May 1533. First published in John Nichols, The Progresses and Public Processions of Queen Elizabeth, I (London, 1788), i-xx.

MS Tanner 103

A folio composite volume of state tracts and letters, in various hands, 297 leaves, in calf (rebacked). Early-mid-17th century.

ff. 7r-17r

RaW 1067: Sir Walter Ralegh, A Military Discourse

Copy.

Lefranc (1968), pp. 64-5.

A treatise beginning ‘Forasmuch as in every doubtfull and questionable matter, it is familiar and common amongst men to be diverse...’. First published in London, 1734. It was probably written by Sir Thomas Wilford (1541-1601?), or possibly by Sir Francis De Vere or Nathaniel Boothe. See Lefranc (1968), pp. 64-5.

ff. 18r-29v

DaS 32: Samuel Daniel, A Breviary of the History of England

Copy, in a rounded hand, ascribed to ‘Sr Walter Raleigh Knight’, in a small folio booklet. First half 17th century.

First published (from a MS ‘found in the Library of a Person of High Quality’) as An Introduction to a Breviary of the History of England with the Reign of King William the I, ascribed to Sir Walter Ralegh (London, 1693). Works of Sir Walter Ralegh (Oxford, 1829), VIII, 509-37. Daniel's probable authorship discussed in Rudolf B. Gottfried, ‘The Authorship of A Breviary of the History of England’, SP, 53 (1956), 172-90, and in William Leigh Godshalk, ‘Daniel's History’, JEGP, 63.1 (1964), 45-57.

ff. 110r-19r

CtR 342: Sir Robert Cotton, A Relation of the Proceedings against Ambassadors who have miscarried themselves, etc. ...[27 April 1624]

Copy, in a professional hand, with a title-page, ascribed to ‘Sr Robert Cotton knight and Barronett. 1629’. c.1630.

Tract, addressed to George, Duke of Buckingham, beginning ‘In humble obedience to your Grace's Command, I am emboldned to present my poor advice...’. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. 1-9.

ff. 148r-71r

CtR 9: Sir Robert Cotton, An Answer made by Command of Prince Henry, to Certain Propositions of Warre and Peace

Copy, in two or three professional hands, untitled, docketed in another hand (? that of William Fulman (1632-88), antiquary) ‘Sr Rob. Cotton agst Warr. Jac. 1.’

A treatise beginning ‘Frames of Policy, as well as works of Nature, are best preserved from the same grounds...’., written in 1609. First published London, 1655. Also published as Warrs with Forregin Princes Dangerous to oyr Common-Wealth: or, reasons for Forreign Wars Answered (London, 1657); as An Answer to such Motives as were offer'd by certain Military-Men to Prince Henry, inciting him to affect Arms more than Peace... (London, 1665); and as A Discourse of Foreign War (London, 1690).

ff. 196r-8v

CtR 527: Sir Robert Cotton, Miscellaneous

Copy of a series of extracts and aphorisms, headed ‘A Colectyone of preceptes & phrases verye Choyse gathered by Sr Robarte Cotton knyght & Baronete’, with a subheading ‘Daunger in Fauorites’ and beginning ‘ffaithe & merite ought to be the attractives of Princes affectyones...’, in a secretary hand, imperfect, lacking the remainder after a catchword ‘His’. Early 17th century.

ff. 201r-4v

CtR 147: Sir Robert Cotton, The Danger wherein this Kingdome now Standeth, and the Remedy

Copy, in a professional secretary hand, endorsed ‘Danger of the state conc. ye Bohem. & Palatine Cause’. c.1620s.

Tract beginning ‘As soon as the house of Austria had incorporated it self into the house of Spaine...’. First published London, 1628. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. 308-20.

ff. 205r-12r

RaW 1083: Sir Walter Ralegh, Observations touching Trade and Commerce with the Hollander

Copy, possibly signed by the author, Keymer.

A tract addressed to the monarch and beginning ‘According to my duty, I am emboldened to put your majesty in mind, that about fourteen or fifteen years past...’. First published, as by Sir Walter Ralegh, in London, 1653. Works (1829), VIII, 351-76.

Written by John Keymer (fl.1584-1622). See Adolf Buff, ‘Who is the author of the tract intitled “Some observations touching trade with the Hollander”?’, ES, 1 (1877), 187-212, and Lefranc (1968), p. 64.

ff. 213r-20v

RaW 574: Sir Walter Ralegh, A Dialogue between a Counsellor of State and a Justice of the Peace

Copy of an abridged version, including the dedicatory epistle to King James, in at least two hands, imperfect, the last leaf gnawed by rodents. Early 17th century.

A treatise, with a dedicatory epistle to James I beginning ‘Those that are suppressed and hopeless are commonly silent ...’, the dialogue beginning ‘Now, sir, what think you of Mr. St. John's trial in the Star-chamber?...’. First published as The Prerogative of Parliaments in England (‘Midelburge’ and ‘Hamburg’ [i.e. London], 1628). Works (1829), VIII, 151-221.

ff. 222r-3v

GgA 144: Sir Arthur Gorges, A True Transcript and Publication of his Majesties Letters Pattent [5 March 1611/12]. For an Office to be erected, and called the Publicke Register for generall Commerce.

MS, in a neat professional hand, of Gorges's proposed patent, drawn up as a letter to a Lord with an introductory explanation, citing ‘Presidentes of sundri patentes for newe inventions wth prohibicions’, endorsed ‘The humble information of Sr Arthure Gorges knight concerning the proiect for genall Commerce and exchang for Interests moneyes’. c.1611/12.

First published, as A Trve Transcript and Pvblication of his Maiesties Letters Pattent [5 March 1612]. For an Office to be erected, and called the Publicke Register for generall Commerce. Whereunto is annexed an Ouerture and explanation of the nature and purport of the said Office for their better vnderstanding and direction that shall haue occasion to vse it, By Sir Arthur Gorges, Knight (London, 1611[/12]).

ff. 235r-8r

EsR 156: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, First Letter of Advice to the Earl of Rutland

Copy, headed ‘The Earle of Essex letter to the Earle of Rutland before his Travell very learnedly pennd’, in a mixed hand, undated. Early 17th century.

The letter, dated from Greenwich, 4 January [1596], beginning ‘My Lord, I hold it for a principle in the course of intelligence of state...’.

First published, as ‘The Late E. of E. his aduice to the E. of R. in his trauels’, in Profitable Instructions; Describing what speciall Obseruations are to be taken by Trauellers in all Nations, States and Countries (London, 1633), pp. 27-73. Francis Bacon, Resuscitatio (London, 1657), pp. 106-10. Spedding, IX, 6-15. W.B. Devereux, Lives and Letters of the Devereux, Earls of Essex (1853), I, No. xciii.

Essex's three letters to Rutland discussed by Paul E.J. Hammer in ‘The Earl of Essex, Fulke Greville, and the Employment of Scholars’, SP. 91/2 (Spring, 1994), 167-80, and in ‘Letters of Travel Advice from the Earl of Essex to the Earl of Rutland: Some Comments’, PQ, 74/3 (Summer 1995), 317-22. It is likely that the first letter was written substantially by Francis Bacon.

MS Tanner 104

A folio composite volume of papers on canon law, 320 leaves.

f. 59r-v

AndL 19: Lancelot Andrewes, A Discourse against Second Marriage after Divorce

The last leaf of AndL 18.

First published in LACT, Minor Works (1854), pp. 106-10.

MS Tanner 108

A folio volume of two tracts (the second a Life of John Fisher), both in the hand of the ‘Feathery Scribe’, 181 leaves. c.1620s.

Once owned Sir Robert Oxenbridge, MP (1595-1638) of Hurstbourne Priors, Hampshire; later by William Sancroft (1617-93), Archbishop of Canterbury, manuscript collector; and by Thomas Tanner (1674-1735), Bishop of St Asaph, ecclesiastical historian, scholar and book collector. It was once bought from John Jackson of Tottenham High Cross.

Described in Peter Beal, In Praise of Scribes: Manuscripts and their Makers in Seventeenth-Century England (Oxford, 1998), p. 259 (No. 97), with facsimile examples on pp. 68 and 70.

ff. 1r-51v

PtG 2.5: George Puttenham, An Apology or True Defence of Her Majesty's Honourable and Good Renown

Copy, headed ‘A Discourse playnelie, proueinge, that, aswell: the sentence, of Death, Latelie, giuen, agaunste, that, vnfortunate, Ladie, Marie, Late, Queene, of Scottes: as, also, the, Execution, of the same, Sentence, was, honnoble: iuste, necessarie, and, Lawfull: An°; 1587; 129 Eliz: J.1’.

This MS recorded in Willcock & Walker, p. xxiii (n). Beal, In Praise of Scribes, p. 259 (No. 97.1), with a facsimile of f. 1r on p. 68.

A treatise on the execution of Mary Queen of Scots, beginning ‘There hath not happened since the memorie of man…’. First published, as ‘A Justification of Queene Elizabeth in relation to the Affaire of Mary Queene of Scottes’, in Accounts and Papers relating to Mary Queen of Scots, ed. Allan J. Crosby and John Bruce, Camden Society, 93 (1867), pp. 67-134.

MS Tanner 118

A folio miscellany of religious verse and prose, partly compiled by Alexander Colepeper and passed on to his son Thomas, 166 leaves. c.1600.

ff. 44r-53r

SoR 267.3: Robert Southwell, S.J., Catholic Saint, A Foure-fold Meditation: of the foure last things (‘O wretched man, which louest earthlie thinges’)

Copy, lacking a leaf after f. 46v (for which see SoR 267.2).

First published, as ‘By R: S. The author of S. Peters complaint’, in London, 1606. The poem is more commonly ascribed to Philip Howard (1557-95), first Earl of Arundel, Catholic Saint, with whom Southwell was acquainted (see McDonald, pp. 6-7, 121-2). EV17760.

MS Tanner 120

A folio volume of state tracts, in a single professional hand, 255 leaves, in reversed calf. c.1630.

A flyleaf annotated by William Sancroft.

ff. 233r-42r

CtR 343: Sir Robert Cotton, A Relation of the Proceedings against Ambassadors who have miscarried themselves, etc. ...[27 April 1624]

Copy.

Tract, addressed to George, Duke of Buckingham, beginning ‘In humble obedience to your Grace's Command, I am emboldned to present my poor advice...’. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. 1-9.

MS Tanner 127

A folio composite volume of letters and papers largely relating to the diocese of Canterbury, in various hands, 342 leaves.

f. 170r

*KiW 48: Sir William Killigrew, Letter(s)

Killigrew's inscribed copy of a letter by Richard Collinge to Tobias Rustan, from Windsor Castle, 30 July 1682. 1682.

MS Tanner 135

A folio composite volume of papers relating to the diocese of Norwich, in various hands, 189 leaves.

f. 163r

*CoR 790: Richard Corbett, Letter(s)

A letter, in the hand of an amanuensis, signed by Corbett, to Mr Turfett, from Norwich, 4 October 1634. 1634.

MS Tanner 169

A folio compendium or entry book of state letters and other documents and memoranda, in various secretary and italic hands, 231 leaves (including numerous blanks), in modern half-calf. Compiled over a period, and partly written, by Sir Stephen Powle (c.1553-1630), Clerk of the Crown.

f. 43r

BrN 54: Nicholas Breton, A passionate Sonett made by the Kinge of Scots uppon difficulties ariseing to crosse his proceedinge in love & marriage with his moste worthie to be esteemed Queene (‘In sunny beames the skye dothe shewe her sweete’)

Copy, in a professional secretary and italic hand, subscribed by Powle ‘Geauen me by Mr. Britton who had beene (as he sayed) in Scotland wth the Kinges Maiesty: but I rather thinke they weare made by him in the person of the Kinge’. [1606].

Edited from this MS in Grosart.

First published in Grosart (1879), I (t), p. 24.

f. 43r

GrF 40: Fulke Greville, Mustapha, IV, iv, 116-117 (‘Mischiefe is like the Cockatrices eyes’)

Copy, in a roman hand, subscribed ‘29 No: 1606: Mr Clapham from Mr. Foucke Greuill’ and here beginning ‘Treason is like a Cocatrices eies’. 1606.

Edited from this MS in G. A. Wilkes, ‘The Sequence of the Writings of Fulke Greville, Lord Brooke’, SP, 56 (1959), 489-503 (p. 491).

Bullough, II, 118.

f. 60v

SiP 180.2: Sir Philip Sidney, A Letter of Advice to Robert Sidney

Copy.

A letter beginning ‘My most deere Brother. You have thought unkindness in me, I have not written oftner unto you...’. First published in Profitable Instructions. Describing what speciall Obseruations are to be taken by Trauellers in all Nations, States and Countries (London, 1633), pp. 74-103. Feuillerat (as Correspondence No. XXXVIII), III, 124-7.

f. 62r

HrJ 348: Sir John Harington, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Harington, to Edward Dyer, [from Cambridge, 1588]. 1580.

McClure, No. 2, pp. 61-2.

f. 69r

LyJ 16: John Lyly, A petitionary letter to Queen Elizabeth

Copy.

Beginning ‘Most Gratious and dread Soveraigne: I dare not pester yor Highnes wth many wordes...’. Written probably in 1598. Bond, I, 64-5. Feuillerat, pp. 556-7.

f. 69r

LyJ 39: John Lyly, A second petitionary letter to Queen Elizabeth

Copy, headed ‘Mr Lillyes peticon to the Queene. 1601: about the tyme of my Ld of Essex followers fall’.

Edited from this MS in Bond, I, 378, and in Feuillerat.

Beginning ‘Most gratious and dread Soveraigne: Tyme cannott worke my peticons, nor my peticons the tyme...’. Written probably in 1601. Bond, I, 70-1. Feuillerat, pp. 561-2.

f. 70v

RaW 487: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘The state of Fraunce as nowe it standes’

Copy, in a secretary hand, headed ‘The French Primero’.

This MS collated in May.

First published in A Catalogue of the Harleian Manuscripts in the British Museum (London, 1808), III, 78. Listed but not printed in Latham, p. 172. Rudick, No. 30, p. 71. EV 24294.

f. 79r

TiC 12: Chidiock Tichborne, Tichborne's Lament (‘My prime of youth is but a frost of cares’)

Copy, apparently made by one of Powle's clerks directly from Tichborne's autograph MS, the poem headed partly in Powle's hand ‘Tichbornes verses made by him selfe not three dayes before his execution at Tower hill with Babington and 12. more of that confederacy / I haue theise verses written by him sealfe’, and subscribed by him similarly ‘Written by him selfe .3. dayes before his exequution: I haue the originall written with his owne hande’.

Edited from this MS in Hirsch, with a facsimile of f. 79r on p. 314, and, in a revised transcription, with another facsimile, in ELR, 17, after p. 276.

First published in the single sheet Verses of Prayse and Joy Written Upon her Maiesties Preseruation Whereunto is annexed Tychbornes lamentation, written in the Towre with his owne hand, and an answer to the same (London, 1586). Hirsch, pp. 309-10. Also ‘The Text of “Tichborne's Lament” Reconsidered’, ELR, 17, No. 3 (Autumn 1987), between pp. 276 and 277. May EV 15464 (recording 37 MS texts). For the ‘answer’ to this poem, see KyT 1-2.

ff. 92r-131r

LeC 5: Anon, Leicester's Commonwealth

Copy, in a secretary hand, annotated by Powle ‘The Ld of Leycester his common wealth coppied of yonge Mr willeam bruwally written...’ [‘by my red hedded madde manne’ added possibly in another hand].

First published as The Copie of a Leter, Wryten by a Master of Arte of Cambrige, to his Friend in London, Concerning some talke past of late betwen two worshipful and graue men, about the present state, and some procedinges of the Erle of Leycester and his friendes in England ([? Rouen], 1584). Soon banned. Reprinted as Leycesters common-wealth (London, 1641). Edited, as Leicester's Commonwealth, by D.C. Peck (Athens, OH, & London, 1985). Although various attributions have been suggested by Peck and others, the most likely author remains Robert Persons (1546-1610), Jesuit conspirator.

f. 139r-42r (passim)

RaW 719: Sir Walter Ralegh, Chemical and Medical Receipts

Copy of receipts by Ralegh, partly in scribal hands, partly by Powle, including ‘Sr W. Rawleigh to cause to pisse bloode’ [1609], ‘December. 3: 1613 ffor the stone in ye bladder and raynes’ (annotated by Powle ‘This stone Sr. w. Rawlegh did geaue mee which I keepe as a Jwell 1613’), ‘December 1613 10 Sr Wa: Raughlyes medicen for the dropsy’, and ‘This medicen for the preservacon of the sight, Sr wa: Rawghly learned of a Dutch man, and imparted the same vnto mee, August: 27th 1614’.

This MS recorded in Lefranc (1968), p. 680 et seq.

f. 143r-4r

EsR 264: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Essex's speech at his execution

Copy, headed ‘The Earl of Essex his behavior speache and prayer at the tyme of his deathe’.

Generally incorporated in accounts of Essex's execution and sometimes also of his behaviour the night before.

f. 147r

BrN 42: Nicholas Breton, Mr. Brittons verses (‘twoe to one is odds: twoe with one makes oddes’)

Copy, at least partly in Powle's hand, under a general heading ‘Mr Brotton. 5. Juni 1616’. 1616.

Edited from this MS in Grosart.

First published in Grosart (1879), I (t), p. 24.

f. 147r

BrN 102: Nicholas Breton, ‘Tempus adest, et tempus abest, fugit Amnus, et amnis’

Copy, headed ‘Mr. Brittons Verses’. [1616-17].

Edited from this MS in Grosart.

First published in Grosart (1879), I (t), p. 24.

f. 173v

BrN 34: Nicholas Breton, I and U (‘A placed aloane is but an idle worde’)

Copy, possibly by Powle, headed ‘i617: / oct: i7:’, the first line originally reading ‘I. and: U: A by it selfe is butt an idle Worde’ and changed to ‘I. and: U: A placed aloane is butt an idle Worde’. October 1617.

First published in Grosart (1879), I (t), p. 24.

See BrN 43.

f. 173v

BrN 43: Nicholas Breton, My Witche (‘Yor. eies bewitchte my wit, yor. wit bewitchte my will’)

Copy, subscribed by Powle ‘Theis 12 verses weare made and geauen me by Mr. Nic. Bretton anno et die supradictis’. [October 1617].

Edited from this MS in Grosart.

First published in Grosart (1879), I (t), p. 24.

ff. 175r-6v

ElQ 182: Queen Elizabeth I, Queen Elizabeth's Speech at the Close of the Parliamentary Session, March 15, 1576

Copy, in a professional hand, headed ‘The Oration the Queenes Matie made in the end of the Parliament the 15th of March. 1576’.

This MS cited in Hartley and in Selected Works.

First published (from a lost MS) in Nugae Antiquae, ed. Henry Harington (London, 1804), I, 120-7.

Version I. Beginning ‘Do I see God's most sacred, holy Word and text of holy Writ drawn to so divers senses...’. Hartley, I, 471-3 (Text i). Collected Works, Speech 13, pp. 167-71. Selected Works, Speech 7, pp. 52-60.

Version II. Beginning ‘My lords, Do I see the Scriptures, God's word, in so many ways interpreted...’. Hartley, I, 473-5 (Text ii).

f. 179r

GaG 4.5: George Gascoigne, The Tale of Hemetes the Heremyte

Copy of a portion of the tale, headed ‘The Hernitts tale, made by Garrett master of Arte of my proceedinge’.

This MS recorded in H. R. Woudhuysen, Sir Philip Sidney and the Circulation of Manuscripts 1558-1640 (Oxford, 1995), p. 72, and the ascription discussed in Gabriel Heaton, ‘The Queen and the Hermit: “The Tale of Hemetes” (1575)’, in Elizabeth I and the Culture of Writing, ed. Peter Beal and Grace Ioppolo (British Library, 2007), pp. 87-114 (pp. 97-100).

First published (English and Latin) in Synesius, Bishop of Cyrene, A Paradoxe ([London], 1579). Cunliffe, II, 473-510. In the dedicatory epistle Gascoigne specifically disclaims authorship of the English version, which originally formed part of the royal entertainment at Woodstock in September 1575 and was probably written by Robert Garrett, Reader in Rhetoric at St John's College, Oxford.

ff. 191r-2r

LoT 30: Thomas Lodge, Letter(s)

A copy in Powle's hand of a letter, with a prescription, sent to him by Thomas Lodge, 20 August 1618. 1618.

Edited in N. Burton Paradise, Thomas Lodge: The History of an Elizabethan (New Haven, 1931), pp. 61-2.

f. 192v

DyE 78: Sir Edward Dyer, ‘The lowest trees haue topps, the ante her gall’

Copy, in a professional secretary hand, headed ‘7o: Semp: 1618. / Smithshall / Verses given as I suppose by Mr Lea to Laut; intimating that secret loue speakes little’, with Powle's addition ‘but sithence I did vnderstande that they weare. Sr. W. Rawleighs verses to Queene Elisabeth,: in the beginninge of his fauoures’.

Edited from this MS in The Poems of Sir Walter Ralegh: A Historical Edition, ed. Michael Rudick (Tempe, Arizona, 1999), No. 40, p. 110. Collated in Sargent.

First published in A Poetical Rapsody (London, 1602). Sargent, No. XII, p. 197. May, Courtier Poets, p. 307. EV 23336.

ff. 192v-3v

RaW 833: Sir Walter Ralegh, Letter(s)

Copy of a letter by Ralegh, to his wife.

ff. 206v-7v

CtR 102: Sir Robert Cotton, A Briefe Discovrse concerning the Power of the Peeres and Commons of Parliament in point of Judicature

Copy, in a professional hand, subscribed ‘R: C:’.

Tract, the full title sometimes given as A Brief discourse prouinge that the house of Comons hath Equall power with the Peeres in point of Judicature written by Sr Rob: Cotton to Sr Edward Mountague Ano Dni. 1621, beginning ‘Sir, To give you as short an accompt of your desire as I can...’. First published in London, 1640. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [341]-351.

See also the Introduction.

MS Tanner 175

A small folio volume of estate and personal records and of verse written by Henry Gurney (1549-1616), lord of the Manor of Great Ellingham, Norfolk, including his comments on other writers and inventory of his books, ii + 239 leaves. c.1570s-1608.

This MS discussed in Steven W. May, ‘Henry Gurney, A Norfolk Farmer, Reads Spenser and Others’, Spenser Studies, 20 (2005), 183-223.

passim

BrN 55.5: Nicholas Breton, The Passions of the Spirit (‘Where shall I finde that melancholy muse’)

Extensive extracts subject to Gurney's ‘corrections’ in red ink

First published London, 1599. Grosart, I (c), as ‘The Countess of Pembroke's Passion.’

passim

SpE 100: Edmund Spenser, Extracts

Extracts from Spenser's works, including the ten dedicatory sonnets as well as most of the commendatory verses in The Faerie Queene, extracts from Book I, Canto 1, and Gurney's verse comments on this and Spenser's Complaints.

MS Tanner 205

A folio composite volume comprising three state letters or tracts, each in a different secretary hand, 87 leaves (plus some blanks), in contemporary vellum.

ff. 4r-84v

LeC 6: Anon, Leicester's Commonwealth

Copy, with a full title-page, headed ‘Leicesters Comon wealth’ and dated at the top ‘1616’, at the end the inscribed name (? the scribe) ‘Rhoda Kinge’. 1616.

First published as The Copie of a Leter, Wryten by a Master of Arte of Cambrige, to his Friend in London, Concerning some talke past of late betwen two worshipful and graue men, about the present state, and some procedinges of the Erle of Leycester and his friendes in England ([? Rouen], 1584). Soon banned. Reprinted as Leycesters common-wealth (London, 1641). Edited, as Leicester's Commonwealth, by D.C. Peck (Athens, OH, & London, 1985). Although various attributions have been suggested by Peck and others, the most likely author remains Robert Persons (1546-1610), Jesuit conspirator.

MS Tanner 221

A quarto composite volume of printed works by Breton, with twenty leaves of MS verse and prose, in four different hands, bound-in at the end, in contemporary calf. Early 1600s.

MS, f. 2r

NaT 8: Thomas Nashe, Verses from ‘Astrophel and Stella’ (‘If flouds of teares could clense my follies past’)

Copy, in a secretary hand, of an untitled version comprising lines 7-12 (here beginning ‘I se my hopes must wether in the budde’), lines 1-6, and an additional six-line stanza beginning ‘Prayse blyndnes (eyes) for seeinge is deceyte’.

Edited from this MS in G.L. [i.e. John Payne Collier], ‘Poem attributed to Thomas Nash’, The Shakespeare Society's Papers, I (London, 1844), 76-9. Collated in Doughtie, pp. 480-2. Recorded in McKerrow.

First published in ‘Poems and Sonets of sundrie other Noble men and Gentlemen’ appended to Sir Philip Sidney, Astrophel and Stella (London, 1591). McKerrow, III, 396 (in poems of doubtful authorship). Doughtie, Lyrics from English Airs, pp. 104-5.

MS, ff. 3r-18v

BrN 55: Nicholas Breton, The Passions of the Spirit (‘Where shall I finde that melancholy muse’)

Copy, in a roman hand, transcribed from the edition of 1599.

This MS recorded in Robertson, p. lv.

First published London, 1599. Grosart, I (c), as ‘The Countess of Pembroke's Passion.’

MS Tanner 235

A folio volume of state papers, in a single professional secretary hand, 28 leaves, in contemporary vellum gilt, the cover inscribed ‘Concerneinge Inuasion or Incursion into a Kingdome. / J. n. 22.’ c.1596.

ff. 18r-22r

RaW 699: Sir Walter Ralegh, Opinion upon the Articles propounded by the Earl of Essex upon the Alarum given by the Spaniards in 1596

Copy of Essex's ‘Articles’, incorporating various commanders' opinions including Ralegh's.

The articles propounded by Essex beginning ‘Besides many advertisements of the great preparation of Spain, of their forwardness or rather full readiness to set sail...’ and Ralegh's opinion beginning ‘First, if we consider without further circumstance that the fleet which was at Lisbon is already gone...’. First published in Opinions delivered by the Earl of Essex, [&c.]...on the Alarm of an Invasion from Spain in the Year 1596 (London, n.d.) [the exemplum in the National Archives, Kew, SP 9/52/25, bears the MS date ‘1803’]. Works (1829), VIII, 675-81.

MS Tanner 237

A folio volume of state letters and tracts, in professional hands, 64 leaves (plus blanks). c.1620s.

A flyleaf inscribed with the text of a settlement between Thomas Bancke of London and John Semens of Yarmouth, Norfolk.

ff. 31v-54v

EsR 106: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, Apology

Copy.

First published, addressed to Anthony Bacon, as An Apologie of the Earle of Essex, against those which jealously and maliciously tax him to be the hinderer of the peace and quiet (London, [1600]), but immediately suppressed. Reprinted in 1603.

ff. 55r-61v

EsR 157: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, First Letter of Advice to the Earl of Rutland

Copy, headed The Earle of Essex to the Earle of Rutland, and dated 4 January 1594.

The letter, dated from Greenwich, 4 January [1596], beginning ‘My Lord, I hold it for a principle in the course of intelligence of state...’.

First published, as ‘The Late E. of E. his aduice to the E. of R. in his trauels’, in Profitable Instructions; Describing what speciall Obseruations are to be taken by Trauellers in all Nations, States and Countries (London, 1633), pp. 27-73. Francis Bacon, Resuscitatio (London, 1657), pp. 106-10. Spedding, IX, 6-15. W.B. Devereux, Lives and Letters of the Devereux, Earls of Essex (1853), I, No. xciii.

Essex's three letters to Rutland discussed by Paul E.J. Hammer in ‘The Earl of Essex, Fulke Greville, and the Employment of Scholars’, SP. 91/2 (Spring, 1994), 167-80, and in ‘Letters of Travel Advice from the Earl of Essex to the Earl of Rutland: Some Comments’, PQ, 74/3 (Summer 1995), 317-22. It is likely that the first letter was written substantially by Francis Bacon.

MS Tanner 251

A folio volume of copies of letters by Bacon, to various correspondents, 54 leaves.

BcF 555: Francis Bacon, Letter(s)

MS Tanner 264

A folio volume of state papers and parliamentary proceedings, 32 leaves. Mid-17th century.

f. 31v

BcF 700: Francis Bacon, An Essay of a King

Spedding, VI, 595-7; discussed 592-4.

Essay, beginning ‘A king is a mortal god on earth...’. Spedding, VI, 595-7 (discussed pp. 592-4).

MS Tanner 265

A folio volume of state tracts, letters and speeches, 34 leaves, in modern half-calf.

Inscribed on a flyleaf ‘Liber Mri ffrancesti Annyson’.

ff. 9r-10r

RaW 710.4: Sir Walter Ralegh, Short Apology for his last Actions at Guiana

Copy, in a professional hand, headed ‘The Coppie of Sr Walter Raighleys Answer for takeng of St Thome in Gaiana i6i8’. c.1620s.

Ralegh's letter of 1618 to his cousin George, Lord Carew of Clopton (beginning ‘Because I know not whether I shall live...’). First published in Judicious and Select Essays (London, 1650). Edwards, II, 375 et seq. Youings, No. 222, pp. 364-8.

MS Tanner 276

A folio composite volume of state papers and parliamentary proceedings, in various hands, 181 leaves.

Once owned by one John Holland.

f. 2r

BcF 329: Francis Bacon, Speech(es)

Notes of a speech by Bacon to James I on presenting a petition against recusants, 1620/1.

ff. 4v, 5v

BcF 440: Francis Bacon, Bacon's Humble Submissions and Supplications

Copy of Bacon's submissions on 19 March 1620/1 and 22 April 1622.

The Humble Submissions and Supplications Bacon sent to the House of Lords, on 19 March 1620/1 (beginning ‘I humbly pray your Lordships all to make a favourable and true construction of my absence...’); 22 April 1621 (beginning ‘It may please your Lordships, I shall humbly crave at your Lordships' hands a benign interpretation...’); and 30 April 1621 (beginning ‘Upon advised consideration of the charge, descending into mine own conscience...’), written at the time of his indictment for corruption. Spedding, XIV, 215-16, 242-5, 252-62.

f. 24r

RuB 52: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, ?4 April 1628

Copy.

Speech beginning ‘We have received many gracious messages from His Majesty. It is now high time to give thanks...’. Yale 1628, II, 297 and 317; variant versions II, 303, 309, 313-14.

f. 75r

RuB 28: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, c.22 March 1627/8

Copy.

Speech beginning ‘Of the mischiefs that have lately fallen upon us by the late distractions here is every man sensible...’.

f. 100r

RuB 93: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, ?22 May 1628

Copy.

Speech beginning ‘I did not think to have spoken...’. First published, as Sir Benjamin Rudierd His speech in Behalfe of the Clergie and of Parishes destitute of Instruction through want of Maintenance, Oxford, 1628. Manning, pp. 135-8. Yale 1628, III, 17-19, where it is dated probably 21 April 1628.

f. 111r

RuB 58: Sir Benjamin Rudyerd, Speech in the House of Commons, 28 April 1628

Copy.

Speech beginning ‘We are here upon a great business...’. Yale 1628, III, 127-9 and 133-4. Variants: III, 138-9, 141, 143, and 161. Variant version in Manning, pp. 126-8.

MS Tanner 278

A large quarto volume of political, ecclesiastical and antiquarian tracts, in a single accomplished professional hand, 268 leaves. c.1630.

ff. 128r-35r

HoH 58: Henry Howard, Earl of Northampton, Duello Foiled

Copy, subscribed with notes in Archbishop Sancroft's hand.

A discourse, with a dedicatory epistle to ‘my very good Lord’, beginning ‘Reasons moving me to write this thing which handleth not the whole matter...’, the tract beginning ‘The two parties between whom this single fight was appointed...’. Published in Thomas Hearne, A Collection of Curious Discourses written by Eminent Antiquaries (London, 1771), II, 223-42, where it is attributed to Sir Edward Coke. It is not certain whether this tract is by Howard or simply annotated by him as a reader.

ff. 142v-6v

DaJ 248: Sir John Davies, Of the Antiquity, Use, and Ceremony of Lawful Combats in England

Copy.

Paper delivered to the Society of Antiquaries, beginning ‘Our Question is of the antiquity and manner of lawful combats...’, dated 22 May 1601. First published in Hearne (1771), II, 180-7. Grosart, III, 293-302.

ff. 217r-39r

RaW 1060: Sir Walter Ralegh, A Discourse of Tenures, which were before the Conquest

Copy, as ‘Written by Sr. Walter Rawleigh’.

A tract beginning ‘The book of Doomsday, which is militia Anglicani imperii, as it was in the Conqueror's time, speaks often of a land...’. First published in London, 1761. Works (1829), VIII, 592-626. It comprises extracts from a work by Sir Roger Owen, of which there are numerous MS copies: see Ernest A. Strathmann, ‘Ralegh's Discourse of Tenures and Sir Roger Owen’, HLQ, 20 (1957), 219-32, and Lefranc (1968), p. 65.

ff. 240r-4r

RaW 709: Sir Walter Ralegh, A Relation of the Action at Cadiz

Copy, inscribed ‘Transcrib'd from a MS. in ye Hands of his Grandchild, Mr Raleigh’.

An account of the Cadiz expedition in 1596, allegedly ‘by Sir Walter Ralegh’ and ‘Transcribed from a manuscript in the hands of his grandchild, Mr. Ralegh’, beginning ‘You shall receive many relations, but none more true than this...’. First published in An Abridgement of Sir Walter Raleigh's History of the World (London, 1700), part ii, pp. 17-25. Works, (1829). VIII, 667-74.

MS Tanner 279

A folio composite volume of theological works, in various hands, 354 leaves. c.1620s.

ff. 202r-9v

BcF 155: Francis Bacon, A Confession of Faith

Copy, imperfect at the end.

First published in London, 1641. Spedding, VII, 217-26.

ff. 221r-5r

SoR 298: Robert Southwell, S.J., Catholic Saint, An Epistle unto his Father (22 October 1589)

Copy, untitled, endorsed on f. 226v ‘To his very louing Freind Mr Clement Knight bookseller at his shopp nere Paules church giue theise’; imperfect.

Apparently edited from this MS in St. Peter's Complaint, and other Poems; by the Rev. Robert Southwell, ed. W.J. Walter (London, 1817).

Epistle, beginning ‘In children of former ages it hath been thought so behooveful a point of duty...’. First published as ‘An Epistle of a Religious Priest unto his Father’ in A Short Rule of Good Life ([London?, 1596-7?]). Trotman, pp. 36-64. Brown, Two Letters, pp. 1-20.

MS Tanner 280

A large folio composite volume of state tracts and papers, many relating to ecclesiastical courts, in various largely professional hands, 473 leaves, in calf.

ff. 55r-64v

CtR 36: Sir Robert Cotton, An Answer to Certain Arguments raised from Supposed Antiquity, and urged by some Members of the lower House of Parliament, to prove that Ecclesiasticall Lawes ought to be Enacted by Temporall Men

Copy. c.1630.

Tract beginning ‘What, besides self-regard, or siding faction, hath been...’. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [203]-217.

MS Tanner 290

A folio composite volume of letters, in various hands, 243 leaves, in contemporary calf.

ff. 4r-5v

RaW 834: Sir Walter Ralegh, Letter(s)

Copy of Ralegh's letter to Winwood, 21 March 1617/18, in a professional secretary hand.

ff. 197r-9v

ClE 129: Edward Hyde, First Earl of Clarendon, Letters to the Duke of York and the Duchess of York

Copy of both letters, in a cursive hand.

Letters by Clarendon to his daughter Anne (who died on 31 March 1671 before the letter arrived) and to her husband, the Duke of York (later James II), on the occasion of her conversion to Roman Catholicism. The original letters, which received particular attention by his contemporaries because of their subject matter, are not known to survive.

These were first published in Two Letters written by…Edward Earl of Clarendon…one to His Royal Highness the Duke of York, the other to the Dutchess, occasioned by her Embracing the Roman Catholic Religion (London, [1680?]) and were reprinted in State Tracts (1689), in An Appendix to the History of the Grand Rebellion (Oxford, 1724), pp. 313-24, and elsewhere.

MS Tanner 299

A quarto volume of letters, tracts and speeches, 208 leaves (plus blanks), in contemporary calf. All in the hand of William Sancroft (1617-93), Archbishop of Canterbury. Mid-late 17th century.

f. 12r

RaW 363: Sir Walter Ralegh, Epitaph on the Earl of Salisbury (‘Here lies Hobinall, our Pastor while ere’)

Copy, untitled and here beginning ‘Heere lies Hobbinal or Sheepheard while here’.

First published in Francis Osborne, Traditionall Memoyres on the raigne of King Iames (London, 1658). Works (1829), VIII, 735-6. Latham, p. 53.

Of doubtful authorship according to Latham, p. 146, and Lefranc (1968), p. 84.

ff. 15r-24v

RaW 548: Sir Walter Ralegh, Apology for his Voyage to Guiana

Copy, headed ‘Sr Walter Rauleigh's Apologie, written to the King & the Councill in defence of his last action in Guiana, since his last coming into the towre’.

A tract beginning ‘If the ill success of this enterprise of mine had been without example...’. First published in Judicious and Select Essays and Observations (London, 1650). Works (1829), VIII, 477-507. Edited by V. T. Harlow in Ralegh's Last Voyage (London, 1932), pp. 316-34.

ff. 25r-6r, 29v-31r

RaW 835: Sir Walter Ralegh, Letter(s)

Copy of five letters by Ralegh, to James I (3), Lady Ralegh, and the Earl of Southampton (14 August 1603).

ff. 26r-v, 28v-9r

RaW 728.71: Sir Walter Ralegh, Ralegh's Arraignment(s)

Copy of an abbreviated version of Ralegh's arraignment in 1618, headed ‘A short relation, wt was done at ye K' Bench-Barr wn Sr W. Ra. had Warng given him tp prpare to die’.

Accounts of the arraignments of Ralegh at Winchester Castle, 17 November 1603, and before the Privy Council on 22 October 1618. The arraignment of 1603 published in London, 1648. For documentary evidence about this arraignment, see Rosalind Davies, ‘“The Great Day of Mart”: Returning to Texts at the Trial of Sir Walter Ralegh in 1603’, Renaissance Forum, 4/1 (1999), 1-12.

ff. 26v-8v

RaW 750: Sir Walter Ralegh, Speech on the Scaffold (29 October 1618)

Copy, headed ‘The effect of sr Walter Rauleigh's speech written on the hearing of him before he was beheaded. Octob. 29th. 1618’.

Edited from this MS in Works (1829), VIII, 775-80, and in Edwards (1868), I, 698-706.

Transcripts of Ralegh's speech have been printed in his Remains (London, 1657). Works (1829), I, 558-64, 691-6. VIII, 775-80, and elsewhere. Copies range from verbatim transcripts to summaries of the speech, they usually form part of an account of Ralegh's execution, they have various headings, and the texts differ considerably. For a relevant discussion, see Anna Beer, ‘Textual Politics: The Execution of Sir Walter Ralegh’, MP, 94/1 (August 1996), 19-38.

f. 28v

RaW 27: Sir Walter Ralegh, ‘Euen such is tyme which takes in trust’

Copy, headed ‘Sr Walter Rauleighs Epitaph made by himselfe, & giuen to one of his the night before his sufferinge’.

First published in Richard Brathwayte, Remains after Death (London, 1618). Latham, p. 72 (as ‘These verses following were made by Sir Walter Rauleigh the night before he dyed and left att the Gate howse’). Rudick, Nos 35A, 35B, and part of 55 (three versions, pp. 80, 133).

This poem is ascribed to Ralegh in most MS copies and is often appended to copies of his speech on the scaffold (see RaW 739-822).

See also RaW 302 and RaW 304.

f. 32r

DnJ 4089: John Donne, Paradoxes and Problems

Copy of the Problem ‘Why was Sr Walter Raleigh thought ye fittest Man to write ye Historie of these Times?’, docketed by Sancroft ‘'Tis one of Dr Donne's problems (but so bitter, yt his son Jacke Donne LL. D. thought not fitt to print it with ye Rest’.

This Problem (which also occurs in at least 10 other MSS of Paradoxes and Problems) first published (from this MS) in Gosse (1899), II, 52.

Eleven Paradoxes and ten Problems first published in Juvenilia: or Certaine Paradoxes and Problemes (London, 1633). Twelve Paradoxes and seventeen Problems published in Paradoxes, Problems, Essayes (London, 1652). Two more Problems published in 1899 and 1927 (see DnJ 4073, DnJ 4089). Twelve Paradoxes and eighteen Problems reprinted in Paradoxes and Problemes by John Donne (London, 1923). Twelve Paradoxes (Nos XI and XII relegated to ‘Dubia’) and nineteen Problems (No. XI by Edward Herbert) edited in Peters.

ff. 33r-43v

BcF 441: Francis Bacon, Bacon's Humble Submissions and Supplications

Copy of Bacon's submissions on 22 and 30 April 1621.

The Humble Submissions and Supplications Bacon sent to the House of Lords, on 19 March 1620/1 (beginning ‘I humbly pray your Lordships all to make a favourable and true construction of my absence...’); 22 April 1621 (beginning ‘It may please your Lordships, I shall humbly crave at your Lordships' hands a benign interpretation...’); and 30 April 1621 (beginning ‘Upon advised consideration of the charge, descending into mine own conscience...’), written at the time of his indictment for corruption. Spedding, XIV, 215-16, 242-5, 252-62.

ff. 76r-83v

WoH 265: Sir Henry Wotton, A Parallel between Robert Earl of Essex and George Duke of Buckingham

Copy, headed ‘The Comparer, or, Observations concerning Robert Earle of Essex, & George Duke of Buckingham by way of parallel. By Sr Henry Wotton’.

First published in London, 1641. Edited by Sir Robert Egerton Brydges (Lee Priory Press, Ickham, 1814).

MS Tanner 302

A quarto volume of state letters and speeches, 137 leaves.

ff. 87r-110v

MrT 32: Sir Thomas More, Historia Richardi Tertii

Copy of the Latin version, in an italic hand, transcribed from More's Latina opera (Louvain, 1565). c.1575-1600.

This MS collated in Yale.

An unfinished work. The English version first published in The chronicle of Ihon Hardyng (London, 1543). The Latin version first published in Thomae Mori...omnia...latina opera (Louvain, 1565). Three versions in Yale, Vol. 2, pp. 1-93, 94-149, and Vol. 15, pp. 313-485, with English translations.

MS Tanner 303

A quarto composite volume of state letters and tracts, 168 leaves, in contemporary calf.

ff. 1r-14r

RaW 624: Sir Walter Ralegh, A Discourse touching a Marriage between Prince Henry and a Daughter of Savoy

Copy, in a secretary hand, headed ‘A politique dispute aboute ye happiest marriage for the noble prince Charles’. Early 17th century.

A tract beginning ‘There is nobody that persuades our prince to match with Savoy, for any love to the person of the duke...’. First published in The Interest of England with regard to Foreign Alliances, explained in two discourses:...2) Touching a Marriage between Prince Henry of England and a Daughter of Savoy (London, 1750). Works (1829), VIII, 237-52. Ralegh's authorship is not certain.

ff. 28r-32r

CtR 148: Sir Robert Cotton, The Danger wherein this Kingdome now Standeth, and the Remedy

Copy, in a professional secretary hand, the tract dated 1627. c.1630.

Tract beginning ‘As soon as the house of Austria had incorporated it self into the house of Spaine...’. First published London, 1628. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. 308-20.

MS Tanner 304

A quarto composite volume of state letters and tracts, in various hands, 130 leaves, in calf.

Among scribbling on a flyleaf of the first item is the name ‘John Allen’.

f. 59v

EsR 5: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, ‘Happy were Hee could finish foorth his Fate’

Copy. Early 17th century.

This MS collated in May, Poems, pp. 124-5. Edited in May, Courtier Poets.

May, Poems, No. 7, p. 47. May, Courtier Poets, p. 254. EV 8176.

MS Tanner 306

A folio composite volume of verse and academic plays, in English and Latin, in various hands, 493 leaves, now in two volumes, foliated 1-250 and 251-493 respectively. Partly compiled by Archbishop Sancroft.

Vol. I, f. 115v

OxE 3: Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford, ‘Feyne would I singe but fury makes me frette’

Copy, in a secretary hand, untitled, on the second page of two conjugate folio leaves. Late 16th-early 17th century.

Edited from this MS in May.

Published in May, Poems, No. 10 (pp. 32-3). May, Courtier Poets, p. 277. EV 6027.

Vol. I, f. 138r

AlW 150: William Alabaster, Upon a Conference in Religion between John Reynolds then a Papist, and his Brother William Reynolds then a Protestant (‘Bella inter geminos plusquam civilia fratres’)

Copy, headed ‘Dr Reynolds a Papist in his younger daies, his brother W. Reynolds a Protestant, they dispute Wm turner a Jesuited Papist, John a zealous Protestant. On wth this Epigram’, and subscribed ‘Dr Alablaster’, on a quarto leaf. Early 17th century.

This MS collated in Sutton.

First published in J.J. Smith, The Cambridge Portfolio (London, 1840), pp. 183-6. Sutton, p. 12-13 (No. XVI).

Vol. I, f. 138r

AlW 170: William Alabaster, Upon a Conference in Religion between John Reynolds then a Papist, and his Brother William Reynolds then a Protestant (‘Between two Bretheren Civil warres and worse’)

Copy of Holland's English translation, headed ‘Strife [above Warres] more then civil 'twixt two brethren’ and subscribed ‘Dr Alablastr’, on a quarto leaf. Early 17th century.

A translation of Alabaster's Latin poem by Hugh Holland. Sutton, p. 13.

Vol. I, f. 139v

AlW 182: William Alabaster, Upon a Conference in Religion between John Reynolds then a Papist, and his Brother William Reynolds then a Protestant (‘In poyntes of faith some undermyning jarres / betwixt two brothers kindled rebell warrs’)

A translation of Alabaster's Latin poem by Peter Heylyn, first published in his Cosmographie (1652), p. 257.

Vol. I, f. 173r-v

DyE 17: Sir Edward Dyer, A Fancy (‘Hee that his mirth hath loste, whose comfort is dismaid’)

Copy, in a secretary hand, untitled, subscribed ‘finis qt Dier’, on the first two pages of two conjugate folio leaves. Late 16th-early 17th century.

This MS text collated in Sargent.

First published, in a garbled version, in Poems by the Earl of Pembroke and Sir Benjamin Ruddier (London, 1660), pp. 29-31. Sargent, No. V, pp. 184-7. May, Courtier Poets, pp. 290-2. EV 8529.

Vol. I, f. 174r-v

DyE 2: Sir Edward Dyer, ‘Amarillis was full fayre, the goodliest mayde was she’

Copy, in a secretary hand, in double columns, untitled, on the third page of two conjugate folio leaves. Late 16th century.

Edited from this MS in Sargent.

First published in Sargent (1935). Sargent, No. X, pp. 192-5. May, Courtier Poets, pp. 303-5. EV 1870.

Vol. I, ff. 188v-9r

DaJ 88: Sir John Davies, On the Marriage of Lady Mary Baker to Richard Fletcher, Bishop of London (‘The pride of Prelacy, which now longe since’)

Copy of the series of five poems, with a sixth beginning ‘Marriage is honourable’, in a secretary and italic hand.

Folio 188v, with the first three poems in this sequence, headed ‘In Tarquinum’ and beginning ‘It is a question in heraldry’, is now separated and incorporated in Bodleian, MS Tanner 306*. Early 17th century.

This MS collated in Krueger.

First published in Samuel A. Tannenbaum, ‘Unfamiliar Versions of Some Elizabethan Poems’, PMLA, 45.ii (1930), 809-21 (pp. 818-19). Krueger, pp. 177-9.

Vol. I, ff. 189r, 190r

DaJ 89: Sir John Davies, On the Marriage of Lady Mary Baker to Richard Fletcher, Bishop of London (‘The pride of Prelacy, which now longe since’)

Copy of the series of five poems, with a sixth beginning ‘Marriage is honourable’, in two secretary hands, untitled, on the rectos of separate folio leaves.

This MS recorded in Krueger, pp. 189-90.

First published in Samuel A. Tannenbaum, ‘Unfamiliar Versions of Some Elizabethan Poems’, PMLA, 45.ii (1930), 809-21 (pp. 818-19). Krueger, pp. 177-9.

Vol. I, f. 193r

OxE 4: Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford, ‘Feyne would I singe but fury makes me frette’

Copy, subscribed ‘Earle of Oxenforde’.

Published in May, Poems, No. 10 (pp. 32-3). May, Courtier Poets, p. 277. EV 6027.

Vol. I, ff. 249r-50v

EsR 60: Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, A Poem made on the Earle of Essex (being in disgrace with Queene Eliz): by mr henry Cuffe his Secretary (‘It was a time when sillie Bees could speake’)

Copy of the fourteen-stanza version, in an accomplished secretary hand, untitled but endorsed ‘The ballade of a Bee’, on three pages of two conjugate folio leaves. Early 17th-century.

This MS text collated in May, pp. 128-32.

First published, in a musical setting by John Dowland, in his The Third and Last Booke of Songs or Aires (London, 1603). May, Poems, No. IV, pp. 62-4. May, Courtier Poets, pp. 266-9. EV 12846.

Vol. II, f. 264v-5r

MrJ 26: John Marston, The Duke Return'd Againe. 1627 (‘And art returned again with all thy faults’)

An anonymous copy, on three pages of a pair of conjugate folio leaves.

Vol. II, f. 251r

CoR 327: Richard Corbett, A letter sent from Doctor Corbet to Master Ailesbury, Decem. 9. 1618 (‘My Brother and much more had'st thou bin mine’)

Copy, on a long ledger leaf, headed ‘A letter written from a Gentleman in Oxford to a Mithemati: his friend being at Sion’ and docketed ‘Dr. Corbet’.

First published in Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 63-5.

Vol. II, ff. 252-3

JnB 615: Ben Jonson, The Gypsies Metamorphosed

Copy of the Lord Keeper's, the Lord Steward's, the Lord Treasurer's and the Lord Chamberlain's fortunes, on three pages of two conjugate folio leaves.

Herford & Simpson, lines 565-84, 631-9, 588-97, 681-97; Greg, Windsor version, lines 392-411, 455-63, 414-23, 373-89. This MS collated in Greg; recorded in Herford & Simpson, VII, 551.

First published in John Benson's 12mo edition of Jonson's poems (1640) and in Workes (London, 1640). Herford & Simpson, VII, 539-622. Edited by George Watson Cole (New York, 1931). Edited by W. W. Greg as Jonson's Masque of Gipsies (London, 1952).

Vol. II, ff. 254r-v, 56r-v

HoJ 49: John Hoskyns, The Censure of a Parliament Fart (‘Downe came graue auncient Sr John Crooke’)

Copy, in a secretary hand, on two folio leaves, endorsed ‘The famous ffarte. 1607’.

Attributed to Hoskyns by John Aubrey. Cited, but unprinted, as No. III of ‘Doubtful Verses’ in Osborn, p. 300. Early Stuart Libels website.

Vol. II, f. 255r-v

HoJ 50: John Hoskyns, The Censure of a Parliament Fart (‘Downe came graue auncient Sr John Crooke’)

Second copy, in a different secretary hand, incomplete.

Attributed to Hoskyns by John Aubrey. Cited, but unprinted, as No. III of ‘Doubtful Verses’ in Osborn, p. 300. Early Stuart Libels website.

Vol. II, f. 256v

HoJ 122: John Hoskyns, Epitaph of the parliament fart (‘Reader I was born and cried’)

Copy, headed ‘The Farts Epitaph’.

Edited from this MS In Early Stuart Libels.

Vol. II, ff. 268r-9v

CoA 131: Abraham Cowley, On the Death of Mr. William Hervey (‘It was a dismal, and a fearful night’)

Copy on both sides of two conjugate folio leaves. Mid-late 17th century.

This MS recorded in Sparrow, p. 203.

First published, among Miscellanies, in Poems (London, 1656). Waller, I, 32-7. Sparrow, pp. 36-41.

Vol. II, f. 367r

PsK 274: Katherine Philips, On the numerous accesse of the English to waite upon the King in Holland (‘Hasten (great prince) unto thy British Isles’)

Copy, in an accomplished hand, headed ‘Vpon ye Numerous accesse of ye English Gentry to his Matie, in Flanders’ on the first page of two conjugate folio leaves, ascribed to ‘Mrs, K. P.’. Late 17th century.

This MS collated in Thomas and also in Mambretti's 1979 dissertation.

First published in Poems (1664), pp. 3-4. Poems (1667), p. 2. Saintsbury, pp. 507-8. Thomas, I, 70-1, poem 2.

Vol. II, f. 368r

PsK 306: Katherine Philips, The Princess royall's Returne into England (‘Welcome sure pledge of reconciled powers’)

Copy, in an accomplished hand, headed ‘Vpon ye Comeing of ye Princesse Royal Into England’, ascribed to ‘Mrs K. P.’, on the third page of two conjugate folio leaves. Late 17th century.

This MS collated in Thomas, and also in Mambretti's 1979 dissertation.

First published, as ‘Upon the Princess Royal her Return into England’, in Poems (1664), pp. 16-18. Poems (1667), pp. 8-9. Saintsbury, pp. 511-12. Thomas, I, 77-8, poem 7.

Vol. II, f. 388r

MaA 25: Andrew Marvell, Eyes and Tears (‘How wisely Nature did decree’)

Copy (lacking stanza 9), in double columns, ascribed to ‘Mr Marvel’, on a single folio leaf.

Edited from this MS in Kelliher, pp. 49-50. Recorded in Margoliouth.

First published in Miscellaneous Poems (London, 1681). Margoliouth, I, 15-17. Lord, pp. 8-10. Smith, pp. 51-3.

Vol. II, f. 397r-v

DoC 257: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, To Mr. Bays (‘Thou mercenary renegade, thou slave’)

Copy, quoted in full in a letter from J. Newton, of the Inner Temple, to Arthur Charlett, Fellow of Trinity College, Oxford, on the first of two conjugate folio leaves addressed and sent as letter. 20 April 1686.

This MS collated in POAS and in Harris.

First published in J.R., Religio Laici, or A Layman's Faith ([London, 1688]). POAS, IV (1968), 79-80. Harris, pp. 18-20.

Vol. II, f. 410r-v

RoJ 578: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, Upon Nothing (‘Nothing! thou elder brother even to Shade’)

Copy on both sides of a single folio leaf.

Edited from this MS in Vieth and in Walker; collated in Love, ‘The Text of Rochester's “Upon Nothing”’.

First published, as a broadside, [in London, 1679]. Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 118-20. Walker, pp. 62-4. Harold Love, ‘The Text of Rochester's “Upon Nothing”’, Centre for Bibliographical and Textual Studies, Monash University, Occasional Papers 1 (1985). Love, pp. 46-8.

Vol. II, f. 424r-v

ClJ 126: John Cleveland, To the State of Love, or, The Senses Festival (‘I saw a Vision yesternight’)

Copy, headed ‘The Scale of Love, or the Senses Festivall’ and here beginning ‘I had a Vision yesternight’.

First published in Poems, by J. C. With Additions (1651). Morris & Withington, pp. 47-9.

Vol. II, f. 425r

RnT 97: Thomas Randolph, An Elegie (‘Love, give me leave to serve thee, and be wise’)

Copy, headed ‘A True Mrs’, on one side of a single folio leaf.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, pp. 66-7.

Vol. II, f. 434r

DoC 242: Charles Sackville, Sixth Earl of Dorset, Pindaric Petition to the Lords in Council (‘Humbly Sheweth / Should you order Tom Brown’)

Copy, headed ‘To the Lds Justices in Councel assembled The Petition of Thom. Bro[wn]’, on one side of a single folio leaf.

This MS collated in Harris.

First published in Flying Post (23-25 November 1697). Harris, pp. 99-100.

MS Tanner 306*

A guardbook of separate verse items extracted from the bound volumes MSS Tanner 306/1 and 306/2.

f. 188r-v

RaW 155: Sir Walter Ralegh, The Lie (‘Goe soule the bodies guest’)

Copy, untitled, together with an answer beginning ‘Stay Conick soule thy errante’, arranged in parallel columns, on both sides of a folio leaf. Late 16th-early 17th century.

See also DaJ 88.

Edited from this MS in Rudick, No. 20C, pp. 42-4. Recorded in Latham, p. 131.

First published in Francis Davison, A Poetical Rapsodie (London 1611). Latham, pp. 45-7. Rudick, Nos 20A, 20B and 20C (three versions), with answers, pp. 30-45.

This poem is attributed to Richard Latworth (or Latewar) in Lefranc (1968), pp. 85-94, but see Stephen J. Greenblatt, Sir Walter Ralegh (New Haven & London, 1973), pp. 171-6. See also Karl Josef Höltgen, ‘Richard Latewar Elizabethan Poet and Divine’, Anglia, 89 (1971), 417-38 (p. 430). Latewar's ‘answer’ to this poem is printed in Höltgen, pp. 435-8. Some texts are accompanied by other answers.

ff. 414r-15v

RoJ 305: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, A Satyr against Reason and Mankind (‘Were I (who to my cost already am)’)

Copy of lines 1-173, with alterations in another hand, headed ‘A Satyr on Man. Anno. 74’, subscribed ‘By Ld of Rochester’ and docketed underneath ‘Of Man’, on two long ledger-size leaves. Late 17th century.

This MS recorded in Vieth; collated in Walker.

First published (lines 1-173) as a broadside, A Satyr against Mankind [London, 1679]. Complete, with supplementary lines 174-221 (beginning ‘All this with indignation have I hurled’) in Poems on Several Occasions (‘Antwerp’, 1680). Vieth, pp. 94-101. Walker, pp. 91-7, as ‘Satyr’. Love, pp. 57-63.

The text also briefly discussed in Kristoffer F. Paulson, ‘A Question of Copy-Text: Rochester's “A Satyr against Reason and Mankind”’, N&Q, 217 (May 1972), 177-8. Some texts followed by one or other of three different ‘Answer’ poems (two sometimes ascribed to Edward Pococke or Mr Griffith and Thomas Lessey: see Vieth, Attribution, pp. 178-9).

MS Tanner 307

A folio volume of 167 poems by George Herbert subsequently published as The Temple (Cambridge, 1633), in a neat hand, probably produced by a member of the Little Gidding community under the supervision of Nicolas Ferrar, 152 leaves. 1633.

Later owned by William Sancroft (1617-93), Archbishop of Canterbury, and by Thomas Tanner (1674-1735), Bishop of St Asaph.

Generally cited as the Tanner MS. A complete facsimile is published as The Bodleian Manuscript of George Herbert's Poems: A Facsimile of Tanner 307, introduced by Amy Charles and Mario A. Di Cesare (Delmar, New York, [1984]). The MS is edited by Mario A. Di Cesare as George Herbert, The Temple: A Diplomatic Edition of the Bodleian Manuscript (Tanner 307) (Binghamton, New York, 1995). The MS is also discussed in Hutchinson, pp. l-lii, lxxii-lxxiv; in J. Max Patrick, ‘Critical Problems in Editing George Herbert's The Temple’, The Editor as Critic and the Critic as Editor (Los Angeles, 1973), pp. 1-40; in Amy Charles, ‘“The Original of Mr George Herbert's Temple”’, George Herbert Journal, 6 (1982-3), 1-14; and in Mario A. Di Cesare, ‘The Bodleian Manuscript and the Text of Herbert's Poems’, George Herbert Journal, 6 (1982-3), 15-35.

f. 1

HrG 79: George Herbert, The Dedication (‘Lord, my first fruits present themselves to thee’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 5.

ff. 2-14v

HrG 52: George Herbert, The Church-porch (‘Thou, whose sweet youth and early hopes inhance’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 6-24.

ff. 11v-12v

HrG 59: George Herbert, The Collar (‘I struck the board, and cry'd, No more’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 153-4.

f. 15r

HrG 255: George Herbert, Superliminare (‘Thou, whom the former precepts have’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 25.

f. 15v

HrG 12: George Herbert, The Altar (‘A broken Altar, Lord, thy servant reares’)

Copy.

Facsimile in James Boyd White, ‘This Book of Starres’: Learning to Read George Herbert (Ann Arbor, 1994), p. 85.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 26.

ff. 16r-21r

HrG 230: George Herbert, The Sacrifice (‘Oh all ye, who passe by, whose eyes and minde’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 26-34.

ff. 21v-2v

HrG 261: George Herbert, The Thanksgiving (‘Oh King of grief! a title strange, yet true’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 35-6.

f. 22v

HrG 226: George Herbert, The Reprisall (‘I have consider'd it, and finde’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 36-7.

f. 23r

HrG 10: George Herbert, The Agonie (‘Philosophers have measur'd mountains’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 37.

f. 23v

HrG 241: George Herbert, The Sinner (‘Lord, how I am all ague, when I seek’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 38.

f. 24r-v

HrG 120: George Herbert, Good Friday (‘O my chief good’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 38-9.

ff. 24v-5r

HrG 222: George Herbert, Redemption (‘Having been tenant long to a rich Lord’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 40.

f. 25r-v

HrG 233: George Herbert, Sepulchre (‘O blessed bodie! Whither art thou thrown?’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 40-1.

ff. 25v-6r

HrG 92: George Herbert, Easter (‘Rise heart. thy Lord is risen. Sing his praise’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 41-2.

ff. 26v-7r

HrG 94: George Herbert, Easter-wings (‘Lord, who createdst man in wealth and store’)

Copy.

Facsimile in David West, ‘Easter Wings’, N&Q, 237 (December 1992), 448-52 (p. 450).

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 43.

f. 27v

HrG 126: George Herbert, H. Baptisme (I) (‘As he that sees a dark and shadie grove’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1613). Hutchinson, pp. 43-4.

f. 28r

HrG 128: George Herbert, H. Baptisme (II) (‘Since, Lord, to thee’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 44.

f. 28v

HrG 187: George Herbert, Nature (‘Full of rebellion, I would die’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 45.

f. 29r

HrG 237: George Herbert, Sinne (I) (‘Lord, with what care hast thou begirt us round!’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 45-6.

ff. 29r-30v

HrG 3: George Herbert, Affliction (I) (‘When first thou didst entice to thee my heart’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 46-8.

f. 31r-v

HrG 224: George Herbert, Repentance (‘Lord, I confesse my sinne is great’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 48-9.

ff. 32r-3r

HrG 109: George Herbert, Faith (‘Lord, how couldst thou so much appease’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 49-51.

f. 33r

HrG 209: George Herbert, Prayer (I) (‘Prayer the Churches banquet, Angels age’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 51.

ff. 33v-4v

HrG 130: George Herbert, The H. Communion (‘Not in rich furniture, or fine aray’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 52-3.

f. 34v

HrG 17: George Herbert, Antiphon (I) (‘Let all the world in ev'ry corner sing’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 53.

f. 35r

HrG 167: George Herbert, Love I. (‘Immortall Love, authour of this great frame’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 54.

f. 35v

HrG 169: George Herbert, Love II. (‘Immortall Heat, O let thy greater flame’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 54.

f. 36r-v

HrG 257: George Herbert, The Temper (I) (‘How should I praise thee, Lord! how should my rymes’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 55.

ff. 36v-7r

HrG 259: George Herbert, The Temper (II) (‘It cannot be. Where is that mightie joy’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 56.

f. 37r-v

HrG 152: George Herbert, Jordan (I) (‘Who sayes that fictions onely and false hair’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 56-7.

ff. 37v-8r

HrG 98: George Herbert, Employment (I) (‘If as a flowre doth spread and die’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 57.

f. 38v

HrG 134: George Herbert, The H. Scriptures (‘Oh Book! infinite sweetnessse! let my heart’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 58.

f. 39r

HrG 136: George Herbert, The H. Scriptures. II. (‘Oh that I knew how all thy lights combine’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 58.

ff. 39v-40r

HrG 285: George Herbert, Whitsunday (‘Listen sweet Dove unto my song’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 59-60.

f. 40r-v

HrG 122: George Herbert, Grace (‘My stock lies dead, and no increase’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 60-1.

f. 41v

HrG 4: George Herbert, Affliction (II) (‘Kill me not ev'ry day’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 62.

f. 41r-v

HrG 205: George Herbert, Praise (I) (‘To write a verse or two is all the praise’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 61.

f. 42r

HrG 180: George Herbert, Mattens (‘I cannot ope mine eyes’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 62-3.

f. 42v

HrG 239: George Herbert, Sinne (II) (‘O that I could a sinne once see!’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 63.

ff. 42v-3v

HrG 106: George Herbert, Even-song (‘Blest be the God of love’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 63-4.

ff. 43v-4r

HrG 48: George Herbert, Church-monuments (‘While that my soul repairs to her devotion’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 64-5.

f. 44r-v

HrG 50: George Herbert, Church-musick (‘Sweetest of sweets, I thank you: when displeasure’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 65-6.

f. 44v

HrG 14: George Herbert, Ana-{MARY/ARMY} gram (‘How well her name an Army doth present’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 77.

ff. 44v-45r

HrG 44: George Herbert, Church-lock and key (‘I know it is my sinne, which locks thine eares’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 66.

f. 45r-v

HrG 42: George Herbert, The Church-floore (‘Mark you the floore? that square & speckled stone’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 66-7.

f. 45v

HrG 286: George Herbert, The Windows (‘Lord, how can man preach thy eternall word?’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 67-8.

f. 46r

HrG 267: George Herbert, Trinitie Sunday (‘Lord, who hast form'd me out of mud’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 68.

ff. 46r-7r

HrG 68: George Herbert, Content (‘Peace mutt'ring thoughts, and do not grudge to keep’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 68-9.

f. 47r-v

HrG 219: George Herbert, The Quidditie (‘My God, a verse is not a crown’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 69-70.

ff. 47v-8r

HrG 145: George Herbert, Humilitie (‘I saw the Vertues sitting hand in hand’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 70-1.

ff. 48v-9r

HrG 115: George Herbert, Frailtie (‘Lord, in my silence how do I despise’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 71-2.

ff. 49r-50r

HrG 65: George Herbert, Constancie (‘Who is the honest man?’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 72-3.

f. 50r-v

HrG 5: George Herbert, Affliction (III) (‘My heart did heave, and there came forth, O God!’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 73.

ff. 50v-1r

HrG 246: George Herbert, The Starre (‘Bright spark, shot from a brighter place’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 74.

ff. 51v-2v

HrG 253: George Herbert, Sunday (‘O day most calm, most bright’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 75-7.

f. 53r

HrG 22: George Herbert, Avarice (‘Money, thou bane of blisse, & sourse of wo’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 77.

ff. 53r-4r

HrG 264: George Herbert, To all Angels and Saints (‘Oh glorious spirits, who after all your bands’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 77-8.

f. 54r-v

HrG 100: George Herbert, Employment (II) (‘He that is weary, let him sit’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 78-9.

f. 55r-v

HrG 81: George Herbert, Deniall (‘When my devotions could not pierce’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 79-80.

ff. 55v-6r

HrG 40: George Herbert, Christmas (‘All after pleasures as I rid one day’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 80-1.

ff. 56v-7r

HrG 276: George Herbert, Ungratefulnesse (‘Lord, with what bountie and rare clemencie’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 82.

ff. 57r-8r

HrG 235: George Herbert, Sighs and Grones (‘O do not use me’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 83.

f. 58r-v

HrG 288: George Herbert, The World (‘Love built a stately house. where Fortune came’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 84.

f. 58v

HrG 61: George Herbert, Coloss. 3. 3. Our life is hid with Christ in God (‘My words & thoughts do both expresse this notion’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 84-5.

f. 59r-v

HrG 279: George Herbert, Vanitie (I) (‘The fleet Astronomer can bore’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 85-6.

ff. 59v-60v

HrG 162: George Herbert, Lent (‘Welcome deare feast of Lent: who loves not thee’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 86-7.

ff. 60v-1r

HrG 281: George Herbert, Vertue (‘Sweet day, so cool, so calm, so bright’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 87-8.

ff. 61r-2v

HrG 199: George Herbert, The Pearl. Matth. 13. 45. (‘I know the wayes of Learning. both the head’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 88-9.

f. 62r-v

HrG 7: George Herbert, Affliction (IV) (‘Broken in pieces all asunder’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 89-90.

ff. 63r-4r

HrG 176: George Herbert, Man (‘My God, I heard this day’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 90-2.

f. 64r-v

HrG 19: George Herbert, Antiphon (II) (‘Praised be the God of love’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 92-3.

ff. 64v-5r

HrG 278: George Herbert, Unkindnesse (‘Lord, make me coy and tender to offend’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 93-4.

f. 65v

HrG 163: George Herbert, Life (‘I made a posie, while the day ran by’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 94.

f. 66r

HrG 250: George Herbert, Submission (‘But that thou art my wisdome, Lord’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 95.

f. 66v

HrG 158: George Herbert, Justice (I) (‘I cannot skill of these thy wayes’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 95-6.

ff. 66v-r

HrG 36: George Herbert, Charms and Knots (‘Who reade a chapter when they rise’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 96-7.

f. 67r-v

HrG 9: George Herbert, Affliction (V) (‘My God, I read this day’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 97.

f. 68r-v

HrG 185: George Herbert, Mortification (‘How soon doth man decay!’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 98-9.

f. 69r

HrG 77: George Herbert, Decay (‘Sweet were the dayes, when thou didst lodge with Lot’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 99.

ff. 69v-71r

HrG 183: George Herbert, Miserie (‘Lord, let the Angles praise thy name’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 100-2.

f. 71v

HrG 154: George Herbert, Jordan (II) (‘When first my lines of heav'nly joyes made mention’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 102-3.

f. 72r-v

HrG 212: George Herbert, Prayer (II) (‘Of what an easie quick accesse’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 103.

ff. 72v-3v

HrG 189: George Herbert, Obedience (‘My God, if writings may’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 104-5.

ff. 73v-4v

HrG 64: George Herbert, Conscience (‘Peace pratler, do not lowre’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 105-6.

ff. 74v-5r

HrG 243: George Herbert, Sion (‘Lord, with what glorie wast thou serv'd of old’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 106-7.

ff. 75r-6v

HrG 140: George Herbert, Home (‘Come Lord, my head doth burn, my heart is sick’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 107-9.

ff. 76v-7v

HrG 30: George Herbert, The British Church (‘I joy, deare Mother, when I view’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 109-10.

ff. 77v-8r

HrG 220: George Herbert, The Quip (‘The merrie world did on a day’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 110-11.

f. 78r-v

HrG 280: George Herbert, Vanitie (II) (‘Poore silly soul, whose hope and head lies low’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 111.

ff. 78v-9r

HrG 73: George Herbert, The Dawning (‘Awake sad heart, whom sorrow ever drowns’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 112.

f. 79r

HrG 147: George Herbert, Jesu (‘Jesu is in my heart, his sacred name’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 112.

ff. 79v-80v

HrG 32: George Herbert, Businesse (‘Canst be idle? canst thou play’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 113-14.

ff. 80v-1

HrG 82: George Herbert, Dialogue (‘Sweetest Saviour, if my soul’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 114-15.

ff. 81v-2r

HrG 90: George Herbert, Dulnesse (‘Why do I languish thus, drooping and dull’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 115-16.

f. 82r

HrG 173: George Herbert, Love-joy (‘As on a window late I cast mine eye’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 116.

ff. 82v-6v

HrG 215: George Herbert, Providence (‘O sacred Providence, who from end to end’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 116-21.

ff. 86v-7r

HrG 242: George Herbert, Sinnes round (‘Sorrie I am, my God, sorrie I am’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 122.

f. 86v

HrG 143: George Herbert, Hope (‘I gave to Hope a watch of mine: but he’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 121.

ff. 87r-8r

HrG 262: George Herbert, Time (‘Meeting with Time, Slack thing, said I’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 122-3.

f. 88r-v

HrG 123: George Herbert, Gratefulnesse (‘Thou that hast giv'n so much to me’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 123-4.

ff. 89r-90r

HrG 197: George Herbert, Peace (‘Sweet Peace, where dost thou dwell? I humbly crave’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 124-5.

f. 90r-v

HrG 63: George Herbert, Confession (‘O what a cunning guest’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 126.

f. 91r-v

HrG 116: George Herbert, Giddinesse (‘Oh, what a thing is man! how farre from power’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 127.

ff. 91v-2v

HrG 31: George Herbert, The Bunch of Grapes (‘Joy, I did lock thee up: but some bad man’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 128.

ff. 92v-4r

HrG 174: George Herbert, Love unknown (‘Deare Friend, sit down, the tale is long and sad’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 129-31.

ff. 94r-5r

HrG 177: George Herbert, Mans medley (‘Heark, how the birds do sing’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 131-2.

f. 95r-v

HrG 249: George Herbert, The Storm (‘If as the windes and waters here below’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 132.

ff. 95v-6r

HrG 194: George Herbert, Paradise (‘I blesse thee, Lord, because I Grow’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 132-3.

f. 96r-v

HrG 181: George Herbert, The Method (‘Poore heart, lament’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 133-4.

f. 97r-v

HrG 86: George Herbert, Divinitie (‘As men, for fear the starres should sleep and nod’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 134-5.

ff. 97v-8v

HrG 103: George Herbert, Ephes. 4. 30. Grieve not the Holy Spirit, &c (‘And art thou grieved, sweet and sacred Dove’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 135-6.

ff. 98v-9r

HrG 110: George Herbert, The Familie (‘What doth this noise of thoughts within my heart’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 136-7.

ff. 99v-100v

HrG 244: George Herbert, The Size (‘Content thee, greedie heart’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 137-8.

ff. 100v-1v

HrG 20: George Herbert, Artillerie (‘As I one ev'ning sat before my cell’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 139.

ff. 101v-2

HrG 57: George Herbert, Church-rents and schismes (‘Brave rose, (alas!) where art thou? in the chair’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 140.

f. 102r-v

HrG 159: George Herbert, Justice (II) (‘O dreadfull Justice, what a fright and terrour’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 141.

f. 103r-v

HrG 201: George Herbert, The Pilgrimage (‘I travell'd on, seeing the hill, where lay’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 141-2.

f. 104r

HrG 139: George Herbert, The Holdfast (‘I threatned to observe the strict decree’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 143.

f. 104r-v

HrG 62: George Herbert, Complaining (‘Do not beguile my heart’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 143-4.

ff. 105r-6r

HrG 84: George Herbert, The Discharge (‘Busie enquiring heart, what wouldst thou know?’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 144-5.

ff. 106r-7r

HrG 206: George Herbert, Praise (II) (‘King of Glorie, King of Peace’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 146.

ff. 107r-8r

HrG 192: George Herbert, An Offering (‘Come, bring thy gift. If blessings were as slow’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 147-8.

ff. 108r-10r

HrG 164: George Herbert, Longing (‘With sick and famisht eyes’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 148-50.

ff. 110r-11r

HrG 25: George Herbert, The Bag (‘Away despair! my gracious Lord doth heare’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 151-2.

f. 111r-v

HrG 150: George Herbert, The Jews (‘Poore nation, whose sweet sap and juice’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 152.

ff. 112v-13r

HrG 118: George Herbert, The Glimpse (‘Whither away delight?’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 154-5.

ff. 113v-14v

HrG 21: George Herbert, Assurance (‘O spitefull bitter thought!’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 155-6.

f. 114v

HrG 33: George Herbert, The Call (‘Come, my Way, my Truth, my Life’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 156.

f. 115r

HrG 58: George Herbert, Clasping of hands (‘Lord, thou art mine, and I am thine’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 157.

ff. 115v-16v

HrG 207: George Herbert, Praise (III) (‘Lord, I will mean and speak thy praise’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 157-9.

f. 116v

HrG 155: George Herbert, Josephs coat (‘Wounded I sing, tormented I indite’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 159.

f. 117r-v

HrG 217: George Herbert, The Pulley (‘When God at first made man’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 159-60.

ff. 117v-18v

HrG 213: George Herbert, The Priesthood (‘Blest Order, which in power dost so excell’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 160-1.

ff. 118v-20r

HrG 231: George Herbert, The Search (‘Whither, O, whither art thou fled’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 162-3.

f. 120r-v

HrG 124: George Herbert, Grief (‘O who will give me tears? Come all ye springs’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 164.

ff. 120v-1v

HrG 71: George Herbert, The Crosse (‘What is this strange and uncouth thing?’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 164-5.

ff. 121v-2v

HrG 111: George Herbert, The Flower (‘How fresh, O Lord, how sweet and clean’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 165-7.

f. 123r

HrG 89: George Herbert, Dotage (‘False glozing pleasures, casks of happinesse’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 167.

f. 123v

HrG 245: George Herbert, The Sonne (‘Let forrain nations of their language boast’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 167-8.

ff. 123v-4r

HrG 269: George Herbert, A true Hymne (‘My joy, my life, my crown!’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 168.

f. 124r-v

HrG 16: George Herbert, The Answer (‘My comforts drop and melt away like snow’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 169.

ff. 124v-5r

HrG 83: George Herbert, A Dialogue-Antheme (‘Alas, poore Death, where is thy glorie?’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 169.

f. 125r

HrG 283: George Herbert, The Water-couse (‘Thou who dost dwell and linger here below’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 170.

f. 125r-v

HrG 232: George Herbert, Self-condemnation (‘Thou who condemnest Jewish hate’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 170-1.

f. 126r

HrG 28: George Herbert, Bitter-sweet (‘Ah my deare angrie Lord’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 171.

f. 126r-v

HrG 117: George Herbert, The Glance (‘When first thy sweet and gracious eye’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 171-2.

ff. 126v-7r

HrG 271: George Herbert, The 23d Psalme (‘The God of love my shepherd is’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 172-3.

f. 127v

HrG 178: George Herbert, Marie Magdalene (‘When blessed marie wip'd her Saviours feet’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 173.

f. 128r-v

HrG 1: George Herbert, Aaron (‘Holinesse on the head’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 174.

ff. 128v-9r

HrG 190: George Herbert, The Odour. 2. Cor. 2. 15 (‘How sweetly doth My Master sound! My Master!’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 174-5.

f. 129v

HrG 112: George Herbert, The Foil (‘If we could see below’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 175-6.

ff. 129v-30v

HrG 113: George Herbert, The Forerunners (‘The harbingers are come. See, see their mark’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 176-7.

ff. 130v-1v

HrG 227: George Herbert, The Rose (‘Presse me not to take more pleasure’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 177-8.

ff. 131v-2r

HrG 85: George Herbert, Discipline (‘Throw away thy rod’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 178-9.

ff. 132v-3r

HrG 146: George Herbert, The Invitation (‘Come ye hither All, whose taste’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 179-80.

ff. 133v-4v

HrG 27: George Herbert, The Banquet (‘Welcome sweet and sacred cheer’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 181-2.

f. 135r

HrG 202: George Herbert, The Posie (‘Let wits contest’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 182-3.

ff. 135r-6r

HrG 195: George Herbert, A Parodie (‘Souls joy, when thou art gone’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). John Donne, Poems, By J.D. (London, 1635). Hutchinson, pp. 183-4.

Herbert's poem is a ‘Parodie’ of a poem by William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke, first published in John Donne, Poems (2nd edition, London, 1635). Entries below include both poems indiscriminately.

f. 136r-v

HrG 96: George Herbert, The Elixir (‘Teach me, my God and King’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 184-5.

ff. 136v-7r

HrG 290: George Herbert, A Wreath (‘A wreathed garland of deserved praise’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 185.

f. 137r-v

HrG 76: George Herbert, Death (‘Death, thou wast once an uncouth hideous thing’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 185-6.

ff. 137v-8v

HrG 88: George Herbert, Dooms-day (‘Come away’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 186-7.

f. 138v

HrG 157: George Herbert, Judgement (‘Almightie Judge, how shall poore wretches brook’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 187-8.

f. 139r

HrG 138: George Herbert, Heaven (‘O who will show me those delights on high?’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, p. 188.

f. 139v

HrG 171: George Herbert, Love III (‘Love bade me welcome: yet my soul drew back’)

Copy.

Facsimile in James Boyd White, ‘This Book of Starres’: Learning to Read George Herbert (Ann Arbor, 1994), p. 263.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 188-9.

ff. 141r-7r

HrG 46: George Herbert, The Church Militant (‘Almightie Lord, who from thy glorious throne’)

Copy.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 190-8.

f. 147r-v

HrG 102: George Herbert, L'Envoy (‘King of Glorie, King of Peace’)

Copy.

MS Tanner 314

A folio composite volume of ecclesiatical letters and papers, 218 leaves, in calf.

f. 216r

*BaJ 10: John Bale, Collectiones

A single leaf containing Bale's autograph index (in red ink) to an unidentified MS presumably relating to the Carmelite order; the first column beginning ‘Iordanus monarchus, fo. 23…’ c.1540s-50s?

Unpublished. This MS described in McCusker (1940), p. 106 (but it is on paper, not on vellum as reported here).

Unpublished.

MS Tanner 394

Copy, in several professional hands, subscribed ‘Robert Cotton’, on 26 quarto leaves (plus a few blanks), in contemporary calf. c.1630.

CtR 464: Sir Robert Cotton, That the Kings of England have been pleased usually to consult with their Peeres in the great Councell, and Commons in Parliament, of Marriage, Peace, and Warre. Written...Anno 1611

Tract beginning ‘To search so high as the Norman Conquest...’. First published, as The Forme of Governement of the Kingdome of England collected out of the Fundamental Lawes and Statutes of this Kingdome, London, 1642. Cottoni posthuma (1651), pp. [11]-39.

MS Tanner 395

An octavo miscellany, chiefly relating to state matters, written from both ends, 102 leaves (plus blanks), in half-calf. Late 17th century.

Once owned by John and William Ayshcombe. A receipt relating to ‘Edmun Savage’, 5 October 1630, on f. 103r.

ff. 45v-7r

MrT 62: Sir Thomas More, Cresacre More's Life of Sir Thomas More

Extract, headed ‘Sr Thomas Moors Advice to Mr Crumwell’.

First published c.1626.

ff. 72r-6v

MaA 446: Andrew Marvell, Advice to a Painter to draw the Duke by (‘Spread a large canvass, Painter, to containe’)

Copy, the heading ‘Advice to a Painter’ written lengthways down the page.

This MS recorded in Osborne.

First published [in London], 1679. A Collection of Poems on Affairs of State (London, 1689), as by ‘A-M-l, Esq’. Thompson III, 399-403. Margoliouth, I, 214-18, as by Henry Savile. POAS, I, 213-19, as anonymous. Recorded in Osborne, pp. 40-2, as by Henry Savile.

f. 48 et seq.

BcF 330: Francis Bacon, Speech(es)

Copy of Bacon's speech on becoming Lord Keeper, 1617. Early-mid-17th century.

MS Tanner 434

Copy, in a professional secretary hand, on 24 quarto leaves, the first leaf imperfect, in half-calf. A reader's note on the first page: ‘This M.S. is not ill writ ye observations just a little enclined to Democrasie...’. c.1620s.

OvT 39: Sir Thomas Overbury, Observations in his travailes

Once owned by one Hugo James. Inscribed ‘Thom. Tanner. Ex dono R.V. H[ugo] James 1629’.

This MS cited in Beecher, p. 30.

A tract beginning ‘All things concurred for the rising and maintenance of this State...’. First published as Sir Thomas Overbvry his Observations in his Travailes vpon the State of The Xvii. Provinces as they stood Anno Dom. 1609 (London, 1626). Rimbault, pp. 223-30. Authorship uncertain.

MS Tanner 445

Copy on 37 quarto leaves, possibly (?) a text used for the edition of 1712. Late 17th century.

BrT 18: Sir Thomas Browne, Repertorium, or Some Account of the Tombs and Monuments in the Cathedrall Church of Norwich 1680

This MS probably corresponds to Quarto item 9 in the Rawlinson ‘Catalogue’ of Browne's MSS printed in Wilkin, IV, 469; recorded in Keynes and an ‘additional’ passage on f. 36 edited (III, 143).

First published in Posthumous Works (London, 1712). Wilkin, IV, 1-31. Keynes, III, 121-43.

See also BrT 21 and BrT 36.

MS Tanner 461

A quarto composite volume of state letters and tracts, in various hands, 180 leaves, in 17th-century calf.

Compiled, and partly written, by William Sancroft (1617-93), Archbishop of Canterbury.

ff. 51r-2v, 50r

WoH 259: Sir Henry Wotton, A Concept of some Observations intended upon Things most Remarkable in the Civil History of this Kingdom

Copy of ‘The preface to my sayd discourse’ which is cited as ‘A taste of some observacons intended upon things most remarkeable in ye history of this Kingdome’, on three quarto leaves (the first misplaced).

This preface first published (from this MS) in John Gutch, Collectanea Curiosa, 2 vols (Oxford, 1781), I, 215-22.

First published in Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), pp. 163-74.

f. 171v

ElQ 230: Queen Elizabeth I, Queen Elizabeth's Latin Speech to the Heads of Oxford University, September 28, 1592

Copy of the Latin speech, headed ‘Reginae Elisabethae Valedictoria ad Oxonienses. Sept. 28. 1592’, with Henry Savile's oration on the same occasion (ff. 169r-71r), both in the hand of Archbishop Sancroft, docketed by him ‘Transcrib'd fro Sr Ja. Ware's MS. Collections Vol. 47 being pt of Q. Elizs Entertainmt at Oxford 1592’, on two pairs of conjugate quarto leaves.

Beginning ‘Merita et gratitudo sic meam rationem captiuam duxerunt...’, in Autograph Compositions, pp. 163-5. An English translation, beginning ‘Merits and gratitude have so captured my reason...’, in Collected Works, Speech 20, pp. 327-8.

MS Tanner 464/1

A quarto volume, containing portions of the Collectanea (on ff. 1r-47r, 60v-150v) transcribed from Leland's autograph MS (LeJ 16) by John Stow (1525?-1605), London historian, 193 leaves. c.1576.

LeJ 20: John Leland, Collectanea [Stow transcript]

This MS recorded in Smith, I, xxiii.

MSS Tanner 464/2, 464/3 and 464/5

Quarto volumes containing a copy of the Itinerary in ten parts, transcribed from Leland's autograph MS (LeJ 54) by John Stow (1525?-1605), entitled ‘Comentaria Angliae John Layland’, 189 leaves, 126 leaves, and 148 leaves respectively. c.1576.

LeJ 57: John Leland, The Itinerary of John Leland [Stow transcript]

This MS recorded in Smith, I, xxii-xxiv.

MS Tanner 464/4

A quarto volume containing a copy of Leland's Latin epigrams transcribed from his (now lost) autograph by John Stow (1525?-1605), 70 leaves. c.1576.

LeJ 2: John Leland, Poemata

Twenty-eight poems printed from this MS in Leicester Bradner, ‘Some Unpublished Poems by John Leland’, PMLA, 71.ii (1956), 827-36.

Many of Leland's Latin epigrams published in Principum, ac illustrium aliquot & eruditorum in Anglia virorum, encomia, trophaea, genethliaca & epithalamia, ed. Thomas Newton (London, 1589). Reprinted in Joannis Lelandi...collectanea, ed. Thomas Hearne, 3rd edition (London, 1774), V, 79-167.

MS Tanner 465

A quarto composite miscellany of verse, in English and Latin, compiled by William Sancroft (1617-93), Archbishop of Canterbury, who lived in Cambridge as student and Fellow of Emmanuel College from 1633 to 1651, ii + 115 leaves, in calf. Comprising three separate units: ff. 1r-96v all in Sancroft's hand; ff. 97r-104r in a second hand; and ff. 105r-9r in a third hand. c.1640s [and later].

Including (on ff. 2-23, 27ar-v, 70) 94 Latin poems ascribed to Crashaw (including three of doubtful authorship) and (on ff. 29-41, 43v, 44v-58, 60v, 62v-5v, 67-70v, 72-3, 95-6) 101 English poems (plus a second copy of one of them) attributed to him (including one of doubtful authorship) and (on f. 16r-v) one Greek poem attributed to him; a list of contents on the first page beginning ‘Mr. Crashaw's poems transcrib'd fro his own copie, before the were printed; among wch are some not printed…’.

Cited in IELM as the ‘Sancroft MS’: CrR Δ 1. Crashaw edited in part from this MS, and collated, in Grosart, in Waller and in Martin (cited as T or T5), and discussed in Waller, pp. vi-ix, and in Martin, pp. lviii-lxxiii. Folios 28-34v, 38v-41, 44v, 52v-6 reproduced in facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

f. 2r

CrR 430: Richard Crashaw, Ps. I (‘O te te nimis, & nimis beatum!’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, II (1873), 221. Martin, p. 352.

f. 2r

CrR 348: Richard Crashaw, Acts 28.3 (‘Paule, nihil metuas. non fert haec vipera virus’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 308. Martin, p. 353.

f. 2v

CrR 394: Richard Crashaw, Joh. 6.14.26 (‘Jam credunt. Deus es. (Deus est, qui teste palato)’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 309. Martin, p. 353.

f. 2v

CrR 377: Richard Crashaw, In lacrymas Christi patientis (‘Saeve dolor! potes hoc? oculos quoque perpluis istos?’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 309. Martin, p. 353.

f. 2v

CrR 402: Richard Crashaw, joh. 19. In Sepulchrum Domini (‘Jam cedant, veteris cedant miracula saxi’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 309. Martin, p. 353.

f. 2v

CrR 398: Richard Crashaw, Joh. 13. 34. voi amorem praecipit (‘Sic magis in numeros, morituraque carmina vivit’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 309. Martin, p. 353.

f. 2v

CrR 344: Richard Crashaw, Act. 12.23 (‘Euge Deus! (pleno populus fremit vndique plausu)’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 310. Martin, p. 354.

f. 2v

CrR 354: Richard Crashaw, Bonum est nobis esse hîc (‘Cur cupis hîc adeo, dormitor Petre, manere?’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 310. Martin, p. 354.

f. 3r

CrR 415: Richard Crashaw, Mat. 6. 29. Videte lilia agrorum - nec Solomon &c. (‘Candide rex campi, cui floris eburnea pompa est’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 310. Martin, p. 354.

f. 3r

CrR 411: Richard Crashaw, Marc. 7. 33 & 36 (‘Voce, manuque simul linguae tu, Christe, ciendae’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 310. Martin, p. 354.

f. 3r

CrR 373: Richard Crashaw, In Beatae Virginis verecundiam (‘Non est hoc matris, sed (crede) modestia nati’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 310. Martin, p. p. 354.

f. 3r

CrR 425: Richard Crashaw, Mitto vos, sicut agnos in medio luporum (‘Hos quoque? an hos igitur saevi lacerabitis agnos?’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 310. Martin p. 354.

f. 3r

CrR 413: Richard Crashaw, Mat. 4. Christus à daemone vectus (‘Ergò ille, Angelicis ô sorcina dignior alis’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 311. Martin, p. 355.

f. 3r

CrR 389: Richard Crashaw, Joh. 1. 23 (‘Vox ego sum, dicis. tu vox es, sancte Johannes?’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 311. Martin, p. 355.

f. 3r

CrR 441: Richard Crashaw, Vox Joannes. Xus Verbum (‘Monstrat Joannes Christum, haud res mira videtur’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 311. Martin p. 355.

f. 3v

CrR 378: Richard Crashaw, In natales Domini Pastoribus nuntiatos (‘Ad te sydereis, ad te, Bone Tityre, pennis’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 311. Martin, p. 355.

f. 3v

CrR 351: Richard Crashaw, Apocal. xii. 7 (‘Arma, viri! (aetheriam quocumque sub ordine pubem’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, II (1873), 231-2. Martin, pp. 355-6.

f. 3v

CrR 345: Richard Crashaw, Act 17. In Atheniensem merum (‘Ipsos naturae thalamos sapis, imaque rerum’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 312. Martin, p. 356.

f. 4r

CrR 399: Richard Crashaw, Joh. 15. Ego vitis vera (‘Credo quidem. sed & hoc hostis te credidit ipse)’)

Copy, headed ‘Joh. 14. Ego vitis vera’.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 312. Martin, p. 356.

f. 4r

CrR 339: Richard Crashaw, Abscessum Christi queruntur discipuli (‘Ille abijt. jamque ô quae nos mala cunque manetis’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 312. Martin, p. 356.

f. 4r

CrR 374: Richard Crashaw, In descensum Spiritûs Sancti (‘Quae vehit auratos nubes dulcissima nimbos?’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 313. Martin, pp. 356-7.

f. 4r

CrR 342: Richard Crashaw, Act. x. 39 (‘Quis malus appendit de mortis stipite vitam?’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 313. Martin, p. 357.

f. 4r

CrR 395: Richard Crashaw, Joh. 10. Ego sum ostium (‘Jamque pates. cordisque seram gravis hasta reclusit’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 312. Martin, p. 357.

f. 4r

CrR 387: Richard Crashaw, In spinas demtas è Christi capite cruentatas (‘Accipe (an ingoscis?) de te sata germina, Miles’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 313. Martin, p. 357.

f. 4v

CrR 391: Richard Crashaw, Joh. iii (‘Nox erat, & Christum (Doctor malè docte) petebas’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 314. Martin, p. 357.

f. 4v

CrR 406: Richard Crashaw, Luc. xv (‘O ego vt Angelicis fiam bona gaudia turmis!’)

Copy, headed ‘Luc. ix.’.

Edited from this MS in Martin (pp. 357-8).

First published, in a version beginning ‘O Ut ego angelicis fiam bona gaudia turmis’, in Poemata et epigrammata (Cambridge, 1670). Martin p. 70 (and later version pp. 357-8).

f. 4v

CrR 372: Richard Crashaw, In Baptistam Vocem (‘Tantum habuit Baptista loqui, tot flumina rerum’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 314. Martin, p. 358.

f. 4v

CrR 343: Richard Crashaw, Act. 12.6,7. In D. Petrum ab Angelo solutum (‘Mors tibi, & Herodes instant: cùm nuncius ales’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 314. Martin, p. 358.

f. 4v

CrR 404: Richard Crashaw, Luc. 5. Relictis omnibus sequuti sunt eum (‘Ad nutum Domini abjecisti retia, Petre’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 314. Martin, p. 358.

f. 5r

CrR 388: Richard Crashaw, Joh. 1. Agnus Dei, qui tollit peccata mundi (‘Ergò tot heu (torvas facies) tot in ora leonum’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 314. Martin, p. 358.

f. 5r

CrR 412: Richard Crashaw, Marc. 8 Pisces multiplicati (‘Quae secreta meant taciti tibi retia uerbi’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 315. Martin, p. 358.

f. 5r

CrR 397: Richard Crashaw, Joh. 13. Domine, non solùm pedes, sed & caput, &c (‘En caput! atque suis quae plus satis ora laborant’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 315. Martin, p. 359.

f. 5r

CrR 396: Richard Crashaw, Joh. 12.37. Cùm tot signa edidisset, non credebant (‘Quantâ amor ille tuus se cunque levauerit alâ’)

Copy, headed ‘Joh. 12. 19. Cùm tot signa edidisset, non credebant’.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 315. Martin, p. 359.

f. 5r

CrR 341: Richard Crashaw, Act 1. In nubem, quae Dnu abstulit (‘O Nigra haec! Quid enim mihi candida pectora monstrat?’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 315. Martin, p. 359.

f. 5r

CrR 409: Richard Crashaw, Luc. 19. Vidit urbem, & flevit super eam (‘Ergò meas spernis lacrymas, urbs perfida? Sperne’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 315. Martin, p. 359.

f. 5v

CrR 407: Richard Crashaw, Luc. 18. Nec sicut iste Publicanus (‘Tu quoque dum istius miseri peccata fateris’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 316. Martin, p. 359.

f. 5v

CrR 417: Richard Crashaw, Mat. 8 - & accedentes discipuli excivavérunt eum (‘Ah, quis erat furor hos (tam raros) soluere somnos’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 316. Martin, p. 360.

f. 5v

CrR 421: Richard Crashaw, Mat. 15. In mulierem Canaanaeam cum Dno decertantem (‘Cjo. jam, jamque cadet modò fortiter vrge’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 316. Martin, p. 360.

f. 5v

CrR 410: Richard Crashaw, Marc. 1 & Luc. 14 In (febricitantem & hydropicum) sanatos (‘Nuper lecta gravem extinxit pia pagina febrem’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 317. Martin, p. 360.

f. 5v

CrR 419: Richard Crashaw, Mat. 9. Quaere comedit Magister vester cum peccatoribus &c. (‘Siccine fraternos fastidis, improbe, morbos’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 316. Martin, p. 360.

f. 6r

CrR 385: Richard Crashaw, In S. Lucam Medicum (‘Hanc, mihi quam miseram faciunt mea crimina vitam’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 317. Martin, p. 361.

f. 6r

CrR 436: Richard Crashaw, Tollat crucem suam - &c. (‘Ergò tuam pone. vt nobis sit sumere nostram’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 317. Martin p. 361.

f. 6r

CrR 376: Richard Crashaw, In (Joh. 17) Cygnaeam Di. Jesû cantionem (‘Quae mella, ô quot, Christe, favos in carmina fundis!’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 317. Martin, p. 361.

f. 6r

CrR 365: Richard Crashaw, Et conspuebant illum (‘Quid non tam foedè saevi maris audeat ira!’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 317. Martin, p. 361.

f. 6r

CrR 392: Richard Crashaw, Joh.4. Rogavit eum, vt descenderet, & sanaret filium suum (‘Ille vt eat tecum, in natique, tuique salutem?’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 318. Martin, pp. 361-2.

f. 6v

CrR 405: Richard Crashaw, Luc. 5.9. Pavor enim occupauerat eum super capturam piscium (‘Dum nimiùm in captis per te, Petre, piscibus haeres’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 318. Martin, p. 362.

f. 6v

CrR 401: Richard Crashaw, Joh. 15.24. vidérunt, & odérunt me (‘Vidit? & odit adhuc? Ah, te non vidit, Jesu’)

Copy, headed ‘Joh.’.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 318. Martin, p. 362.

f. 6v

CrR 408: Richard Crashaw, Luc. 18. 39. (‘Tu mala turba tace. mihi tam mea vota propinquant’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published, in a version beginning ‘Improba turba tace. Mihi tam mea vota propinquant’, in Poemata et epigrammata (Cambridge, 1670). Martin p. 69. Later version published in Waller (1904), p. 318, and in Martin, p. 362.

f. 6v

CrR 423: Richard Crashaw, Mat. 22. In Pharisaeos Christi uerbis insidiantes (‘O quàm te miseri ludunt vaga taedia voti’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 319. Martin, pp. 362-3.

f. 7r

CrR 418: Richard Crashaw, Mat. 9 (‘Falleris. & nudum malè ponis (Pictor) Amorem’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 319. Martin, p. 363.

f. 7r

CrR 437: Richard Crashaw, ‘Tolle oculos, tolle ô tecum (tua sydera) nostros’

Copy, untitled.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 319. Martin p. 363.

f. 7r

CrR 347: Richard Crashaw, Act 21. Nam ego non solum vinciri - &c.

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 319. Martin, p. 363.

f. 7r

CrR 420: Richard Crashaw, Mat. 11. Legatio Baptistae ad Christum (‘Oro, quis es? legat ista suo Baptista Magistro’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 320. Martin, p. 363.

f. 7r-v

CrR 364: Richard Crashaw, ‘Ergò veni: quicunque ferant tua signa timores’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, II (1873), 223-4. Martin, pp. 363-4.

ff. 7v-8

CrR 366: Richard Crashaw, ‘Felices! properâstis jo, properâstis. & altam’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, II (1873), 235-6. Martin, pp. 364-5.

f. 8r

CrR 359: Richard Crashaw, Domitiano. De S. Johanne ad portam Lat. (‘Ergò vt inultus eas? Sed nec tamen ibis inultus’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 321. Martin, p. 365.

f. 8r

CrR 442: Richard Crashaw, ‘Ecce tuos lapides! nihil est pretiosius illis’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, II (1873), 239. Martin, p. 365.

f. 8r-v

CrR 350: Richard Crashaw, ‘Ah ferus, ah culter! qui tam bona lilia primus’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, II (1873), 225-7. Martin, pp. 365-6.

f. 9r

CrR 426: Richard Crashaw, ‘Ne pia, ne nimium, Virgo, permitte querelis’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, II (1873), 229-30. Martin, pp. 366-7.

f. 9r

CrR 340: Richard Crashaw, ‘Accipe dona, Puer. parvae libamina laudis’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 324. Martin, p. 367.

f. 9v

CrR 381: Richard Crashaw, In partum B Virgs. non difficilem (‘Nec facta est tamen illa Parens impunè. quòd almi’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 324. Martin, p. 367.

f. 9v

CrR 356: Richard Crashaw, ‘Circulus hic similem quàm par sibi pergit in orbem!’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 324. Martin, p. 368.

f. 9v

CrR 386: Richard Crashaw, In Sanctum igneis lnguis descendentem Spiritum (‘Absint, qui ficto simulant pia pectora vultu’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 324. Martin, p. 368.

f. 10r

CrR 357: Richard Crashaw, Cùm horum aliqua dedicâram Praeceptori meo colendissimo Amico amicissimo, R. Brooke (‘Qualiter è nido multâ jam floridus alâ’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 325. Martin, pp. 368-9.

f. 10v

CrR 370: Richard Crashaw, Hymnus Veneri, dum in illius tutelam transëunt virgines (‘Tu tuis adsis, Venus alma, sacris’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, II (1873), 300-1. Martin, pp. 369-70.

f. 11r

CrR 434: Richard Crashaw, ‘Spes Diva, salue. Diva auidam tuo’

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, II (1873), 237-8. Martin, p. 370.

f. 11r-v

CrR 427: Richard Crashaw, Non accipimus brevem vitam, sed facimus (‘Ergò tu luges nimiùm citatam’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, II (1873), 233-4. Martin, p. 371.

ff. 11v-12

CrR 432: Richard Crashaw, Pulchra non diuturna (‘Eheu ver breve, & invidum!’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, II (1873), 295-7. Martin, pp. 371-3.

ff. 12v-13

CrR 439: Richard Crashaw, Veris descriptio (‘Tempus adest, placidis quo Sol novus auctior horis’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, II (1873), 303-5. Martin, pp. 373-4.

f. 13r

CrR 382: Richard Crashaw, In Picturam Reverendissimi Episcopi, D. Andrews (‘Haec charta monstrat, Fama quem monstrat magis’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 163.

f. 13v

CrR 428: Richard Crashaw, On Bp Andrew's's picture (‘Haec est, quae sacrâ didicit florere figurâ’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 332. Martin p. 374.

f. 13v

CrR 444: Richard Crashaw, Meliùs purgatur stomachus per vomitum, quàm per secessum (‘Dum vires refero vomitûs, & nobile munus’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, II (1873), 317-18. Martin, p. 411.

Probably spurious (see Martin, p. lxiv).

f. 14r-v

CrR 379: Richard Crashaw, In Natales Mariae Principis (‘Parce tuo jam, bruma ferox, ô parce furori’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, II (1873), 350-2. Martin, pp. 375-6.

ff. 14v-15r

CrR 367: Richard Crashaw, Honoratisso Do. Robo. Heath, summo Justit. de com. Banco. Gratulatio. (‘Ignitum latus, & sacrum tibi gratulor ostrum’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, II (1873), 326-7. Martin, pp. 376-7.

f. 15r

CrR 433: Richard Crashaw, Serenissimae Reginae librum suum commendat Academia (‘Hunc quoque maternâ (nimium nisi magna rogamus)’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, II (1873), 345. Martin, p. 377.

f. 15r-v

CrR 445: Richard Crashaw, Priscianus verberans, & vapulans (‘Quid facis? ah! tam perversâ quid volvitur irâ?’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Martin.

Lines 39-40 first published in William Hawkins, Priscianus verberans et vapulans (London, 1632). The whole poem published in Grosart, II (1873), 311-13. Martin, pp. 411-12.

Probably spurious (see Martin, p. lxiv).

ff. 15v-16r

CrR 443: Richard Crashaw, Ad librum super haec ab ipso ludi magistro editum, qui dr̈ Priscianus verberans & vapulans (‘Sordes ô tibi gratulamur istas’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Martin.

Extracts (14 lines) first published in William Hawkins, Priscianus verberans et vapulans (London, 1632). The whole poem published in Grosart, II (1873), 315-16. Martin, p. 413.

Probably spurious (see Martin, p. lxiv).

f. 16r-v

CrR 368: Richard Crashaw, Horatii Ode. Ille & nefasto te posuit die &c. (‘_______________________’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, II (1873), 329-30. Martin, pp. 377-8.

f. 17r

CrR 358: Richard Crashaw, Damno affici saepe fit lucrum (‘Damna adsunt multis taciti compendia lucri’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple, 2nd edition (London, 1648). Martin, p. 226.

f. 17r

CrR 435: Richard Crashaw, Thesaurus malorum faemina (‘Qvis deus, O quis erat qui te, mala faemina, finxit?’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple, 2nd edition (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 221-2.

f. 17v

CrR 383: Richard Crashaw, In Pigmaliona (‘Paenitet Artis’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple, 2nd edition (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 223-4.

f. 17v

CrR 429: Richard Crashaw, Phaenicus (Genethliacon & Epicedion) (‘Phaenix alumna mortis’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple, 2nd edition (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 224-5.

ff. 18r-19v

CrR 355: Richard Crashaw, Bulla (‘Qvid tibi vana suos offert mea bulla tumores?’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published at the end of Daniel Heinsius, Crepundia siliana. ejusdem dissertatio de verae criticae (Cambridge, 1646). Among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple, 2nd edition (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 216-20.

f. 20r-v

CrR 438: Richard Crashaw, Tranquillitas animi, similitudine ductâ ab ave captivâ & canorâ tamen (‘Vt cùm delicias leves, loquacem’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple, 2nd edition (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 227-8.

ff. 20v-1r

CrR 369: Richard Crashaw, Humanae vitae descriptio (‘O vita, tantum lubricus quidam furor’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple, 2nd edition (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 226-7.

f. 21r

CrR 371: Richard Crashaw, In Apollinem depereuntem Daphnen (‘Stulte Cupido’)

Copy, headed ‘In Phaebum amantem’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple, 2nd edition (London, 1648). Martin, p. 222.

f. 21r-v

CrR 353: Richard Crashaw, Arion (‘Squammea vivae’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple, 2nd edition (London, 1648). Martin, p. 224.

f. 21v

CrR 349: Richard Crashaw, Aeneas Patris sui bajulus (‘Maenia Trojae’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple, 2nd edition (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 222-3.

f. 22r-v

CrR 440: Richard Crashaw, Votiva Domus Petrensis Pro Domo Dei (‘Ut magis in Mundi votis, Aviúmque querelis’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple, 2nd edition (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 206-7.

ff. 22v-3r

CrR 360: Richard Crashaw, Ejusdem In caeterorum Operum difficili Parturitione Gemitus (‘O felix nimis Illa, & nostrae nobile Nomen’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple, 2nd edition (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 207-8.

f. 27a

CrR 380: Richard Crashaw, In obitum Rev. V. Dris Mansell Coll. Regin. Mri qui reu. Ds. Brooke interitum proximè secutus est (‘Ergo iterum in lacrymas, & saevi murmura planctûs’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, II (1873), 323-4. Martin, p. 379.

f. 27a

CrR 384: Richard Crashaw, In reu. Dre. Brooke. Epitaphium (‘Posuit sub istâ (non gravi) caput terrâ’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, II (1873), 376-7. Martin, pp. 378-9.

f. 27av

CrR 362: Richard Crashaw, Epitaphium (‘Quisquis nectareo serenus aevo’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple, 2nd edition (London, 1648). Martin, pp. 225-6.

f. 27av

CrR 361: Richard Crashaw, Elegia (‘Ite meae lacrymae (nec enim moror) ite. Sed oro’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple, 2nd edition (London, 1648). Martin, p. 225.

ff. 28r-9v

CrR 323: Richard Crashaw, The Weeper (‘Haile Sister Springs’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple, (London, 1646). 2nd edition (1648). Revised version published as ‘Sainte Mary Magdalene or The Weeper’ in Carmen Deo Nostro (Paris, 1652). Martin, pp. 79-83 (and later version pp. 307-14).

f. 30r-v

CrR 234: Richard Crashaw, The Teare (‘What bright soft thing is this?’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 84-5.

ff. 30v-1r

CrR 219: Richard Crashaw, Psalme 137 (‘On the proud bankes of Great Euphrates flood’)

Copy, headed ‘Ps. 137. (Paraphrasi Poëtica.)’.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 104-5.

ff. 31r-2r

CrR 214: Richard Crashaw, Psalme 23 (‘Happy me! ô happy sheepe!’)

Copy, headed ‘Ps. 23. (Paraphrasticè.)’.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 102-4.

f. 32r-v

CrR 92: Richard Crashaw, Luke 2. Quaerit Jesum suum Maria (‘And is he gone, whom these armes held but now?’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Grosart, I (1872), 185-6. Martin, pp. 379-80.

f. 32v

CrR 168: Richard Crashaw, On the Blessed Virgins bashfulnesse (‘That on her lap she casts her humble Eye’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon the Virgins looking on our Saviour’.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 89.

f. 33r

CrR 108: Richard Crashaw, Marke 4. Why are yee afraid, O yee of little faith? (‘As if the storme meant him’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon the disciples awaking Christ in the storme’.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 88-9.

f. 33r

CrR 246: Richard Crashaw, To the Infant Martyrs (‘Goe smiling soules, your new built Cages breake’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 88.

f. 33r

CrR 112: Richard Crashaw, Marke 12. Give to Caesar — And to God — (‘All we have is God's, and yet’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon paying tribute to Caesar’.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 96.

f. 33v

CrR 256: Richard Crashaw, Two went up into the Temple to pray (‘Two went to pray? ô rather say’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon the Pharisee, & the Publicane’.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 89.

f. 33v

CrR 274: Richard Crashaw, Vpon the Asse that bore our Saviour (‘Hath onely Anger an Omnipotence’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon ye Asse that carried or Saviour’.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 90.

f. 33v

CrR 116: Richard Crashaw, Matthew. 9. The blind cured by the word of our Saviour (‘Thou speak'st the word (thy word's a Law)’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon Christs restoring sight only by his word’.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 91.

f. 33v

CrR 96: Richard Crashaw, Luke 10. And a certaine Priest comming that way looked on him and passed by (‘Why dost Thou wound my wounds, ô Thou that passest by’)

Copy, headed ‘To them, yt passed by at or Saviors passion’.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 94.

f. 33v

CrR 176: Richard Crashaw, On the Miracle of Loaves (‘Now Lord, or never, they'l beleeve on thee’)

Copy, headed ‘On Christ's miracle at the supper’.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 88.

f. 34r

CrR 93: Richard Crashaw, Luc. 7. She began to wash his feet with teares and wipe them with the haires of her head (‘Her eyes flood lickes his feets faire staine’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon Mary Magdalene’.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 97.

f. 34r

CrR 165: Richard Crashaw, On the bleeding wounds of our crucified Lord (‘Iesu, no more, it is full tide’)

Copy of stanzas 1-5, headed ‘Upon our Saviours wounds’.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 101-2.

f. 34r

CrR 156: Richard Crashaw, On St. Peter casting away his Nets at our Saviours call (‘Thou hast the art on't Peter. and canst tell’)

Copy, headed ‘On Peters casting the nett’.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 98.

f. 34r

CrR 118: Richard Crashaw, Math. 16.25. Whosoeuer shall loose his life &c. (‘Soe I may gaine thy death, my life I'le giue’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Waller (1904), p. 343. Martin, p. 381.

f. 34v

CrR 20: Richard Crashaw, Easter day (‘Rise, Heire of fresh Eternity’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon Christs resurrection’.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 100.

f. 34v

CrR 185: Richard Crashaw, On the water of our Lords Baptisme (‘Each blest drop, on each blest limme’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon the water, wch baptiz'd Christ’.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 85.

f. 34v

CrR 80: Richard Crashaw, Joh. 3. But men loved darknesse rather than Light (‘The worlds light shines, shine as it will’)

Copy, headed ‘Joh. 3. 19. Light is come into the world &c.’.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 97.

f. 34v

CrR 179: Richard Crashaw, On the miracle of multiplyed loaves (‘See here an easie Feast that knowes no wound’)

Copy, headed ‘John 6. Upon the five loaves’.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 86.

f. 35r

CrR 2: Richard Crashaw, Act. 8. On the baptized Aethiopian (‘Let it no longer be a forlorne hope’)

Copy, headed ‘Acts. 8. Upon the Aethiopian’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 85.

f. 35r

CrR 1: Richard Crashaw, Act. 5. The sicke implore St. Peter's shadow (‘Vnder thy shadow may I lurke a while’)

Copy, headed ‘Acts. 5. The sick crave the shadow of Peter’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 87.

f. 35r

CrR 329: Richard Crashaw, The Widowes Mites (‘Two Mites, two drops, (yet all her house and land)’)

Copy, headed ‘The Widdowes two mites’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 86.

f. 35r

CrR 183: Richard Crashaw, On the still surviving markes of our Saviours wounds (‘What ever story of their crueltie’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon the print of Christs wounds’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 86-7.

f. 35r

CrR 110: Richard Crashaw, Mar. 7. The dumbe healed, and the people enjoyned silence (‘Christ bids the dumbe tongue speake, it speakes, the sound’)

Copy of an eight-line version, headed ‘Upon the tongue’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 87.

f. 35v

CrR 103: Richard Crashaw, Luk. 15. On the Prodigall (‘Tell me bright Boy, tell me my golden Lad’)

Copy, headed ‘Luke 15. 13. Upon the rich young man’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 86.

f. 35v

CrR 125: Richard Crashaw, Mat. 28. Come see the place where the Lord lay (‘Show me himselfe, himselfe (bright Sir) O show’)

Copy, headed ‘Mat. 28 Mary to the Angell, shewing her the place, where Jesus lay’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 87.

f. 35v

CrR 78: Richard Crashaw, Is it better to go to Heaven with one eye, &c. (‘One Eye? a thousand rather, and a Thousand more’)

Copy, headed ‘It is better to enter into the kingdom of God with one eye &c.’

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 93.

f. 35v

CrR 114: Richard Crashaw, Matthew 8. I am not worthy that thou should'st come under my roofe (‘Thy God was making hast into thy roofe’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 90.

f. 35v

CrR 123: Richard Crashaw, Matthew. 27. And he answered them nothing (‘O mighty Nothing! unto thee’)

Copy, headed ‘Christ accused answered nothing’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 91.

f. 36r

CrR 99: Richard Crashaw, Luke 11. Blessed be the paps which Thou hast sucked (‘Svppose he had been Tabled at thy Teates’)

Copy, headed ‘Blessed is — & the papps, wch thou hast suckt &c’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 94.

f. 36r

CrR 85: Richard Crashaw, Joh. 16. Verily I say unto you, yee shall weep and lament (‘Welcome my Griefe, my Ioy. how deare's’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 95.

f. 36r

CrR 15: Richard Crashaw, But now they have seen, and hated (‘Seene? and yet hated thee? they did not see’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 96.

f. 36r

CrR 106: Richard Crashaw, Luke 16. Dives asking a drop (‘A drop, one drop, how sweetly one faire drop’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 96.

f. 36r

CrR 67: Richard Crashaw, I am the Doore (‘And now th'art set wide ope, The Speare's sad Art’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 90.

f. 36r

CrR 303: Richard Crashaw, Vpon the Infant Martyrs (‘To see both blended in one flood’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 95.

f. 36v

CrR 189: Richard Crashaw, On the wounds of our crucified Lord (‘O these wakefull wounds of thine!’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 99.

f. 36v

CrR 316: Richard Crashaw, Vpon the Thornes taken downe from our Lords head bloody (‘Know'st thou this, Souldier? 'tis a much chang'd plant, which yet’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 96-7.

f. 36v

CrR 244: Richard Crashaw, To Pontius washing his hands (‘Thy hands are washt, but ô the waters spilt’)

Copy, headed ‘Pilate washes his hands’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 88.

f. 37r

CrR 5: Richard Crashaw, Act. 21. I am ready not onely to be bound but to dye (‘Come, death, come bands, nor do you shrink, my cares’)

Copy, headed ‘Pauls resolution’ and here beginning ‘Come Bonds, come death, nor do you shrink, my eares’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 98.

f. 37r

CrR 240: Richard Crashaw, To our Lord, upon the Water, made Wine (‘Thou water turn'st to Wine (faire friend of Life’)

Copy, headed ‘Christ turnes water into wine’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 91.

f. 37r

CrR 101: Richard Crashaw, Luk. 11. Vpon the dumbe Devill cast out, and the slanderous Jewes put to silence (‘Two Devills at one blow thou hast laid flat’)

Copy, headed ‘Christ casteth out 2 divells at once’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 93.

f. 37r

CrR 70: Richard Crashaw, In cicatrices Domini Jesu (‘Come, Braue soldjers, come, & see’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, I (1872), 187. Martin, p. 381.

f. 37v

RnT 259: Thomas Randolph, On the Passion of Christ (‘What rends the temples vail, where is day gone?’)

Copy.

First published in Poems (1638). Thorn-Drury, p. 57. This poem is the ‘Englished’ version of Latin verses beginning ‘Quid templum abscindit? quo luxque diesque recessit’, printed in Thorn-Drury, pp. 178-9.

f. 37v

CrR 121: Richard Crashaw, Matthew 23. Yee build the Sepuchres of the Prophets (‘Thou trim'st a Prophets Tombe, and dost bequeath’)

Copy, headed ‘Ye build the sepulchres &c.’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 95.

f. 37v

CrR 264: Richard Crashaw, Vpon Lazarus his Teares (‘Rich Lazarus! richer in those Gems, thy Teares’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 89.

f. 37v

CrR 269: Richard Crashaw, Vpon our Saviours Tombe wherein never man was laid (‘How life and Death in Thee Agree?’)

Copy, headed ‘In Sepulchrum Domini. (Luke 23. where was neu man laid)’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 93.

f. 37v

CrR 69: Richard Crashaw, In amorem divinum (Hermannus Hugo) (‘Aeternall loue! what 'tis to loue thee well’)

Edited from this MS in Waller and in Martin.

First published in Waller (1904), p. 344. Martin, p. 381.

f. 37v

CrR 313: Richard Crashaw, Vpon the Sepulchre of Our Lord (‘Here, where our Lord once laid his Head’)

Copy, headed ‘On our Saviours Sepulcher’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Carmen Deo Nostro (Paris, 1652). Martin, p. 86 (and later version, p. 277).

f. 37v

CrR 309: Richard Crashaw, Vpon the Powder Day (‘How fit our well-rank'd Feasts doe follow’)

Copy, headed ‘In conjurationem sulphuream’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 185.

f. 38r

CrR 192: Richard Crashaw, Our Lord in his Circumcision to his Father (‘To these first fruits of my growing death’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 98-9.

f. 38r

CrR 82: Richard Crashaw, Joh. 15. Vpon our Lords comfortable discourse with his Disciples (‘All Hybla's honey, all that sweetnesse can’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 95.

ff. 38v-9v

CrR 62: Richard Crashaw, A Hymne of the Nativity, sung by the Shepheards (‘Come wee Shepheards who have seene’)

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 106-8.

f. 39v

CrR 242: Richard Crashaw, To Pontius washing his blood-stained hands (‘Is murther no sin? or a sin so cheape’)

Copy, headed ‘On Pilate washing his hands’.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 94-5.

f. 40r

AlW 128: William Alabaster, A New Year's Gift to my Saviour (‘Ho, God be here, is Christ, my lord, at leisure?’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Dr Alablaster’.

Edited from this MS in Malone. Collated in Sonnets.

First published in Edmond Malone (ed.), The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare (20 vols, 1821), II, 260-3. Sonnets, p. 41 (No. 75).

f. 40r

AlW 26: William Alabaster, The Sponge (‘O sweet and bitter monuments of pain’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Sonnets.

First published in Edmond Malone (ed.), The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare (20 vols, 1821), II, 260-3. Sonnets, p. 13 (No. 24).

ff. 40v-1r

CrR 160: Richard Crashaw, On the Assumption (‘Harke shee is called, the parting houre is come’)

Copy, headed ‘On the Assumption of the Virgin Marie’.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). A version published, as ‘In the Glorious Assvmption of Ovr Blessed Lady’, in Carmen Deo Nostro (Paris, 1652). Martin, pp. 139-41 (and later version pp. 304-6).

f. 41r

WoH 51: Sir Henry Wotton, A Hymn to my God, in a night of my late sickness (‘Oh Thou great power! in whom I move’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Hannah; facsimile in the appendix of the Scolar Press facsimile edition of Richard Crashaw, Steps to the Temple < 1646 > (menston, 1970).

First published in Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 515. Hannah (1845), pp. 49-51.

f. 42r-v

FlG 1: Giles Fletcher the Younger, A Description of Encolpius (‘It was at evening, & in Aprill mild’)

Copy, headed ‘Nisus amore pio pueri &c.’ and endorsed in another hand ‘'tis Encolpus in Petronius. I had it of Mr. Blois’.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Boas.

First published in Miscellanies of the Fuller Worthies Library, ed. Alexander B. Grosart, III (1872), 510-12. Boas, I, 89-90.

f. 42v

StW 785: William Strode, Song (‘I saw faire Cloris walke alone’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Dr Corbett’.

This MS recorded in Bennett and Trevor-Roper, pp. 169-70.

First published in Walter Porter, Madrigales and Ayres (London, 1632). Dobell, p. 41. Forey, pp. 76-7. The poem also discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Notes on some Poems attributed to William Strode’, PQ, 34 (1955), 444-8 (pp. 445-6), and see Mary Hobbs, ‘Early Seventeenth-Century Verse Miscellanies and Their Value for Textual Editors’, EMS, 1 (1989), 182-210 (pp. 199, 209).

f. 43r

WoH 78: Sir Henry Wotton, On his Mistress, the Queen of Bohemia (‘You meaner beauties of the night’)

Copy of a six-stanza version, headed ‘A Song’ [‘by Sr H Wotton’added in a later hand].

This MS collated in Hannah; recorded in Leishman.

First published (in a musical setting) in Michael East, Sixt Set of Bookes (London, 1624). Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 518. Hannah (1845), pp. 12-15. Some texts of this poem discussed in J.B. Leishman, ‘“You Meaner Beauties of the Night” A Study in Transmission and Transmogrification’, The Library, 4th Ser. 26 (1945-6), 99-121. Some musical versions edited in English Songs 1625-1660, ed. Ian Spink, Musica Britannica XXXIII (London, 1971), Nos. 66, 122.

f. 43v

CrR 13: Richard Crashaw, The Beginning of Heliodorus (‘The smiling Morne had newly wak't the day’)

Copy, headed ‘The Faire Aethiopian. R. Cr.’, deleted.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 158.

f. 44v

CrR 446: Richard Crashaw, Vpon a gnatt burnt in a candle (‘Little = buzzing = wanton elfe’)

Copy, ascribed to Crashaw in the MS index.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, I (1872), 284-5. Martin, pp. 413-14.

Probably spurious (see Martin, p. lxv). Also ascribed to Thomas Randolph and to Thomas Vincent.

f. 45r-v

CrR 88: Richard Crashaw, Loves Horoscope (‘Love, brave vertues younger Brother’)

Copy, deleted.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 185-6.

f. 45v

RnT 3: Thomas Randolph, Ad Amicam (‘Sweet, doe not thy beauty wrong’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Thorn-Drury.

First published, in a version beginning ‘Deare, doe not your fair beauty wrong’, in Thomas May, The Old Couple (London, 1658), p. 25. Attributed to Randolph in Parry (1917), p. 224. Thorn-Drury, p. 168.

ff. 46r-8r

CrR 128: Richard Crashaw, Musicks Duell (‘Now Westward Sol had spent the richest Beames’)

Copy, headed ‘Fidicinis, & Philomelae / Bellum Musicum’, deleted.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 149-53.

f. 48r

CrR 154: Richard Crashaw, On Mr. G. Herberts booke intituled the Temple of Sacred Poems, sent to a Gentlewoman (‘Know you faire, on what you looke’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon Herberts Temple sent to a gentlewoman. R. Cr.’, deleted.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 130-1.

f. 48v

CrR 173: Richard Crashaw, On the Frontispiece of Isaacsons Chronologie explained (‘Let hoary Time's vast Bowels be the Grave’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon the Frontispiece of Mr Isaackson's Chronologie. R. Cr.’, deleted.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Henry Isaacson, Saturni ephemerides sive tabula historico-chronologica (London, 1633). Among The Delights of the Muses in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 191.

ff. 48v-9r

CrR 259: Richard Crashaw, Vpon Bishop Andrewes his Picture before his Sermons (‘This reverend shadow cast that setting Sun’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon BP. Andrewes picture before his booke R.Cr.’, deleted.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Lancelot Andrewes, XCVI Sermons, 2nd edition (London, 1641). Among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 163-4.

f. 49r-v

CrR 138: Richard Crashaw, On a foule Morning, being then to take a journey (‘Where art thou Sol, while thus the blind-fold Day’)

Copy, headed ‘An Invitation to faire weather. In itinere cum vrgeretur matutinum coelum, tali carmine invitabatur serenitas. R. Cr.’, deleted.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 181-2.

ff. 49v-50r

CrR 249: Richard Crashaw, To the Morning. Satisfaction for sleepe (‘What succour can I hope the Muse will send’)

Copy, headed ‘Ad Auroram. Somnolentiae expiatio. R. Cr.’, deleted.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 183-5.

f. 50v

CrR 194: Richard Crashaw, Out of Catullus (‘Come and let us live my Deare’)

Copy, headed ‘Catull./Vivamus, mea Lesbia &c R. Cr.’, deleted.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 194.

ff. 50v-1v

CrR 212: Richard Crashaw, Petronij Ales Phasiacis petita Colchis &c. R.Cr. (‘The bird, that's fetch't from Phasis floud’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, I (1872), 286. Martin, p. 382.

f. 51r-v

CrR 60: Richard Crashaw, Horatij Ille & nefasto te posuit die &c. R. Cr. (‘Shame of thy mother soyle! ill=nurtur'd tree!’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, I (1872), 287-9. Martin, pp. 382-4.

ff. 51v-2r

CrR 209: Richard Crashaw, Out of Virgil, In the praise of the Spring (‘All Trees, all leavy Groves confesse the Spring’)

Copy, headed ‘E Virg. Georg: particula In laudem Veris. R. Cr.’, deleted.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 155-6.

ff. 52v-3r

CrR 175: Richard Crashaw, On ye Gunpowder — Treason (‘Dull, sluggish Ile! what more than Lethargy’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Grosart, I (1872), 188-90. Martin, pp. 384-5.

ff. 53r-4r

CrR 302: Richard Crashaw, Upon the gunpowder treason (‘Reach me a quill, pluckt from the flaming wing’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Grosart, I (1872), 190-2. Martin, pp. 386-7.

f. 54r-v

CrR 301: Richard Crashaw, Upon the gunpowder treason (‘Grow plumpe, leane Death. his Holinesse a feast’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Grosart, I (1872), 192-4. Martin, pp. 387-8.

f. 55r-v

CrR 307: Richard Crashaw, Upon the Kings coronation (‘Sound forth, caelesiall Organs, lett heauens quire’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Grosart, I (1872), 279-80. Martin, pp. 389-90.

ff. 55v-6r

CrR 308: Richard Crashaw, Upon the Kings Coronation (‘Strange Metamorphosis! It was but now’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Grosart, I (1872), 280-2. Martin, pp. 390-1.

ff. 56r-7v

CrR 293: Richard Crashaw, Vpon the Duke of Yorke his Birth A Panegyricke (‘Brittaine, the mighty Oceans lovely Bride’)

Copy, headed ‘A Panegyrick. / Upon the birth of the Duke of Yorke’, deleted.

This MS collated in Martin. Facsimile in Steps to the Temple (1970).

First published in Voces votivae ab academicis Cantabrigiensibus (Cambridge, 1640). Among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 176-81.

ff. 57v-8v

CrR 276: Richard Crashaw, Upon the birth of the Princesse Elizabeth (‘Bright starre of Majesty, oh shedd on mee’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, I (1872), 282-4. Martin, pp. 391-2.

f. 58v

CoR 606: Richard Corbett, To the Ladyes of the New Dresse (‘Ladyes that weare black cypresse vailes’)

Copy.

First published in Witts Recreations (London, 1640). Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, p. 90.

This poem is usually followed in MSS by ‘The Ladyes Answer’ (‘Blacke Cypresse vailes are shrouds of night’): see GrJ 14.

ff. 58v-9r

GrJ 22: John Grange, ‘Black cypress veils are shrouds of night’

Copy, headed ‘Their Answer’.

An ‘Answer’ to Corbett's ‘To the Ladyes of the New Dresse’ (CoR 595-629), first published in Witts Recreations (London, 1640). The Poems of Richard Corbett, ed. J.A.W. Bennett and H.R. Trevor-Roper (Oxford, 1955), p. 91. Listed as by John Grange in Krueger.

f. 59r-v

WoH 228: Sir Henry Wotton, A Farewell to the Vanities of the World (‘Farewell, ye gilded follies, pleasing troubles!’)

Copy, headed ‘An Hermite in an Arbour, wth a prayer booke in his hand, his foote spurning a globe, thus speaketh’.

This MS recorded in Hannah.

First published, as ‘a farewell to the vanities of the world, and some say written by Dr. D[onne], but let them bee writ by whom they will’, in Izaak Walton, The Complete Angler (London, 1653), pp. 243-5. Hannah (1845), pp. 109-13. The Poems of John Donne, ed. Herbert J.C. Grierson, 2 vols (Oxford, 1912), I, 465-7.

f. 60r

HeR 66: Robert Herrick, The Curse. A Song (‘Goe perjur'd man. and if thou ere return’)

Copy, untitled.

First published in Hesperides (London, 1648). Martin, p. 49. Patrick, p. 69. Musical setting by John Blow published in John Playford, Choice Ayres and Songs (London, 1683).

f. 60r-v

CwT 745: Thomas Carew, A Song (‘Aske me no more whether doth stray’)

Copy, headed ‘An Ode’ [‘by Sr. H. Wotton’added afterwards].

First published in a five-stanza version beginning ‘Aske me no more where Iove bestowes’ in Poems (1640) and in Poems: by Wil. Shake-speare, Gent. (London, 1640), and edited in this version in Dunlap, pp. 102-3. Musical setting by John Wilson published in Cheerful Ayres or Ballads (Oxford, 1659). All MS versions recorded in CELM, except where otherwise stated, begin with the second stanza of the published version (viz. ‘Aske me no more whether doth stray’).

For a plausible argument that this poem was actually written by William Strode, see Margaret Forey, ‘Manuscript Evidence and the Author of “Aske me no more”: William Strode, not Thomas Carew’, EMS, 12 (2005), 180-200. See also Scott Nixon, ‘“Aske me no more” and the Manuscript Verse Miscellany’, ELR, 29/1 (Winter 1999), 97-130, which edits and discusses MSS of this poem and also suggests that it may have been written by Strode.

f. 60v

CrR 49: Richard Crashaw, Ex Euphormione R. Cr. (‘Bright Goddesse, whether thy father be’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, I (1872), 289. Martin, pp. 392-3.

f. 60v

CrR 71: Richard Crashaw, In praise of Lessius his rule of health (‘Goe now with some dareing drugg’)

Copy of lines 1-15, headed ‘Upon Lessius his Hygeiasticon’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published (lines 15-46 only) in Leonard Leys, Hygiasticon…done into English, 2nd edition (Cambridge, 1634). Published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Reprinted, as ‘Temperance, Or the Cheap Physitian Vpon the Translation of Lessivs’, in Carmen Deo Nostro (Paris, 1652). Martin, pp. 156-8 (and later version pp. 342-4).

f. 61r

StW 1273: William Strode, Jack on both Sides (‘I holde as fayth What Englandes Church Allowes’)

Copy, in double columns, headed ‘A Romish Catholick demanding of his freind, what he should report his religion to be, setts it downe thus in 2 Columnes, as followeth’.

First published, as ‘The Church Papist’, in Wits Recreations (London, 1640). Reprinted as ‘The Jesuit's Double-faced Creed’ by Henry Care in The Popish Courant (16 May 1679): see August A. Imholtz, Jr, ‘The Jesuits' Double-Faced Creed: A Seventeenth-Century Cross-Reading’, N&Q, 222 (December 1977), 553-4. Dobell, p. 111. Listed, without text, in Forey, p. 339.

f. 61v

WoH 58: Sir Henry Wotton, An Ode to the King, at his returning from Scotand to the Queen after his coronation there (‘Rouse up thyself, my gentle Muse’)

Copy, in double columns.

This MS collated in Hannah.

First published in Ben Jonson's Vnder-wood in his Workes (London, 1640). Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 521. Hannah (1845), pp. 21-4. Ben Jonson, ed. C.H. Herford and Percy and Evelyn Simpson, VIII (Oxford, 1947), p. 267.

f. 61v

WoH 60: Sir Henry Wotton, On a Bank as I sat a-Fishing. A Description of the Spring (‘And now all nature seemed in love’)

Copy, in double columns, headed ‘On the Spring’.

This MS collated in Hannah.

First published in Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 524. Hannah (1845), pp. 32-5.

f. 61v

WoH 201: Sir Henry Wotton, Upon the Sudden Restraint of the Earl of Somerset then falling from favour (‘Dazzled thus with the height of place’)

Copy, in double columns, headed ‘On the suddaine restraint of a Favourite’ and here beginning ‘Thus dazel'd wth ye height of place’.

This MS collated in Hannah and in Pebworth, p. 161 et seq.

First published in Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 522. Hannah (1845), pp. 25-7. Some texts of this poem discussed in Ted-Larry Pebworth, ‘Sir Henry Wotton's “Dazel'd Thus, with Height of Place” and the Appropriation of Political Poetry in the Earlier Seventeenth Century’, PBSA, 71 (1977), 151-69.

f. 62r

BrW 192: William Browne of Tavistock, On the Countess Dowager of Pembroke (‘Underneath this sable herse’)

Copy.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1623), p. 340. Brydges (1815), p. 5. Goodwin, II, 294. Browne's authorship supported in C.F. Main, ‘Two Items in the Jonson Apocrypha’, N&Q, 199 (June 1954), 243-5.

f. 62r

HoJ 163: John Hoskyns, Epitaph On Sr Walter Pye, Attorney of the Wardes, dying on Christmas Day, in the morning (‘If Any aske, who here doth lye’)

Copy, headed ‘Vppon Sr Walter Pye Attorney of the Court of Wards, who died in Christmasse’.

This MS recorded in Osborn.

Osborn, No. XLVI (p. 214).

f. 62r

DaJ 176: Sir John Davies, On the Deputy of Ireland his child (‘As carefull mothers doe to sleeping lay’)

Copy, headed ‘On the death of an infant’ and here beginning ‘As Nurses strive their babes in bedd to lay’.

First published in William Camden, Remaines (London, 1637), p. 411. Krueger, p. 303.

f. 62v

CrR 171: Richard Crashaw, On the death of Wm Henshaw, student in Eman. Coll. (‘See a sweet streame of Helicon’)

Copy, subscribed ‘P. Cornwallis’.

Edited from this MS in Martin.

First published in Martin (1927). Martin (1957), pp. 401-2.

This poem has been erroneously attributed to Philip Cornwallis: see Introduction.

f. 63r-v

CrR 32: Richard Crashaw, An Elegy vpon the death of Mr Wm Carre, student in Eman: Colledge (‘Death hath drawne our golden Carre’)

Copy, here ascribed to ‘P. Cornwallis’.

Edited from this MS in Martin.

First published in Martin (1927). Martin (1957), pp. 402-3.

This poem has been erroneously attributed to Philip Cornwallis: see Introduction.

ff. 63v-4r

CrR 30: Richard Crashaw, An Elegy upon the death of Mr. Stanninow fellow of Queenes Colledge (‘Hath aged winter, fledg'd with feathered raine’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, I (1872), 290-2. Martin pp. 394-5.

f. 64r-v

CrR 279: Richard Crashaw, Vpon the Death of a Gentleman (‘Faithlesse and fond Mortality’)

Copy, headed ‘Ad exequias / In obitum desideratissimi Mri Chambers, / Coll: Reginal. Socij. R. Cr.’, deleted.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 166-7.

f. 65r

CrR 277: Richard Crashaw, Upon the death of a freind (‘Hee's dead: Oh what harsh musicks there’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, I (1872), 292-3. Martin, p. 393.

f. 65v

CrR 37: Richard Crashaw, An Epitaph. Vpon Doctor Brooke (‘A Brooke whose streame so great, so good’)

Copy, headed ‘In obitum Dris Brooke. R. Cr.’, deleted.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 175.

f. 65v

CrR 42: Richard Crashaw, An Epitaph Vpon Husband and Wife, which died, and were buried together (‘To these, Whom Death again did wed’)

Copy, headed ‘Epitaphium Conjugug unâ mortuor4 & sepultor4 R. Cr.’, deleted.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple, 2nd edition (London, 1648). Carmen Deo Nostro (Paris, 1652). Martin, p. 174 (and later version pp. 399-400).

f. 65v

CrR 83: Richard Crashaw, Joh. 15. Vpon our Lords comfortable discourse with his Disciples (‘All Hybla's honey, all that sweetnesse can’)

Second copy, heavily deleted.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 95.

ff. 67r-8r

CrR 288: Richard Crashaw, Vpon the death of the most desired Mr. Herrys (‘Death, what dost? ô hold thy Blow’)

Copy, headed ‘An Elegie on Mr Herris. R.Cr.’, deleted.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 168-170.

f. 68r-v

CrR 7: Richard Crashaw, Another (‘If ever Pitty were acquainted’)

Copy, deleted.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 170-2.

ff. 68v-9v

CrR 55: Richard Crashaw, His Epitaph (‘Passenger who e're thou art’)

Copy, headed ‘Epitaphium in eundem. R.G.’, deleted.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 172-4.

ff. 69v-70r

CrR 284: Richard Crashaw, Vpon the Death of Mr. Herrys (‘A plant of noble stemme, forward and faire’)

Copy, headed ‘In ejusdem præmatur obitu. Allegoricum. R.Cr.’, deleted.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 167-8.

f. 70r

CrR 375: Richard Crashaw, In Eundem Scazon (‘Huc hospes, oculos flecte, sed lacrimis coecos’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple, 2nd edition (London, 1648). Martin, p. 214.

f. 70r-v

CrR 24: Richard Crashaw, An Elegie on the death of Dr Porter (‘Stay, silver-footed Came, striue not to wed’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Grosart and in Martin.

First published in Grosart, I (1872), 293-4. Martin, pp. 395-6.

f. 71r

PoW 83: Walton Poole, On the death of King James (‘Can Christendoms great champion sink away’)

Copy, headed ‘On the death of King James’, ascribed to Dr. Goad.

First published in Oxford Drollery (1671), p. 170. A version of lines 1-18, on the death of Gustavus Adolphus, was published in The Swedish Intelligencer, 3rd Part (1633). Also ascribed to William Strode.

f. 72r-v

CrR 26: Richard Crashaw, An Elegie on the death of the Lady Porter (‘Can such perfection fade? can Vertue die’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Martin.

First published in Martin (1927). Martin (1957), pp. 403-4.

The poem has been erroneously attributed to Philip Cornwallis: see Introduction.

ff. 72v-3

CrR 28: Richard Crashaw, An Elegy upon the death of Mr Christopher Rouse Esquire (‘Rich, purest rose, prime flowre of blooming youth’)

Edited from this MS in Martin.

First published in Martin (1927). Martin (1957), pp. 404-5.

The poem has been erroneously attributed to Philip Cornwallis: see Introduction.

f. 73r

CrR 34: Richard Crashaw, An Epitaph (‘Heere in deaths closett, Reader, know’)

Copy.

Edited from this MS in Martin.

First published in Martin (1927). Martin (1957), p. 405.

This poem has been erroneously attributed to Philip Cornwallis: see Introduction.

ff. 75r-7r

CoR 31: Richard Corbett, A Certaine Poeme As it was presented in Latine by Divines and Others, before his Maiestye in Cambridge (‘It is not yet a fortnight, since’)

Copy, headed ‘The Oxfd-Ballad: by Dr Corbet’.

First published in Poëtica Stromata ([no place], 1648). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 12-18.

Some texts accompanied by an ‘Answer’ (‘A ballad late was made’).

f. 83r

CoR 737: Richard Corbett, Nonsence (‘Like to the thund'ring tone of unspoke speeches’)

Copy, headed ‘Non=sence By Dr Corbett’ and here beginning ‘Like to the silent tone of vnspoke speeches’

This MS recorded in Bennett & Trevor-Roper, p. 163.

First published in Witts' Recreations Augmented (London, 1641). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 95-6.

f. 83r-v

ClJ 57: John Cleveland, How the Commencement grows new (‘It is no Curranto-news I undertake’)

Copy, headed ‘The new Comencement by Mr Cleueland St John.’ Coll. and here beginning ‘Noe curranto newes I vndertake’, deleted.

First published in Poems, by J. C., with Additions (1651). Morris & Withington, pp. 56-7.

f. 84r

HoJ 319: John Hoskyns, John Hoskins to the Lady Jacob (‘Oh loue whose powre & might non euer yet wthstood’)

Copy, headed ‘Drollery’ and here beginning ‘Oh Loue, whose force & might’, the seventh stanza deleted.

Osborn, p. 301.

f. 85r-v

JnB 633: Ben Jonson, The Gypsies Metamorphosed, Song (‘Cock-Lorell would needes haue the Diuell his guest’)

Copy, headed ‘A feast for the devill, at the divells arse ith' Peake’.

This MS recorded in Herford & Simpson, X, 634.

Herford & Simpson, lines 1061-1125. Greg, Burley version, lines 821-84. Windsor version, lines 876-939.

ff. 88r-9r

RnT 454: Thomas Randolph, The Combat of the Cocks (‘Go, you tame gallants, you that have the name’)

Copy, subscribed ‘R. Wold’.

(Sometimes called A terible true Tragicall relacon of a duell fought at Wisbich June the 17th: 1637.) Published, and attributed to Randolph, in Hazlitt, I, xviii. II, 667-70. By Robert Wild.

f. 89r-v

SuJ 199: John Suckling, Upon Sir John Suckling's hundred horse (‘I tell thee Jack thou'st given the King’)

Copy.

First published in Wit and Drollery (London, 1656). Clayton, pp. 204-5.

f. 90r

SuJ 218: John Suckling, Sir John Suckling's Answer (‘I tell thee foole who'ere thou be’)

Copy, ascribed to Sir John Suckling.

First published in Wit and Drollery (London, 1656). Clayton, pp. 205-6. Sometimes erroneously attributed to Suckling himself.

f. 91r-3r

ClJ 68: John Cleveland, The Mixt Assembly (‘Fleabitten Synod: an Assembly brew'd’)

Copy, headed ‘On the Synod’ and subscribed ‘J. Cleveland’, deleted.

First published in Character (1647). Morris & Withington, pp. 26-8.

f. 92r

ClJ 84: John Cleveland, The Rebell Scot (‘How? Providence? and yet a Scottish crew?’)

Copy.

First published in Character (1647). Morris & Withington, pp. 29-32.

f. 95r

DnJ 1757: John Donne, A lame begger (‘I am unable, yonder begger cries’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon a Cripple’ and here beginning ‘I cannot goe, sitt, stand, the cripple cries’.

This MS recorded in Shawcross.

First published in Thomas Deloney, Strange Histories (London, 1607), sig. E6. Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 76. Milgate, Satires, p. 51. Shawcross, No. 88. Variorum, 8 (1995), pp. 7 (as ‘Zoppo’) and 10.

f. 95r

CrR 149: Richard Crashaw, On Marriage (‘I would be married, but I'de have no Wife’)

Copy, headed ‘Marriage. R. Cr.’, deleted.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 183.

f. 95v

CrR 319: Richard Crashaw, Vpon Venus putting on Mars his Armes (‘What? Mars his sword? faire Cytherea say’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 161.

f. 95v

CrR 311: Richard Crashaw, Vpon the same (‘Pallas saw Venus arm'd and streight she cry'd’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 161.

f. 95v

CrR 51: Richard Crashaw, ‘High mounted on an Ant Nanus the tall’

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 161.

f. 95v

CrR 335: Richard Crashaw, With a Picture sent to a Friend (‘I paint so ill, my peece had need to bee’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 156.

f. 95v

CrR 262: Richard Crashaw, Vpon Ford's two Tragedyes Loves Sacrifice and The Broken Heart (‘Thou cheat'st us Ford, mak'st one seeme two by Art’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 181.

f. 95v

CrR 299: Richard Crashaw, Vpon the faire Ethiopian sent to a Gentlewoman (‘Lo here the faire Chariclia! in whom strove’)

Copy.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 183.

f. 96r

StW 1018: William Strode, A Sonnet (‘My Love and I for kisses played’)

Copy, untitled, subscribed ‘R. Cr.’

This MS recorded (erroneously as MS Tanner 306) in Forey, p. 334.

First published in A Banquet of Jests (London, 1633). Dobell, p. 47. Forey, p. 211. The poem also discussed in C.F. Main, ‘Notes on some Poems attributed to William Strode’, PQ, 34 (1955), 444-8 (p. 446-7).

f. 96r

CrR 199: Richard Crashaw, Out of Martiall (‘Foure Teeth thou had'st that ranck'd in goodly state’)

Copy, untitled.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published, among The Delights of the Muses, in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, p. 188.

ff. 97r-8r

DrW 117.17: William Drummond of Hawthornden, For the Kinge (‘From such a face quois excellence’)

Copy, headed ‘The five senses’.

Often headed in MSS ‘The [Five] Senses’, a parody of Patrico's blessing of the King's senses in Jonson's Gypsies Metamorphosed (JnB 654-70). A MS copy owned by Drummond: see The Library of Drummond of Hawthornden, ed. Robert H. Macdonald (Edinburgh, 1971), No. 1357. Kastner printed the poem among his ‘Poems of Doubtful Authenticity’ (II, 296-9), but its sentiments are alien to those of Drummond: see C.F. Main, ‘Ben Jonson and an Unknown Poet on the King's Senses’, MLN, 74 (1959), 389-93, and MacDonald, SSL, 7 (1969), 118. Discussed also in Allan H. Gilbert, ‘Jonson and Drummond or Gil on the King's Senses’, MLN, 62 (January 1947), 35-7. Sometimes also ascribed to James Johnson.

ff. 98r-v

MrJ 27: John Marston, The Duke Return'd Againe. 1627 (‘And art returned again with all thy faults’)

Copy, headed ‘Vpon the Dukes returne from the Isle of Ree’.

ff. 98v-100

MrJ 28: John Marston, The Duke Return'd Againe. 1627 (‘And art returned again with all thy faults’)

An anonymous copy.

f. 100r

MrJ 59: John Marston, Georg IVs DVX BVCkIngaMIae MDCXVVVIII (‘Thy numerous name with this yeare doth agree’)

Copy.

Text from this MS in Early Stuart Libels online website.

MS Tanner 466

A composite quarto verse miscellany, 199 leaves, in calf. Compiled (and ff. 2-39 written) by William Sancroft (1617-93), Archbishop Canterbury; the rest in other hands. Mid-17th century.

f. 4r

CaW 9: William Cartwright, Confession (‘I do confess, O God, my wand'ring Fires’)

Copy, headed ‘Confession’, subscribed ‘W. Cartwright. poems. p. 320’.

First published in Works (1651), p. 320. Evans, p. 563.

f. 4r-v

DnJ 1579: John Donne, A Hymne to God the Father (‘Wilt thou forgive that sinne where I begunne’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Dr Donne in his former sicknesse. See his life & his poems. p. 368.’

This MS recorded in Shawcross.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 369 (and variant text p. 370). Gardner, Divine Poems, p. 51. Shawcross, No. 193. Variorum, 7 Pt 1 (2005), pp. 10, 16, 26, 110 (in four sequences).

f. 4v

WoH 52: Sir Henry Wotton, A Hymn to my God, in a night of my late sickness (‘Oh Thou great power! in whom I move’)

Copy, subscribed ‘H. Wotton oper p. 515’.

First published in Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 515. Hannah (1845), pp. 49-51.

f. 4v-5r

WoH 163: Sir Henry Wotton, This Hymn was made by Sir H. Wotton, when he was an Ambassador at Venice, in the time of a great sickness there (‘Eternal mover, whose diffused glory’)

Copy, subscribed ‘H. Wotton. oper p. 529’.

First published in Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 529. Hannah (1845), pp. 45-8.

f. 5v

PeW 156: William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke, Benj. Rudier of Tears (‘Who would have thought there could have been’)

Copy.

Poems (1660), pp. 46-7. Listed in Krueger's Appendix I: ‘Spurious Poems in the 1660 Edition’. By Dr Samuel Brooke.

ff. 8r-13r

CoA 135: Abraham Cowley, The Plagues of Egypt (‘Is this thy Brav'ery Man, is this thy Pride?’)

Copy, transcribed from a printed source by William (later Archbishop) Sancroft (1617-93).

First published, among Pindarique Odes, in Poems (London, 1656). Waller, I, 219-31.

ff. 13r-14r

CoA 184: Abraham Cowley, The 34. Chapter of the Prophet Isaiah (‘Awake, and with attention hear’)

Copy, subscribed ‘A. Cowley. Poëm. p. 48&’.

First published, among Pindarique Odes, in Poems (London, 1656). Waller, I, 211-14.

Musical setting by Henry Purcell published in Harmonia Sacra, Vol. I (London, 1688).

ff. 14r-15v, 19v-20v, 24r-6v

CoA 265: Abraham Cowley, Extracts

Extracts from works by Cowley, including Davideis.

f. 16r-v

WoH 174: Sir Henry Wotton, A Translation of the CIV. Psalm to the original sense (‘My soul exalt the Lord with hymns of praise’)

Copy, subscribed ‘H. Wotton. oper. p. 525.&c’.

First published in Reliquiae Wottonianae (London, 1651), p. 525. Hannah (1845), pp. 36-9.

f. 17r-v

DnJ 2646.63: John Donne, Psalme 137 (‘By Euphrates flowry side’)

Copy, subscribed ‘Dr Donne poëm. p 327&c.’.

This MS collated in Crowley.

First published in Poems (1633). Grierson, I, 424-6 in his Appendix B, as ‘Probably by Francis Davison’. Discussed, and the case for Donne's authorship reviewed, in Lara Crowley, ‘Donne, not Davison: Reconsidering the Authorship of “Psalme 137”’, Modern Philology, 105, No. 4 (May 2008), 603-36.

ff. 17v-18r

CrR 221: Richard Crashaw, Psalme 137 (‘On the proud bankes of Great Euphrates flood’)

Copy, headed ‘Ψ. 137.’, subscribed ‘R. Crashaw. p. 27’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 104-5.

f. 18r-v

HrG 272: George Herbert, The 23d Psalme (‘The God of love my shepherd is’)

Copy, subscribed ‘G. Herbert. p. 167’.

First published in The Temple (1633). Hutchinson, pp. 172-3.

ff. 18v-19v

CrR 218: Richard Crashaw, Psalme 23 (‘Happy me! ô happy sheepe!’)

Copy, headed ‘Ψ. 23.’, subscribed ‘R. Crashaw. poem. p. 25’.

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 102-4.

ff. 20v-1r

MnJ 24: John Milton, Psalm 136 (‘Let us with a gladsom mind’)

Copy, transcribed from the printed text of 1645, subscribed ‘Milton. poëms. p. 13. (done at 15 years old’.

This MS recorded in LR, II, 212-14.

First published in Poems (1645). Columbia, I, 12-15. Darbishire, II, 121-3. Carey & Fowler, pp. 7-10.

f. 22r-v

CrR 431: Richard Crashaw, Ps. I (‘O te te nimis, & nimis beatum!’)

Copy, subscribed ‘R. Crashaw. MS.’

This MS collated in Martin.

First published in Grosart, II (1873), 221. Martin, p. 352.

f. 27r

AlW 19: William Alabaster, A Divine Sonnet (‘Jesu, thy love within me is so main’)

Copy, headed ‘A divine Sonnet’ and subscribed ‘in Dr Boys's Postill on ye Circumciss. made by a friend of his an accurate poët’.

This MS collated in Sonnets.

First published in John Boys, An Exposition of the Festivall Epistles and Gospels (London, 1613). Sonnets, p. 10 (No. 19).

f. 27v

AlW 129: William Alabaster, A New Year's Gift to my Saviour (‘Ho, God be here, is Christ, my lord, at leisure?’)

Copy, headed ‘A New-years-Gift to my Savior’, subscribed ‘Dr. Alablaster’.

This MS collated in Sonnets.

First published in Edmond Malone (ed.), The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare (20 vols, 1821), II, 260-3. Sonnets, p. 41 (No. 75).

f. 27v

AlW 27: William Alabaster, The Sponge (‘O sweet and bitter monuments of pain’)

Copy, headed ‘Upon ye Ensigns of ye crucified Lord’, subscribed ‘Idem’.

Edited from this MS in Malone. Collated in Sonnets.

First published in Edmond Malone (ed.), The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare (20 vols, 1821), II, 260-3. Sonnets, p. 13 (No. 24).

f. 28r

CoA 84: Abraham Cowley, The Extasie (‘I leave Mortality, and things below’)

Copy, headed ‘Raptus Eliæ. 2. Reg. 2’ and beginning at stanza 7 (‘The mighty Eliah mounted up on high’), subscribed ‘A. Cowley. Pindar. Odes. p. 42.’

First published, among Pindarique Odes, in Poems (London, 1656). Waller, I, 204-6. Sparrow, pp. 161-4.

ff. 32v-3r

CaW 41: William Cartwright, On the Nativity. For the Kings Musick (‘Heark, 'Tis the Nuptiall Day of Heav'n and Earth’)

Copy, headed ‘On the Nativitie. For the Kinges Musicke’, subscribed ‘W. Cartwright. poem. p. 317’.

First published in Works (1651), pp. 317-18. Evans, p. 558.

ff. 33v-6v

MnJ 17: John Milton, On the Morning of Christs Mativity (‘This is the Month, and this the happy morn’)

Copy, transcribed from the printed text of 1645, subscribed ‘Jo Miltons. poëms. p. 1.’.

This MS recorded in LR, II, 212-14.

First published in Poems (1645). Columbia, 1-11. Darbishire, II, 113-20. Carey & Fowler, pp. 97-113.

f. 67v

CoR 439: Richard Corbett, On Great Tom of Christ-Church (‘Bee dum, you infant chimes. thump not the mettle’)

Copy, on two pairs of conjugate quarto leaves of verse. After 1660.

This MS recorded in Bennett & Trevor-Roper, p. 149.

First published (omitting lines 25-48) in Certain Elegant Poems (London, 1647). Bennett & Trevor-Roper, pp. 79-82. Ithuriel, ‘Great Tom of Oxford’, N&Q, 2nd Ser. 10 (15 December 1860), 465-6 (printing ‘(from a MS collection) which bears the signature of Jerom Terrent’).

f. 82r et seq.

RoJ 104.6: John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, The History of Insipids (‘Chaste, pious, prudent, Charles the Second’)

Copy.

See Vivian de Sola Pinto in ‘“The History of Insipids”: Rochester, Freke, and Marvell’, MLR, 65 (1970), 11-15 (and see also Walker, p. xvii). Rejected by Vieth, by Walker, and by Love.

ff. 154r-63r

CrR 230: Richard Crashaw, Sospetto d'Herode (‘Mvse, now the servant of soft Loves no more’)

Copy, with a title-page, La Strage De Gli Innocentj Dei Caualier Marino Nouember 15th 1637, in a gathering of ten quarto leaves (plus two blanks).

Edited in part from this MS in Claes Schaar, Marino and Crashaw: Sospetto d'Herode. A Commentary (Lund, 1971); collated in Martin.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 109-26.

ff. 164r-73r

CrR 231: Richard Crashaw, Sospetto d'Herode (‘Mvse, now the servant of soft Loves no more’)

Second copy, with a title-page, La Strage De Gli Innocentj Dei Caualier Marino Nouember 15th 1637, docketed in another hand ‘Translated by R.C.’, in a gathering of ten quarto leaves (plus two blanks).

Edited in part from this MS in Schaar; collated in Martin. This MS not in the same hand as CrR 230.

First published in Steps to the Temple (London, 1646). Martin, pp. 109-26.